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Found 1,243 results

  1. Celiac.com 09/18/2015 - That old saw about death and taxes might need a bit of amending to include complaints about pharmaceutical companies working on celiac drug treatments. One interesting facet of our coverage of the development of various drugs to treat and/or cure celiac disease has been the regular presence of comments questioning the motives,and actions of the companies involved. It's funny, but no one complains that companies still make money selling aspirin, and that no one has cured a headache, and that there must be some conspiracy to profit off of those who suffer a headache. There's no doubt that there's money to be made producing drugs that treat disease. But, if a company can develop and produce a safe drug to protect celiacs against contamination, or to help reduce symptoms, what's wrong with that? Just like an aspirin, I can take it or not take it. In the old days, ten years ago or more, people with celiac disease generally suffered in silence, with scant gluten-free food choices, and little information. However, in just a decade, we've got a wealth of information, and multi-billion dollar gluten-free foods market and a number of companies developing drugs to treat or cure celiac disease. To me, that's a good thing. Still, there are naysayers. Here's a rundown of comments by readers who seem less than enthused about celiac drugs in development. Our recent article, An Update on Every Celiac Disease Drug Currently in Development included the comment: "Article's fine. Concept's disturbing. Eating a gluten-free diet is the free, already-proven cure for celiac and gluten-intolerance. They don't have to torture mice and likely other animals to find a 'cure' for something that there already is a cure for. I imagine there is $$ for the researchers here and $$ for the animal labs and $$ for the pharmaceuticals." Of our article entitled, How Close Are New Celiac Disease Treatments? one reader wrote: "I would be very cautious about taking any of these until it was proven absolutely to have no side effects. There always are some and history has shown some to be deadly." Commenting on our article ALV003 Reduces Gluten Damage in Celiac Disease Patients, one reader commented: "I only want to know: how long until random internal organs begin to fail or malfunction as a result of yet another new mystery drug? I'd rather starve to death than be a guinea pig for big pharma again." Our article on NexVaxx, entitled Is a Vaccine for Celiac Disease Just Around the Corner? included the following comments: "Totally agree with vhill seems like a ploy to poison people with GMO foods that come up with a supposed "'cure'. Eat healthy whole foods this is not a curse its a wake up call to be healthy if you didn't have celiac you'd probably be eating processed crap." Balm wrote: "Thanks but no thanks. I'll remain a celiac and continue to eat healthy. While trying to fix one problem, some will end up with far worse problems." Jonnys wrote: "Stupid idea! Just another way to make more money off of people." These are but a few of the largely positive comments we receive, and we hope you enjoyed them as much as we do.
  2. Celiac.com 05/07/2018 - Pursuing a hypothesis that Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS) and Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity (NCGS) may be related, a team of researchers recently set out to assess the efficacy of a gluten-free diet in 29 patients with Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome GTS in a prospective pilot study. The research team then evaluated patient progress after one year on a gluten-free diet. The research team included Luis Rodrigo, Nuria Álvarez, Enrique Fernández-Bustillo, Javier Salas-Puig, Marcos Huerta, and Carlos Hernández-Lahoz. To establish a baseline of conditions, the team used a series of questionnaires, including YGTSS, Y-BOCS/CY-BOCS and GTS-QOL, which they then compared before and after the gluten-free diet. The YGTSS questionnaires measured tics, while the Y-BOCS/CY-BOCS questionnaires measured the intensity and frequency of OCD. The study group included 23 children and 6 adults. In all, 74% of children and 50% of adults were male. When the study began, nearly 70% of children and 100% of adults showed OCD (NS). Both groups showed frequent symptoms of NCGS, with nearly half of the children and 83.6% of adults reporting headaches. After one year of gluten-free diet, both child and adult patients showed a substantial reduction in tics (YGTSS), a reduction in the intensity and frequency of OCD, along with improved QOL measurements. This study showed that both children and adults with Tourette syndrome and non-celiac gluten sensitivity who followed a gluten-free diet for one year showed a significant reduction in tics and OCD. A gluten-free diet seems to reduce tics and OCD both in both children and adults with Tourette syndrome and gluten sensitivity. Clearly larger studies are needed to confirm these finding, but this is exciting news for those with Tourette syndrome and the doctors who treat them. Meantime, the number of conditions that seem to improve with gluten-free diet treatment continues to grow. Stay tuned for more developments. Source: Preprints 2018, 2018040332. doi: 10.20944/preprints201804.0332.v1
  3. Celiac.com 05/04/2018 - It has been recognized for several decades that both children and adults with celiac disease have a significantly increased frequency of osteoporosis and increased risk of fractures as compared to the age-matched non-celiac healthy individuals. Based on published data the prevalence of osteoporosis among celiac patients varies from as low as 4% to as high as 70%. The data from our clinic indicate that prevalence of osteoporosis among adults with gluten intolerance and celiac disease is in the vicinity of 30-40%. Characteristics and causes of osteoporosis Osteoporosis is a bone disease characterized by the reduced bone mineral density and impaired bone architecture that leads to an increased risk of fracture. The three main mechanisms by which osteoporosis develop include an inadequate peak bone mass, excessive bone resorption and inadequate formation of new bone during remodeling. At a given age, bone mass results from the amount of bone acquired during growth (the peak bone mass) minus the acquired bone loss due to variety of reasons including age-related processes, malabsorption syndromes, chronic steroid use etc. The rate and magnitude of bone mass gain during the pubertal years may markedly differ from one individual to another. It has been demonstrated that pediatric onset of celiac disease and poor compliance with gluten-free diet during childhood do significantly reduce peak bone mass. One of the main causes of osteoporosis is an alteration in bone remodeling due to imbalance between bone formation and resorption, with a predominance of resorption resulting in a reduction in bone mass and increased risk of fractures. Formation of the