• Ads by Google:
     




    Get email alerts Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter

    Ads by Google:



       Get email alertsSubscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter

  • Announcements

    • admin

      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
8 8
mamaupupup

Need Help With Sibo In Kids--Input?

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

Hi there,

We have a six year old who was diagnosed a year ago with Celiac. We were gluten-free and happy/no problems until about month 9 gluten free. She developed abdominal pain below her belly button which is moderate, constant pain and sometimes flares up. We have had numerous doctors visits (also with our Celiac GI) and are now embarking on an effort to clear up "SIBO" which is the current diagnosis.

Any experience with this? Thoughts? Suggestions on diet? What worked? What didn't?

Thanks in advance for input!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:
Ads by Google:


Unfortunately - I have experience.

Surprised only that we are discussing a young child -- my thinking is that if caught early the digestive system can recover with only removing gluten.

?s

Do you use processed/prepackaged gluten-free foods regularly? If so -- cut those first. Keep with whole foods, rice and corn is fine -- unless a problem is detected.

Perhaps cut out citrus.

Take it slow in removing foods for now...it may be something simple.

Keep a food log -- patterns emerge with the diary that are hard to detect without it.

Hang in there :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Lisa,

Thank you so much for your input. It's interesting, we see two specialists in LA--a GI pain specialist and a Celiac researcher. The pain specialist is also considered one of the thought leaders in SIBO in kids. From what I'm gathering, SIBO is typically an adult "term" and that there are lots of kids with undiagnosed SIBO.

We removed almost all the processed foods in our quest for finding an offending food group/ingredient. So far we have logged diet, found some offenders and have eliminated the following (without 100% improvement): gluten (she has Celiac and we have a 100% gluten-free home and homeschool so little if any cc), lactose, polyols, soy (including soy lecithin, etc), nightshades (tomato was horrible for her), avocado, canola oil, peanuts, some galactans (no soy, no beans, no lentils). Basically, we are on a low fodmap diet with additional restrictions.

What our diary is showing now that we've gotten to a level of whole foods/get rid of lots of stuff is that there is constant pain with flare ups that (in my opinion) are related to ingesting carbs (including rice). Other than pain, bloating is her main complaint with some harder stools (not constipation) when she hasn't had enough fluids.

The pediatrician has prescribed flagyl as the antibiotic to give her, but I'm thinking/considering whether or not we're going to give it to her.

More thoughts?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Lisa,

Thank you so much for your input. It's interesting, we see two specialists in LA--a GI pain specialist and a Celiac researcher. The pain specialist is also considered one of the thought leaders in SIBO in kids. From what I'm gathering, SIBO is typically an adult "term" and that there are lots of kids with undiagnosed SIBO.

We removed almost all the processed foods in our quest for finding an offending food group/ingredient. So far we have logged diet, found some offenders and have eliminated the following (without 100% improvement): gluten (she has Celiac and we have a 100% gluten-free home and homeschool so little if any cc), lactose, polyols, soy (including soy lecithin, etc), nightshades (tomato was horrible for her), avocado, canola oil, peanuts, some galactans (no soy, no beans, no lentils). Basically, we are on a low fodmap diet with additional restrictions.

What our diary is showing now that we've gotten to a level of whole foods/get rid of lots of stuff is that there is constant pain with flare ups that (in my opinion) are related to ingesting carbs (including rice). Other than pain, bloating is her main complaint with some harder stools (not constipation) when she hasn't had enough fluids.

The pediatrician has prescribed flagyl as the antibiotic to give her, but I'm thinking/considering whether or not we're going to give it to her.

More thoughts?

What was her reaction to avocado?

I ask because it was a one-off food that made me bloat like crazy during my elimination diet. Nearly a year later I realized my intolerance of histamine containing and histamine inducing foods.

Might want to take a look at this:

http://www.allergyuk.org/downloads/factsheets/intolerances-and-sentivities/Histamine%20Intolerance.pdf

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow! This is an amazing perspective! Thank you! I'm going to go to the kitchen, eat some chocolate chips, do the dishes, get kids to bed and come back an re-read that! Thank you! I doubt we would have ever thought to look at the histamine list! She's still eating a tiny bit of chocolate, pineapple, and many other things on that list!

Avocado made her severely bloated, poor thing. Can't wait to get kids off to bed and research more! Thank you!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:


You are more than welcome -- let me know if you can't find info...I have found some interesting papers and websites over the past few months related to Histamine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:) thanks Lisa! I'll take any/all links to this you have. A couple questions:

- I've read mixed reviews on the DAO blood serum test. Have you read anything definitive? What is your opinion?

