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Welda Johnson

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About Welda Johnson

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    Star Contributor

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  • Gender
    Female
  • Location
    Escondido, California

  1. Hi,

    I hope you're feeling better, now that you're on the gluten-free diet! I will be thinking of you and hoping that all goes well. I've dealt with symptoms since age 8 and am now 63, but after going gluten-free I felt so much better. Then I went milk & dairy free and felt even better. Then I eliminated egg whites, yeast and meat, and I feel great. Have you ever eliminated milk, dairy and eggs? Going to fruits, vegetables, meats, nuts and seeds might just be what you need, or you might learn that you can't tolerate other foods (corn, soy, casein, whey, etc. are often culprits) as well. This is such an opportunity to pay attention to what our bodies are telling us.

    I was primary daycare provider for my newborn grandson and when he started having problems immediately with milk, I ordered a stool sample test from Enterolab.com and within six weeks we learned that he was intolerant of all grains and all milk & dairy. It took some thought to keep him free of those foods, and lots of reading of labels, but he is now a vibrant five year old. It is well worth the time and effort we invest in this search, in terms of finding health. Keep coming back and we will do all we can to help. Welda


  2. Hi all,

    This is the first time I've heard about Celiac in connection with long life, but I'm intrigued because my great-grandfather lived to be 98, my grandma 96, and I now have an aunt who is 98, all from my dad's family, which is where I think the Celiac originates. I'd love to hear more about this theory, since I definitely see my ancestors as role models, and envision a long life with health and happiness now that I am on a gluten-free, milk & dairy free, egg whites & yeast and meat-free diet. Thanks for the info. It is good "food for thought." Welda


  3. Hi Deb,

    I feel for you and your daughter! I know how hard the beginning phases of getting on a Celiac diet can be. I've had symptoms since the age of 8 and am now 63. Whereas I was so sick before, now that I have been on the Celiac diet, I feel healthy spiritually, mentally and physically. I can see that having this condition is one of the main reasons I have learned more about who I am and how I can be the best that I can be. Having Celiac helps me be more aware of others and whatever illnesses they are experiencing or have experienced.

    I was primary daycare provider for my newborn grandson when I discovered that he had Celiac and allegies to all milk and dairy, just as I do. I learned alot about taking care of an infant who had to be on a special diet, then about a toddler, then about a child of preschool age and how you can keep them well. It IS possible to help your child be gluten-free, and there is no more fiercely protective person on earth than a parent or grandparent. I was just talking to my son, who commented on a little girl who has Celiac and is a friend of my 14 year old granddaughter. For the past 7 years she has attended birthday parties and pizza parties with these same children, and her mother provides cupcakes for the birthday parties, and I think maybe gluten-free pizza for the pizza parties. All the other kids seem to take it for granted now that she will be eating a little differently, but they seem to love her as a friend, so it doesn't seem to matter. As a retired teacher, I can attest to the fact that being in touch with teachers, and with the parents of your child's friends, will make all the difference.

    If you'd like to talk about some of the problems that are coming up, feel free to email me at Welda@att.net. Best of luck on making this work. You and your daughter will feel so much bettter. Welda


  4. I use the words "intolerant of" or "allergic to." I'm intolerant of all grains, all milk & dairy, egg whites & yeast." I now eat vegan, and some people know that term. "I eat fruits and vegetables, nuts and seeds," I might say.

    Usually they ask what happens if I eat the above. I get asthma (wheezing, closed air passages, etc.). Most people understand if you keep it simple.

    Here's a good sign: more and more people are mentioning the word "gluten."

