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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Thanksgiving Ideas...
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68 posts in this topic

Two things make amazing gravy. First, you have to start with good drippings from meat that was well seasoned. Check? Okey dokey. Throw it all in a pan and turn it up nice and high so it gets to a rolling boil. Taste. Is it good and salty? No. Add salt, liberally. You're already making gravy, this is not the time to be worried about your ticker. Taste and taste again until it's just like you want your gravy to taste.

Oh, did I mention you shouldn't start this process if you don't already have your cornstarch/water mix ready? I go with a liberal 2 tablespoons of cornstarch and just enough water to make it soupy. Then pour slowly while whisking, just a little dribble at a time. You will almost never need it all, and letting it cook for 30 seconds after you add an entire teaspoon full of thickener lets it cook out some of that starchy flavor, gives it more time to thicken up with what you added and keeps you from adding too much.

If I use flour, I put it in a shaker cup, about 1/2 cup to a cup of water and just pour slowly in a drizzle the same way only with out stopping so often. I know some people can't do corn. I just find it cheaper and easier cleanup than flour shaker cups.

In the end, there is nothing inherently wrong with keeping emergency supplies of canned gravy. Or, I keep Kirkland chicken stock on hand which makes amazing gravy with just a little salt added. There is nothing like bad gravy to ruin Thanksgiving and better canned than nothing!

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Also, mailing gravy will probably be a little messy. You can just come over for Thanksgiving. The more the merrier. :D

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Can you send me some of that gravy? :lol:

My Mom made the best gravy in the world, and even though (I think) I do it just like she did, mine always comes out flavorless. All you can taste in mine is the cornstarch. (YUCK!) I have tried everything! Someone said I need to "cook" the drippings longer. I did and it didn't work. Some have told me to use bullion cubes, but Mom never did. One time I cooked the heck out of the giblets and added that broth to the drippings. It STILL tasted like corn starch. WHAT am I doing WRONG???

Have you tried rice flour or potato starch? Might taste less corny.

Really. It would be easier if we all just went to Ad's house for dinner. :D

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O.o did you not season the gravy enough? I can't taste cornstarch at all when i make it.

I'm blaming you guys for me wanting a cornish hen. I might make one for thanksgiving in the roticery (only ever been used for chicken and beef, thus gluten free XD).

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OK. A lot of times there really aren't a lot of drippings in the pan when I am cooking small meals for myself. Can I just add water and scrape up the crusty bits, then cook 'em? When I make pork chops or even chicken breasts, I usually only cook two at a time and there just isn't much left in the pan. I don't usually season either of those things, although I used to season the gravy itself with sage and the like. Should I add butter to the meat while cooking to get more drippings?

I used to use Heinz gravy in the jar but with all of my crazy intolerances I'm afraid to try anything like that now.

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I'm going to make my stuffing separate this year - we always make ours using cubed bread instead of the hard crouton type stuffing mixes. I haven't decided what bread I want to use yet. I will have to do a trial run this month just to make sure it works well. I made stuffing in the crock pot a couple years ago and it turned out SO well. My family will still want to stuff the turkey with their stuffing - question...can I cook my turkey breast in the same oven as the stuffed turkey?

How do you make stuffing in the crockpot?

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Bart, when i make a soup or whathave you, I just use those. Add a little water to get it up, and it makes a pretty good stalk. I don't see why it couldn't do the same for gravy (maybe add a little EVOO to it?). Someone else probably knows better than i do though.

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I use gluten-free bread and vegetable broth bc I'm a vegetarian, but this is by far the best stuffing I've ever had. Have made it gluten-free for the past 6 years and it's loved my all!

http://allrecipes.com/recipe/slow-cooker-stuffing-2/detail.aspx?event8=1&prop24=SR_Title&e11=crockpot%20stuffing&e8=Quick%20Search&event10=1&e7=Home%20Page

How do you make stuffing in the crockpot?

This one Rachelle (celiac-mommy)posted is for a crockpot.

I think I will have to take the dinner to my mom's house this year. I could make stuffingin one crockpot and my scalloped potatoes in the other.

potatoes use extra sharp dry cheddar (not Kraft) & I didn't use parsnips:

http://crockpot365.blogspot.com/2008/01/companys-coming-potatoes-augratin.html

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This one Rachelle (celiac-mommy)posted is for a crockpot.

