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NicoleAJ

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NicoleAJ last won the day on June 28 2019

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About NicoleAJ

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  1. I had a student last semester in my class that hid his Crohn's diagnosis from the army so that he could continue his officer training. Of course Crohns is a disease that requires much medication and, in some cases, frequent surgery. Where celiac is controllable by diet, they might have some provisions for you--I agree that checking with your commanding officer would be a good idea, and I second the gratitude for what you're doing for our country.


  2. Someone can correct me if I'm wrong, but the unconsecrated host is just a food product and can be eaten, but once it has become the body of Christ, that is when there are specific rules for how it can be consumed. I believe at the practice for my first communion that they gave us an unconsecrated host so that we wouldn't make a face during the ceremony when we realized its funny texture.


  3. Kimberly,

    I actually haven't seen glutenfree4me products at Nature's pantry--I might not have been looking hard enough. Nevertheless, their selection is unparalled in State College. They are located on Rte 26 (College Ave). If you are going from campus heading east on College Ave, they are on the right hand side 1 block before you reach 322 in a complex with a pool table store.

    Golden Wok is on the intersection of College Ave and Atherton, next to Zola and Taco Bell.


  4. I had ovarian cysts constantly before my diagnosis, and often they would burst, causing unbelievable pain that required high doses of narcotic painkiller from the doctor. My doctor prescribed hormonal contraceptive because you cannot develop a cyst if you are not ovulating. I've been on the ring for 4 years to prevent ovarian cysts, but when I get married in March, I'm planning starting natural family planning. I'm not sure if the cysts will return or not--this will be an experiment. Where is this info that you've found on celiacs and ovarian cysts? I'd really like to take a look at it. Thanks.


  5. Thank you all for your responses. The pyx sounds like a great solution. I know that I'll be receiving communion first, but I would like to avoid any potential problems. I'm not getting married in my own parish but rather in the church I attended in college (since my parents still live in Miami and are doing much of the planning), so the easier I can make it on the pastor, the better. I really appreciate all of the suggestions.


  6. I'm getting married next March in a Catholic church in Miami. For the last three years I have simply avoided taking communion, but for my wedding, I would like to receive communion. I've found the site for the Benedictine Sisters' low gluten host, and I was wondering, from those of you who have used it, how you avoid cc with your alternative host. I imagine there is a type of vessel approved for holding the host during the mass, so I was wondering where you might find one. I know similar issues have come up here in the past, but so often the topics turn to politics, and it is difficult to scan through to find the information. I really hope not to discuss the reasons why Canon law requires wheat, but I'd just like some info from fellow Catholics who use the low gluten hosts.


  7. Thank you everyone for your responses. I've actually scheduled my appointment with Dr. Rampertab on Sept 11th, so I'll let you know what I think.

    Lauren M--I'm sorry your experience was so bad at Hershey and hope that mine isn't equally disappointing.

    Dr. Fasano sounds great, but as a grad student, my insurance only covers doctors in the Penn State system, and it seems like Hershey is as good as it gets. Until I get a job as a professor, I'll have to do the best I can within the Penn State system.


  8. Amanda,

    Thanks for checking around on this doctor and for offering to volunteer directions advice--I'll definitely need that come September when I go to see the doctor.

    Stephanie,

    I just posted info on State College in the travel forum yesterday. Here's the link: http://www.glutenfreeforum.com/index.php?showtopic=35016

    What part of California do you live in? I'm going to be moving to San Luis Obispo next year because my fiance got a job as a professor at Cal Poly, but I will be spending a lot of time in the LA and San Diego areas if you have any suggestions. If you have any questions about State College, just PM me. I'm happy to talk about food issues or about the area in general.


  9. I'm unhappy with the three GIs I've seen in small town PA, and I was wondering if anyone has seen one of the GIs at Hershey medical center? As a PSU grad student, I'm eligible to go there for treatment, and I noticed on the website that Dr. Rampertab lists celiac and ulcerative colitis as her clinical interests. I'd love to hear if you have any feedback, good, bad, or indifferent. Thanks so much!

    Nicole


  10. I live in State College, and I would also recommend the Outback. I've only gotten sick there once, and ever since, I've just been more explicit about what I need from them. Downtown there's a Chinese restaurant called Golden Wok. Talk to the manager about the fact that you cannot have wheat or gluten--they will suggest either the chicken with mixed vegetables with white wine sauce, or if you're there at lunch, the chicken with baby spinach and tomatoes is also excellent (also in a white wine sauce). The Tavern, a restaurant downtown, is also excellent if you bring in a dining card and give them detailed instructions. Their steak can be made gluten free and their chicken with wild rice (although I always sub a baked potato for the wild rice). If you want a really upscale meal, go to the neighboring town of Bellefonte to the Gamble Mill Tavern--the wife of the owner has celiac, so they really know how to do gluten free, and always make an excellent and safe meal.

    As far as grocery stores, Weis is ok for gluten-free foods, Giant is good, Wegman's is better, and Nature's Pantry, an independently owned natural food store, is the best (they carry kinnickinnick and lots of other goodies). If you have any questions, feel free to contact me.