    We're making progress! Welda


  5. I've found that yams, potatoes of any kind, and corn tortillas with refried beans & Ortega chiles helps to fill the void. I'm five feet tall, but sometimes I'll eat 4-6 tortillas with beans, chiles and salsa, and that really helps me feel better. The yams (sweet potatoes) are so good with Stevia on them. This is a natural sweetener with no calories, no carbs, no gluten (It's a plant from Paraguay and comes in little packets like Equal). I also eat Genisoy soy powder each day (you can order it online), made into a cookie dough with dark chocolate chips or chunks (no sugar or milk added), vanilla, a lot of cinnamon and a little water. I chill it and add nuts, or you can cook it in the microwave as a cookie. It is very filling. Of course I also eat corn pasta too, but I saw that that was already discussed in the posts above. Prego spaghetti sauce goes well with any of the pastas, and Vegan Gourmet makes a great cheese that melts. Have you tried Earth Balance Margarine or Vegennaise mayo? I know that it takes a lot of time to find the products that are gluten free, but if you have a health food store near you, usually that makes life easier. Ours has now started labeling foods "Gluten Free," which is great. I am hoping that you will find your health and stamina getting better each day. Welda Welda@att.net


  6. Hi,

    My name is Welda, and I'm here to tell you that we do heal! I am 63 years old and have had symptoms of Celiac since age 8, when I started having asthma. No one ever mentioned Celiac throughout the years, but by 1963 I was told I would be bedridden by the age of 25 if I didn't have all the scratch tests for allergies and then the shots to "desensitize" me to whatever I proved to be sensitive to. I did the tests and the shots, but nothing helped. During the 1970s I started trying natural foods and by 1982 I began to eliminate foods to see what happened. I learned that all grains and all milk & dairy were culprits for me. However, it took hospital stays, spending my income on doctors, specialists and medications, and lots of times of depression and despair before I finally was blessed in 2001 with the news that the allergies I had were called "Celiac." I had gone for a colonoscopy after my father died of colon cancer, and the nurse saw the notations I had made on my entry chart and said, "Oh you have Celiac!."

    "I knew there was a name for it," I said. I went home and got on the internet and found this site. I had already eliminated the foods I mentioned, but added egg whites & yeast to the list after testing them on myself, then began reading labels and ingredients interminably, in order to avoid the slightest trace of things to which I was intolerant (I learned that casein, whey, maltodextrin and modified food starch also made me wheeze, so I stopped those). I switched to soy margarine and Vegennaise mayo and that helped too.

    Skip ahead to the year 2007: I was still wheezing after eating meat, poultry or fish. I started a vegan diet! I lost 20 pounds, and now at five feet tall I weigh 100 pounds, sleep 8 hours a night, walk five miles a day on the treadmill and outdoors with my doggy, and have plenty of energy to spare.

    As a retired teacher I'm studying for a Real Estate Broker's License, writing books on San Diego County Indian history, gathering inventory to open a Cowboy's & Indians Store, and keeping busy with family and friends. I've written a booklet entitled, "Grandma, Can I Eat This?" centering on my grandson's experiences with Celiac, as well as a recipe book featuring Celiac menus. I keep thinking of it as "Man Does Not Live By Bread Alone," but know that a better name will probably pop up.

    So, I will attest to the fact that we are so blessed to be living with Celiac, since it seems we eventually end up becoming healthier than the general population, and become examples of a new way of living and being, always ready to help someone else who learns they have this condition.

    I hope that we all become the best that we can be. Welda@att.net


  7. Hi,

    My name is Welda, and I'm here to tell you that we do heal! I am 63 years old and have had symptoms of Celiac since age 8, when I started having asthma. No one ever mentioned Celiac throughout the years, but by 1963 I was told I would be bedridden by the age of 25 if I didn't have all the scratch tests for allergies and then the shots to "desensitize" me to whatever I proved to be sensitive to. I did the tests and the shots, but nothing helped. During the 1970s I started trying natural foods and by 1982 I began to eliminate foods to see what happened. I learned that all grains and all milk & dairy were culprits for me. However, it took hospital stays, spending my income on doctors, specialists and medications, and lots of times of depression and despair before I finally was blessed in 2001 with the news that the allergies I had were called "Celiac." I had gone for a colonoscopy after my father died of colon cancer, and the nurse saw the notations I had made on my entry chart and said, "Oh you have Celiac!."

