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Found 390 results

  1. Hi Yenny, I realize this was years ago, but I wanted to post to make myself feel better and also because I wasn’t satisfied with any other answers! I was previously severely gluten intolerant but not quite celiac. With a change in lifestyle, lower stress, healthier exercise program (less exercise) and a thyroidectemy, I have a smaller reaction to gluten than I used to. At the most stressful time in my life- emotional as well- I would want to cut out my stomach if I ate almost anything, now I can tolerate a beer or even bread with some bloating but almost no aches. It’s taken 5-8 years for the change to occur. I associate my personal indigestion and reactions to stress. My body was not able to cope. That being said, I just learned to fry chicken yesterday and was really proud with how it came out. I used almost 1.5 quarts of vegetable oil (canola oil) to do it and then poured most of the oil out and made gravy with the drippings. Eating the gravy got me really sick. I know for me this has nothing to do with gluten even though I used glutinous self rising flour to fry the chicken and thicken the gravy. I feel exactly like I drank two heaping tablespoons of canola oil and it’s just sitting in my stomach threatening to come up. It’s been 10 hours. I was able to sleep and I don’t think I’ll throw up (I almost wish I would), but I also don’t want my body processing this oil. I guess it will have to. Sounds so gross. This stuff must be so bad for you. It will be a while before I fry chicken again, or I will try another oil that doesn’t smoke.
  2. Whatever you do, DO NOT fail to mention that you are a Celiac if you have to go into your local hospital, even if it is not an admission for celiac disease:- It is dangerous not to mention to your nurse, or any nurse treating you, that you are a brittle celiac. I have had so many "accidental issues" - outbreaks of dermatitis herpetiformis and celiac disease issues. From the nurse that told me she would make me a "Nice cup of tea with some cheese crackers" when I could not get back to sleep one night. She returned with some crackers containing gluten, and when I asked about the cheese, which was a cheese not familiar to me, but not Blue Cheese, which I know contains gluten. I have had hot chocolate that contained flour, and I have also had some gravy over my potatoes but containing flour as a thickener. This was after three days in hospital. Many nurses, even R.N.'s do not know that Soya Sauce contains gluten, and I often wonder what is going on in the kitchen too. I know, and they say, that the longer you have celiac disease the more "brittle" you become - that means that you possibly cannot tolerate the 20 grams guideline of gluten in foods that they suggest. After 27 years of living with celiac disease I know I have become more brittle, or sensitive to gluten. Recently my husband purchased me a nutrition bar while waiting at the Pharmacy, On the front of the nutrition bar, at the top of the wrapper it had the official Celiac insignia, the wheat sheaf crossed out, so he purchased one, not thinking to check the ingredients. I enjoyed the first few bites of the bar when I decided to read the back label. Right at the top, and that usually means it is one of the bigger parts of the nutrition bar, it listed FLOUR. There are lots of flours, so I called the company, asked them about the "Gluten Free" insignia on the front of the bar package, and I mentioned the "Flour" noted in the ingredients, What often occurs when you call a company like this you are reaching their general reception and not the floor where they make the food article. So I was told they would call me back. I waited until the next day, when I could have told them that the nutrition bar did contain gluten. "Oh No," I was told, that is until I asked them what flour they were using in creating the bar. Big Silence. Referred to the General Manager of that Department, and she apologized because it was plain, not acceptable flour. She offered a refund which I refused, but told her that either the Wheat sheaf insignia had to be taken off the bar, or the flour had to change to a gluten free flour. Many people would accept the insignia as the "truth in advertising". I found out that it was not a "cheap Bar'. My husband would not tell me how much he paid for it, but I did find out that he had purchased two of them, one he was going to save until later. I told him to eat the second one because I had a stomach ache, some diarrhea and some DH sores. "All that from eating half the bar!?" He said. I told him that the longer you live with celiac disease the more sensitive you became to the smallest amounts of gluten. When I became a Celiac 27 years ago I used to gather some icing off the covered cardboard holder for the cake. Often, there is a LOT of nice gooey icing remaining on the cardboard, and some people take off the created roses off their piece of cake. Such a travesty for a sweet person's tooth! I woke up to this fact, but it took me over a year to realize where I was getting "Bitten" by the celiac bug, and it was all my fault. Since then I have resisted licking any icing from anywhere. Why they had to use flour in their icing I will never know, but I now manage to restrain myself with icing of any kind. I know it is not good for me, Number One. and Number Two, there is always crumbs attached to the icing, and the longer I suffer with celiac disease the more sensitive I become. We have only one Chinese Restaurant in Langley that we can trust, where the person that answers the telephone knows my husband and knows about celiac disease. They do not use MSG, and they tell me what has gluten in it, or flour if they do not understand the gluten part of the question. I do not use the cellulose pre-packaged Soya Sauce or Sesame Seeds or even the oil or the fortune cookie. You become your own detective, and I have learned from my earlier mistakes. This nutrition bar is the first time I have experienced something like the Logo issue and the ingredients. I will stick with reading the ingredients from hereon in. Vonnie Mostat