new bone is facilitated by specialized cells, osteoblasts, which actively synthesize bone matrix. Bone resorption is mediated by other specialized cells, osteoclasts. One of the main regulators of bone remodeling is the RANK/RANKL/OPG system. During bone remodeling, bone marrow cells and osteoblasts produce RANKL(receptor activator for nuclear factor kB ligand), which bonds with a transmembrane receptor of the osteoclast precursor, RANK(receptor activator of nuclear factor kB), causing their differentiation and activation. Osteoprotegerin (OPG) binds to RANKL before it has an opportunity to bind to RANK, and hence suppresses its ability to increase bone resorption. Normal bone remodeling is based on the permanent renovation of the skeleton and consists of an initial phase of bone resorption followed by a phase of formation, both of which are regulated by general (endocrine) factors and local (paracrine) factors. The main endocrine factors include parathyroid hormone [PTH] and vitamin D as well as estrogens and, to a lesser extent, testosterone, thyroid hormones, growth hormone and leptin. Local factors include various cytokines (IL-1, IL-6 and TNF-a playing a role) key growth factors that regulate the process. There are several well-characterized risk factors which contribute to the development of osteoporosis in celiac patients. These include: 1. Malabsorption of vitamin D and secondary hyperparathyroidism Villous atrophy in celiac patients reduces the active absorption surface and induces steatorrhea (exces fat in feces), which has a chelating effect on calcium and vitamin D, making their absorption difficult. This reduces levels of the vitamin D transporting protein (calbindin and calciumbinding protein) and increases PTH synthesis which, in turn, lead to increased bone resorption causing osteoporosis. 2. Malabsorption of vitamin K Malabsorption of fat soluble vitamins including vitamin K is a common finding in celiac patients. Three vitamin-K dependent proteins have been isolated in the bone: osteocalcin, matrix Gla protein (MGP), and protein S. Osteocalcin is a protein synthesized by osteoblasts. The synthesis of osteocalcin by osteoblasts is regulated by the active form of vitamin D—1,25-dihydroxy-cholecalciferol. The mineral-binding capacity of osteocalcin requires vitamin K-dependent gamma-carboxylation of three glutamic acid residues. MGP has been found in bone, cartilage, and soft tissue, including blood vessels. The results of animal studies suggest MGP facilitates normal bone growth and development. The vitamin K-dependent anticoagulant protein S is also synthesized by osteoblasts, but its role in bone metabolism is unclear. Children with inherited protein S deficiency suffer complications related to increased blood clotting as well as decreased bone density. The data on the role of vitamin K in osteoporosis came from the clinical observations indicating that a chronic use of vitamin K antagonists such as warfarin increases risk of vertebral and rib fractures. Accordingly, vitamin K supplementation significantly lowers risk of vertebral and hip fractures. 3. Magnesium deficiency Magnesium deficiency may be an additional risk factor for celiac-associated osteoporosis. This may be due to the fact that magnesium deficiency alters calcium metabolism and the hormones that regulate calcium. Several human studies have suggested that magnesium supplementation may improve bone mineral density. Magnesium deficiency is easily detected with laboratory tests (eg, low serum magnesium, low serum calcium, resistance to vitamin D) or clinical symptoms (eg, muscle twitching, muscle cramps, high blood pressure, irregular heartbeat). Screening for magnesium deficiency should be routinely included in the screening of celiac patients with osteoporosis. 4. Chronic diarrhea and metabolic acidosis Chronic diarrhea in patients with celiac disease results in significant bicarbonate losses and development of metabolic acidosis. Bone is a major site for the extracellular buffering of the retained acid. Therefore, one of the main compensatory mechanisms maintaining a stable serum bicarbonate level in the face of an uncorrected metabolic acidosis is the dissolution of bone buffers and net efflux of calcium from bone. Bicarbonate supplementation in patients with metabolic acidosis decreases urinary calcium, phosphorus and hydroxyproline wasting supporting the concept of negative effects of acidosis on bone health. 5. Hypogonadism Decline of estrogen production and activity is one of the main events in the development of age-related osteoporosis. It is well known that estrogen deficiency is important in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis not only in women but also in men. Increase in bone mineral density in young men and declines in older men are related to circulating free estrogen, not testosterone. In general, patients with celiac disease are characterized by low levels of circulating estrogens which contributes to the development of premature osteoporosis. 6. Chronic use of Proton Pump Inhibitors Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are one of the most widely used classes of drugs. The commonly used PPIs include such drugs as Omeprazole (brand name: Prilosec), Lansoprazole (brand name: Prevacid), Dexlansoprazole (brand names: Kapidex, Dexilant), Esomeprazole (brand name: Nexium), Pantoprazole (brand name: Protonix) and Rabeprazole (brand name: AcipHex). Chronic use of PPIs for gastroesophageal reflux disease and other related conditions has been associated with impaired calcium and magnesium absorption and increased risk of vertebral and nonvertebral fractures. 7. Chronic use of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) are frequently used in celiac patients for treatment of depressive disorders. The commonly used SSRIs include such drugs as Citalopram (brand name: Celexa), Escitalopram (brand name: Lexapro), fluoxetine (brand name: Prozac), fluvoxamine (brand name: Luvox), Paroxetine (brand name: Paxil) and Sertraline (brand name: Zoloft). It has been demonstrated that SSRIs increase extracellular 5-HT (5-Hydroxytryptophan) levels that have deleterious skeletal effects. The skeletal serotonergic system consists of 5-HT receptors and the 5-HT transporter (5-HTT) in osteoblasts and osteocytes. 5-HTT is a transmembrane protein targeted by SSRIs. 5-HT restrains osteoblastic activity, thus leading to bone loss. 8. Autoimmune mechanisms Autoimmune mechanisms have been long suspected as risk factors contributing to development of osteoporosis in celiac patients. Near a decade ago, it was demonstrated that sera from celiac patients with osteoporosis contains significantly high titers of antibodies against bones as compared to non-celiac osteoporotic patients. The immunostaining was localized in areas where an active mineralization process occurred and was similar to the distribution of the native bone tissue transglutaminase. Recently, it has been described that a subset of patients with celiac disease has autoantibodies to osteoprotegerin, which block the inhibitory effect of osteoprotegerin on signaling by the receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB (RANK), and are associated with severe osteoporosis and high bone turnover. 