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Showing content with the highest reputation on 05/01/2019 in all areas

  1. 1 point
    A lot of good info here. https://www.makesauerkraut.com/fermented-pickles/ I use 1/2 to 3/4 cup of kosher salt per gallon of purified water, a handful of crushed garlic, a handful of bay leaves crumpled up, a bunch of dill, and Kirby cucumbers. A tablespoon or so of Crushed red pepper if you like a slight bit of heat. Remove the blossom end. Three days around 75 degrees on the counter and start checking. Put in the fridge to stop progression. I use an old one gallon rectangular Brita water filter because the top section holds the cucumbers under water and can hold 15 small kirbys.
  2. 1 point
    04/22/2019 - A gluten-free diet can improve symptoms of schizophrenia in certain patients, new research suggests. In the small pilot study, Deanna L. Kelly, PharmD, professor of psychiatry, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, and colleagues studied the effects a gluten-free diet in schizophrenia, especially in patients with elevated gluten antibodies. Kelly and her team set out to determine whether a gluten-free diet would improve psychiatric symptoms in this subgroup of patients with elevated AGA IgG. They found that schizophrenia patients with elevated gluten antibodies, specifically, elevated antigliadin antibodies (AGA IgG), who followed a gluten-free-diet for 5 weeks saw a greater reduction in negative symptoms compared counterparts on a non-gluten-free diet. "With a gluten-free diet, we do have the potential to improve psychiatric symptoms, particularly negative symptoms, which is a symptom domain with a high unmet clinical need," said lead investigator Deanna L. Kelly, PharmD, professor of psychiatry, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore. Currently, there are no good treatment options for negative symptoms of schizophrenia, "so this could be a treatment for people if they have these antigliadin antibodies," Kelly said. Nearly One-third of Schizophrenia Patients Gluten Intolerant Elevated AGA IgG may be present in about 30% of all patients with schizophrenia. The antigliadin antibody is not related to the antibodies seen in celiac disease, which affects roughly 1% of the overall population. Schizophrenia patients with elevated AGA IgG show substantially lower positive schizophrenia symptoms than those who test negative no AGA IgG. They also have higher levels of kynurenine, a metabolite of the amino acid L-tryptophan. Kynurenine has been linked to schizophrenia pathology, and to other conditions, Kelly noted. The tryptophan kynurenine pathway also has important links to neurotherapy. Strategies for treatment of schizophrenia are still largely "one-size-fits-all." The team's study began largely after a single 2-week gluten-free trial in two people with elevated AGA IgG and schizophrenia showed "robust symptom improvements, particularly in the domain of negative symptoms," so we wanted to do a feasibility study and enroll more patients," Kelly told reporters. The team's findings were presented at the first annual Congress of the Schizophrenia International Research Society (SIRS) 2019. Read more at Medscape Medical News
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    • It is unfortunate that fear of soy has become so popular.  Check out the region around Okinawa, where soy is a foundational food and has been for centuries.  Note that this area is one of the World's green zones where people on average live the longest of all.  This is just one example of an area where soy has been used for a very long time with positive results, or I suppose it is more accurate to say without harmful results.  Of course it is different for those who are medically sensitive to soy derived products and must avoid them.  As for people with Celiac, one must always be aware of cross reactivity and periodic testing is a very good idea.  Celiac is sneaky that way.  For the rest of us, organic, unmodified soy is not only safe to eat, but is an excellent and inexpensive source for a multitude of nutrients.  Thank you for qualifying your statement about MSG.  Personally I tend to avoid additives like MSG that are not actually naturally occurring food, but I reserve any comment beyond my personal preference and will wait for the research to catch up.  I am encountering increasing evidence that you may be absolutely right about avoiding it.
    • Depends on what kind of Advil.  The gel capsules used to contain gluten from what I recall.  What does the label say?   Here is a list of gluten free pain relievers: https://www.verywellfit.com/gluten-free-pain-relievers-562382  
    • https://www.beyondceliac.org/research-news/View-Research-News/1394/postid--114197/?utm_campaign=Research Opt-In&utm_source=hs_email&utm_medium=email&utm_content=72478196&_hsenc=p2ANqtz-8cBCeWpQSG8tjxT3AC5kO9JlVU9sKiGcArKDefDbz0UI0-FrJiSWvmuEAJ7HWszix_3WVyFj1AaK8h8iqwb5bG0LBdew&_hsmi=72478196 A potpourri of issues discussed in this article but here are some things that stood out to me: "Similarly, in Robert’s multinational study reviewing biopsies of patients done initially and at follow up, persistent symptoms were found on the second biopsy in 78 percent of patients with damaged villi and 66 percent of patients who had normal biopsy . . . More than half of 184 patients in the study who had a second biopsy had persistent damage. In addition to the findings related to symptoms and damage, the study was designed to show physicians how to  correctly take samples when a patient needs a second biopsy so changes are not missed." Also, it seems persistent diarrhea is the one symptom that correlates well with continuing villi damage: "Diarrhea was the only symptom the predicted intestinal damage found when a biopsy was done . .  . The study found symptoms of celiac disease are inconsistent in predicting the results of a blood tests and biopsies. This inconsistency led researchers to conclude symptoms should not be the only thing used to evaluate a patient’s response to a gluten-free diet. However, frequent and severe diarrhea should prompt a reevaluation of the condition of the intestine, they noted." Finally and this is long overdue, researchers are beginning to look at the impact of anxiety on Celiac sufferers: "Peter Green, MD, director of the Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University, asked if the study evaluated whether the gluten transgressions being detected with the urine and stool tests had caused the study participants any real harm. “We are concerned we are driving these people crazy,” he said in a question and answer period following the lecture.  Green noted that researchers are increasingly looking at the effect anxiety about the gluten-free diet has on patients."        Celiac disease can become bigger than life if we let it.
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