  3. Celiac.com 11/17/2020 - For people with celiac disease or gluten-intolerance, preparing a great gluten-free Thanksgiving feast has never been easier! For the first time ever, our gluten-free holiday food and dessert guide breaks it all down to a simple six-step process that guarantees success. We’ve got recipes, and links to great examples to help make your gluten-free thanksgiving and holiday celebrations the best ever. Here are the six steps to a perfect gluten-free Thanksgiving: Get a gluten-free holiday turkey Make great gluten-free stuffing Make great gluten-free gravy Make great gluten-free mashed potatoes and side dishes Make great gluten-free pies and desserts Serve gluten-free beer, wine, and booze Step One - Know Which Holiday Turkey is Gluten-Free Always make sure you buy a 100% gluten-free turkey for your holiday dinner. Don't assume your turkey is gluten-free. Numerous brands use gluten when processing their turkeys, so be sure to read the label, and to make sure there is no hidden gluten in any of the ingredients. Be especially cautious of any seasoning or gravy packets that come with otherwise gluten-free turkeys. If you’re not sure, check the ingredients and use our Gluten-Free Ingredient Lists to help you shop. If you’re wondering which brands of turkey are gluten-free, here’s a helpful list of gluten-free turkey brands. There are probably many other gluten-free brands, but be sure to check with your local store and read labels to be sure. Step Two - Here are Nine of Our Best Recipes for Great Gluten-free Stuffing Brown and Wild Rice Savory Mushroom Stuffing Rice Stuffing with Apples, Herbs, and Bacon Best Gluten-free Holiday Stuffing Recipe Chestnut, Wild Rice, and Pistachio Dressing Gluten-free Bread Stuffing with Herbs Gluten Free Holiday Stuffing Whole Foods Market Classic Gluten-free Stuffing Food Network Classic Gluten-free Stuffing Rudi’s Bakery Gluten-free Stuffing Mix Step Three - Serve Our Best Gluten-free Holiday Gravy This recipe makes a rich, savory gravy that will have all your holiday guests smiling! Makes enough gravy to serve about eight to ten people. Ingredients: 1 pound turkey giblets and neck 1½ quarts gluten-free chicken stock (low sodium is fine) 2 carrots, chopped 1 stalk celery, chopped 2 cups water 1½ cups pan drippings from roasted turkey 4 tablespoons of corn starch (approximate) Note: One tablespoon corn starch (¼-ounce) thickens one cup of liquid 2 tablespoons tomato paste 2 tablespoons cranberry sauce Salt and ground black pepper to taste Directions: While the turkey is roasting, place the turkey giblets and neck into a large saucepan with the carrots, celery, water, and chicken stock. Bring to a boil over medium heat, skim off any foam that rises to the top, reduce heat to low, and simmer the stock for 3 hours. Skim off the fat, strain the stock, and set aside. There should be about 4 cups of stock. Take carrots and celery and press through a strainer. Spoon strained carrots and celery into the stock and stir. Skim off and discard all but ¼ cup of the fat from the drippings in the roasting pan, and place the roasting pan over medium heat. Whisk in the corn starch, then heat and stir the corn starch mixture until it becomes pale golden brown, about 5 minutes. To avoid lumps, mix the starch with an equal amount of cold liquid until it forms a paste, then whisk it into the liquid you're trying to thicken. Once the thickener is added, cook it briefly to remove any starchy flavor. Don't overcook. Whisk in the stock and tomato paste; bring to a boil, simmer for 5 minutes, then whisk in the cranberry sauce. Simmer for 10 more minutes. Season to taste with salt and black pepper. Step Four - Make Great Gluten-Free Mashed Potatoes and Side Dishes Make these roasted garlic and chive mashed potatoes, and/or make easy, tasty gluten-free side dishes using Celiac.com's extensive listing of gluten-free recipes. Roasted Garlic Chive Mashed Potatoes Ingredients: 5 large russet potatoes (about 4½ pounds), peeled and cut into chunks 1 head of garlic (8-10 cloves), roasted 1 cup fresh cream, warmed ¾ cup (1½ sticks) butter, room temperature 1 teaspoon finely chopped fresh thyme 1 tablespoon finely chopped chives Salt and freshly ground black pepper Directions: Use a knife to cut off 1/4 to a 1/2 inch of the top of cloves, exposing the individual cloves of garlic. Drizzle lightly with olive oil, and wrap in foil. Place in oven at 400 degrees F, and roast for about 30 minutes, until cloves are soft. While garlic is roasting, wash and peel potatoes and cut into 6 chunks each. Add 1 teaspoon of salt to a large pot of water, add potatoes and boil until the potatoes are soft (about 25-30 minutes). When garlic is soft, remove from oven and allow to cool slightly. Once cool, place garlic on a plate and use a wooden spoon to squeeze roasted garlic out of the clove. When potatoes are done, strain them into a colander and let stand for 5 minutes to allow them to steam dry over the pot they were cooked in. Mash the potatoes. Stir in the cream, butter, roasted garlic, thyme and chives, and season to taste with salt and pepper. Serve immediately. Here’s a helpful list of Velveeta and Twenty Other Surprisingly Gluten-Free Foods. Step Five - Serve One of Our Most Loved Gluten-free Holiday Dessert Recipes Scroll down and follow the Pumpkin Pie recipe below, or follow the links to some of our best loved gluten-free desserts and baked goods (Note: King Arthur Gluten-Free Multi-Purpose Flour will work well in place of regular wheat flour most of these recipes, so feel free to substitute as you like): Holiday Pumpkin Bread (Gluten-Free) Orange Walnut Bread (Gluten-Free) Pumpkin Pie Banana Nut Bread #3 (Gluten-Free) Gingerbread #2 (Gluten-Free) Decadent Gluten-Free Triple Chocolate Chunk Cookies Quick Cranberry Coconut Cookies (Gluten-Free) Molasses Spice Cookies (Gluten-Free) Snickerdoodles (Gluten-Free) Pumpkin Chocolate Chip Cookies (Gluten-Free) Soft Sugar Cookies (Gluten-Free) Frosted Pumpkin Bars (Gluten-Free) Sugar & Spice Madeleines (Gluten-Free) Lebkuchen (German Ginger Cookies - Gluten-Free) Three Ingredient Gluten-Free Pie Crust Danish (Gluten-Free) Pumpkin Cheesecake with Butter Pecan Crust (Gluten-Free) Apple Crisp #2 (Gluten-Free) Tasty Apple Crisp (Gluten-Free) Gluten-free Chocolate Cream Pie Pumpkin Cheesecake with Almond Meal Crust Pumpkin Cheesecake with Butter Pecan Crust Traditional Gluten-free Apple Pie Low-Fat Pumpkin Flan Gluten-free Apple Crisp Gluten-free Gingerbread Gluten-free Orange Walnut Bread Candied Orange Peels Thanksgiving Gluten-free Pumpkin Pie Prepare winning gluten-free desserts, such as Celiac.com’s Best Ever Gluten-free Pumpkin Pie Recipe (Adapted from Libby's Original Pumpkin Pie Recipe) Ingredients: ¾ cup granulated sugar 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon ½ teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon ground ginger ¼ teaspoon ground cloves 2 large eggs 1 can (15 oz.) Libby's 100% Pure Pumpkin (Yes, it's gluten-free!) 1 can (12 fl. oz.) Evaporated Milk 1 unbaked 9-inch (4-cup volume) deep-dish pie shell Whipped cream (optional) Directions: MIX sugar, cinnamon, salt, ginger and cloves in small bowl. Beat eggs in large bowl. Stir in pumpkin and sugar-spice mixture. Gradually stir in evaporated milk. POUR into gluten-free pie shell. BAKE in preheated 425° F oven for 15 minutes. Reduce temperature to 350° F; bake for 40 to 50 minutes or until knife inserted near center comes out clean. Cool on wire rack for 2 hours. Serve immediately or refrigerate. Top with whipped cream before serving. For more great gluten-free sides, desserts, and more, be sure to consult Celiac.com’s Gluten-free Recipes list. Step Six - Serve Great Gluten-Free Booze, Wine and Beer Serve booze freely, as all distilled spirits are now considered gluten-free but the FDA and the TTB, unless any gluten-ingredients are added afterward. To serve gluten-free beer, consult our Oktoberfest Beer Guide! Gluten-free vs. Gluten-removed Beers, and wine is gluten-free.