9. Chronic inflammation Chronic inflammatory diseases, including celiac disease, are associated with overproduction of proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-a, interleukin(IL)-1, IL-6, IL-11, IL-15 and IL-17 among others which activate osteoclasts and accelerate bone resorption leading to osteoporosis. In conclusion, osteoporosis associated with celiac disease is not a coincidental problem. It is a consequence of disease-specific (autoantibodies to osteoprotegerin), disease-nonspecific (malabsorption of vitamin D, K and magnesium, hypogonadism, chronic inflammation, chronic diarrhea and metabolic acidosis) and jatrogenic (overuse of PPIs and SSRIs) events accelerating resorptive processes in the skeleton. Correction of the aforementioned risk factors in celiac patients can reverse the development of osteoporosis and reduce the risk of osteoporosis-associated fractures. Bibliography: Bab I, Yirmiya R. Depression, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and osteoporosis. Curr Osteoporos Rep. 2010 Dec;8(4):185-91. Bianchi ML. Inflammatory bowel diseases, celiac disease, and bone. Arch Biochem Biophys. 2010 Nov 1;503(1):54-65. Ito T, Jensen RT. Association of long-term proton pump inhibitor therapy with bone fractures and effects on absorption of calcium, vitamin B12, iron, and magnesium. Curr Gastroenterol Rep. 2010 Dec;12(6):448-57. Katz S, Weinerman S. Osteoporosis and gastrointestinal disease. Gastroenterol Hepatol (N Y). 2010 Aug;6(8):506-17. Riches PL, McRorie E, Fraser WD, Determann C, van't Hof R, Ralston SH. Osteoporosis associated with neutralizing autoantibodies against osteoprotegerin. N Engl J Med. 2009 Oct 8;361(15):1459-65. Stazi AV, Trecca A, Trinti B. Osteoporosis in celiac disease and in endocrine and reproductive disorders. World J Gastroenterol. 2008 Jan 28;14(4):498-505. Sugai E, Cherñavsky A, Pedreira S, Smecuol E, Vazquez H, Niveloni S, Mazure R, Mauriro E, Rabinovich GA, Bai JC. Bone-specific antibodies in sera from patients with celiac disease: characterization and implications in osteoporosis. J Clin Immunol. 2002 Nov;22(6):353-62. Turner J, Pellerin G, Mager D. Prevalence of metabolic bone disease in children with celiac disease is independent of symptoms at diagnosis. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2009 Nov;49(5):589-93. Vasquez H, Mazure R, Gonzalez D, Flores D, Pedreira S, Niveloni S, Smecuol E, Mauriño E, Bai JC. Risk of fractures in celiac disease patients: a cross-sectional, case-control study. Am J Gastroenterol. 2000 Jan;95(1):183-9.
  4. Addisons Disease Alopecia Anxiety and Depression Ataxia Attention Deficit Disorder / ADHD Autism and Celiac Disease Autoimmune Hepatitis / Chronic Active Hepatitis Bird Fancieris Lung Brain White-Matter Lesions Cerebellar Atrophy Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (myalgic encephalomyelitis or ME, PVS, post viral fatigue syndrome or PVFS) Crohns Disease Congenital Heart Disease Cystic Fibrosis Dental-Enamel Hypoplasia Dyspepsia Epilepsy (with or without cerebral calcification) Farmeris Lung Fibromyalgia and Celiac Disease Fibrosing Alveolitis Follicular Keratosis Gall Bladder Disease Gastroparesis Head Aches (Migraine) IBD - Irritable Bowel Disease Impotency Infertility Inflammatory Bowel Disease Lung Cavities Multiple Sclerosis and Celiac Disease Myasthenia Gravis Pancreatic Disorders / Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency Peripheral Neuropathy Polymyositis Polyneuropathy Primary Biliary Cirrhosis Pulmonary Hemosiderosis Recurrent Pericarditis Sarcoidosis Schizophrenia / Mental Problems and Celiac Disease Scleroderma Short Stature, Delayed Puberty Small-Intestinal Adenocarcinomas Spontaneous Abortion and Fetal Growth Retardation Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Thrombocytosis (Hyposplenism) Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP) Thyrotoxicosis Vasculitis Vitamin K Deficiency
  5. Abdominal Distention (children) Abdominal Pain, Steatorrhea Anemia - Folate-Deficiency / Iron Deficiency / Pernicious Arthralgia or Arthropathy Arthritis - Rheumatoid Carcinoma of the Oropharynx, Esophagus, and Small Bowel Collagenous Sprue Dermatitis Herpetiformis Diabetes (Type 1) and Celiac Disease Diarrhea Down Syndrome Enteropathy-Associated T-cell Lymphoma Failure to Thrive (children) Hypertransaminasemia IBS - Irritable Bowel Syndrome IgA Deficiency IgA Nephropathy Kidney Disease Liver Disease Low Bone Mass and Celiac Disease Microscopic Colitis / Collagenous Colitis Nerve Disease and Celiac Disease Osteomalacia, Osteoporosis and Celiac Disease Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis, Recurrent Refractory Sprue / Celiac Disease Sjogrens Syndrome Thyroid Disease (Autoimmune) Ulcerative Jejunoileitis
  6. Celiac.com 05/01/2018 - Celiac disease is marked by a variety of intestinal and extra-intestinal symptoms. One of the most common and best described expressions of celiac disease outside the gut is the presence of osteopenia and osteoporosis, which make for a higher fracture risk. A team of researchers recently set out to see if a gluten-free diet (GFD) improves bone mineralization. The research team included MB Zanchetta, AF Costa, V Longobardi, R Mazure, F Silveira, MP Temprano, H Vázquez, C Bogado, SI Niveloni, E Smecuol, ML Moreno, A González, E Mauriño, JR Zanchetta, and JC Bai. They are variously associated with the Instituto de Diagnóstico e Investigaciones Metabólicas, Buenos Aires, Argentina; Research Institute, Universidad del Salvador, Buenos Aires, Argentina; the Department of Medicine, Dr C. Bonorino Udaondo Gastroenterología Hospital, Buenos Aires, Argentina; and with Consejo de Investigaciones en Salud, Health Ministry, Buenos Aires City Government, Buenos Aires, Argentina. These researchers previously identified a significant deterioration of bone microarchitecture in premenopausal women with newly diagnosed celiac disease using high‐resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HRpQCT). In that study, the team also compared 1‐year results with those of a control group of healthy premenopausal women of similar age and BMI in order to assess whether the micro-architectural parameters of treated celiac patients had reached the values expected for their age. While that study showed that a year on a gluten-free diet had improved most of the women’s bone parameters, it also showed that those parameters continued to be significantly lower than those of healthy control subjects. In a recent paper, the team describes the results of their study that offers data to show improvements bone mineralization microarchitecture in celiac patients after three years on a gluten-free diet. Source: Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2017 Oct 6. pii: S1542-3565(17)31200-4. doi: 10.1016/j.cgh.2017.09.054.