    "I knew there was a name for it," I said. I went home and got on the internet and found this site. I had already eliminated the foods I mentioned, but added egg whites & yeast to the list after testing them on myself, then began reading labels and ingredients interminably, in order to avoid the slightest trace of things to which I was intolerant (I learned that casein, whey, maltodextrin and modified food starch also made me wheeze, so I stopped those). I switched to soy margarine and Vegennaise mayo and that helped too.

    Skip aheat to the year 2007: I was still wheezing after eating meat, poultry or fish. I started a vegan diet! I lost 20 pounds, and now at five feet tall I weigh 100 pounds, sleep 8 hours a night, walk five miles a day on the treadmill and outdoors with my doggy, and have plenty of energy to spare.

    As a retired teacher I'm studying for a Real Estate Broker's License, writing books on San Diego County Indian history, gathering inventory to open a Cowboy's & Indians Store, and keeping busy with family and friends. I've written a booklet entitled, "Grandma, Can I Eat This?" centering on my grandson's experiences with Celiac, as well as a recipe book featuring Celiac menus. I keep thinking of it as "Man Does Not Live By Bread Alone," but know that a better name will probably pop up.

    So, I will attest to the fact that we are so blessed to be living with Celiac, since it seems we eventually end up becoming healthier than the general population, and become examples of a new way of living and being, always ready to help someone else who learns they have this condition.

    I hope that we all become the best that we can be. Welda@att.net


  8. Hi,

    Good for you for taking such good care of yourself. I always take my food wherever I go, and have for years. Nobody says anything anymore, and I am always a happy camper because I have whatever I need. Large bags, especially those lined with plastic are great, and I use those plate-sized styrofoam tortilla warmers to keep my hot food in and it stays hot for hours. I always take my own spoon or fork and napkins too, in order to be really prepared. It has become kind of a game to see how well I can package whatever I'm eating, and how unobtrusive I can be in eating it. Good luck, and have lots of fun at your barbecue. Welda


  9. Hi,

    I stopped beef and other meats and poultry a year ago because I would wheeze after eating them (whenever I am glutened I have asthma). I concluded that maybe these animal products are "grain-fed" since I have heard that term "grain-fed beef" before in advertisements. Because I am intolerant of all grains, all milk & dairy, egg whites and yeast, I eat vegan, which is fruits, vegetables, nuts and seeds (including soy, corn, potatoes, sweet potatoes, etc.). I never eat fruits with vegetables, beans, soy, corn or potatoes, because it takes different enzymes to digest fruits than it does vegetables. Please email me at welda@att.net if you'd like. I've had Celiac symptoms since age 8 and am now 63. Welda


  10. I hope you quickly feel better. I think this has happened to most of us. I sometimes get in a hurry, even after spending years and years checking every label and ingredient, and somehow something will just get past me. It is my reminder to slow down and take better care of myself, so that is a good thing. I wanted to comment on your intolerance of oats, because I have some of the same intolerances as you do. Oprah has just started a 21 day gluten-free diet on her show, but is eating oatmeal. I also cannot handle oatmeal, so maybe that is one of our jobs--to tell people to be careful of eating oats, as well as checking all labels. Best of luck to you on your new pathway! Welda


  11. Hi,

    I feel for you! I am of the opinion that feeding someone food that upsets their delicate balance is like feeding someone poison, and in the case of Celiac, those foods really are poison for us.

    I've had symptoms of Celiac since age 8 but no one knew in those days what was going on. I'm now 63, avoid all grains, all milk and dairy, egg whites, yeast, and meat, poultry, etc. since I have asthma symptoms even after eating animal products.

    I sent away to Enterolab for tests for my newly-born grandson when he started having symptoms ($400 or so) and then for my three grown children, sister and brother. My kids didn't take the tests, and my sister did and has Celiac, but my brother doesn't have it. However, my sister doesn't do the diet and has had thyroid cancer, colon polyps which they told her they were 99% cancerous but proved to be benign when they took them out, and a couple of weeks ago non-malignant skin cancer on her leg.