  4. At a restaurant, I talked to the waitress re the "sauce" that would be on the main dish. I explained that I had an autoimmune disease and couldn't eat anything with gluten in it. I told her no wheat, barley or rye. She assured me that the "sauce" was OK. When she presented the dish, clearly covered in brown gravy, she explained that it "just had flour in it .......no wheat". This was early in my days of learning to live Gluten Free.
  5. I bought pioneer gravy packet from my local Kroger. It’s Sunday today so I cannot call the manufacturer of this company. I seen the packet had the certified gluten free symbol on it and I poured it into my crockpot. I went to throw the packet out and said I should look at the ingredients. I saw “autolyzed yeast extract” from what I remember from my nutritionist a few years ago she said look out for this ingredient it could be barley. Does anyone know if this is safe. If it’s certified gluten free?
  6. Celiac.com 11/18/2020 - We get more than a few questions about holiday turkeys. One question we get a lot this time of year is: Which turkey brands are gluten-free and safe for people with celiac disease? The good news is that, except for gluten added after processing, turkey meat is naturally gluten-free, including turkey fed with wheat or gluten-containing grains. However, as with so many foods that start out gluten-free, the deeper answer lies in the extras. Unless you add wheat or gluten ingredients afterward, most turkeys and turkey meat is gluten-free. However, many of the commercial turkeys include seasoning packets or gravy packets that may contain wheat or gluten. These brands of whole turkeys and turkey products are labeled "Gluten Free." You can breath extra easy about serving them to people with celiac disease. Do you have a favorite brand of turkey that we might have missed? Share it below in the comments. Butterball Gluten-Free Turkey Butterball, does not label whole fresh or frozen turkeys as gluten-free. They do state "only two of our retail products currently contain gluten: Butterball Frozen Italian Style Meatballs and Butterball Frozen Stuffed Turkey." Double-check if you plan to use Butterball gravy, as most packets do contain gluten. Butterball turkeys can be found in many major grocery stores. Diestel Family Turkey Diestel Turkey Ranch, a fourth-generation family farm, provides tasty gluten-free whole turkeys from its sustainable ranch, including organic, all-natural, heirloom and pasture-raised varieties. Diestel turkeys are fed gluten-free grains without fillers and are raised under strict standards. Empire Kosher Brand Gluten-Free Turkey Products Empire Kosher Poultry, Inc., sells gluten-free whole turkeys in several sizes, along with half turkey breasts, turkey thighs, turkey drumsticks, and ground turkey. Empire brand turkey products can be found in most major grocery stores. Foster Farms Turkey Foster Farms Fresh Young Turkey and Fresh Young Turkey Breast are both gluten-free. Honeysuckle White Gluten-Free Turkey Honeysuckle White markets gluten-free turkeys. The company's website recommends that consumers "refer to product packaging for current and most accurate product information." Jennie-O Brand Gluten-Free Turkey Products Jennie-O brand sells a number of gluten-free turkey products including Jennie-O Prime Young Turkey, fresh or frozen, Jennie-O Turkey Store Oven-Ready Turkey Breast, and Jennie-O Frozen Turkey Breast. Jennie-O turkey products can be found in many major grocery stores. Be sure to avoid the gravy packet included with all of these turkeys, because it does contain gluten. Norbest Turkeys Norbest turkey products are "completely free of gluten from wheat, barley, rye, oats, or their derivatives." Look for Norbest turkey products in your grocery store or buy them online. Shelton's Brand Gluten-Free Turkey Products Shelton's Poultry products include organic, gluten-free turkeys, raised in “free-range conditions, without the use of antibiotics or artificial growth stimulants." Look for Shelton’s turkeys in your grocery store or buy them online.
  7. All Day Roast Pork, Spicy Apple Chutney, Mashed Citrus Sweet Potatoes, and Sauteed Chard ***Save left over Pork and Apple Chutney for a hot sandwich. I use Against the Grain baguette and then I load up a layer of shredded pork roast, apple chutney, and top it with EXTRA sharp white cheddar. I shove it under the broiler for a moment until its a nice melt and then we feast like kings. This recipe is adapted from Rachael Ray food network and is available online* You can also find the video of it under Rachael Ray's Week in a Day, Slow Ride episode. Apple Chutney how to video 1 (5-pound) bone-in pork shoulder Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper 2 teaspoons fennel seeds 2 tablespoons chopped fresh thyme 2 medium onions, sliced 1 head garlic, cloves peeled and sliced 2 medium carrots, sliced 2 ribs celery, sliced 5 to 6 fresh bay leaves 2 cups chicken stock 1 cup white wine 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil 2 medium onions, chopped 2 Fresno chile peppers, seeded and finely chopped 1 (1-inch) piece fresh ginger, grated or minced 6 medium Braeburn or Gala apples, peeled and chopped 2 tablespoons dark brown sugar 1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme 1/4 cup dark amber maple syrup 1/4 cup cider vinegar 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice Kosher salt Freshly grated nutmeg 4 large sweet potatoes, peeled and sliced 1 tablespoon orange zest 1 cup chicken stock Juice of 1 lemon Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 1 very large bunch red chard, stemmed and shredded Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper Freshly grated nutmeg Preheat the oven to 450 degrees F. Score the top of the roast in a crosshatch pattern about 3/4-inch apart. Rub the salt, pepper, fennel, and thyme into the pork skin and set the pork into a roasting pan. Roast about 30 minutes, or until crispy on top. Cover the pork tightly with foil and reduce oven to 325 degrees F, and roast about 4 hours. Remove the pork from the oven and set onto a cutting board. Spoon off most of the fat from the drippings and add the onions, garlic, carrots , celery, bay leaves, salt, and pepper to the pan, and stir to combine. Set the roast on top of the vegetables and cover again with foil, roasting for 1 to 1 1/2 hours more. Meanwhile, start on the spicy apple chutney and side dishes. For the spicy apple chutney: Heat 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil in a saucepot over medium to medium-high heat. Add the onions, chiles, and ginger to the pan and cook to soften, 10 to 12 minutes. Add the apples, dark brown sugar, thyme, maple syrup, cider vinegar , lemon juice, a little salt, and nutmeg. Cover and cook, stirring occasionally, for 15 to 20 minutes, until a thick sauce forms. Adjust the seasoning and transfer to a serving dish. For the sweet potatoes: Cover the sweet potatoes with water in a pot over medium-high heat, bring to a boil, and cook until tender. Drain and return to the hot pot . Mash the sweet potatoes with orange zest, chicken stock, lemon juice , salt, and pepper. Keep warm until ready to serve. For the chard: Heat 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat, season with salt, pepper, and nutmeg, and saute until just tender, about 5 minutes. Keep warm until ready to serve. Remove the pork roast to a carving board and cover with the roasting foil to tent. Skim the fat again, and then place the roasting pan over medium-high heat on the stovetop. Deglaze the pan with stock, and wine, and stir for a few minutes with a wooden spoon to scrape up all drippings . Strain the sauce and pour it into a serving bowl or gravy boat . Serve the pork with the spicy apple chutney , mashed citrus sweet potatoes and sauteed chard. . Instead of straining the sauce, I throw it all in the food processor. No sense in wasting good vegetables and it makes the gravy quite thick and perfect. I put the gravy back in the pan, and then lightly shred the pork and lay it right in there. This recipe freezes PERFECTLY if you want to freeze the leftovers and makes those absolutely fabulous hot sandwiches later on. I also double the potato and chard recipes as we like vegetables here and the gluten eaters are also heavy carb eaters.