  7. Celiac.com 04/24/2008 - Genetic tests for celiac disease and gluten sensitivity are readily available. Testing can be performed on either blood and mouth swab samples. If the testing is performed by certain laboratories not only will you have quite an accurate prediction of your risk of Celiac disease but also you may have information about the statistical probability that your children will inherit the risk, your likelihood of more severe Celiac disease, whether one or both of your parents had the risk gene, and for some laboratories you may determine your risk of gluten sensitivity without Celiac disease. The absence of any portion of the high-risk genetic patterns DQ2 and DQ8 nearly excludes the possibility of celiac disease with an approximate accuracy of 99.9%. However, there is a big caveat about relying on "negative celiac genetic testing". To definitively declare you have negative celiac genetic tests requires that the laboratory test for and report the presence or absence of the entire HLA DQ genetic pattern, including both alpha and beta subunits. The DQ genetic patterns DQ2 and DQ8 have two subunits but some laboratories only test for the beta subunit. This DQ typing is complicated and difficult to understand even by physicians and scientists. I have written an updated detailed review that appears in the Spring 2008 issue of Scott-Free newsletter published by celiac.com. Data collected by Dr. Ken Fine of Enterolab has supported the well-known fact that the absence of DQ2 and DQ8 does not exclude the risk of being gluten intolerance or sensitive though it now generally believed that one or both of those genetic white blood cell patterns are required to develop the autoimmune disorder known as Celiac disease or Celiac Sprue. However, there is a new study that reports that being negative for DQ2 and DQ8 does not completely exclude the possibility of celiac disease, especially in men. Previous studies have well documented blood test negative Celiac Sprue, also more common in elderly men with long-standing severe disease. Since DQ2 or DQ8 is almost universally present with the specific blood tests tissue transglutaminase and anti-endomysial antibodies are present it is not surprising that individuals without DQ2 or DQ8 that are negative for these two blood tests are being reported that meet criteria for Celiac disease. These new studies are also providing further information that the genetics of Celiac is gender specific. If you are a man, your risk of celiac disease may be higher than a woman if you don't have the classic genetic patterns. Again, in this situation your blood tests may be negative. If you are a woman, the risk for Celiac disease is generally higher than a man, especially if you have received the at risk gene from your father instead of your mother. Celiac is arguably the most common autoimmune disease. It is very common. It is easily treated. It affects 1/100 people worldwide. However, most people with celiac disease (~90%) are unaware, undiagnosed or misdiagnosed. Most adults finally diagnosed with celiac disease have suffered at least 10-11 years and have seen more than 3 or more doctors. Genetic testing is not only available but can be extremely helpful in determining your risk of developing Celiac disease, how severe it may be and the risk of your family members. Don't be one of those whose diagnosis is missed or needlessly delayed for over a decade. Get tested! Learn about the genetic tests for Celiac disease and if necessary educate your doctor about this testing. Here are ten facts you should know and remember about Celiac genetic testing. Genetic testing can help determine your risk as well as your children's risk. Celiac genetic tests can be done on blood or a mouth swab sample but your doctor may be unaware of the tests, not know how to order them, or know how to interpret the results. Genetic testing is not affected by diet. You can be eating gluten or on a gluten free diet. Blood tests for celiac disease antibodies, however, need to be done while eating gluten. They can become negative within a few weeks of restricting gluten so if you are going to get the diagnostic antibody blood tests don't begin a gluten free or restricted diet before being tested. Some insurance companies do not for the Celiac genetic test and almost all who do require pre-authorization first. The following diagnostic codes are helpful when requesting insurance coverage: 579.0 (Celiac disease); V18.59 (family history of GI disease); and/or V84.89 (genetic susceptibility to disease). Some laboratories do not perform the all of the necessary components of the test to completely exclude the possible genetic risk of Celiac disease and most don't test for or report the other gluten sensitive DQ patterns. Before you accept that have a negative test you need to know if your test included both the alpha and beta subunits of HLA DQ or did they just perform the beta typing. In some rare individuals, especially some men, a negative genetic test may not exclude the possibility of celiac disease anymore than a negative blood test. Men more commonly have negative genetic tests and blood tests, especially older men with long-standing severe disease. Both the DQ type, and number of copies you have, matter when determining not only your risk but also the possible severity of celiac disease. Two copies of DQ2 carries more risk than one copy of DQ8 or only partial DQ2. Even a single copy of DQ2 alpha subunit ("half DQ2 positive") carries risk for celiac disease but most of the commonly used laboratories for Celiac genetics do not test for or report the presence of this component of the celiac genes. The absence of at risk genes DQ2 and/or DQ8 does not exclude the possibility of being gluten intolerant or sensitive. You may respond to a gluten free diet even if you don't have DQ2 or DQ8 or true autoimmune Celiac disease. You can get genetic testing without a doctor's order and the tests can be done without having blood drawn or insurance authorization if you are willing to pay between $150-400 (www.kimballgenetics.com and www.enterolab.com). Laboratories in the U.S. that are known to offer complete alpha and beta subunit genetic testing include Kimball Genetics, Prometheus, and LabCorp. Bonfils, Quest and Enterolab only test for the beta subunit portions and therefore their test can miss part of a minor alpha subunit that carries a risk of Celiac disease. A negative DQ2 and DQ8 report from these labs may not necessarily be truly negative for the risk of Celiac disease. References and Resources: HLA-DQ and Susceptibility to Celiac Disease: Evidence for Gender Differences and Parent-of-Origin Effects. Megiorni F et al. Am Journal Gastroenterol. 2008;103:997-1003. Celiac Genetics. Dr. Scot Lewey. Scott-Free, Spring 2008.