- Have you read anything about doing a two week trial where you go on anti-histamines for two weeks--if symptoms go away (they are supressed, really), then go through the effort to do a low-histamine diet and eliminate offending foods?

I so appreciate your help!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:


The lab at UCSD along with conversations with Mayo could not figure out how to run DAO levels -- crazy and sad, but true.

I had tried every antihistamine available while trying (in vain) to diagnose my extreme intolerance to heat and exercise with my allergist -- only one that ever worked for me is Benedryl -- problem was it makes me so tired I cannot exercise and have no desire to go outside on a warm day -- kinda defeated the purpose.

I removed histamine foods officially just after thanksgiving -- has helped my overall health emensly -- I do hope and believe this is the last piece of my very complex health puzzle. Should add that several foods that are recommended to avoid were already on my no-no list -- spinach and pumpkin were surprises -- I ate alot of spinach and some pumpkin over the past few years.

Because I had already gone thru a strict elimination diet that found most of my intolerances -- removing histamines was easy for me -- since your daughter bloats with avocado and other random foods it may be worth the effort for you.

I'm on a different computer right now -- will post some links when I get to that computer

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is another link regarding what foods to avoid.

http://www.urticaria.thunderworksinc.com/pages/lowhistamine.htm#foodsource

This page made me realized why I failed the GAPS diet -- I could not eat the fermented food recommended -- only the bone broth.

http://www.ehow.com/info_8110125_high-histamine-foods.html

I can't seem to find my file of links to research papers with regard to histamine inloerance -- I'll keep looking.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Lisa,

Thank you so much. We are going to the allergist tomorrow...we'll see how receptive she is... (She is the doctor who did finally do the Celiac testing for my kids after I had asked and been turned down by the pediatricians for 18 months...so, I have hope!).

:)

Courtney

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:


As a quick update, we did the SIBO breath test yesterday at Children's Hospital in LA. Results due back Tuesday. Super simple test (the nurse had ME administer it...which was a slight bit annoying just because I'm sure it costs insurance an arm and a leg...). My daughter was a champ. Took about 2.5 hours all in.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Courtney-

Perhaps your doc has already told you the test for SIBO is not always accurate -- I had one last summer and doc thought it was accurate somewhere between 60 and 75 percent of the time -- I think I found similar statitistics when I researched it online.

If you administered it -- do you remember the highest number. You should be able to find info online to translate if you don't want to wait for the doc to get results on Tuesday.

The good news and the reason I took the test is if it is positive - that info is helpful.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Lisa--the test we did was to have my daughter "fill" a bag by breathing into it every 15 minutes. We capped the bag and labeled it. I think it gets sent off somewhere--so I don't know the numbers yet. I was thinking about the poor company that does these tests and HOPES for a higher accuracy rate--which could be higher if the nurses administered it (instead of the Mom!). I was quite fine at it (really punctual, etc), but it makes me wonder...

On another note, our allergist had "heard of" histamine intolerance but "needs to read up" on it (and wasn't too keen on doing even that). However, she did say that putting our daughter on anti-histamines full time for 1-2 months is a reasonable and ok thing to do to see if she improves. She'd do the child dose of Claritan 2x a day.

More on Tuesday...

Thanks for keeping up!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have low hopes the OP will see this, but did you ever get results back? My daughter is getting breath tested in 2 weeks and I highly suspect SIBO. Her symptoms are exactly the same. 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I found this thread to be really interesting. We are going through this with our 3 year old. She tested positive for Sibo after the extended breath test. @KBart or @mamaupupup any update on your kiddos? What worked or what didn't? 

We have tried 2 rounds of Flagyl and probiotics,  but there's still something going on. She goes for an endoscope next week, but I'd love to hear about your experiences. 

Hoping you may see this!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:


Unforunately, we haven't had much luck with the SIBO stuff either. It's so frustrating.