  8. Celiac.com 03/04/2020 - What's Loco Moco? Well, if you have to ask, you might not have been to Hawaii, or you might have been looking at the ocean so much, you missed out on this tasty, popular local dish. Loco Moco is a hamburger patty served over rice and topped with mushroom gravy, and usually topped with a fried egg, and maybe a bit more gravy. This recipe uses gluten-free gravy to deliver a tasty Loco Moco that will have you dreaming or your next trip to the islands. Loco Moco Ingredients 8 oz. lean ground beef ½ teaspoon garlic powder ¼ teaspoon kosher salt ¼ teaspoon ground black pepper 1½ tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 2 tablespoons butter 2 large eggs 1½ cup hot, steamed basmati rice, divide Sliced chives, for garnish Gluten-Free Mushroom Gravy Ingredients 4 tablespoons butter, divided 2 cloves garlic, thinly sliced 8 oz. shiitake mushrooms, stems removed and thinly sliced 1-2 tablespoons potato starch 1½ cup chicken broth kosher salt, to taste Ground black pepper Directions for Loco Moco In a mixing bowl, add ground beef, salt, garlic powder, and pepper and stir together. Form two even 4-ounce patties and lightly season each side with salt and pepper. Heat oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. When oil is hot, add patties and sear, 3 to 4 minutes per side. Lower heat to medium and continue to cook patties until medium doneness, 3 to 4 minutes more. Remove patties to a large plate, and tent loosely with foil. Gluten-Free Mushroom Gravy In a saucepan over medium-high heat, add 2 tablespoons butter. Add garlic and mushrooms and cook until mushrooms are lightly caramelized, 3 minutes. Season with salt and pepper. Melt remaining 2 tablespoons butter, sprinkle with potato starch, and whisk together. Lower heat to medium and stir in broth. Continue to whisk until no lumps remain and gravy has thickened enough to coat the back of a wooden spoon. Add salt and pepper, as desired. Cover and set aside. In another skillet over medium-high heat, add 2 tablespoons butter. Once hot, add eggs and fry until whites have set and edges are crisp, 3 to 4 minutes. Remove from heat. To assemble: Divide To serve: Spoon rice onto a plate, top each with a burger patty, gravy, a fried egg, and more gravy, as desired. Top with a sprinkle of sliced chives. Enjoy!
  9. This is a list of unsafe and forbidden ingredients for those who have celiac disease. We keep it up to date, and feel free to use the comment field below to suggest any changes or additions. A Abyssinian Hard (Wheat triticum durum) Atta Flour B Barley Grass (can contain seeds) Barley Hordeum vulgare Barley Malt Beer (most contain barley or wheat) Bleached Flour Bran (wheat, rye or barley bran) Bread Flour Brewer's Yeast Brown Flour Bulgur (Bulgar Wheat/Nuts) Bulgur Wheat C Cereal Binding Chilton Club Wheat (Triticum aestivum subspecies compactum) Common Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Cookie Crumbs Cookie Dough Cookie Dough Pieces Couscous Criped Rice D Dinkle (Spelt) Disodium Wheatgermamido Peg-2 Sulfosuccinate Durum wheat (Triticum durum) E Edible Coatings Edible Films Edible Starch Einkorn (Triticum monococcum) Emmer (Triticum dicoccon) Enriched Bleached Flour Enriched Bleached Wheat Flour Enriched Flour F Farik Farina Farina Graham Farro Filler Flour (normally this is wheat) Freekeh Frikeh Fu (dried wheat gluten) G Germ (wheat, rye or barley bran) Graham Flour Granary Flour Groats (barley, wheat) H Hard Wheat Heeng Hing Hordeum Chilense (Wild Barley) Hordeum Vulgare Extract Hydroxypropyltrimonium Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein K Kamut (Pasta wheat) Kecap Manis (Soy Sauce) Ketjap Manis (Soy Sauce) Kluski Pasta M Maida (Indian wheat flour) Malt Malted Barley Flour Malted Milk Malt Extract Malt Syrup Malt Flavoring Malt Vinegar Macha Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Matza Matzah Matzo Matzo Semolina Meripro 711 Mir N Nishasta O Oriental Wheat (Triticum turanicum) Orzo Pasta P Pasta Pearl Barley Persian Wheat (Triticum carthlicum) Perungayam Poulard Wheat (Triticum turgidum) Polish Wheat (Triticum polonicum) R Rice Malt (if barley or Koji are used) Roux Rusk Rye S Seitan Semolina Semolina Triticum Shot Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Small Spelt Spirits (Specific Types) Spelt (Triticum spelta) Sprouted Wheat or Barley Stearyldimoniumhydroxypropyl Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein Strong Flour Suet in Packets T Tabbouleh Tabouli Teriyaki Sauce Timopheevi Wheat (Triticum timopheevii) Triticale X triticosecale Triticum Durum (Durum Wheat) Triticum Vulgare (Wheat) Flour Lipids Triticum Vulgare (Wheat) Germ Extract Triticum Vulgare (Wheat) Germ Oil Tritordeum (combination of durum wheat - Triticum Durum - and wild barley (Hordeum Chilense) U Udon (wheat noodles) Unbleached Flour V Vavilovi Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Vital Wheat Gluten W Wheat, Abyssinian Hard triticum durum Wheat Amino Acids Wheat Bran Extract Wheat, Bulgur Wheat Durum Triticum Wheat Germ Extract Wheat Germ Glycerides Wheat Germ Oil Wheat Germamidopropyldimonium Hydroxypropyl Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein Wheat Grass (can contain seeds) Wheat Nuts Wheat Protein Wheat Starch Wheat Triticum aestivum Wheat Triticum Monococcum Wheat (Triticum Vulgare) Bran Extract Whole-Meal Flour Wild Barley (Hordeum Chilense) Wild Einkorn (Triticum boeotictim) Wild Emmer (Triticum dicoccoides) The following items may or may not contain gluten depending on where and how they are made, and it is sometimes necessary to check with the manufacturer to find out: Amp-Isostearoyl Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein2 Artificial Color2 Baking Powder2 Clarifying Agents2 Coloring2 Dry Roasted Nuts2 Emulsifiers2 Enzymes2 Fat Replacer2 Gravy Cubes2 Ground Spices2 Hydrolyzed Wheat Gluten2 Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein2 Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein Pg-Propyl Silanetriol2 Hydrolyzed Wheat Starch2 Hydrogenated Starch Hydrolysate2 Hydroxypropylated Starch2 Miso2 Natural Juices2 Non-dairy Creamer2 Pregelatinized Starch2 Protein Hydrolysates2 Seafood Analogs2 Seasonings2 Sirimi2 Soba Noodles2 Soy Sauce2 Soy Sauce Extract2 Soy Sauce Solids2 Sphingolipids2 Stabilizers2 Starch1, 2 Stock Cubes2 Suet2 Tocopherols2 Vegetable Broth2 Vegetable Gum2 Vegetable Protein2 Vegetable Starch2 Vitamins2 1) If this ingredient is made in North America it is likely to be gluten-free. 2) Can utilize a gluten-containing grain or by-product in the manufacturing process, or as an ingredient.
