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zamm0

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  1. Considering changing your workout to running only. It's the single most powerful exercise to loose weight and it worked well for me and my friends. Good luck and think positive!

    Or cycling - because it's low impact and you'll be able to do more of it. Running is better for losing weight as weight-bearing but easy to get injured. If I were you I'd mix the two.


  2. Went to see a dietician last week and the one thing she picked up on was calcium supplementation now that I've cut right back on dairy (lactose was giving me gastric pain which was higher up than my "gluten pain"). She suggested 1500mg a day but it's pretty hard to hit that with normal diet - I eat alot of sardines and there is quite a bit of calcium in those among lots of other good stuff. Are there any risks with taking calcium supplements? Was just thinking about possible kidney issues? Many thanks people....


  3. New here and I wanted to just ask if any of you have had issues with exercise, especially those of you who used to be athletic and then "came down" with celiac/gluten intolerance. When I was 21 I was very active, fit, had a great amount of energy and could exercise quite a bit, running for about an hour everyday and lifting weights. Then I came down with feeling fatigued, and feeling worse after exercise, feeling like my body was inflamed. I have been tested for lupus, RA, and several other autoimmune disorders and come out that they are negative. The only test to be positive/elevated ever was the deamidated gliadin peptide IgG. I miss exercising so much, but it seems like when I do, my body reacts negatively. Has anyone ever experienced this? Fatigue after exercise, pain in joints, lack of endurance and feeling like your body gets inflamed afterwards? I am new to the gluten-free diet, only been seriously on it for a day and a half so I haven't seen any major improvements in symptoms yet. Thanks in advance.

    I think that's the key point and that you need to give things a few months, possibly even a year or two. I get the impression you are still fairly young? Plenty of time to get fit again and achieve all those goals.


  4. An opposing challenge to this remark. :) When time permits, I'll review some of the topics/post in the major DH heading.

    I pondered over DH vs heat rash for a long time. No Doc ever Dx'ed me for DH. I reviewed/compared some photos on the internet and it can be nasty stuff. The rash(almost look the same) varies in intensity and body location for both. Last summer, I did get a itchy/blustery rash doing yard work. Many summers have gone by without any rashes.The Doc said it was poison ivy( grown from the neighbors side) and treated it with oral and topical corticosteroids. I used Zyrtec for the itching.

    When I worked out(very intensely to lose weight) all of 2012, I didn't break out in a rash when sweating. In my case, I wonder what else( beside gluten sensitivity) can trigger a DH rash. My GFD is working well over the years. By reference, DH is treated with dapsone ( to relieve itching). Do you take this Rx for treatment?

    Firstly, I will say that the Elocon corticosteroid I use works brilliantly. However, I don't think very long term use is ideal so I'm trying to wean myself off of it - now trying to use it once a week and very very sparingly. While ice packs relieve the itchiness I would say only the Elocon gets rid of it without waiting a long time for it to go on it's own. I believe I read somewhere Dapsone affects red blood cell production so a no-no for anyone wanting performance.

    As long as you are well nourished no reason not to exercise to your limits ( and every reason to exercise to your limits )

    This is increasingly the message people are telling me, other than my parents - but I guess that's to be expected :-)


  5. Another point I'd like to make to do with DH - and I think it's more pertinent to put it here than in the DH forum. One of things that does make DH worse is heat and sweat....so here in the UK it's seldom that warm so I've found going out on bike as per usual gets my mind off the DH and as long as you don't overdress the heat is not an issue. Same with indoor riding on my trainer....now I just ensure I don't wear a t-shirt on top and turn the fan in front of me up an extra notch and the DH feels much better i.e. it's not an issue AT ALL in this situation. Sometimes this is even one more reason to do some training. So...win-win.


  6. Hello people. I have heard colostrum can help heal the gut and can be used as a preventative measure prior to exercise. My questions are:

    1. has anyone had good/bad experiences with using it?

    2. does it contain the same components as regular milk that cause many people to abstain or reduce milk intake during early stages of gut healing? fwiw i am 5 months gluten-free and have found less gastric distress from reducing milk intake but don't want to use colostrum if it brings back those symptoms.

    Thanks.


  7. Exercise is good for you and, unless it is really wiping you out after a work-out, just keep doing what you feel like doing.

    At no point have I found any difference in how I feel after working out pre or post diagnosis. The problem is the more you read on what can affect the gut integrity the more you think moderation is imperative. I've just been reading about 'Leaky Gut Syndrome' and how being Celiac fits within that context. It would appear that if you are doing absolutely everything to maximise gut healing only a small amount of quite easy exercise is best, and activities that don't jarr the body are better i.e. running ain't good, cycling better. I suppose it is up to each individual to assess the best course of action FOR THEM. Personally, I think my plan will be to continue exercising but only do around 50% of my normal load, limit any particularly high intensity riding, and re-assess in a few months - particularly when I get a new blood test.


  8. With that intense training, I'd be more concerned with your lipid numbers. I'm 67 and fought celiac disease for 30 years. My WBC's are close to yours (last 2 yrs- 4.4, 4.9, 3.7 low, 4.2, and 3.6 low; neutrophils, all within range). My lipids are OK. I did weight training during 2012. But had to stop due to recent headaches. Need to determine source(celiac disease or exercise). Your body will tell you when its time to slow down with age. I was ok until 2007(got IBS/GERD) and now headaches (late 2012).