Our GI would only do one round of Flagyl. It helped...but I don't think it totally got rid of it. She even did a repeat Endoscopy (to confirm celiac disease because of inconclusive results before) and they did an intestinal aspirate (tested the fluid in the intestine and cultured for bacteria). It was negative. So....I don't know where to go from here. I think she still has a touch of SIBO...but I'm just not sure. Her GI won't do anymore tests.  We try and control it with diet but she still has pain daily.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Parents,

have you looked into a Histamine Intolerance as Gotta Ski  discussed?  I know it is considered "new" here in the US.  (SIBO is more accepted in the US and HI is more accepted in Europe.)  I had been gluten-free for 2 1/2 years when I was glutened badly.  I was only anemic when I was first diagnosed.  After my glutening experience (confirmed by my GI through antibody testing) , it hurt to digest anything.  He suspected SIBO but I took the approach first of trying to heal from the gluten exposure.  I also broke out in hives/rash almost every few days.  It started always with tummy pain before the rash appeared.  Not everyone gets a rash with HI.  

It resolved months later when my gut healed.  Antihistamines helped as did the HI diet.  I also found that well-cooked foods were easiest to digest.  

Something to consider......I am not discounting SIBO at all!  It just might not be the only thing going on.  I was thankful that SIBO turned out not to be an issue for me!

 

 

Edited by cyclinglady
More info.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is some information on the topic of histamine intolerance and Mast Cell Activation Syndrome.  This blogger is also a member of Celiac.com (Jebby).  She is a Neonatologist (premie baby doctor) who has celiac disease and four kids.  

http://www.thepatientceliac.com/tag/histamine-intolerance-and-celiac-disease/

 I hope you figure it out.  I have a healthy 15 year old and I would hate for her to experience any abdominal pain like your little ones.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for your responses @KBart and @cyclinglady .

I'll definitely talk with her GI about the possibility of HI. Sounds interesting, and I hadn't heard of that before. 

Her GI is going to be testing for celiac as well as problems with enzymes. I think I'll ask him to do an intestinal aspirate and some extra blood work as well. 

I just refuse to believe that we can't make this better for her. I think we will seek naturopathic help if we don't see drastic improvements after whatever is ordered from the endoscopy results. 

Thanks again for your help!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/7/2016 at 11:21 PM, Aehrhart said:

I found this thread to be really interesting. We are going through this with our 3 year old. She tested positive for Sibo after the extended breath test. @KBart or @mamaupupup any update on your kiddos? What worked or what didn't? 

We have tried 2 rounds of Flagyl and probiotics,  but there's still something going on. She goes for an endoscope next week, but I'd love to hear about your experiences. 

Hoping you may see this!

I was searching the internet and came across this blog.  we are currently dealing with sibo with my 3 year old as well.  There's definitely still another underlying issue but we can't seem to figure it out  he definitely has histamine intolerance which is tied with sibo. I give him Hist DAO before meals but eating is such a challenge for him since he has such anxiety towards food because he associates it with pain.  I'm just curious if you have found any solution with your 3 year old.  we have been treating his sibo since June with no success  we tried herbal antibiotics, a round of xifixan and getting ready to start his 3rd round  this week  any feedback would be greatly appreciated  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:


@Pjadcock The 2 rounds of Flagyl cleared up our daughter's sibo. She had loose stools daily, but now they're firm. We still see bloating and fat malabsorption though. She's on digestive enzymes (Zenpep) with meals and a low fodmap diet. We've seen a little improvement but not where we want to be. I read a little about the histamine intolerance, but I haven't talked with her GI doctor about that. What kind of probiotics are you using? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My 11 year old daughter was just diagnosed with SIBO and fructose malabsorption.  Her levels were at their highest, H2 49 and CH4 22.  I have no idea how severe her condition is.  All I have gotten from her GI is that she is positive for both and she called in a 7 day treatment of FLAGYL.  My daughter took this and had some bacterial die off symptoms, shaky and fatigued.  Three days after the last dose, her symptoms returned. We gave her two doses of Probiotics and have tried to follow the SCD and FODMAP diet somewhat but it is very hard for her.  All of the things that make her nausea better are not allowed.  If you take out Gluten, most recipes replace it with rice, potato or corn starches or flours so we are not able to stay strictly on the diet.  The diet also says cheddar is fine so she eats a lot of that but I have a feeling she has lactose issues as well. We are struggling.... no support from her GI.  I have no idea how to get her enzyme or acid levels tested to see if that is the underlying problem.  She does have bouts of constipation.... Her blood and skin tests show negative for Gluten allergy as well as soy but yet she in intolerant so I am thinking it has to do with enzymes rather than histamine.  Any advise would be appreciated.  I found a few people who say they are online specialists but insurance does not cover them and they have a three month waiting list anyway... my heart breaks for my daughter.  She missed a month a half of school due to nausea and stomach issues....