  10. Don't be too hard on yourself...A learning curve is very common, esp. in the first months after diagnosis. As a relative newbie, I still find it difficult to figure out what is safe and/or gluten-free, esp. when labels list so many ingredients with vague or esoteric names (e.g. "modified food starch"...."xanthan gum"..."ammonium phosphatide emulsifier" etc.). I never realized how much weird-named "stuff" is in processed/packaged foods until I started closely reading labels after my diagnosis. You almost need to be a professional chemist to be able to understand any of it...:). Be especially careful with gravy mixes, soups. Lots of gravy, soups contain gluten as "thickeners". When I told my GI doc I was confused by all these labels, he laughed and said, "I have no idea what that any of that stuff means. But if any of those ingredients were really healthy, they would probably be listed in plain English." He said to just stick with fresh foods for now to minimize the chance of gluten CC and facilitate faster healing.
  11. Celiac.com 11/18/2016 - With your local grocer carrying more gluten-free products then ever before, preparing a great gluten-free Thanksgiving has never been easier. If you plan on using pre-made, or packaged items for your dinner, then be sure to read labels and make certain your choices are gluten-free. If you are preparing a meal at home, make sure the turkey you buy is gluten-free. Not all brands of turkey are gluten-free. Some contain gluten in their additives, and some birds are treated with various flavorings or rubs, and may not be gluten-free, so double check. Also, be very careful about any seasoning or gravy packets that come with otherwise gluten-free turkeys. If you're not sure, check the ingredients, and use our Gluten-Free Ingredient Lists to help you shop. There other gluten-free brands, but be sure to check with your local store and read labels to be sure your turkey is gluten-free. Here's a helpful list of gluten-free turkey brands from our online forum. Next, make great gluten-free gravy with Celiac.com's delicious gluten-free gravy recipe. Remember, some bouillon cubes contain gluten, so be sure to use gluten-free bouillon cubes. Tip: Thicken your homemade gravy with either corn starch or arrowroot flour. This recipe makes a rich, savory gravy that will have your guests coming back for more. This recipe makes enough gravy to serve about eight to ten people. Gluten-Free Savory Gravy Ingredients: 1 pound turkey giblets and neck 1½ quarts gluten-free chicken stock 2 carrots, chopped 1 stalk celery, chopped 2 cups water 1½ cups pan drippings from roasted turkey 4 tablespoons of corn starch, adjusted as needed 2 tablespoons tomato paste 2 tablespoons cranberry sauce Salt and ground black pepper to taste Note: One tablespoon corn starch (¼ ounce) thickens one cup of liquid Preparation: While the turkey is roasting, place the turkey giblets and neck into a large saucepan with the carrots, celery, water, and chicken stock. Bring to a boil over medium heat, skim off any foam that rises to the top, reduce heat to low, and simmer the stock for 3 hours. Skim off the fat, strain the stock, and set aside. There should be about 4 cups of stock. Take carrots and celery and press through a strainer. Spoon strained carrots and celery into the stock and stir. Skim off and discard all but ¼ cup of the fat from the drippings in the roasting pan, and place the roasting pan over medium heat. Whisk in the corn starch, then heat and stir the corn starch mixture until it becomes pale golden brown, about 5 minutes. To avoid lumps, mix the starch with an equal amount of cold liquid until it forms a paste, then whisk it into the liquid you're trying to thicken. Once the thickener is added, cook it briefly to remove any starchy flavor. Don't overcook. Whisk in the stock and tomato paste; bring to a boil, simmer for 5 minutes, then whisk in the cranberry sauce. Simmer for 10 more minutes. Season to taste with salt and black pepper. Best Ever Gluten-Free Stuffing Recipe Make sure you prepare gluten-free stuffing. Try Celiac.com's Best Ever Gluten-free Stuffing Recipe. Ingredients: 5-6 cups gluten-free bread (about 2 loaves), cut into one-inch cubes, toasted and cooled 2 tablespoons olive oil 3 cups celery, chopped 1 large yellow onion, chopped 1 tablespoon fresh thyme, finely chopped 1 tablespoon fresh sage, finely chopped 1-2 teaspoons fresh rosemary, finely chopped 1-2 cups gluten-free chicken broth 1 egg yolk 1 teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon pepper Directions: Sauté the onion and celery in olive oil on medium-low heat until clear. Stir in the rosemary, sage, and thyme, and cook two more minutes, until the aroma of the herbs fills the air. Bring the chicken stock to boil on high heat. Place the egg yolk in a medium-sized bowl and carefully spoon two or three ounces of the chicken stock into the egg yolk, slowly, while whisking the mixture. Add the rest of the chicken stock to the egg mixture. Note: Blending a small amount of stock into the egg first will prevent scrambled eggs. Add the cooled celery, onion, and herbs mixture into the stock and egg mixture. Toss the bread cubes into this mixture and coat thoroughly. Add the salt