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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes

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Hello!,

I am new to this forum and I hope I am posting in the right place. LONG story short, I have had a panic disorder that doctors called PTSD so shoved pills down my throat for years, got to the point where I spent 2 years in bed. Could not even get to my mailbox. 2 years not one step out the door. I found out I have these allergies and I still struggle but I am out again...absolutely amazing! After being told time and time again that a food could not contribute to it by Doctors. I am allergic to gluten, casein, soy, and corn.

I eat hummus every day for the protein, etc...but lately it has been making me very tired. I see people saying they cut out legumes from their diet, I was wondering why they cut them out? Is there evidence that Celiacs can't always stomach legumes?

-Josh

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No most Celiac, as well as most people, can tolerate them just fine. There are a few people that can't.

Do you have Celiac? Or an allergy to wheat? They are 2 different things. If you are allergic to corn or soy, it it possibly an ingredient in the hummus?

If you are eating a small variety of foods, perhaps you need some vitamins? Have they checked your iron, ferritin, B12 & D? A lack of any of those can make you tired. Have they checked your thyroid?

Just a few things to think about.

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No most Celiac, as well as most people, can tolerate them just fine. There are a few people that can't.

Do you have Celiac? Or an allergy to wheat? They are 2 different things. If you are allergic to corn or soy, it it possibly an ingredient in the hummus?

If you are eating a small variety of foods, perhaps you need some vitamins? Have they checked your iron, ferritin, B12 & D? A lack of any of those can make you tired. Have they checked your thyroid?

Just a few things to think about.

No most Celiac, as well as most people, can tolerate them just fine. There are a few people that can't.

Do you have Celiac? Or an allergy to wheat? They are 2 different things. If you are allergic to corn or soy, it it possibly an ingredient in the hummus?

If you are eating a small variety of foods, perhaps you need some vitamins? Have they checked your iron, ferritin, B12 & D? A lack of any of those can make you tired. Have they checked your thyroid?

Just a few things to think about.

I have Celiac. I just went into a Celiac center in Boston and they ran a bunch of tests and after a year of gluten free, my IgA is back to almost normal...I still deal with anxiety every day but the fraction compared to how it was is like, 1/100. They checked my vitimans, and everything looked good except D, so I need to find a supp. for that. Thyroid is fine, senstivie thyroid check has been fine. No corn or soy in the hummus I eat.

ONLY possible thing I can think of, is that I take klonopin and it has a corn starch filler so I am sure that is contributing negatively to everything...it may be CAUSING some anxiety rather than what is is supposed to be doing, but that is a long ween to get off of it, which I am starting this week.

I would hate to cut Hummus out of my diet, its how I get most my protein, the healthy fat I need(Olive oil) etc.

Thanks for the reply!

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Legumes are a good source of protein. Some of us do not tolerate them but it has nothing to do with gluten. I had to cut them from my diet because of the lectins contained in their outer skins which interfere with my autonomic nervous system and give me atrial fibrillation. I am also intolerant of soy (which happens to be in the legume family) and corn for the same reason.

If you suspect that you might have this additional intolerance, you should try eliminating all beans and peas and see if your fatigue level improves. You can always verify by challenging the food group again and observing your reaction once your system has been clear of it for a while. Often you will react more strongly on reintroduction.

Are you allergic to the foods you list, or intolerant? There is a difference in the body's reaction between the two conditions. Celiac disease is not an allergy to gluten but an intolerance, which causes physical damage to the small intestine. An allergy will cause hives, itching, swelling, anaphylaxis.

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Legumes are a good source of protein. Some of us do not tolerate them but it has nothing to do with gluten. I had to cut them from my diet because of the lectins contained in their outer skins which interfere with my autonomic nervous system and give me atrial fibrillation. I am also intolerant of soy (which happens to be in the legume family) and corn for the same reason.

If you suspect that you might have this additional intolerance, you should try eliminating all beans and peas and see if your fatigue level improves. You can always verify by challenging the food group again and observing your reaction once your system has been clear of it for a while. Often you will react more strongly on reintroduction.