Edited by ALE143
missed spelling

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fascinating discussion. My daughter is nearly 7 and was diagnosed with a gluten intolerance in early fall and SIBO late last fall. We've gone through a few rounds of AB, Xifaxin. She seemed to resolve, almost entirely in January and her wholistic nurse suggested we not do another course and let her body take over. 3 months later the pain, gas and nausea returned. In that time, her nurse has learned more about SIBO. Now our daughter is completing a dual course of ABs and then will progress to a daily regimen of herbs (oregano oil and Allimax), Prokinetics and Enzymes. While she has given me info a SCD-Low FODMAP diet, she recognizes that for a 6 year old to follow that to the letter is hard. My plan is to do as much of the diet as possible. The hardest part will be eliminating/reducing corn, rice, potatoes. As most parents know, that is everything to a kid who is also gluten free. 

My question is does anyone have any experience with trying to limit but not eliminate those items from the diet of a child with SIBO and how effective has it been at reducing or even eliminating symptoms? 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My daughter is now 11 and we are finally on top of her SIBO (since she was 8).  Diet is super important. I know it's hard with kids, but a diet low in fermentable carbs is key. Especially when SIBO appears to be chronic. 

I suggest looking into the Fast Tract Diet. There is a book and an app. Using glycemic index, fiber, and total carbs, the diet tells you the fermentation potential of different foods. There is a point system. The goal is to keep your fermentation potential points between 20-30 per day when you are experiencing SIBO symptoms, and then slowly increase to 40 points for the long term maintenance.  It is important to note that Fast Tract is not strictly gluten free. So you have to choose that yourself. 

This system has worked very well for my daughter.  She also takes Atrantil daily and her GI at U of C suggested once a month going on a preventative herbal antibiotic.  Honestly, this is the best she has felt in years. Avoiding gluten is key...this is the other part of the equation. Incidentally, since gluten affects her nervous system, I think it has affected her motility, hence the SIBO. 

So, diet is important and kids are difficult. Avoiding most grains is important since they are super high in fermentable carbs. BUT, there are some grains that are lower in fermentable carbs that help:  Jasmine Rice (cook in water like pasta and drain. Do not use left over because cooling causes resistant starches to form and that is aweful for SIBO).  Also mashed Red Potatoes (soak in salt water for 30 minutes to get most starch out, then rinse well, boil, drain, mash.  Again don't cool and reheat because of resistant starch).

I have a terrific biscuit recipe and tortilla/flat bread recipe that I can post too. 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also want to say that a lot of gluten free  recipes are not good for SIBO- too many starches. Also large quantities of almond flour or coconut flour have too much fermentable fibers so be careful with Paleo/SCD recipes too.  It's a bit of a balancing act in what you make and how much is eaten (that's why I like fast Tract- you can qualify things and it works).

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

8 8

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      108,432
    • Total Posts
      941,232
  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      66,360
    • Most Online
      3,093

    Newest Member
    Jen1104
    Joined
  • Popular Now

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Turkey, vacuum pack it, you can use it later for soups, stews, sandwiches, omelettes etc. Will keep for months in the freezer

      Dressing,
      You can use it in various ways my fun thing to do with it is moisten it back up a bit and load it into a waffle maker these can then be frozen or eaten when ever, dressing and sausage flavored waffles are AWESOME.
      Other leftovers can be put in a icecube tray and froze these cubes can be kept in a bag in the freezer, they are perfect for just putting a few in a bowl and zapping in the microwave later for quick meal, I love stir frying them in with eggs.

      Gravy, Gravy can be frozen in icecube trays, and kept in bags, you can then put these over bread, mash, etc and melt them over them later in the microwave or use in a soup like a stock to add flavor.

      Most Desserts can be frozen but around here I have hardly ever had any last the next week.