  8. Celiac.com 01/04/2018 - Nexvax2 is a peptide-based, epitope-specific immunotherapy intended to reduce reactions to natural gluten exposure, and ultimately restore tolerance to gluten in patients with celiac disease. Celiac disease patients who received fixed intradermal doses of Nexvax2 lost their sensitivity to the HLA-DQ2·5-restricted gluten epitopes in Nexvax2, but their tolerance was limited to 150 μg, due to gastrointestinal symptoms and cytokine release, mimicking gluten exposure, that accompany the first dose. A team of researchers recently set out to test whether small doses in steps might reduce the first dose effect of Nexvax2 in celiac disease patients. The research team included James M. Daveson, Hooi C. E, Jane M. Andrews, Timothy King, Kaela E. Goldstein, John L. Dzuris, James A. MacDougall; Leslie J. Williams, Anita Treohan, Michael P. Cooreman, and Robert P. Anderson. They are variously associated with the Faculty of Medicine, University of Queensland, QLD, Australia b Department of Gastroenterology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, WA, Australia; Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, SA, Australia; Department of Gastroenterology, Auckland City Hospital, Auckland, New Zealand; PROMETRIKA, LLC, Cambridge, MA, USA; and ImmusanT Inc., Cambridge, MA, USA. The team conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial at four community sites in Australia (3) and New Zealand (1) in HLA-DQ2·5 genotype positive adults with celiac disease who were on a gluten-free diet. By using doses escalated from 3 μg up to 300 μg in HLA-DQ2·5 homozygotes or to 900 μg in HLADQ2.5 non-homozygotes the team was able to eliminate the adverse events and cytokine release that had limited the previous maximum dose to 150 μg. Administration of Nexvax2 at dose levels from 150 μg to 900 μg preceded by dose escalation was not associated with elevations in plasma cytokines at 4 h. Otherwise, the most common treatment-related side effects in the Nexvax2 participants were headache (52%), diarrhea (48%), nausea (37%), abdominal pain (26%), and abdominal discomfort (19%). This study shows that antigenic peptides recognized by CD4-positive T cells in an autoimmune disease can be safely administered to patients at high maintenance dose levels without immune activation when preceded by gradual dose escalation. These findings help further these efforts to develop a successful immunotherapy drug to treat celiac disease. Read more at Ebiomedicine.com This completed trial is registered with ClinicalTrials. gov, number NCT02528799.
  9. Celiac.com 04/23/2018 - A team of researchers recently set out to learn whether celiac disease patients commonly suffer cognitive impairment at the time they are diagnosed, and to compare their cognitive performance with non-celiac subjects with similar chronic symptoms and to a group of healthy control subjects. The research team included G Longarini, P Richly, MP Temprano, AF Costa, H Vázquez, ML Moreno, S Niveloni, P López, E Smecuol, R Mazure, A González, E Mauriño, and JC Bai. They are variously associated with the Small Bowel Section, Department of Medicine, Dr. C. Bonorino Udaondo Gastroenterology Hospital; Neurocience Cognitive and Traslational Institute (INECO), Favaloro Fundation, CONICET, Buenos Aires; the Brain Health Center (CESAL), Quilmes, Argentina; the Research Council, MSAL, CABA; and with the Research Institute, School of Medicine, Universidad del Salvador. The team enrolled fifty adults with symptoms and indications of celiac disease in a prospective cohort without regard to the final diagnosis. At baseline, all individuals underwent cognitive functional and psychological evaluation. The team then compared celiac disease patients with subjects without celiac disease, and with healthy controls matched by sex, age, and education. Celiac disease patients had similar cognitive performance and anxiety, but no significant differences in depression scores compared with disease controls. A total of thirty-three subjects were diagnosed with celiac disease. Compared with the 26 healthy control subjects, the 17 celiac disease subjects, and the 17 disease control subjects, who mostly had irritable bowel syndrome, showed impaired cognitive performance (P=0.02 and P=0.04, respectively), functional impairment (P<0.01), and higher depression (P<0.01). From their data, the team noted that any abnormal cognitive functions they saw in adults with newly diagnosed celiac disease did not seem not to be a result of the disease itself. Their results indicate that cognitive dysfunction in celiac patients could be related to long-term symptoms from chronic disease, in general. Source: J Clin Gastroenterol. 2018 Mar 1. doi: 10.1097/MCG.0000000000001018.
