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Nanny Jo

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About Nanny Jo

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  1. I agree with Guest in Pgh, recipe looks delicious, but tortillas looked like they have been fried and recipe does not not include any info on that.
  2. The favorite gluten-free bread of our grandson is Gluten Free French Bread from www.recipezaar/180306: 2 c. white rice flour 1 c. tapioca starch 1 Tblsp. xanthan gum 1 1/2 tsp. salt 2 Tblsp. sugar (divided) 1 1/2 c. lukewarm water 2 Tblsp. fast acting yeast 2 Tblsp. veg.oil 3 egg whites, slightly beaten 1 tsp. vinegar Mix dry ingredients & 1 Tblsp. sugar in large bowl of heavy duty mixer. Dissolve 1 Tblsp. sugar in water and add yeast. Wait until mixture foams slightly, then blend into dry ingredients. Add oil, egg whites, and vinegar. Beat on HI for 3 minutes. Spoon into large bread pan (I use silicone pan). Slash diagonally every 2". Cover with plastic wrap which has been coated/sprayed with oil or margarine. Let rise in warm place (like oven with light on) until double in bulk - 20-25 minutes. Preheat over to 400F degrees. Bake about 50 minutes (covering with aluminum foil after 10-15 min. to keep from browning too much). Bread will sound hollow and test about 208F degrees on quick read thermometer. Remove from pan to cooling rack. Brush crust with margarine. I buy rice four, tapioca and potato starch at Oriental market which is much less expensive. This bread is best the first 2-3 days. After that I wrap individual slices in plastic wrap and put in plastic storage container and freeze. It's great eating plain, toasted, grilled, etc.
  3. I agree that baking your own bread is the least expensive and more satisfying way to go. Go to recipezaar.com and look for gluten-free Flax Bread and gluten-free French Bread. We like both of these breads and they are not difficult to make. We make the French Bread in a silicone bread pan which is a little larger than the regular size. We have also made it on a cookie sheet if you want it thinner. Oriental/Asian markets are the least expensive places to purchase rice, potato, sweet rice, and tapioca flours. Other flours I usually just buy at the supermarket. The bread is especially good the first 2-3 days, but after that we freeze the individual slices. Hope this helps you.
  4. Nanny Jo

    gluten-free Icing

    We use Pillsbury frosting - most of them are gluten-free. I wrote to Duncan Hines a few years ago asking about their frostings and got a "we could care less" reply, so I don't even look at their products. I think some of the Betty Crocker frostings are gluten-free, but just read the label. With the new truth in labeling it's much easier to tell if they are gluten free.
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