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racheltom

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About racheltom

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  1. Hello everyone,

    My daughter was diagnosed with celiac just after her 2nd birthday.  She is now almost 4 and is doing very well on the gluten free diet - a very healthy kid!  We have no other family history of this, and now my son just turned one, and he has been having diahrea for a few weeks.  (Lots of undigested food in his diapers).  It seems quite early for him to be showing symptoms if he has celiac disease... am I wrong?  We are quite suspicious, so I've put him on a gluten free diet for a few days to see if it makes a difference and it hasn't so far.   It has been 4 days.   How long should I try this to determine if it makes a difference?  If it isn't gluten, he may be having a dairy intolerance or something else?  (By the way I know that if we eventually request testing we will need him to eat gluten regularly prior to the test... just trying to determine if diet helps him at this point). 

     

    Thanks all. -Rachel


  2. I am "playdough mom" at my son's preschool! I provide a fresh batch of gluten free playdough to his preschool every two weeks. The teachers love the donation of time and supplies, and I don't have to think twice about my son getting glutened via playdough. I couldn't tolerate gluten playdough in his classroom. All those gluteny little hands touching all the furniture, books, art supplies, my son etc. I don't see how my son would be able to avoid getting glutened in those conditions. Making a batch of homemade gluten free playdough is just as easy as regular playdough, and once you do it a couple of times you'll have it nailed.

    I am "playdough mom" at my son's preschool!  I provide a fresh batch of gluten free playdough to his preschool every two weeks. The teachers love the donation of time and supplies, and I don't have to think twice about my son getting glutened via playdough.  I couldn't tolerate gluten playdough in his classroom. All those gluteny little hands touching all the furniture, books, art supplies, my son etc.  I don't see how my son would be able to avoid getting glutened in those conditions. Making a batch of homemade gluten free playdough is just as easy as regular playdough, and once you do it a couple of times you'll have it nailed.

    Hi Annie, thanks for your reply. I have another question... I Know I probably sound like a cheapskate but I feel like the school should provide the play doh. It is so generous of you to provide it! We pay an arm and a leg for full day pre school so I feel like I shouldn't have to also provide play doh. I realize its not that much money to make it at home but I guess it's just the idea of it. By the way can you share your recipe?

  3. My 3 year old is a healthy eater and eats a lot of raw veggies, fresh fruits, etc.  She is also a good meat eater.  Since her celiac diagnosis, we have gotten into a bad habit of eating the processed gluten free crackers/pretzels for snacks. I'd like to replace these with protein based snacks.  Any ideas? I've tried to sell her on almonds but she's not interested (even almonds/raisins/peanuts as a "trail mix" but no luck).  She does occasionally have peanut butter spread on apples as a snack.  I'm looking for ideas of what to send to daycare/preschool that can be easily snacked on without preparation. 

    Has anyone had luck with yogurt?  I hate to buy the flavored yogurt since it has so much sugar… what is a good way to flavor the plain yogurt?  Other protein based snack ideas? 

    Thanks! 


  4. Hi everyone, 

    My 3 year old was diagnosed one year ago and so far so good.  She is gaining weight and takes pride in telling everyone "I eat gluten free!"   :)   She has had two isolated severe reactions where she vomited  after accidentally eating gluten.  But we are careful with her diet and this hasn't happened since.

     

    She is starting preschool soon.  At her current daycare, she occasionally plays with play doh.  I have told her daycare provider that it is okay for her to play with it as long as she is very careful to make sure she doesn't put it in her mouth.  The caregiver also knows it is extremely important that she wash her hands immediately after play doh.  At her new preschool there will be several teachers in and out of the classroom and I'm concerned about whether I should start sending in special gluten-free play doh.  Has anyone had a child have a reaction from playing with play doh?  I'm sure the adults will do everything they can to keep her safe/healthy but you never know what might happen if there is a new teacher or someone is covering someone else's class, etc.  

     

    For what its worth, my daughter is not the type to put things in her mouth… she never was even as a young toddler.  I know it could still happen, of course.  

     

    Any thoughts or experiences? 


  5. Without a diagnosis, schools, hospitals, dormitories, etc do not have to provide gluten-free foods or excuse the child from activities like baking in 6 th grade. When she is older, she may think " I don't have a diagnosis, I'll eat what I want."

    I think it would be easier to keep her eating gluten for 3 more weeks and get a real diagnosis. You won't want to do it when she is 5 to get a diagnosis for school or let her gluten herself for a few years as a young adult.

     

    You are right. Thank you. I'm just not looking forward to watching her go through an endoscopy at only 2.  :(  


  6. if it were me, I would keep her on a regular diet and get a new doctor.  Maybe the GI doctor understands Celiac testing better?  Low IGA means that the common blood tests, the IGA versions,  will not work.  

     

    http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/archives/faq/how-common-is-iga-deficiency-in-those-with-celiac-disease

     

    Thanks for the reply.  This is a GI Specialist that gave us this suggestion of doing the endoscopy, but keeping gluten in the diet.  I just feel icky continuing to give her gluten in her diet when she may be getting sick from it.  Hope this makes sense. 


  7. I'm looking for advice on navigating the process of getting a diagnosis.  My 2-year-old daughter has been having symptoms for about a month now (consistent diahrea and distended belly) and the specialist we saw said he is predicting (not diagnosing) celiac.  He wants to do an endoscopy which they weren't able to schedule this procedure until mid-January.  The doctor does not want me to change her diet in the mean time, because he doesn't want the results of the endoscopy to be invalid.  Hope this makes sense.  I've so far ignored his advice and have been gluten-free with her for 5 days now.  No change in her symptoms yet of course, but we're hoping.  Do we cancel the endoscopy and just keep going with the diet?  Do we keep giving her gluten and do the procedure?  Any advice?  The blood test they did showed a low level of IGA which the doctor said indicates celiac.  Do we need to do the endoscopy in order to get an official diagnosis?  What if we just keep going with the diet to see if we get results?  Is there some advantage to having an official diagnosis, for example when she starts school in a few years?