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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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rebeccanicole88

Been 2 Years And Still Coping

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I'm 25 and have been gluten free for two years. I live in a dorm with five other girls and I want to eat what they are eating. I know that it will make me really sick. It's hard to eat gluten free when everyone around you is eating pizza and people bake sweets and bring them to us. When they find out I can't eat what they brought the only thing that they say is sorry and feel bad for me. I don't want people to feel bad for me but I don't want to beat myself up because I long for the things I can't have. Does it get easier to eat gluten free and not long for what you can't have?

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Yes, it gets easier. You're still relatively young. Wait until all these pizza and junk food swilling contemporaries reach their late thirties/early forties and their metabolisms slow down, they're going to look like what they've been eating. :P

Since you're in a dorm, (ugh.... :rolleyes: ) is there any access to any common cooking areas, or can you set up a corner with a small prep area, a microwave and a large toaster oven, to bake your own gluten free treats ? I'm assuming you have access to a mini fridge. If I really want pizza, I either make the crust and my spouse does the toppings, or we drive down to the city to a place that has gluten free ones, but I believe ours are better. But there are also lots of ways to make a pizza using pre- made crusts, such as with gluten free tortillas. And single serve microwave baking in cups or bowls is a great way to get a fast "cupcake" or sandwich bun.

It is a self- sufficiency mindset that you need, instead of the current culture of existing on take- out food. Bad cravings for junk food mean you're not getting enough "real food" and nutrients, unless you are an athlete upping training, and you are burning it off too fast.

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We have a recreational center that has a full size kitchen. I go in there and cook sometimes. How do you make a fast cupcake or sandwich bun? We have a pizza delivery place with gluten free pizza but it's 13 dollars. I'd rather make my own. I need some ideas of how to do that on a budget. I have gluten free tortillas.

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Udi's makes gluten free pre-made pizza crust. Also, red mill barn brand has a pizza crust flour that's quite good. All of these can be bought online if you don't have any stores that carry them around you. I know its hard, I'm 27 and I go through the same ordeal every time we talk about where to eat. I know right now it may seem silly but every time you eat a slice a pizza or a cookie, you're hurting your body. Its not worth pleasing your friends for days off pain and agony.

Also, I've noticed that most college towns have the best alternative, gluten free restaurants. See what's around you before you guys go out next time. Also, most of my friends are starting to love my gluten free food. My roommate loves the red mill barn gluten free pancakes and she eats them more than me! Don't worry, it gets better with time I promise.

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We have a recreational center that has a full size kitchen. I go in there and cook sometimes. How do you make a fast cupcake or sandwich bun? We have a pizza delivery place with gluten free pizza but it's 13 dollars. I'd rather make my own. I need some ideas of how to do that on a budget. I have gluten free tortillas.

I make a very thin crust on gluten-free tortillas (not the corn kind). I spray the tortilla with a little oil and bake it for 2 minutes to get it a bit brown. Then I put a little jarred pasta sauce on it and cheese, etc and bake until the cheese is starting to brown. there are frozen gluten-free pizza crusts you can get,too.

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Sorry it took so long to get back to this, was outdoors yesterday. :)

You take a small microwave proof ramekin, bowl, or soup or coffee cup, and put the single/double serving of gluten free ingredients in that, and bake it in the microwave on regular setting for anywhere from 1 min to 2 minutes, depending on the power of the machine, the cup materials, and the type of flours used. Altho most of the recipes on the 'net say "mix in bowl" I find that I either have to add more olive oil than they say, or instead lightly oil the cup and then put the batter in it, so it comes out of the bowl easier, and does not stick. The typical proportions for 1 serving is 1 egg and about 1/4 cup to 1/3 cup of flours. I have done a double serving in a cereal bowl with one egg and 2/3 cup flour. They typically do not need extra gums because of the high proportion of egg vs. flours. It is possible to do these egg free if you use certain ingredients, if you cannot do egg - the basic homemade 1/3 each of ~ buckwheat/potato starch/bean flour~ or the ~buckwheat/potato starch/amaranth~ mixes can work for this. Some people will use flaxseed meal (I can't do flax, so I don't experiment much with it) as flax, soaked in warm water or beaten egg, gels up. Others will use chia seed soaked in cool water to make a gel. You can also use premade flour mixes like Pamela's gluten free, if you can get along with all those ingredients.

Typically the leavening in these is just baking soda and pure apple cider vinegar, altho lemon juice can be used also, so you don't use that much salt, as the soda tastes salty.

recipes:

from another website, but this recipe is too dry, so I add some oil to it

http://blog.kitchentherapy.us/2009/08/wonder-buns/

If you do not have nut meals, such as almond, or buckwheat flour, you can easily grind your own very quickly in a blender, a magic bullet type mini blender, or a coffee grinder by purchasing almonds or other nuts and gluten-free buckwheat cereal.

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Here's another microwaveable bun recipe:

We generally substitute coconut flour for almond flour due to allergies. I make a batch of the mix and keep it in a fridge. Just grease a bowl, crack an egg, add 1/4 c of mix and nuke it for 90 seconds. We like to give it a light toasting afterwards too.

For a cupcake, add vanilla, extra sugar and some chocolate chips or coconut. Yummy

Best wishes to you.

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