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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Walmart And Gluten Free Section
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ALWAYS READ THE LABEL!! Even if you shop in a store where they have a gluten-free section, some shopper might have picked something up in a different part of the store, then noticed they had a gluten-free version of it and just plopped the gluteny one on the shelf and taken the gluten-free one instead. Or maybe something that always used to be gluten-free has changed their recipe and it is no longer gluten-free. We can't rely on the employees to read the label and determine it no longer belongs in the gluten-free section.

No matter where you shop and how many times you have purchased something, ALWAYS READ THE LABEL.

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ALWAYS READ THE LABEL!! Even if you shop in a store where they have a gluten-free section, some shopper might have picked something up in a different part of the store, then noticed they had a gluten-free version of it and just plopped the gluteny one on the shelf and taken the gluten-free one instead. Or maybe something that always used to be gluten-free has changed their recipe and it is no longer gluten-free. We can't rely on the employees to read the label and determine it no longer belongs in the gluten-free section.

No matter where you shop and how many times you have purchased something, ALWAYS READ THE LABEL.

EXACTLY! We are responsible for our own health. I would not dare leave these decisions to others. Prior to my own celiac diagnosis I knew so very little about it and cannot expect everyone, including employees, to be well versed in it (though that would be lovely).

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Indeed!

I do not do much shopping in the 'middle' isles. I may go down them to find a spacific thing (peanut butter i'ma lookin' at you), but elsewise i steer clear.

For example, the one store i normally go to has a gluten free section, but they also put 'organic' things at the bottom row....

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For example, the one store i normally go to has a gluten free section, but they also put 'organic' things at the bottom row....

I think most stores do that, actually, One special diet merges into another, into and out of organic, gluten free, diabetic....

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