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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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IrishHeart

Real Life With celiac disease - Excellent Resource Book

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Real Life with Celiac Disease

Melinda Dennis, MS, RD, LDN Daniel Leffler, MD. MS

The Celiac Center at Beth israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston.

I am reading this book and find it is an excellent resource for us. I've read many books on celiac disease and tons of pretty dry research, :D but this one seems to cover a great deal of information all in one collection.

I am so glad someone on another site mentioned it to me!

Honestly wish I had found it 2 years ago--would have saved me a lot of research time!! :huh:

Articles by more than 50 international experts.

Not "too techie", short enough chapters ... and very enlightening.

Covers just about everything imaginable: the disease process itself, obstacles to healing and solutions,

nutritional advice, dietary advice if you gain weight after getting your absorption back, trouble-shooting other food intolerances, elimination diets, depression and anxiety, related AI conditions, celiac and diabetes, infants and teens, eating disorders at celiac disease, etc. I was thrilled to see Dr. Gaundalini talk favorably about using probiotics.

I highly recommend it.

Cheers, IH

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I read it. Consider it my bible of celiac disease. I will recommend it to my GI/ PCP so we will be on equal level.

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I read it. Consider it my bible of celiac disease. I will recommend it to my GI/ PCP so we will be on equal level.

 

Just to follow up.

To date, my PCP (of 14 months) won't read this book.  He said it's not his job, has no interest or time in reading books on specific diseases and tells me to direct my questions regarding celiac/gluten issues to my GI Doctor.  

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I got this on IH's recommendation and it is excellent. I would say that the chapters are short and self contained enough to copy and pass to family and friends (and more receptive doctors perhaps) to explain certain aspects of the condition without being overwhelming.

Definitely recommend

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