    So I believe that those foods really are poison! Probably you will get more perseverant about your son's health as you see your own health improve, and while you can't control what his father or grandparents feed him, you can be extremely diligent about getting him on a good diet now, because what we teach our kids when they are young is so important. Has he had any symptoms of ADD or ADHD? My grandson's Kaiser doctor said he would "outgrow it" but I think that is wrong. His blood test came back negative at a year old, but we had had him totally on a gluten free and milk free diet for his first year, just before the testing.

    I love Enterolab! For $100 they will identify gluten intolerance, then you can do an elimination diet for milk, dairy, casein, whey, etc. etc. etc. as symptoms crop up. I'll be thinking of you and wishing you well in your quest for good health for your son and you. Please feel free to email me at welda@att.net if you have any questions. Welda


  12. Hi Lucy Lou,

    I'm a 63 year old female who has had symptoms of Celiac since age 8. In the 1960s I had asthma so bad the doctors said I would probably be bedridden by the age of 25, so I had scratch tests for allergies and shots for the next 3 years. Little improvement. In the 1970s I finally started doing my own elimination tests of foods, since I had spent so much money already on doctors and specialists. I breathed easier when I cut out all grains, and all milk and dairy products, but I always went back to eating those foods again, and I usually was sick (many hospitalizations followed). In the 1980s I tried to stick to the diet, but kept going back to forbidden foods. I got a breathing machine and took Prednisone and lots of asthma medication each day. By the 1990s I was sticking to the diet better and feeling better. In 2001 I had a colonoscopy (my father died of colon cancer) and the nurse told me the name for my food allergies = Celiac. I got on this site and my life changed drastically.

    I learned about casein, whey, maltodextrin, modified food starch, etc. and eventually even cut out eating meats, since I seems to be sensitive to grain-fed animal products. In 2003 I became primary daycare provider for my newly-born grandson and learned all about how to keep children on the diet. I put together a booklet called, "Grandma, Can I Eat this?" and a recipe booklet for Celiacs. I gave my sister, brother, and three grown children Enterolab test kits and learned my sister has it, my brother doesn't, and my kids didn't take the tests. I bought the full-spectrum test kit for my grandson and learned he is intolerant of all grains and all milk and dairy. That test was about $400 but the tests for gluten intolerance only were about $100 each.

    I wish you well on this new journey, and want to tell you to please email me at welda@att.net if you'd like more information or have questions. I have been blessed to have this disease, and feel better than ever. Welda Lou


  13. Hi,

    I think Enterolab is such a good way to go, because they send the stool sample kit directly to your home, then send UPS (or was it Fed-Ex?) to your door to pick it up. I bought a test for my grandson to start with (newly born and suffering after his formula) and he had gluten intolerance and intolerance of all milk and dairy. I already knew that I had Celiac (symptoms since age 8 and I'm now 63). Dakota's test was around $400 but later I ordered tests for my three grown children, my sister and my brother, at about $100 for testing gluten intolerance only, not milk or dairy products. My sister has it, my brother doesn't, and none of my kids took their tests.

    I stick to the diet totally and feel great. I kept Dakota on the diet the first year, then his folks chose to give him everything, and the Kaiser doctor said he didn't have Celiac, but when I had him I kept him on the diet until recently. He is now ready to go to Kindergarten and shows signs of ADHD as his father, my son, did. The question is now cropping up about Ritalin, and his mom says yes while his father, who we tried it on years ago, says no. Dakota's dad became a zombie on Ritalin and hated it, as did we.