    I signed up for a 5K Warrior Dash with obstacles race, for Aug 3. I'm now concentrating on walk/jog intervals to determine my pace. Need to check with Doc for any bone issues since left hip hurts a little after about 5 minutes jogging. This comes and goes.

    Due err on the side of caution.

    Cheers for the reply. This is the problem though isn't it if you've been used to and enjoyed pushing yourself to see what you can do? My tests don't show lipids but I will bear in mind - I try to eat oily fish at least 3 times a week and other good fat sources too. FWIW - b12/folate are fine and iron is on it's way up so obviously absorbing more (63>77 in 4 months). I think my plan is to keep training at my off season levels for a couple more months until I can get a follow up blood test, and effectively delay racing by a few months. I'll take it from there....

    P.S. I've also got a suspicion that the corticosteroid cream Elocon used for DH for the last few years may've played a role in WBC suppression. Just a theory. As per usual with all this it's so hard to look for cause/effect relationships so you can act.


  9. Hi there, diagnosed 4 months ago and been gluten-free ever since. Only ever had mild symptoms including DH. I've been fairly physically fit all my life but last 3 years I've cycled competitively. This has involved intense training and racing. Often >95% of max heart rate and up to 15hours a week of training. I feel absolutely fine and 2012 was my best year ever BUT I know from a bloodtest my white blood cell count is down (neutrophils) over this 3 year period from 5 to 3.7. My question is - is it perhaps time to call it day with this sort of level of regime and take a more modest approach?? Intense exercise does affect the immune system but whether this should stop me doing what I love is up for debate.


  10. Yes, could be. Infact I have DH and those pictures look very similar. I've had it for >2 years and it pre-dated my Celiac diagnosis by almost as much. Since going gluten-free four months ago I've now tested negatively for Celiacs i.e. the diet is working. I still have DH though, it's not too bad - elocon used very sparingly calms it down pretty well. I get it mainly on top of my back, shoulder, and abdomen at the sides, and head/face much more mildly. Used to get it on the legs too but not now for some reason.


  11. Ok, so had the positive Celiac diagnosis from a blood test around 4 months ago. I decided i needed a follow up blood test as want to see how I'm doing (possibly a bit early I know). My ferritin was low so was pleased to see that has responded to supplementation and I note B12 and folate are fine. Celiac antibodies are now negative. However, red blood cell count and white blood cell (neutrophils ONLY) counts were down quite a bit and are now jus outside the 'normal' statistical range. Cue the obligatory googling but although wbc reduction appears to be common in celiacs (assume more are used up trying to react to any ongoing inflammation although this should be reducing as am on the gluten-free diet) rbc reduction appears less common. 2 weeks before my blood test I *did* have what I think was a brief stomach virus. Any ideas?

    FWIW the intestine pain I had has now largely gone altough I regularly get indigestion type dull ache just below the rib cage - feels better when I eat or take antacids. H pylori or peptic ulcer test?

    Paul.


  12. Have to say I have noticed less of a trend for reaction (and it is always so mild anyway with me) with my own coffee made in a cafetiere. I use Starbucks Verona blend from Asda with a little milk. I am more likely to get a reaction when buying a coffee out and particularly with ones with a higher milk content such as lattes and cappucinos (lactose issue rather than direct gluten issue?), being mindful not to add any 'sprinkles'. Haven't braved the flavoured coffees from such chains such as mochas - unsure as whether this may be a step too far with gluten in the flavouring. A dietician I saw earlier today recommended decaf for a few months (was diagnosed 6 weeks ago).

    Sorry this is only really applicable for UK readers but here goes and just for info really:

    1. Tried two Costa Mochas over the last two days and did not get a reaction and felt fine (their 'Flat White' coffees have given me a mild lactose-like reaction). See here for details:

    http://www.costa.co.uk/media/6271/allergy.pdf

    2. For the Cafe Nero chain see here for gluten details for their drinks (note: mocha here has wheat) unlike Costa: http://www.caffenero.../hotdrinks.aspx


  13. Have to say I have noticed less of a trend for reaction (and it is always so mild anyway with me) with my own coffee made in a cafetiere. I use Starbucks Verona blend from Asda with a little milk. I am more likely to get a reaction when buying a coffee out and particularly with ones with a higher milk content such as lattes and cappucinos (lactose issue rather than direct gluten issue?), being mindful not to add any 'sprinkles'. Haven't braved the flavoured coffees from such chains such as mochas - unsure as whether this may be a step too far with gluten in the flavouring. A dietician I saw earlier today recommended decaf for a few months (was diagnosed 6 weeks ago).


  14. I'm glad this one has been dug up. The Celiac organisation Food Directory List says in the UK that Tesco own-brand Rice Krispies are within 20ppm. I've been eating them and my symptoms are quite mild anyway so hard to detect whether they are OK or not. My instinct is that Asda own brand Cornflakes are more innocuous FWIW. The problem with cereal in the 'Free From" isles of supermarkets is a) the packets are tiny and b ) they're very expensive, so was quite keen to work out which 'normal' products are OK.


  15. Diagnosed Celiac about 6 weeks ago and have always been a big bread eater. Tried a range of brands from the big four UK supermarkets - the Genius brand was about the best. However, there is a new king for me - Glutafin brown sliced is even better. I will say though that in my limited experience the Genius branded goods are excellent - their savoury pies for example, while not a patch on a (gluten containing AFAIK) Pukka pie, are pretty good.