      Mashed potatoes, again these can be loaded into icecube trays frozen and kept in bags for quick reheat and use meals. Goes great in soups later to thicken them up. Green beans, after thanksgiving....you might want a new flavor thankfully the green beans can be incorporated into another cuisines using spices, in a soup or stir fried Asian style in coconut secret teriyaki sauces.
      Casserole dishes honestly freeze quite well in may cases, I have not had many survive the next week but often you can top them other other cuisine spices or sauces and fry them up in a skillet or reheat in a bowl for something different.  
    • Appreciate the thorough responses.    The stomach issues have been dreadful the past few weeks and brought hurrendous awakenings.the worst I have slept in a long time. I have had a few gluten foods in all honest. Maybe a mcdonalds twice in 2 months. Which isnt ideal. But I dont seem to feel anything afterwards (terrible excuse I know)  My biggest worries were my memory and cognitive behaviour! I was in London Bridge station and forgot where I was heading for 15 minutes. My memory is terrible, as is the concentration. So its a bit of a battle at the minute and I am flunking in my new job. I feel like as you said, neurologically I have deteriorated. Wit and brain function out the window. Considering I was a pretty switched on person. Balance and diziness at points. (all this on a gluten free diet after 4 months triggered me too my mcdonalds binge) ha ha.  I think the memory was the worst.    As you said about the brit medical side being useless. I think you are correct. I understand its the NHS and free etc. But this is just not considered a worry. Ive considered pulling myself into A and E this past few weeks because of the pain and I know this is the only way anyone will give me a thorough look over. I was also sent for a bone scan ( no reasoning as to why) But from research it seems to be for searching the nutrients in the bone?    Neurological side has been really i think what has been the toughest. My job requires an awful lot of high concentration and memory. Which when I fail at, causes stress, and then I am caught in the vicious cycle! Thanks for the help guys. Nice to meet some fellow people who can relate. I just feel like celiacs seem to know more then the doctors, which shows primitive practice in order to solve it. Once again, I would never know the NHS or doctors. I understand free health care is health care. But how low on the list this is, is a worry.    
    • I get vomiting with large amounts of gluten, and motion control loss, followed by either Diarrhea or constipation for a week was back in June 2016 when I decided to eat at a new place, I was on my floor unable to move vomiting so hard there was blood in it.
      NOW trace amounts I have gotten sense then and confirmed via Nima Gluten sensor then following lab testing have show that for me I get constipation, gas, bloat, and nerve issues with fog and peripherally neuropathy. The vomiting was missing from stuff confirmed at 6ppm, but obvious other nerve and fog issues were apparent (I kept dropping stuff and walking into things, mind kept on wondering and having those what was I doing moments, topped with backed up to hell with painful gas)
      Everyone is a little different and symptoms seem to change and evolve with time and type/form of exposure. I used to get a angry Mr, Hyde rage mode, and weeks of constipation and I used to not have the motor loss issues just brain fog and looping thoughts. It changes

      The cause is mostly due to your antibodies going up and your immune system attacking your own body, where it attacks, how, and to what degree greatly varies and after a exposure it can take weeks to wind down off the response and for the antibodies to go down. Just giving a basic idea here.

      Once you get exposed all you can do is treat the symptoms and wait it out, up supplementation of b vitamins, magnesium etc. Take pepto, or Imodium depending on what you have, teas and bone broths and try to eat easy to digest foods for the next week, Mushed up, blended, purreed, stewed/steamed super soft foods.
    • Hi everyone,  Once again I am here looking for your help. I was diagnosed with Celiac less than a year ago. It took quite a while to find out because I didn't experience any particular symptoms after eating gluten. I was always tired, had memory problems and was frequently ill; sometimes I had gastrointestinal issues, but they came and went.  Last night I went out for dinner, to a Thai place I trust(ed). Later, I could hardly sleep, I had horrible nightmares, those where you can hardly tell apart when you are awake or not. I expected to have high fever but nothing!  Today all my body aches, I am very tired and was nauseated all day. A little bit gasy and bloated as well.. Was I glutened?? Did I already clean my body enough that I now start to react in this fashion? If so, why does that happen?  There is also gastroenteritis going around, that would be the alternative explanation. I thought I excaped it. I also didn't vomit or have diahrrea like the rest.  What do you think?
    • With a positive EMA and a positive tTg, that is a slam dunk for Celiac Disease.  If you read about testing results, the odds are 99% that you have it. You also had very high numbers on your testing so that adds to the diagnosis.  At this point, the biopsy, if you have it done, is to check for the amount of damage, and is not needed for a diagnosis. I declined the biopsy as I was very sick at diagnosis.  The doctor who ran my blood panel said there was no doubt I had it due to the high numbers on my blood work.  I have been gluten-free for 12 years and every single doctor I have ever seen since then, who whined about me not having the biopsy, shut up about it once they saw my initial blood work.  The difference in my health since going gluten free was nothing short of amazing. I am sure you will have the same results, once you go gluten free.
  • Upcoming Events