Are you allergic to the foods you list, or intolerant? There is a difference in the body's reaction between the two conditions. Celiac disease is not an allergy to gluten but an intolerance, which causes physical damage to the small intestine. An allergy will cause hives, itching, swelling, anaphylaxis.

Intolerant to the foods listed, sorry for the terminology mix up.

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I am just trying to find a diet that works for me and it's been so hard. Ever since hummus has been making me so tired lately (its also a good food to eat when I am out and about because everywhere sells it) I am kind of worried.

Lately my diet has been:

Food:

Hummus, vegetables, bananas(only fruit I really like), and chicken(some nights)

Drink:

Coconut water

Water.

It is a very boring diet but it beats the alternative of being stuck in my bed, I am just trying to find a way to expand it without any kind of problems. I know I am overly cautious and I know I am not getting my calorie intake daily.

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Hi Josh-

I am intolerant of many foods - most of which are high in lectins as Mushroom mentioned. The theory is once the damage caused by celiac disease heals/repairs itself I will be able to tolerate many of the foods that I am intolerant of.

All legumes make me tired - peas are like sleeping pills for me, peanuts make me tired and extremely emotional, soy makes me tired and angry -

How about trying a fruit smoothie if you arent a fan of many fruits - my son loves them with al different fruits and even greens - but will only eat green apples or grapes normally.

Can you eat almonds? I grind almonds with basil or cilantro - and a little garlic & plive or coconut oil -- makes a great replacement for hummus and easy to make in the blender.

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Hi Josh-

I am intolerant of many foods - most of which are high in lectins as Mushroom mentioned. The theory is once the damage caused by celiac disease heals/repairs itself I will be able to tolerate many of the foods that I am intolerant of.

All legumes make me tired - peas are like sleeping pills for me, peanuts make me tired and extremely emotional, soy makes me tired and angry -

How about trying a fruit smoothie if you arent a fan of many fruits - my son loves them with al different fruits and even greens - but will only eat green apples or grapes normally.

Can you eat almonds? I grind almonds with basil or cilantro - and a little garlic & plive or coconut oil -- makes a great replacement for hummus and easy to make in the blender.

It's funny because after I cut out peas from my diet, I felt a lot better. I am intolerant to soy. Intolerant to corn. I guess other legumes wouldn't surprise me. That being such a staple food. What can I replace it with...I don't do almonds. I can't do potatoes. Veggies and fruits all day sometimes make me edgy because of all the sugar. It's so frustrating. I'm so new to this and have come such a long way by finding out all these intolerances after 4 or 5 doctors all told me I was wrong. They all believe me now and get their mental health patients checked before even prescribing now. I am 20 years old and still pretty new to all of this. Hell, to think if I never have found all this out alone and requested those tests, I would still be on bed.

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Does anyone here react to rices?

I don't eat any grains - rice passed my eliminaiton/challenge diet, but I had to remove later. It will be the first grain I reintroduce after another six months or so.

If you don't do potato -- is it because it is a nightshade or you just don't like them? Sweet potato and yams are not nightshade. I also eat quite a bit of squash -- I cook a spaghetti squash every couple days to keep "noodles" ready to add to meat and vegies for quick meals. I love butternut squash fries -- and recently got a julienne mandolin to cut zucchini into angel hair like "noodles"

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I don't eat any grains - rice passed my eliminaiton/challenge diet, but I had to remove later. It will be the first grain I reintroduce after another six months or so.

If you don't do potato -- is it because it is a nightshade or you just don't like them? Sweet potato and yams are not nightshade. I also eat quite a bit of squash -- I cook a spaghetti squash every couple days to keep "noodles" ready to add to meat and vegies for quick meals. I love butternut squash fries -- and recently got a julienne mandolin to cut zucchini into angel hair like "noodles"

I don't do potatoes because I read somewhere people with a lot of intolerances react to them quite often. I know I am being overly cautious but I just came out of two years of the darkest point in my life and never want to go back. So sweet potatoes and yams aren't in that same class as say a normal red skin potato?

Also,

I would just like to thank everyone so much for all this info. It means the world to be truly. I am

Having a hard time.

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So sweet potatoes and yams aren't in that same class as say a normal red skin potato?