  11. I, too, hope everything goes well with your son's surgery. I don't know the size of the hospital he's going to, but usually the nurses are very kind about making arrangements, particularly because they have enough medical training to know that people with celiac need to eat special things (even if they don't always know exactly what those things are). When I stayed in the hospital for a week in February, my boyfriend brought me individual packs of gluten free broth, and when I asked them to, the nurses would heat it up in their microwave. I'm sure they'll let you do the same thing there as well. Sorry I can't be more helpful about other foods--I was on clear liquids only though, you could probably do Thai soup bowls, those little gluten-free mexican rice bowls, Amy's meals, etc.


  12. I almost always have mucous. I go through long periods of time where the mucous is bloody as well. The doctors believed they found the source once, but it stopped responding to treatment. I actually feel quite healthy now in comparison to how I was doing a few months ago despite the fact that I'm losing copious amounts of blood. If it doesn't go away in a few weeks, I'd make an appointment, but I imagine it will fix itself. I always go back to normal after periods of much mucous. By the way, my mucous doesn't seem to have anything to do with cross contamination--I haven't eaten out for several months now, and I still have problems even with obsessive calls to companies, etc.


  13. Sponges are apt to absorb everything around them, including gluten. They're also inexpensive. I'd just have one color sponge for gluten-containing food and one color sponge for gluten free food, and make sure that the two never mate or cross pollinate. Why risk it?

    When I'm at other people's houses, I generally wash the dish I eat from with a clean paper towel to avoid this problem.


  14. I'm in the middle of doing an elimination diet for intolerances, and I have found a few things that cause GI symptoms, migraines, etc. However, my doctor laughed at the idea of an arrowroot allergy because he'd never heard of it before. I did all of the scratch tests, but they never found the source. I just know a few foods that list "spices" have caused my throat to swell to the uncomfortable point of needing to go to the ER. The only inkling that I have that it could be arrowroot is that there's a taste that I've noticed in certain foods and my mom said, "I don't know arrowroot doesn't seem to be in many things--maybe it's that." The last time I had to go to the hospital with a closing throat, arrowroot was not listed in the ingredients of the food I was eating, only "spices." If I knew for sure what my allergy was, then I certainly wouldn't try it, but it would be nice to pin it down so I don't have to spend my life avoiding all foods that list "spices" as an ingredient (since that includes most foods).


  15. I also found B12 shots were a miracle solution for my tingling extremities and tongue, extreme fatigue, joint pain, etc. My doctor prescribed 2 one cc shots per month, and my boyfriend usually gives them to me. I do all the prep and I push the plunger, but he just jabs the needle because the one time that I did it, I was too slow and it hurt a lot. He hates needles, but he does it for me anyway--that's love! I also found that the sublingual B12 doesn't work that well for me. With the shots, I feel instantly rejuvenated, but with the sublingual--I took them for a while without really noticing any effects either way.


  16. I am a huge fan of the Barefoot Contessa on the food network, and so I was really excited when I saw a display of Ina Garten's gluten free bread in my grocery store. The various whole grain varieties are baked in a gluten free facility. I bought the bread, but I haven't tried it quite yet--I freezed it to save it for later. You see, I have had anaphylactic reactions in the past to a certain ingredient in some baked products, and I'm not 100% certain, but I think it might be to arrowroot, and there is some arrowroot in this bread. I'm prepared to eat the bread with an epi-pen in one hand and a dose of benadryl in the other if it's as good as it looks. I'd do almost anything to taste Barefoot Contessa baked products, but if it's not that great, I don't want to risk it.


  17. I've had stylists in the past that have used dyes with wheat in them, and I've never had a problem with cross contamination. I'm just extra careful for the first few washings not to get the shampoo water into my mouth. That being said, I don't have DH--I imagine wheat hair products would be off limits for people with topical reactions. I wouldn't worry too much about it, but if you're concerned, just avoid the product in the future.


  18. I went to a Thai restaurant in San Jose on a street off of Market (either Hedding or 2nd). I'm sorry that I can't remember the name, but there were two Thai restaurants on that street. There was one on the corner of a business building, and they looked totally oblivious when I asked them about gluten, so we left. But then I went to the other Thai restaurant (that had a pergola built within the restaurant), and spoke with the waitress about my intolerances and showed her a restaurant card and they made me a delicious meal from which I had no side effects whatsoever. It's really just hit or miss, but I'd definitely go back to that place in the future.


  19. Good luck with all of your tests. I hope it goes well. I'm sure it's not a worst case scenario. I go through periods of severe rectal bleeding--to the point where I become anemic and sometimes all that comes out is blood. In the past, they attributed it to ulcerative colitis. But I was just hospitalized for a week in February, and after scoping me they said that I wasn't having an active outbreak and that I did not have internal hemorroids, so despite the fact that they found large amounts of blood in the samples, they have no idea what's causing it. I'm doing much better now, but I still have an occasional bloody day. I hope that they are able to come up with definitive answers for you and quick.