    I am a retired teacher and NEVER recommended drugs for kids during my years of teaching, mainly because I saw what it did to my son's personality, which was sparkling and active when natural, but dark and moody on drugs. So, I highly recommend doing whatever it takes to find out what is going on, even if it is just trying the gluten-free diet yourself and suggensting that others in your family join you. I always felt better during the years when I did elimination diets, and that's how I learned to cut out all grains, all milk and dairy, egg whites and yeast, and recently I stopped meat, because I have asthma symptons apparently when eating grain-fed animal products. Best wishes to you. If you'd like to email me at welda@att.net feel free. Welda


  14. Hi,

    I think Enterolab is such a good way to go, because they send the stool sample kit directly to your home, then send UPS (or was it Fed-Ex?) to your door to pick it up. I bought a test for my grandson to start with (newly born and suffering after his formula) and he had gluten intolerance and intolerance of all milk and dairy. I already knew that I had Celiac (symptoms since age 8 and I'm now 63). Dakota's test was around $400 but later I ordered tests for my three grown children, my sister and my brother, at about $100 for testing gluten intolerance only, not milk or dairy products. My sister has it, my brother doesn't, and none of my kids took their tests.

    I stick to the diet totally and feel great. I kept Dakota on the diet the first year, then his folks chose to give him everything, and the Kaiser doctor said he didn't have Celiac, but when I had him I kept him on the diet until recently. He is now ready to go to Kindergarten and shows signs of ADHD as his father, my son, did. The question is now cropping up about Ritalin, and his mom says yes while his father, who we tried it on years ago, says no. Dakota's dad became a zombie on Ritalin and hated it, as did we.

    I am a retired teacher and NEVER recommended drugs for kids during my years of teaching, mainly because I saw what it did to my son's personality, which was sparkling and active when natural, but dark and moody on drugs. So, I highly recommend doing whatever it takes to find out what is going on, even if it is just trying the gluten-free diet yourself and suggensting that others in your family join you. I always felt better during the years when I did elimination diets, and that's how I learned to cut out all grains, all milk and dairy, egg whites and yeast, and recently I stopped meat, because I have asthma symptons apparently when eating grain-fed animal products. Best wishes to you. If you'd like to email me at welda@att.net feel free. Welda


  15. Hi,

    Boy, I thought it was bad to get asthma and start wheezing whenever I ate gluten--I feel for you, having anaphylaxis as a result of eating gluten! I've dealt with this problem since I was 8 and am now 63 so I hope I can help. I also went to college and faced what you are in terms of eating with other people and feeling strange, but as time has gone by I have let all that go, and just realize that others really don't know that much about Celiac, so I can be their guide. Who knows? Maybe you will help someone else find out they have Celiac too. 1 of every 133 Americans is said to have Celiac, whether they know it or not.

    I am intolerant of all grains, all milk and dairy, egg whites, yeast, casein, whey, etc. I now eat vegan, which means I've eliminated everything except fruits and vegetables (I eat corn, soy, beans, etc.), and I feel great, but I've put together a recipe book for my family members. I will share this with you.

    1. Pamela's cookies 2. Mi-Del cookies 3. Ener-G yeast-free gluten-free bread 4. Vegan Gourmet soy cheese 5. Corn & rice pastas 6. Red Mill gluten-free mixes (brownies, cakes, etc.) 7. Almond Milk

    8. Soy Milk 9. Rice Milk 10. Popcorn 11. rice cakes 12. Vegennaise Mayonnaise 13. Earth Balance Margarine 14. Van's gluten-free Waffles 15. Cream of Rice cereal

    16. Doritos Corn Chips (not cheese) 17. Fritos 18. Tortilla Chips 19. Hershey's Unsweetened Chocolate 20. Hershey's Powdered Cocoa 21. Hershey's Chocolate Syrup 22. Dennison's Chili

    23. Prego Spaghetti Sauce 24. dried fruits 25. corn tortillas = tacos, enchiladas, quesadillas

    26. refried beans 27. Dennison's Chili 28. corn flour, rice flour, etc. 29. Fruits 30. Vegetables

    31. Enjoy Life Granola and Cookies

    I hope this helps you! Please feel free to email me at welda@att.net if you need some encouragement and help. I thank God for this site and for those who have helped me. Always, Welda