and pepper and toss bread a bit more. Place all of this into a greased casserole dish (big enough to hold three quarts) and cover it with aluminum foil. Place in 400°F oven for 40-50 min, covering as needed with aluminum foil, until done. Insert a toothpick into the stuffing. If it comes out clean, the stuffing is done. If not, bake until the toothpick comes out clean. If you want to cook the stuffing inside the turkey add only 1 cup of chicken broth. Serves six to eight people, depending on their appetite for stuffing. Thanksgiving Gluten-free Pumpkin Pie Lastly, prepare winning gluten-free desserts, such as: Celiac.com's Best Ever Gluten-free Pumpkin Pie Recipe (Adapted from Libby's Original Pumpkin Pie Recipe) Ingredients: ¾ cup granulated sugar 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon ½ teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon ground ginger ¼ teaspoon ground cloves 2 large eggs 1 can (15 oz.) Libby's 100% Pure Pumpkin (Yes, it's gluten-free!) 1 can (12 fl. oz.) Evaporated Milk 1 unbaked 9-inch (4-cup volume) deep-dish pie shell Whipped cream (as desired) Directions: MIX sugar, cinnamon, salt, ginger and cloves in small bowl. Beat eggs in large bowl. Stir in pumpkin and sugar-spice mixture. Gradually stir in evaporated milk. POUR into gluten-free pie shell. BAKE in preheated 425° F oven for 15 minutes. Reduce temperature to 350° F; bake for 40 to 50 minutes or until knife inserted near center comes out clean. Cool on wire rack for 2 hours. Serve immediately or refrigerate. Top with whipped cream before serving.
  12. Hi I am new to this site and to Celiacs Disease. I have made my own gravy, but I am having difficulty finding a Gluten Free stock as the one I use have all got Wheat Flour. Can anyone assist with beef, and chicken stock suggestions. I am ok as I have used corn Flower, which is a good thickener Thanks Dave
  13. Celiac.com 11/11/2011 - Once again, Thanksgiving looms, as does the specter of pulling off a smooth, tasty, gluten-free dinner on the big day. To help make that goal an easy reality, celiac.com once again offers up a heaping of gluten-free information and recipes to help make your gluten-free Thanksgiving celebrations a smashing success! For those cooking a gluten-free turkey dinner at home, these helpful tips will make your work easier: First, be certain to start with a 100% gluten-free turkey for your gluten-free holiday dinner. Gluten? In my turkey? Yes! Many brands use gluten when processing their turkeys. Don't assume your turkey is gluten-free. Be sure to check the ingredients list. Celiac.com offers a fairly comprehensive list of safe gluten-free foods and ingredients, along with gluten-free shopping guides to make gluten-free shopping easier. Next, be certain to serve only gluten-free stuffing! Accept no substitute. Don't risk putting gluten-based stuffing in your turkey. Instead, astonish and satisfy all of your guests by preparing celiac.com's delicious Best Gluten-free Holiday Stuffing Recipe. Lastly, prepare a simple, delicious gluten-free gravy using Celiac.com's Thanksgiving Holiday Gluten-Free Turkey Gravy recipe, or your favorite gluten-free gravy mix. Thicken homemade gravy with either corn starch or arrowroot flour. Be careful: Many bouillon cubes contain wheat or gluten, so make sure to use only gluten-free bouillon cubes. Make easy, tasty gluten-free side dishes using Celiac.com's extensive listing of gluten-free recipes. Order gluten-free baking ingredients and other hard-to-find items like prepared gluten-free pies ahead of time for convenience—this will allow you to spend more time with friends and family rather than spending all of your time in the kitchen! Many excellent prepared gluten-free products can now be ordered and delivered directly to your door from places like the Gluten-Free Mall, and your purchases there actually directly support Celiac.com. Gluten-free Thanksgiving Recipes: Our Great Brined Turkey recipe offers a fabulous way to prepare your gluten-free turkey that will leave your guests quizzing you about your secrets to such a moist, savory bird. Spiced Pumpkin Soup makes a delightful holiday treat for yourself, your family, or your guests. Gluten-free Stuffing is a holiday staple that keeps them coming back for more. Gluten-free Gravy is the perfect topping to your delicious stuffing. If you don't want to prepare your own, be sure to use a gluten-free gravy mix. Meanwhile, our recipe for Red Pepper Pumpkin Seeds is sure to delight, and makes a great addition to the holiday snack bowl. In addition to our ever-popular recipe for Gluten-free Pumpkin Pie, we offer this delicious variation: Ginger Crust Pumpkin Pie: In anticipation of the next two months worth of feasting, I’ve been tinkering with this Thanksgiving classic. The crust is perfectly spiced and also goes well with sweet potato pies. A dollop of fresh whipped cream and you’re good to go. Coconut flakes also make a tasty topping. Ingredients: Crust 1 ½ cups gluten-free gingersnaps ½ cup walnuts 3 tablespoons light brown sugar ¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg 4 tablespoons melted butter Filling 1 ¼ cup canned pumpkin ½ cup sweetened condensed milk 1 teaspoon each ground ginger, cloves, and cinnamon ½ teaspoon salt ½ cup sugar ¼ teaspoon vanilla extract 2 eggs, lightly beaten Directions: Preheat oven to 350 degrees F and lightly butter a 9-inch pie dish. For the crust, combine cookies, walnuts, brown sugar, and nutmeg in a food processor and grind to a powder. Slowly add melted butter and pulse until mixture forms clumps. Spread evenly over the pie dish press down until tightly packed. Set aside. In the bowl of a mixer, combine pumpkin and condensed milk. Add sugar and salt and beat until well-combined. Add eggs, then vanilla and spices. Pour filling into the unbaked pie crust and bake for 40-50 minutes, or until center is set. Cool on a wire rack before serving.