  10. Celiac.com 04/27/2018 - The latest market research shows that the gluten-free food boom is being driven by people looking to improve their diets with healthier, more nutritious food, rather than concerns about gluten intolerance or celiac disease. A recent survey showed that gluten-free items were the top bakery choice for consumers. That news led DuPont Nutrition & Health to begin trials in its bakery center in an effort to improve their product offerings. The company said in a news release that the trend was driven by people looking to improve their diets with healthier food, rather than concerns about gluten intolerance or celiac disease. Additionally, consumers are looking for better quality and wider availability in their favorite specialty foods. Even though just under 1% of the population avoids gluten due to celiac disease, more than 10% of people in Italy and the U.K. choose gluten-free products, while in France and Spain, about 8% of consumers choose gluten-free. Obviously, these numbers greatly exceed the number of people with celiac disease, and that is part of the power driving the rapid expansion of gluten-free products. According to DuPont’s reading of the Mintel study data shows “untapped potential for bakers to develop more and better-quality products with extra nutritional benefits,” including products that are high in fiber, devoid of added preservatives, and low in saturated fats, carbohydrates and calories. These numbers help to dispel the idea that the gluten-free food explosion is simply a passing fad. In any case, building an association between good nutrition and gluten-free bakery products can only help food makers with global consumers who are actively seeking one. Read more at: fooddive.com
  11. Celiac.com 04/10/2018 - Celiac disease is a multi-system disorder with manifestations that may result in psychiatric disorders. Does that mean that celiac disease patients are more likely to take psychotropic drugs than other gastrointestinal patients? A team of researchers recently set out to assess the prevalence of medication use to treat psychiatric disorders in celiac disease patients compared to other gastrointestinal patients. The research team included Haley M. Zylberberg, Jonas F. Ludvigsson, Peter H. R. Green, and Benjamin Lebwohl. They are variously affiliated with the Division of Digestive and Liver Diseases, Department of Medicine, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, USA; the Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Pediatrics, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; the Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, USA; and with the Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University in New York, NY, USA. For their cross-sectional study, the team compiled data on patients undergoing esophago-gastroduodenoscopy over 9-years at a celiac disease referral center. They then compared rates of psychotropic medication use among 1,293 celiac disease patients to a control group of 1,401 patients with abdominal pain or reflux. Average patient age was 48.4 years, nearly 70% were female, and 22.7% used some sort of psychotropic medication. Overall, the team found no difference between rates of psychotropic medication use among celiac disease patients compared to control subjects. However, they did find that people with celiac disease were more likely to use antidepressants. This was confirmed using both univariate and multivariate analysis. Psychotropic medication use was not connected with either the duration or mode of presentation of celiac disease. So, even though the data show that celiac disease patients may use more antidepressants, they use psychotropic medications at similar rates as those with other gastrointestinal diseases. From these data, the study team suggests that researchers should try to assess whether people with celiac disease suffer from mood disorders that are not treated with medications. Source: BMC Psychiatry. 2018; 18: 76. Published online 2018 Mar 27. doi: &nbsp;10.1186/s12888-018-1668-0
  12. Celiac.com 04/26/2018 - Emily Dickson is one of Canada’s top athletes. As a world-class competitor in the biathlon, the event that combines cross-country skiing with shooting marksmanship, Emily Dickson was familiar with a demanding routine of training and competition. After discovering she had celiac disease, Dickson is using her diagnosis and gluten-free diet a fuel to help her get her mojo back. Just a few years ago, Dickson dominated her peers nationally and won a gold medal at Canada Games for both pursuit and team relay. She also won silver in the sprint and bronze in the individual race. But just as she was set to reach her peak, Dickson found herself in an agonizing battle. She was suffering a mysterious loss of strength and endurance, which itself caused huge anxiety for Dickson. As a result of these physical and mental pressures, Dickson slipped from her perch as one of Canada's most promising young biathletes. Eventually, in September 2016, she was diagnosed with celiac disease. Before the diagnosis, Dickson said, she had “a lot of fatigue, I just felt tired in training all the time and I wasn't responding to my training and I wasn't recovering well and I had a few things going on, but nothing that pointed to celiac.” It took a little over a year for Dickson to eliminate gluten, and begin to heal her body. She still hasn’t fully recovered, which makes competing more of a challenge, but, she says improving steadily, and expects to be fully recovered in the next few months. Dickson’s diagnosis was prompted when her older sister Kate tested positive for celiac, which carries a hereditary component. "Once we figured out it was celiac and we looked at all the symptoms it all made sense,” said Dickson. Dickson’s own positive test proved to be both a revelation and a catalyst for her own goals as an athlete. Armed with there new diagnosis, a gluten-free diet, and a body that is steadily healing, Dickson is looking to reap the benefits of improved strength, recovery and endurance to ramp up her training and competition results. Keep your eyes open for the 20-year-old native of Burns Lake, British Columbia. Next season, she will be competing internationally, making a big jump to the senior ranks, and hopefully a regular next on the IBU Cup tour. Read more at princegeorgecitizen.com