  16. Hi A-Swiss,

    Welcome to the site! The best part of your life is likely just beginning. I can identify with the suffering you've probably gone through getting to this point. I'm here to let you know that everything will get better, now that you are diagnosed. Do you know all the foods you are intolerant of? Yes, I can identify with the frustration you feel when you go shopping--but please believe that it will get better. Your mind will become clearer, your moods will become more even, your cheerfulness and joy will return, and you will live again. How do I know this you ask. I've had symptoms since the age of 8 and am now 63. I believe that we are called to be pioneers in learning about this disease. Our bodies are wonderful to help us know what we can tolerate. I learned on my own that all grains, all milk and dairy, egg whites and yeast were the main culprits, then after learning five years ago that I had Celiac, I narrowed that down and eliminated casein, whey, etc. etc. Reading labels takes time, but soon you will have a long list of foods and restaurants that you know you can live with and trust. It feels really great now to know that I can handle this challenge with dignity and grace, and that I can choose to take the high road and see the positive things life has to offer, if only I will choose that route. I am happy that now doctors are beginning to realize that Celiac is common, and that they can have a hand in making our lives better. Feel free to email me at welda@att.net anytime and I will tell you how I always take food with me when going out, and always make sure that I have plenty of my allowed foods at home. We can do this! Welda


  17. Hi,

    As I've said before on this board, I'm now 63 and have had symptoms of Celiac since I was 8. Mine appear as asthma and the inability to breathe--wheezing, coiughing, bronchitis, then pneumonia, etc. as well as stomach and digestive issues. For many years I had to find answers on my own, but five years ago I learned that what I had was called Celiac. That's when I got on this site and began eliminating most processed foods. Before that I had eliminated all grains, milk & dairy on my own. After getting on this site I eliminated products with casein, whey, maltodextrin and modified food starch (corn is usually okay). I also had to eliminate egg whites and yeast. Keeping a simple diet while doing food eliminations is a good way to go, and when you start feeling better you know you're on the right track. It sounds as though you have Dermatitis Herpetiformis (I think that's what it's called). Aramgard on this site has had that for years, so maybe you could connect with her. Feel free to contact me at welda@att.net any time you want. Best wishes. Welda


  18. Hi Ellen,

    I'm sorry you're feeling so bad. I have almost forgotten what those feelings were like, I have felt well for so long, so I can assure you that things will get better if you stick to the diet. There may be more modifications to your diet coming, but you will learn through this process just how strong you have been all your life, and how strong you are now. I have the feeling that years from now, when you're feeling great, you will be able to help others. I thnk Missy's Mom is right. You're just beginning to weed through a thicket of sensitivities, which will become more apparent as your body is healing. It is imperative to be aware of food additives and those to which you are intolerant, as well as foods themselves. Reading labels and ingredients becomes second nature, as does providing food for yourself that you KNOW is safe, even when going to the movies, to theme parks, or elsewhere.

    I have plastic containers and cloth bags, some with plastic linings, just for taking foods with me, wherever I go. I am allergic to all grains, all milk & dairy, egg whites, yeast, casein, whey, etc. I recently stopped all meats because they contributed to my asthma. I have had problems since age 8 and am now 63 but since dedicating myself to this diet totally five years ago, I feel so much better. I sleep better, am able to exercise each day, breathe so much better, and feel so much better.

    I am hoping that you will stick strictly to this diet, and learn more about what your body is trying to tell you. My sister has Celiac and refuses to change her diet--she has had thyroid cancer. colon polyps that were diagnosed cancerous but, thank God, proved not to be, and recently had a growth on her leg removed that was termed non-malignant skin cancer.

    Enterolab.com can send a test kit to your home so you can take a stool sample and learn if you're allergic to all grains, milk and dairy, etc. I wish you love and care in your quest for good health. Welda


  19. Hi,

    Yep! Your body is now working for your well-being and health. As you stick to the diet and perhaps learn even more foods which are not healthy for your particular makeup, you will become increasingly sensitive. But I think that we also become increasingly sensitive as people, so that is also good!