  14. Well, actually, not all gravy contains gluten. All of the gravy we serve at our hospital is gluten free. The Chili is gluten free. Not saying the nursing home was serving gluten-free gravy but commercially prepared gravy is available gluten-free and served by many hospitals. The key is letting the Dr and nursing staff know of the need for gluten-free, they should be able to work with their nutritionists to get you safe meals. If you worry about that at all ask your Dr if you can have a family member bring you meals or ask for fruit and veggies. I'm from rural MN, BTW.....
  15. Celiac.com 03/18/2016 - An Australian man's fight to force his local pub to provide gluten-free gravy to go with his gluten-free New Year meal made it all the way to that country's Federal Circuit Court, before a judge brought the man's quest to an ignoble end by pronouncing the suit "frivolous," and dismissing it entirely. The man in the center of the battle is Bruce Skeen, an elderly gentleman with celiac disease or gluten intolerance. Mr. Skeen's travails began when he paid $1 to attend Christmas function at Blacktown Workers Club in December 2013. For the Christmas function, Skeen pre-ordered a gluten-free meal and gluten-free dessert, despite never having done so in the past. When his gluten-free roast dinner arrived without gluten-free gravy, Mr. Skeen became "angry and disruptive." One week later, Mr Skeen returned to the club, where he became "physically and verbally aggressive" towards staff as he placed another order for a gluten-free meal and demanded gluten-free gravy be served at the upcoming New Year's Eve function. When he did not receive his gluten-free gravy he had demanded, he later sued the club for discrimination. Skeen's suit was dismissed as frivolous by the Federal Circuit Court in Sydney last month. Suing establishments for discrimination over failure to provide gluten-free foods seems to be on the rise lately, and not just in America. What do you think? Is Mr. Skeen helping the cause of celiacs, or is he perhaps doing more harm than good? Source: SMH.com.au
  16. Celiac.com 11/16/2019 - Celiac.com’s annual Gluten-Free Thanksgiving Guide dishes up a heaping helping of gluten-free information and recipes to help make your gluten-free Thanksgiving celebrations a smashing success! Celiac.com offers an extensive list of safe gluten-free foods and ingredients, along with gluten-free shopping guides to make gluten-free shopping easier. Gluten-Free Thanksgiving Turkey This Great Gluten-Free Brined Turkey recipe offers a fabulous way to prepare your gluten-free turkey that will leave your guests quizzing you about your secrets to such a moist, savory bird. Here’s a list of gluten-free Thanksgiving turkeys from major manufacturers. Gluten-Free Holiday Stuffing Next, be certain to serve only gluten-free stuffing! Accept no substitute. Don't risk putting gluten-based stuffing in your turkey. Instead, astonish and satisfy all of your guests by preparing celiac.com's delicious Best Gluten-free Holiday Stuffing Recipe. Gluten-Free Gravy Celiac.com's Thanksgiving Holiday Gluten-Free Turkey Gravy recipe, is the perfect topping to your delicious stuffing. If you don't want to prepare your own, be sure to use a gluten-free gravy mix. Thicken homemade gravy with either corn starch or arrowroot flour. Be careful: Many bouillon cubes contain wheat or gluten, so make sure to use only gluten-free bouillon cubes. Gluten-Free Thanksgiving Pumpkin Pie Top off your gluten-free Thanksgiving feast with our ever-popular recipe for Gluten-free Pumpkin Pie, or try this delicious Ginger Crust Pumpkin Pie. Prepare easy, tasty gluten-free side dishes by browsing celiac.com's extensive listing of gluten-free recipes, where you will find side dishes to impress even the snootiest gourmet. Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Here's our guide to Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages, along with Fifteen Common Questions About Gluten-Free Alcohol and Booze Gluten-Free Side Dishes Make easy, tasty gluten-free side dishes using Celiac.com's extensive listing of gluten-free recipes. Here’s a helpful list of Velveeta and Twenty Other Surprisingly Gluten-Free Foods.
  17. Celiac.com 11/18/2013 - It's Thanksgiving time once again, and celiac.com is here with gluten-free information, tips and recipes to help you make the most of your gluten-free Thanksgiving and holiday celebrations! These helpful tips will help to make a great gluten-free turkey dinner at home: First, always make sure you buy a 100% gluten-free turkey for your holiday dinner. Don't assume your turkey is gluten-free. Numerous brands use gluten when processing their turkeys, so be sure to read the label, and to make sure there is no hidden gluten in any of the ingredients. Check our extensive list of safe gluten-free foods and ingredients, along with gluten-free shopping guides to make gluten-free shopping easier. Brining is a great way to prepare your gluten-free turkey that will leave your guests quizzing you about your secrets to such a moist, savory bird. For those of you who plan a smaller Thanksgiving, consider this recipe for stuffed Cornish Game Hens. Remember, you can also brine the game hens for a extra-moist, flavorful birds. Next, make sure to prepare a gluten-free stuffing! Don't risk cross-contamination by putting gluten-based bread or stuffing ingredients in your turkey. Gluten-free stuffing is a holiday staple that keeps them coming back for more. Be sure to check out Celiac.com's recipe for our tried and true gluten-free holiday stuffing that will keep your guests happily coming back for seconds. You can find some alternative stuffing recipes on celiac.com's forum. Be sure to prepare gluten-free gravy. If you don't want to prepare your own, be sure to use a gluten-free gravy mix. Thicken homemade gravy with either corn starch, tapioca or arrowroot flour. Be careful: Bouillon cubes often contain wheat or gluten, so make sure to use only gluten-free bouillon cubes. Vegetarian boullion is also an option. Lastly, ordering gluten-free baking ingredients and other hard-to-find items, like prepared gluten-free pies, ahead of time will help you to spend less time cooking and more time with friends and family. Many excellent prepared gluten-free products can be ordered online and delivered directly to your door from places like the Gluten-Free Mall. Your purchases there will directly support the celiac awareness and support mission of Celiac.com. Here's a recipe for a delicious variation on traditional mashed potatoes: Perfect Harvest Mashed Potatoes These harvest mashed potatoes are a nice alternative or supplement to traditional mashed potatoes. They go great with gluten-free stuffing and gravy, or with a splash of butter. Ingredients: 1 pound Yukon gold potatoes 1 pound large red potatoes 1½ pounds sweet potatoes ¼ cup butter ½ cup buttermilk ¼ cup Greek yogurt ¼ cup freshly grated Romano cheese 1 tablespoon prepared horseradish ½ teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon pepper ¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon Directions: Boil water with a dash of salt in a large pot. Rinse and peel all potatoes, and cut into 1-inch pieces. Place peeled potatoes in boiling salted water, cover and cook 15 to 20 minutes or until tender. Drain and place in a large bowl. Add ¼ cup butter and add the rest of the ingredients ingredients; mash with a potato masher until smooth. Top with additional butter, if desired. ** For a sure-fire dessert hit, serve up some Classic Gluten-free Holiday Pumpkin Pie. Round out your gluten-free dinner with gluten-free side dishes from Celiac.com's extensive listing of gluten-free recipes. Meanwhile, be sure to check out these other gluten-free Thanksgiving recipes that will help make your holiday dinner a success: Fast Nutty Apple Crumble Holiday Pumpkin Bread (Gluten-Free) Gingerbread #2 (Gluten-Free) Molasses Spice Cookies (Gluten-Free) Pumpkin Chocolate Chip Cookies (Gluten-Free) Soft Sugar Cookies (Gluten-Free) Frosted Pumpkin Bars (Gluten-Free) Pumpkin Cheesecake with Butter Pecan Crust (Gluten-Free) In addition to our recipes for Classic Gluten-free Pumpkin Pie, and gluten-free Ginger Crust Pumpkin Pie, we offer recipes for Gluten-free Apple Pie and 20 Recipes for Festive Gluten-free Holiday Treats.