.

.Nope , not in the same class ( different family )

I had eliminated potatoes for quite awhile but now that my food selection is so limited I do rotate potatoes into my diet once or twice a week.

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Sweet potatoes and yams are a staple of my diet. Unlike GottaSki, I am not totally grain free. I do eat alternative breads made with rice flour, tapioca, sorghum, buckwheat, arrowroot, teff. I do not eat wheat, oats, rye, barley, corn, quinoa, millet or amaranth. I eat white rice, but to be safe avoid brown rice which has the bran (and therefore the lectins) left on. Like you, I don't want to lose any more foods, although I found that healing the leaky gut was the key to preventing additional food loss. So long as those partially digested proteins are able to make it through the gut lining into the blood stream you run the risk of developing antibodies and 'losing' another food.

A program for gut healing often consists of a good quality (high billion count) probiotic to rebuild good flora in the gut, digestive enzymes to help with digestion as the pancreas is often not doing its job well, and L-glutamine for healing the lining.

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ONLY possible thing I can think of, is that I take klonopin and it has a corn starch filler so I am sure that is contributing negatively to everything...it may be CAUSING some anxiety rather than what is is supposed to be doing, but that is a long ween to get off of it, which I am starting this week.

Hi Josh, I think it is the Klonopin contributing to your fatigue. It is an anti-anxiety med, classified as a sedative. Fatigue/tiredness is a side effect. You are also correct, in that it may also be causing anxiety--called "rebound anxiety". It can also cause depression.

When weaning off, do so very slowly (very slowly) and you will be fine. Contact me anytime.

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Jerseygirl...I have been on the same dose of klonopin for a year. At first it made me tired but not anymore so I know it's not my klonopin. And it happens about 30 min after I eat my hummus

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Jerseygirl...I have been on the same dose of klonopin for a year. At first it made me tired but not anymore so I know it's not my klonopin. And it happens about 30 min after I eat my hummus

You know the old joke, Josh: Doctor, doctor, it hurts when I do this!! Doctor: "Don't do that." Just 'joshing' :D

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Hi Josh,

Here's a link for Klonopin side affects for info. This AskaPatient site is great for getting input from actual people taking drugs versus drug companies selling them.

http://www.askapatie...3&name=KLONOPIN

Try doing a search of the forum on elimination diets. That is basically when you start out with just a few whole foods and then add one at a time for 3 or 4 days to see how it affects you. The idea is to build up a list of safe foods for your body. Elimination diets can be very helpful with finding food intolerances.

I gave up hummus for a couple years myself, and all beans too. I can now eat hummus and black beans in limited quantities after being off them for that time. I also react to nightshades, potatoes, tomatoes, peppers and eggplant. Grapes and soy are big triggers for me also. We all have to find out how our own bodies react to foods. Each of us may develop reactions to different foods.

Don't forget to look at any vitamins and meds and also drinks like coffee, tea etc that might affect your body. Those kitchen sink all-in-one multivitamin pills are risky IMHO, as they have so may ingredients it's hard to identify which might cause a reaction. It's better to get individual vitamin pills or limited combos.

Some starting the gluten-free diet tips for the first 6 months:

Get tested before starting the gluten-free diet.

Get your vitamin/mineral levels tested also.

Don't eat in restaurants

Eat only whole foods not processed foods.

Eat only food you cook yourself, think simple foods, not gourmet meals.

Take probiotics.

Take gluten-free vitamins.

Take digestive enzymes.

Avoid dairy.

Avoid sugars and starchy foods.

Avoid alcohol.

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Jerseygirl...I have been on the same dose of klonopin for a year. At first it made me tired but not anymore so I know it's not my klonopin. And it happens about 30 min after I eat my hummus

Sorry about the delay in replying.....sometimes I'd forget my head.....

Well, if you are sure it's not the Klonopin (and after taking it for a time, it can cause the rebound type symptoms I mentioned before--I have taken it. It is because of the tolerance it can cause), I think the reasonable thing to do would be to fine a sub for the legumes. I had problems with legumes and was off them completely for 5 years. I can now eat them in moderation.

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