  13. Celiac.com 04/17/2018 - Could the holy grail of gluten-free food lie in special strains of wheat that lack “bad glutens” that trigger the celiac disease, but include the “good glutens” that make bread and other products chewy, spongey and delicious? Such products would include all of the good things about wheat, but none of the bad things that might trigger celiac disease. A team of researchers in Spain is creating strains of wheat that lack the “bad glutens” that trigger the autoimmune disorder celiac disease. The team, based at the Institute for Sustainable Agriculture in Cordoba, Spain, is making use of the new and highly effective CRISPR gene editing to eliminate the majority of the gliadins in wheat. Gliadins are the gluten proteins that trigger the majority of symptoms for people with celiac disease. As part of their efforts, the team has conducted a small study on 20 people with “gluten sensitivity.” That study showed that test subjects can tolerate bread made with this special wheat, says team member Francisco Barro. However, the team has yet to publish the results. Clearly, more comprehensive testing would be needed to determine if such a product is safely tolerated by people with celiac disease. Still, with these efforts, along with efforts to develop vaccines, enzymes, and other treatments making steady progress, we are living in exciting times for people with celiac disease. It is entirely conceivable that in the not-so-distant future we will see safe, viable treatments for celiac disease that do not require a strict gluten-free diet. Read more at Digitaltrends.com , and at Newscientist.com
  14. Celiac.com 03/04/2016 - For anyone who hasn't seen it, the website Glutendude.com has an article titled "Why Doesn't the Military Accept Those With Celiac Disease?" The article highlights the story of a smart, capable, American who was motivated to serve in the military, but who was medically disqualified by military policy, and all had failed in all attempts to secure an admission waiver. The man was further frustrated by the fact that he had very minimal symptoms, and felt that he had the ability to serve effectively. The article also highlights the military's uneven treatment of personnel with celiac disease. Medical fitness for the military is governed mainly by the Department of Defense Medical Examination Review Board (DoDMERB), which schedules, evaluates, and certifies all applicants as "medically qualified," or as "medically does not meet the medical accession standards" for the US Service Academies, ROTC Scholarship Programs, Direct Commission Programs, and the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences. Basically, current military policy is to reject potential recruits with known celiac disease, provide some accommodation for some troops already in the service, and to provide medical discharges other troops, as needed. The military doesn't reject you if they don't know you have celiac disease, and wouldn't likely test you for celiac disease unless you pressed the issue. But if there's no official diagnosis, or no debilitating symptoms, and the recruit says nothing, then celiac disease is not a barrier to military service. And, once in the military, if the disease is kept under wraps, then it's likely it will never come up, and thus pose no problem. Going back to GlutenDude's article, here's part of a quote from the soldier who was rejected due to celiac disease: "Two years ago I was diagnosed with celiac disease, and the military does not accept people with this disease. I was medically disqualified by DODMERB, and all waiver attempts have been denied. Years of hard work, a 3.9 GPA, a 32 MCAT, and a desire to spend my entire career in the service have been for naught. The most frustrating aspect of this situation is that I have almost no physical symptoms, am not on medications, and the few symptoms I have are completely controlled by diet. Yet even though my disease would not affect my ability to serve, my dreams have come to a screeching halt." The man also points out that: "Militaries in other countries accept celiac patients like Israel. Even in our military there are celiac patients that are accommodated for, albeit ones that have already been accepted and are diagnosed after being in for some time. The fact that one percent of the population, nearly 3 million people, have no chance to give their service to their country is a disgrace." What do you think? Is the current military policy of rejecting people with celiac disease only if it becomes known a bit like Don't Ask Don't Tell? Are potentially good recruits being turned away unnecessarily? Are existing soldiers being asked to cover up a treatable medical condition for fear of being discharged? Should people with celiac disease or gluten-intolerance be able to serve in the military?
  15. Celiac.com 04/25/2018 - A team of Yale University researchers discovered that bacteria in the small intestine can travel to other organs and trigger an autoimmune response. In this case, they looked at Enterococcus gallinarum, which can travel beyond the gut to the spleen, lymph nodes, and liver. The research could be helpful for treating type 1 diabetes, lupus, and celiac disease. In autoimmune diseases, such as type 1 diabetes, lupus, and celiac disease, the body’s immune system mistakenly attacks healthy cells and tissues. Autoimmune disease affects nearly 24 million people in the United States. In their study, a team of Yale University researchers discovered that bacteria in the small intestine can travel to other organs and trigger an autoimmune response. In this case, they looked at Enterococcus gallinarum, which can travel beyond the gut to the spleen, lymph nodes, and liver. They found that E. gallinarum triggered an autoimmune response in the mice when it traveled beyond the gut. They also found that the response can be countered by using antibiotics or vaccines to suppress the autoimmune reaction and prevent the bacterium from growing. The researchers were able to duplicate this mechanism using cultured human liver cells, and they also found the bacteria E. gallinarum in the livers of people with autoimmune disease. The team found that administering an antibiotic or vaccine to target E. gallinarum suppressed the autoimmune reaction in the mice and prevented the bacterium from growing. "When we blocked the pathway leading to inflammation," says senior study author Martin Kriegel, "we could reverse the effect of this bug on autoimmunity." Team research team plans to further investigate the biological mechanisms that are associated with E. gallinarum, along with the potential implications for systemic lupus and autoimmune liver disease. This study indicates that gut bacteria may be the key to treating chronic autoimmune conditions such as systemic lupus and autoimmune liver disease. Numerous autoimmune conditions have been linked to gut bacteria. Read the full study in Science.
