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ciamarie

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About ciamarie

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    http://www.renewmind.net

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  • Gender
    Female
  • Interests
    baking, computers, Debian Linux, politics
  • Location
    state of Washington, USA

  1. When I saw asthma, I thought you may also have an issue with sulfites (which is a type of preservative / food additive). Also, if your digestion is having issues due to ncgi or celiac, etc. then sometimes raw fruits and veggies can cause problems. They're a bit harder to digest. Same goes for chickpeas, they're higher in fiber than other beans.

     

    Also, if you're eating canned chickpeas, they most likely have added sulfites. I cook beans on a pretty regular basis, after soaking for several hours. I usually use a pressure cooker, and today I'm going to make some in my new crock pot. The kinds of beans I eat most are great northern and navy beans. I've recently added black beans, too. I'm going to re-test pinto beans again soon. I also avoid all soy.

     

    Here's a link that's a good starting place for sulfite information: http://www.readingtarget.com/nosulfites/


  2. I can't add anything to mushroom's excellent answer, except my own opinion would be to possibly challenge long enough to get a dermatologist biopsy for DH, but forget trying to get a biopsy by GI. I suspect if you try to go the GI route, you'll be one very miserable person long before enough intestinal damage is done. Especially since you said when you challenged for a week, the rash was all over. Many of us take much more than 1 weekend to get over it.


  3. I've actually been doing pretty good, thankfully! Even itching behind the knees is a rare thing for the last couple of weeks. I think I may be absorbing iodine better. For salt, I've been using the Morton canning & pickling salt. It has NO additives, not even for anti-caking. I quit sea salt for a while, went back to it for a bit and think I had some issues with it. Otherwise I do eat salted butter and eggs with yolks just fine. But I did have some issues with 1 brand of butter I tried, so there was something in there that bothered my system.

    I did want to add that I'm still avoiding the sulfites, as well as MSG type ingredients. That helped a ton, also.


  4. Part of the answer depends on whether you'll be using an all-in-one gluten-free flour mix, or buying individual flours. I usually stick with rice flour, tapioca starch / flour (in the case of tapioca they're interchangeable terms) and buckwheat. I'm going to be trying millet flour soon too. At any rate, starting with a mix like Pamela's might be the best bet to start.

    My 2nd tip would be to make just 1/2 or 1/3 of the recipe as a test, since 3 cups of flour and 2 cups of sugar is a lot for a cake. It would not be good to be disappointed with it. I know carrot cakes usually use a lot of oil, so scouting out a gluten-free carrot cake recipe might give you some clues on the right proportions. I would suspect you'd want to reduce the oil some for using gluten-free flours with this recipe.

    Lastly, I posted a recipe for applesauce cake a little while back you might want to try:

    https://www.celiac.com/forums/topic/96322-applesauce-cake/


  5. Hi, welcome to the forum. Yes, if you have DH then you have celiac disease. I think it's wonderful that you found a dermatologist that suspected DH and did a biopsy -- apparently that's a rarity. I hope he did the biopsy from skin right next to the blister and not directly on it?

    As to your question about being dx later in life, it's not uncommon; especially if you didn't or don't have the 'classic' symptoms. Even those with the classic symptoms sometimes have a hard time being diagnosed. Those of us with DH usually have fewer of the GI symptoms, though looking back I did have my moments, they were uncommon. Keep us posted on the results of the biopsy. Also be sure to look for the thread about itch relief for some helpful suggestions.


  6. OMG! I get this. I thought it was just weird hives...just as itchy as hives. Is iodine (besides gluten) the answer?

    For some of us, yes. I also had to cut out MSG and all the msg 'alias' ingredients I didn't know about, as well as sulfites. Some folks on here had to go with low salicylates, so we're all a bit different. If or when you go low iodine, don't cut it out for more than maybe a couple of months? I'm not an expert... but it is a necessary mineral. As we heal, our body can process it better too.

    I'd start with the gluten-free and possibly low iodine, then keep a food diary to see what sorts of other things may cause an issue for you. Then you can come back here with questions or for some research. Hope you stop itching soon!

    Edited to add: If you want a diagnosis, don't start a gluten-free diet until you get a DH biopsy done or blood tests done or whatever testing your doctor agrees to do. Sorry, I should have put that up front.


  7. Hang in there! It does get terribly frustrating sometimes, but you'll get through it. My non-expert suggestion would be to eat what you can, and if that means only eating meat and possibly rice for a few days, then do that. When you say you may have problems with rice, is that brown rice, white rice or both? Brown might be a bit harder to digest, however if you're also reacting to corn products you may want to try rinsing white rice before you cook it. That will remove the added nutrients, because apparently they're applied by way of something derived from corn. Dextrose perhaps?

    Also, try very well cooked veggies such as carrots, green beans, squash and possibly peas. I'm not sure how any of those would fit with the fructose issues, though.


  8. I've seen several people on here mention that they were positive on biopsy, but negative on blood tests. Also, if you have or can get the actual blood test results with reference ranges, etc. and post them here some of those who are more familiar may have some input. In particular, it would be good to know which tests were part of the 'panel'.

    And welcome to the forums!