    Whereas we may have had some self-destructive tendencies in the past, I believe that once we make the decision to seek good health, our bodies realize that we mean business and help us out. I first learned that I was intolerant of all grains, then all milk & dairy, then egg whites & yeast, and, finally, I stopped all meats & poultry because I would have asthma after eating them.

    Yep! Our bodies are with us in this quest. It feels so good to feel good--after years and years of struggling with ill health and working so hard to learn what was causing the symptoms. I wish you well as you continue to increase in well-being, and as you make choices which will benefit you greatly. Welda


  20. Hi,

    Well, the anger is normal I believe, because you have had a huge loss in your life. In the beginning it hurts to see everyone eating normally, but let me tell you that after years of trying to discover what was causing my health problems, I was so grateful to finally have the answers to some of my health problems (asthma, bronchitis, pneumonia, depression, tiredness, mood swings, etc.).

    Enterolab.com can provide a home test that tells if other family members have Celiac, and usually some do. You have been chosen to be a pioneer! I am 63 and suffered since age 8, so you can see why I am so happy to be gluten free now. I took tiny steps to discover on my own during the 1970s which foods gave me problems (this was after scratch tests for food allergies and injections to remedy the situation for three straight years--the doctor told me at age 19 that I would most likely be bedridden at age 25 if I didn't do something--no mention of Celiac however).

    All grains, all milk & dairy, egg whites & yeast have proved to be the culprits. A tough diet, eh? Well, I was still feeling depressed, so last year I dropped all meats, because grain-fed beef and chickens, along with who knows what is in meat and produce all made me wheeze with asthma.

    Today I feel great. I can cry, but sometimes I have to really work to get in touch with my feelings, then the dam bursts and I feel great again. Some people that I know are on medications, but I only take a couple of asthma pills now (compared to 13 daily a couple of years ago) and use a breathing machine. We are all so different! What a journey it is to explore and discover which foods are healthy for your body and your body alone. It is a daily quest. Last week I had a bad reaction from drinking Lemonade, which I prepared myself (I don't indulge in sugar so I used Stevia, a calorie-free sweetener from Paraguay). It is surprising to think that I even know about these things, but you learn to watch and listen like crazy to others who have food intolerances.

    I walked over 5 miles this morning, after sleeping 9 hours last night. That is incredible when I think about how little I used to sleep before this wonderful diet. Do I miss all those other foods? I don't, because I realize how bad I would feel if I put them into my body. Within 15 minutes I would feel lousy.

    Here is one last thought: Eat fruit in the morning, only one fruit. Wait two hours before eating another fruit or wait three hours before going on to starches; eat proteins last. Don't mix fruit and starches or fruit, starches and protein. Digestion returns! If you're ever glutened, stop eating and start drinking water or herbal tea. The next morning eat pineapple, strawberries, papaya, kiwi or mangoes. I read that this digests what you ate the day before, and it is true. I've tried it (The Beverly Hills Diet by Judith Mazel I think). Best wishes. You can email me at Welda@att.net if you like. Welda


  21. Hi Tori,

    I'm here to reassure you that your life will get increasingly better, and you will feel increasingly healthy. I'm 63 and have had Celiac apparently all my life, but it took years to diagnose, since the term Celiac was considered relatively rare until a few years ago. I can empathize with your concerns.

    About eating out: I almost always take food with me wherever I go. It beats going somewhere and being hungry. Saturday at Legoland I found green salad with Italian dressing, along with some fries, and was so happy. Then when the salad came it had croutons on it. Duh! I explained to the waitress that I was allergic to croutons and she immediately had another salad for me. I gave her a big tip and we all ended up happy. That's how easy it can be. For an unexpected birthday dinner for my grandson that night I hit Costco and bought corn tortillas, refried beans and green chiles. While the rest of the family ate pizza I ate my selections. My family has learned that I will always take care of my own menu, so they don't have to be responsible for me.

    A lot of Mexican Restaurants are friendly places, since we can indulge in corn tortillas, refried beans, tamales, enchiladas, salsa, salads, etc., all without cheese for me (I have to avoid all grains, all milk & dairy, egg whites & yeast, and I recently stopped eating meat as well--I feel great). Most places have baked potatoes, green salad, vegetables, and when I used to eat meat I would always just order hamburgers and hot dogs and other things without the bread. You can make a wrap with lettuce and pick the foods up. It's easy.