I think I will have to take the dinner to my mom's house this year. I could make stuffingin one crockpot and my scalloped potatoes in the other.

potatoes use extra sharp dry cheddar (not Kraft) & I didn't use parsnips:

http://crockpot365.blogspot.com/2008/01/companys-coming-potatoes-augratin.html

I made those potatoes again last night. You can crockpot it or cook in the oven

In a bowl, combine:

16oz container sour cream

1 box condensed cream of mushroom soup-I use Pacific brand

2+ cups shredded cheddar cheese

Then add 1 pkg frozen hashbrowns-I use the cubed ones

Mix, pour into 9x13 pan, bake 350 for about 45 min or crockpot for 6-8hrs on low/4-5 hours on high

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OK. A lot of times there really aren't a lot of drippings in the pan when I am cooking small meals for myself. Can I just add water and scrape up the crusty bits, then cook 'em? When I make pork chops or even chicken breasts, I usually only cook two at a time and there just isn't much left in the pan. I don't usually season either of those things, although I used to season the gravy itself with sage and the like. Should I add butter to the meat while cooking to get more drippings?

I used to use Heinz gravy in the jar but with all of my crazy intolerances I'm afraid to try anything like that now.

How To Make A Gravy Roux

Okay. Take the pan the meat was cooked in, with the remaining crusty bits, and add to it a form of fat, such as butter, margarine, coconut oil, olive oil, lard, or whatever you are not allergic to.

Melt or heat it up, stirring and scraping the pan bits into it.

When it is heated, add the gluten free flour substitute of your choice, anything from rice flour to (cornstarch- not you, that's a generic instruction) to sourghum mixtures, to seed or nut meal flours or mixtures.

You are going to cook the flour mixture in the hot melted butter/oil. This will brown it and give it a nice taste and smell. You may add salt and pepper to it, as well as any spices you might like, such as sage for a chicken/poultry gravy. You may also add other seasoning ingredients, such as a dash of coconut aminos, wheat free soy sauce, curry spices, a splash of wine or balsamic vinegar, garlic, onion, etc. You can also add a bit of mashed pumpkin to thicken it.

Once the roux mixture has cooked for awhile, then s l o w l y add some liquid to it, and stir it very well, to make a gravy sauce.

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How To Make A Gravy Roux

Okay. Take the pan the meat was cooked in, with the remaining crusty bits, and add to it a form of fat, such as butter, margarine, coconut oil, olive oil, lard, or whatever you are not allergic to.

Melt or heat it up, stirring and scraping the pan bits into it.

When it is heated, add the gluten free flour substitute of your choice, anything from rice flour to (cornstarch- not you, that's a generic instruction) to sourghum mixtures, to seed or nut meal flours or mixtures.

You are going to cook the flour mixture in the hot melted butter/oil. This will brown it and give it a nice taste and smell. You may add salt and pepper to it, as well as any spices you might like, such as sage for a chicken/poultry gravy. You may also add other seasoning ingredients, such as a dash of coconut aminos, wheat free soy sauce, curry spices, a splash of wine or balsamic vinegar, garlic, onion, etc. You can also add a bit of mashed pumpkin to thicken it.

Once the roux mixture has cooked for awhile, then s l o w l y add some liquid to it, and stir it very well, to make a gravy sauce.

THANK YOU!!

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I made those potatoes again last night. You can crockpot it or cook in the oven

In a bowl, combine:

16oz container sour cream

1 box condensed cream of mushroom soup-I use Pacific brand

2+ cups shredded cheddar cheese

Then add 1 pkg frozen hashbrowns-I use the cubed ones

Mix, pour into 9x13 pan, bake 350 for about 45 min or crockpot for 6-8hrs on low/4-5 hours on high

I've made those in the oven, too. I have added cooked chicken to make it a main dish. I have split it into to pans and frozen one to cook later.

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what seasonings do you guys add to the bird? Butter, salt and pepper is what i'd do.

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I've made those in the oven, too. I have added cooked chicken to make it a main dish. I have split it into to pans and frozen one to cook later.

That is my favorite potato casserole - we make it in the oven and I top mine with buttered cornflakes (the gluten-free ones of course). Always always make it for Easter with ham.

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Last year was my first gluten-free Thanksgiving and we just used the standard stuffing recipe that we'd been using (my Grandma's), but substituted gluten-free bread instead (I toasted a bunch of UDI's white sandwich bread and crushed it into breadcrumbs). I thought it came out fine... for a gravy thickener I just use cornstarch instead of flour. I suppose gluten-free flour would work just as well.

