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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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That 'special thing' for me is butterflies- there's a fantastic butterfly conservatory an hour

and a half from me, and when I get really bad from all the stress in my life I go spend a day

there. It's also really nice in the winter because it's 85 and humid in there for the butter

flies, so it's a nice break from the winter weather!

Butterflies are cool too. I don't see many wild ones in the city here in Utah, but I always notice them if they're around. There is something special about them, you just have to stop and watch them for a moment before carrying on with your day. I've never been to a conservatory but I'll bet it is just wonderful.

Swimming with dolphins again is on my list too .... they do it at sea world here, but I prefer them in the ocean -- on a very lucky day they come to play with you in our waves.

One helped me find the surface when I was trapped in "the washing machine" of big surf while body surfing as a young teen and once a small family played around me while kayaking --- me heat weirdness has kept me off the beach for the last ten or so summers - but I'll be back at some point.

Wild animals are far cooler. I want to pet a wild giraffe, but Giraffe Manor is extremely expensive by itself, not to mention the trip to Africa or trying to be gluten-free at a B&B in the middle of nowhere. I will go one day, mark my words, I will go. And I will pet a wild giraffe out my bedroom window as I wake up, and as I eat breakfast. Any other attempt at wild giraffes outside that manor would probably lead to being kicked in the face and being mildly dead... after all they can kill lions. I'm obsessed, not stupid. (Not usually.... okay okay... not always.)

I always giggle a little at your "heat weirdness." I'm not laughing at you, just the way you put it. I don't do well in the heat, and I say it just like that. "Do you want to go to the Festival of Color down at the temple?" "Sorry, I don't do well in the heat." One day... one day I'll make it down there. They have llamas! Also, by the time you are showing up 2-3 hours early you have a several mile hike, that is how many people go.

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My "heat weirdness" includes anaphalaxis and hives and swelling up like "violet" it is quite strange for others around me when it happens.

I got rewarded for telling my dolphin stories this morning - son and I got to see a pair frolicking in the surf near the cabrillo tidepools :D

That trip to Africa sounds like another great birthday plan to me!

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