  9. My suggestion would be to eat only unprocessed foods, because it may be some additives that are causing you some of the problems. And keeping a food diary is probably a good idea too. If you have veggies, make sure they're well-cooked. Also, it may be something like soy or dairy is the culprit, so go a day or 2 or a week without either of those ingredients, then test only 1 of them at a time.

    Hope you figure it out soon, having a reaction to everything isn't much fun.


  10. Actually, I had a rash on the back of my upper arms ever since I can remember, and I don't recall if it used to itch, but basically it didn't. However, about 2-3 months after starting a gluten-free diet, the back of my arms are clear! No rash! I didn't expect that at all.

    They were basically small red bumps, and didn't seem to grow larger or smaller or anything. They were just there... and now they're gone. :D


  11. It may be part of the healing process, I sometimes get random itchy spots for no apparent reason. However, they itch for a few minutes or maybe the afternoon / evening and then they're gone. On the other hand, I quit drinking almond milk and similar items long ago, due to the carageenan and natural flavors since I noticed MSG type additives as well as sulfites cause problems for my skin, in addition to gluten.

    So, since it appears to be spreading, I'd be sure to note it in your food diary and maybe try eliminating anything new you've had in the last couple of days and see what happens. If you have some lotion with tea tree oil, that might help soothe the itch.


  12. I found 2 pages that gave me nutrition information (calories, etc.) but neither had the ingredients for this yogurt. I avoid all except plain yogurt due to 'natural flavors'. They may or may not be gluten-free, but they likely contain free glutamates (i.e. very close to MSG) which bother me. I recently found a plain yogurt that I used to like, turns out it also has pectin added so I didn't get it since I didn't feel like experimenting.


  13. Here's a long article about the movie:

    http://rawfoodsos.co...w-and-critique/

    I haven't read the whole thing, but apparently the science in the movie is sometimes sketchy.

    And here's an article that has tons of links to other articles that discuss the bad conclusions drawn by the vegetarian crowd in relation to The China Study, which is apparently at least part of the basis for the movie's conclusions: http://freetheanimal...wn-roundup.html


  14. I've discovered I also have to avoid sulfites (and msg), and one of the things some of the items on the sulfite 'avoid' list do to me is make me very tired, along with brain fog. I'm basically not taking any supplements except liquid iodine drops that only have purified water as another ingredient. I sometimes take a magnesium supplement, and I have a couple of multivitamins to test again sometime soon.

    However, the supplement ingredients I avoid are: gelatin capsule and maltodextrin or any starches. They may be gluten-free, but they make me tired. So my suggestion would be to ditch all supplements for a few days to a week, then test them 1 at a time, about 2 days apart to note any reactions.


  15. Since I'm one of those Linux / opensource 'geeks', I've been using something called Zim wiki and there's a windows download link available here: http://www.zim-wiki.org/downloads.html

    Before that I was using Red Notebook which is available here: http://rednotebook.sourceforge.net/

    I've been keeping 2 weeks' worth of entries on 1 calendar page, with the date and then how I feel in the morning (or through the day), then skip a couple lines and note what I eat for breakfast; lunch; dinner including any supplements. I don't note my tea with stevia, unless I'm trying a different type of tea (I gave up on that after a bad reaction to some earl grey tea). I also abbreviate some things, like bw for buckwheat, etc.

    With rednotebook, I used it as a sort of journal for other things too, and tagged my food entries under 'food diary'. Then they upgraded and changed how they handled tags, which annoyed me greatly so I went back to Zim.

    Then, it's really easy to search for a particular food item or symptom and go to that day and to see how I felt the next day or 2nd day after.


  16. I don't know what your diet is at the moment, but I wouldn't rule out it still being a diet issue as others have noted. 2 things I thought of when reading your post were either A.) Nightshades (i.e. potatoes, all peppers, tomatoes) or B.) GMO foods. In the genetic roulette movie, it showed that some doctors prescribe a GMO free diet and get good results.

    If you're not familiar with that issue, there is a GMO free shopping guide available: http://www.nongmoshoppingguide.com/


  17. I would also suggest that you get printed copies of all test results, and reference ranges for the blood tests and post them here. Those who are knowledeable about such things will help decipher them. It's possible he's on the border line, or it shows 'equivocal' or something like that, but it could easily be a positive when taken with the biopsy results. It's also possible that it wasn't a complete 'celiac panel', I forget what the previous messages said in that respect.

    It sounds like you're on the right track, don't get too discouraged. :)


  18. It's allegedly a Republic, not a democracy! Sheesh. At any rate, we have mail-in voting in Washington state, and we can also drop off ballots at most local libraries to go into a special ballot drop box. I dropped mine off yesterday, and lots of other people were doing the same.

    Given the potential fraud with the electronic voting machines, I think mail-in is probably a little better. I do miss going to a regular polling place, though...


  19. If you have only been eating gluten-free for 2 weeks, then if you start back eating gluten now I'd suspect you should be fine for testing by the time you get in to get tested, if it's in the range of 2-3 weeks out. If it's at least a month or more out that would probably be better, just in case. That is just my not expert opinion from having read a lot of others' experiences.

    In addition to the excellent advice from GFinDC, that is.