I have used pre-made gluten-free breadcrumbs, but they tend to soak up moisture and generally have a weird texture in my experience,so I can't say I really recommend them...

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This is also my first Thanksgiving gluten free. Any idea how to make green bean casserole. Cream of mushroom soup seems hard to come by, and french fried onion rings are out.

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Progresso has a gluten free cream of mushroom. Granted its a bit more runny then cambells, but it should work.

You can make your own onion-y things, just carmalize them :3

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This is also my first Thanksgiving gluten free. Any idea how to make green bean casserole. Cream of mushroom soup seems hard to come by, and french fried onion rings are out.

Pacific Foods makes some condensed soups that are pretty good - I like the crm of chicken better than the crm of mushroom personally, but in recipes you don't really notice the difference as much.

http://www.pacificfoods.com/our-foods/condensed-soups

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I like the Pacific brand of condensed soups as well . . . and they won't be as runny as the Progresso. However, the Progresso cream of mushroom soup has slices of mushrooms which I think would be good. Whatever works best for you.

I've heard people say they use "Funyuns" as the topping.

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Funyuns are one of my weaknesses - so weird. I don't buy them because I can't just grab a handful and walk away - I'll end up eating the whole bag, finding crumbs everywhere and feeling gross for two days! :)

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I've heard people say they use "Funyuns" as the topping.

That is a GREAT idea!!

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If you don't have enough (or any) drippings, you can make motherless gravy. Make a roux with gluten free flour ( I use Wm Sanoma's cup-4-cup) and butter. Then whisk in a good well flavored broth, beef or chicken to match your meat. Emeril's and Rachel Ray's are both gluten free. Simmer to the thickness you want. Season with salt and pepper. Makes good gravy. I do this to make open faced roast beef sandwhiches with deli beef.

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This is also my first Thanksgiving gluten free. Any idea how to make green bean casserole. Cream of mushroom soup seems hard to come by, and french fried onion rings are out.

Pacific makes a cream of mushroom, chicken and celery that are all gluten-free and interchangable with Campbell's. For the onion rings... cut a leek (white only) into match sticks and fry quickly in an inch or so of oil. They get really crunchy, but work best if you put them on the casserole after it has baked.

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So to make gravy for biscuits, do that and add milk instead of broth?

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Lst year I attended the community Thanksgiving dinner our American Legion puts on every year. Everything is homemade from scratch and it is all SO GOOD! All of my friends go there now too. Of course I brought all of my own sides, but I did risk the turkey, which wasn't stuffed. Bad mistake. I think the turkey was injected with something that had corn in it. Or maybe it was CC, I don't know.

My local gluten free store had a free class last night on how to plan an allergy free thanksgiving. Lots of good tips and recipes. I think I might post them. The lady conducting the class is married to a "meat man", aka butcher. She surprised all of us by telling us that turkeys are not all gluten free. Many are injected with a gluten-containing solution. The gravy packet inside is pretty much always a gluten product, and there is a chance of the pouch ripping, getting a pinhole, or the outside of the pouch being cc'd during processing. Her family avoided turkeys for a couple years because of this. She also informed us that she knew people directly who were instructed to slap gluten free labels on turkeys so they would sell better, even though they were not gluten free.

This is also my first Thanksgiving gluten free. Any idea how to make green bean casserole. Cream of mushroom soup seems hard to come by, and french fried onion rings are out.

The lady who put on this class gave us this recipe. This is something I'm sure a lot of us miss. She said to make extra's because people will steal them while they are cooling, so if you want enough for your green beans, make a lot.

French Fried Onion Ring recipe

2-3 large sweet onions (shallots would be a good choice too)

Dairy free milk to soak onions in

1/4 tsp cayenne

2 tsp sea salt

pepper

1 1/2 cups fluten free flour mix of choice (Hagmann's gluten-free blend is a lighter blend that is a good option)

coconut oil or oil of choic for frying

Heat oil in a large frying pan. Oil should be about 1 inch deep. Slice onions into super thin rings, and soak in dairy alternative of choice. Mix flour and spices in a ziploc bag. Dredge the onions in your flour mix. Place in oil. Do small batches. When they float towards the surface, flip over. Drain on paper towels when done.

These can be made ahead and then recrisped in the oven if they are soggy.

Another option would be to use Holgrain's onion ring batter mix.

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