    My suggestion is to list all the restaurants where you used to eat and all the foods you used to enjoy and then get a list of as many vegetables, fruits, nuts & seeds, soy products, corn products, and potato products as you can find and coose the substitutions you are allowed to eat. Henry's labels their gluten free products, and Trader Joe's identifies gluten free products in a flyer. This is a good time for expanding your thinking, for being inventive and creative, for being kind and gentle with yourself and with others.

    Do you cook much at home? With two little kids I'll bet you do. Have they been tested yet? I helped raise my grandson and we learned that he also has Celiac, so I learned a lot when I was his primary daycare provider. We used Enterolab.com to have a home test that diagnosed his intolerances to all grains and all milk & dairy. If you'd like to email me (Welda@att.net) I would be happy to share with you all the details of how our family has adjusted to Celiac (my sister also has it). I wish you health and happiness! Welda


  22. Hi,

    I've learned that once you realize you've been glutened, the best recourse is to just stop eating, find a spot to relax, maybe read a good book or listen to soothing music, and sip soothing tea. The sooner you can let the gluten move through your digestive system the better.

    The following morning, try eating fresh pineapple only. It digests any gluten and moves it right out of your body. I often eat fresh pineapple for breakfast and lunch if I feel clogged up. Then try waiting 3 hours before you eat again, and ingest only starchy foods (no fruit or protein). Three hours after that eat your protein. The key is to read each and every label and list of ingredients, then take note of your feelings after eating each and every meal. Not mixing fruit with starches, or starches or fruit with protein, makes life a lot easier.

    Have you been told that casein and whey are ingredients you should avoid, as well as maltodextrin and modified food starch? I have to avoid all grains, all milk & dairy, egg whites, yeast and meat, and it has taken years to learn this, usually the hard way, so I hope that you will be blessed to realize quickly how very good you feel when you eat the right foods. Best wishes. Welda


  23. Hi,

    I just wanted to offer a few words of encouragement, since I can feel how frustrated and sad you probably are at learning you have Celiac. I had Asthma from the age of 8 and never realized that it became worse after I ingested certain foods. That is until I started eliminating certain foods in my thirties and seeing that I would improve. I finally learned about six years ago that the disease is called Celiac and that I have it. Now at age 63 I have been able to get on a strict vegan diet, avoiding all grains, all milk & dairy, egg whites, yeast, and meat. At five feet tall I now weigh 100 pounds, and by using a breathing machine and minimal medication, I am breathing well, so all those years of suffering are but a dim memory, as is the weight control issue with which I had struggled for so long. Guess what? I sleep 8-10 hours a night and walk the treadmill each morning from 3-6 miles. Life is good.

    It took a long time to be able to diagnose each and every food or additive which affected my life, but the effort was worth it, and along the way I was able to read a lot of books about healthy nutrition, so that was good too. I wish you well in your quest for good health. Keep on going on! Welda


  24. Hi,

    I handled some of the preparations for our 45th high school reunion last Summer, and since I am intolerant of all grains, all milk and dairy, egg whites and yeast, I contacted only restaurants for catering that I knew would be mostly "safe." The Saturday night buffet was Greek Chicken with salad, rice, beans and rolls, and since I had eaten there I knew that everything except the bread was gluten-free. Sunday Lunch was Wrangler Barbecue, and since I had eaten there many times I knew that the beef, ham, cole slaw and beans were safe, though the rolls had to be avoided. I've found that most people with food allergies know what to avoid and what to go for, so that makes the buffet dilemma easier. That is a good idea though to label foods as "Gluten-Free," an idea that I have found to be most helpful at the health food store I frequent. My former daughter-in-law used to create little flags using straws and construction paper, and that would certainly make life easier for those who have already suffered so much because of their food intolerances. Welda