  18. I know when I go to my daughters and eat it never fails I end up sick. She tries really hard to fix me strictly gluten-free food. This is all after eating from paper plates. So, the only conclusion we can come to is the silverware. Maybe they had eaten from the silverware and there was food left on it, or maybe the silverware had been scratched and the gluten left in the scratch's, so we started using plastic knifes and forks that seemed to have finely worked for me. Concerning me at home I have replaced all my cookware and did it little by little. I have fixed my grandson sausage gravy with regular flour, make sure I wash the pan really well and the next time I use that pan to cook my dinner or what ever I seem to not have any issues. Hope this little bit of information helps!
  19. An Australian man's fight to force his local pub to provide gluten-free gravy to go with his gluten-free New Year's meal made it all the way to that country's Federal Circuit Court. View the full article
  20. Celiac.com 02/05/2019 - Grits are a southern favorite that are gaining popularity outside their traditional strongholds, as eateries like Waffle House and IHOP expose more eaters to this delicious breakfast food. Grits aren’t just for breakfast. Savory grits make a great meal or side for lunch or dinner. Grits are delicious, and because they are made from corn, they are naturally gluten-free. Grits are made from ground, dried hominy. Hominy is the inner portion of corn. When it comes to prepared grits, especially at restaurants, be careful of any extras, especially the gravy. Always make sure the gravy is gluten-free, then ask again. Gravy is often thickened with wheat four, though that’s changing as more places look to offer gluten-free options to their diners. Most brands of grits should be naturally gluten-free, but if you’re looking for a brand specifically labeled as gluten-free, one major gluten-free brand is Bob's Red Mill Gluten-Free Corn Grits.So, even if you have celiac disease or gluten-intolerance, you can likely go ahead and enjoy delicious gluten-free corn grits for breakfast, lunch or dinner. Here are some gluten-free grits recipes: Gluten-Free Shimp and Grits Gluten-Free Cheesy Grits Gluten-Free Grits and Gravy Also, if you’re not sure about a food or an ingredient, please check Celiac.com’s SAFE Gluten-Free Food List, and Celiac.com’s UNSAFE Gluten-Free Food List.
  21. I also went more thoroughly today through my pantry and realized I'd inadvertantly glutened myself 3 times this past week. OMG! My dairy free ice cream on a stick had wheat and I had one several days ago. And twice when I've had salad this week I realized the "real bacon bits" also had wheat. *face palm* I had the contents of my entire pantry and fridge out. Haha! I got rid of everything that wasn't labeled gluten-free (given away to my parents because food is too expensive to waste) and went to the store and took my time and repurchased gluten free items that stated it. I also ordered from Thrive Market. I did keep my husband's snacks that I don't touch anyway. I have zero gluten items now. From canned food to veggie brown gravy mixes to spices, snacks, etc. LESSON LEARNED! And that's to NEVER just assume. Read! Thank you everyone for commenting and providing all of this help. I appreciate it so much.
  22. .....hey seen that before then low and behold it was spent brewers yeast, but also seen it come up to be safe. But how the hell do you not know the source of such a ingredient?! I am paranoid and iffy with companies, but I also have a really random corn allergy and pretty severe whey allergy. I have to email and ask the source on everything then sometimes gamble on if the end product contains the offending proteins. (some stuff I use might be derived from corn but processed in a way that removes the proteins that trigger the allergic reaction I have, I find Erythritol is normally safe while fiber/starches are hit and miss if I react) ON gravy, I would never use a packet, between unknown ingredients, fillers, and carbs not worth it. I normally make mine by tampering egg yolks into a simmered down base, or I use a bit of coconut flour sometimes both....but I can not have carbs. NOW my father still uses my old method to make the gravy for the community thanksgiving dinner and uses a bit of potato starch and mixes it in with the turkey drippings and chicken broth...heck they feed this gluten free gravy to 300-400 people each year and no one knows lol.
  23. Right, the sealed gravy packets may contain gluten. But that doesn't mean the turkey itself has gluten in it. The gravy packets are easy to throw away, or give to someone else. I hear Bob Cratchett has a turkey but no gravy packet. So he might want it. It would be a good idea to check with the company to be sure. We don't have those stores around here.
  24. So I found this recipe and I just changed out the butter for butter flavored coconut oil...wish I had some Miyoko Buttery Spread. I also used a 3lb top round roast instead of a chuck (cheaper per lb here and leaner) due it it being thicker I cut it in half. I also upped the cooking time to 70mins. And I used a carton of beef broth instead of the bullion. I then used the extra beef broth that was unused to store the roast in a sealed container to keep leftovers moist. The cooking juices I used a separator to get rid of the oils on top then used the egg method to make a gravy out of it. I served to my family with my own recipe of cauliflower mash. https://triedandtasty.com/instant-pot-keto-mississippi-pot-roast/ Gravy, I had 16oz of cooking juice so the last steps of this made it perfect https://ketosummit.com/keto-gravy-recipe/

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