  16. Celiac.com 07/09/2009 - Rates of celiac disease are four times higher today than they were just fifty years ago, according to the results of a new study by scientists at the Mayo clinic. In addition, the study showed that people with undiagnosed celiac disease died at rates four times higher than non-celiacs over the 45 year follow-up period. Celiac disease is an immune system reaction to gluten in the diet which, left untreated, celiac disease causes damage to the lining of the digestive tract and leaves sufferers at risk for various cancers and other associated conditions. When people with celiac disease eat wheat, barley or rye, a protein called gluten triggers an immune system attack, which damages the villi in the small intestine.Villi are finger-like folds in the intestine that increase surface area for nutrient absorption. Celiac disease symptoms may include diarrhea, abdominal discomfort, weight loss, anemia, unexplained infertility, loss of teeth or even premature or severe osteoporosis, among others. Joseph Murray, M.D., the Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist who led the study says celiac disease "now affects about one in a hundred people. We also have shown that undiagnosed or 'silent' celiac disease may have a significant impact on survival. The increasing prevalence, combined with the mortality impact, suggests celiac disease could be a significant public health issue." So, celiac disease is striking a higher than ever portion of the population, yet doctors don't yet fully understand the reasons for this reality. A team of Mayo Clinic scientists team performed celiac disease antibody tests on blood samples gathered at Wyoming's Warren Air Force Base (AFB) between 1948 and 1954. They then compared those blood test results with results from two recently collected groups from Olmsted County, Minn. Tests for the first group were matched by age to those from the Warren AFB group at the time of the blood draw, while the second group was matched by birth years. Researchers found that young people today are 4.5 times more likely to have celiac disease than young people were in the 1950s, while those whose birth years matched the Warren AFB participants were four times more likely to have celiac disease. Celiac disease was once thought to be rare, and many physicians still regard it as so, but, according to Dr. Murray, that is no longer the case. "Celiac disease is unusual, but it's no longer rare," he says. Dr. Murray adds: "Something has changed in our environment to make it much more common. Until recently, the standard approach to finding celiac disease has been to wait for people to complain of symptoms and to come to the doctor for investigation. This study suggests that we may need to consider looking for celiac disease in the general population, more like we do in testing for cholesterol or blood pressure." For Dr. Murray, the findings underscore the importance of raising awareness of celiac disease, both among physicians and patients. He adds that some studies "have suggested that for every person who has been diagnosed with celiac disease, there are likely 30 who have it, but are not diagnosed. And given the nearly quadrupled mortality risk for silent celiac disease we have shown in our study, getting more patients and health professionals to consider the possibility of celiac disease is important." One interesting point not touched on in the study is the increase in the gluten content of commercial varieties of wheat now being grown compared to gluten levels of 50 years ago. Additionally, people are eating more wheat and gluten than ever before. (http://www.mayoclinic.org/bio/13032852.html) Gastroenterology, July 2009;137(1)pp 373-374
  17. Celiac.com 04/19/2018 - Previous genome and linkage studies indicate the existence of a new disease triggering mechanism that involves amino acid metabolism and nutrient sensing signaling pathways. In an effort to determine if amino acids might play a role in the development of celiac disease, a team of researchers recently set out to investigate if plasma amino acid levels differed among children with celiac disease compared with a control group. The research team included Åsa Torinsson Naluai, Ladan Saadat Vafa, Audur H. Gudjonsdottir, Henrik Arnell, Lars Browaldh, and Daniel Agardh. They are variously affiliated with the Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Karolinska University Hospital and Division of Pediatrics, CLINTEC, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institute, Sodersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Mathematical Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Diabetes & Celiac Disease Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; and with the Nathan S Kline Institute in the U.S.A. First, the team used liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS) to analyze amino acid levels in fasting plasma samples from 141 children with celiac disease and 129 non-celiac disease controls. They then crafted a general linear model using age and experimental effects as covariates to compare amino acid levels between children with celiac disease and non-celiac control subjects. Compared with the control group, seven out of twenty-three children with celiac disease showed elevated levels of the the following amino acids: tryptophan; taurine; glutamic acid; proline; ornithine; alanine; and methionine. The significance of the individual amino acids do not survive multiple correction, however, multivariate analyses of the amino acid profile showed significantly altered amino acid levels in children with celiac disease overall and after correction for age, sex and experimental effects. This study shows that amino acids can influence inflammation and may play a role in the development of celiac disease. Source: PLoS One. 2018; 13(3): e0193764. doi: & 10.1371/journal.pone.0193764
  18. Celiac.com 04/16/2018 - A team of researchers recently set out to investigate whether alterations in the developing intestinal microbiota and immune markers precede celiac disease onset in infants with family risk for the disease. The research team included Marta Olivares, Alan W. Walker, Amalia Capilla, Alfonso Benítez-Páez, Francesc Palau, Julian Parkhill, Gemma Castillejo, and Yolanda Sanz. They are variously affiliated with the Microbial Ecology, Nutrition and Health Research Unit, Institute of Agrochemistry and Food Technology, National Research Council (IATA-CSIC), C/Catedrático Agustín Escardin, Paterna, Valencia, Spain; the Gut Health Group, The Rowett Institute, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK; the Genetics and Molecular Medicine Unit, Institute of Biomedicine of Valencia, National Research Council (IBV-CSIC), Valencia, Spain; the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton, Cambridgeshire UK; the Hospital Universitari de Sant Joan de Reus, IISPV, URV, Tarragona, Spain; the Center for regenerative medicine, Boston university school of medicine, Boston, USA; and the Institut de Recerca Sant Joan de Déu and CIBERER, Hospital Sant Joan de Déu, Barcelona, Spain The team conducted a nested case-control study out as part of a larger prospective cohort study, which included healthy full-term newborns (> 200) with at least one first relative with biopsy-verified celiac disease. The present study includes 10 cases of celiac disease, along with 10 best-matched controls who did not develop the disease after 5-year follow-up. The team profiled fecal microbiota, as assessed by high-throughput 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing, along with immune parameters, at 4 and 6 months of age and related to celiac disease onset. The microbiota of infants who remained healthy showed an increase in bacterial diversity over time, especially by increases in microbiota from the Firmicutes families, those who with no increase in bacterial diversity developed celiac disease. Infants who subsequently developed celiac disease showed a significant reduction in sIgA levels over time, while those who remained healthy showed increases in TNF-α correlated to Bifidobacterium spp. Healthy children in the control group showed a greater relative abundance of Bifidobacterium longum, while children who developed celiac disease showed increased levels of Bifidobacterium breve and Enterococcus spp. The data from this study suggest that early changes in gut microbiota in infants with celiac disease risk could influence immune development, and thus increase risk levels for celiac disease. The team is calling for larger studies to confirm their hypothesis. Source: Microbiome. 2018; 6: 36. Published online 2018 Feb 20. doi: 10.1186/s40168-018-0415-6
  19. Celiac.com 09/24/2012 - With all the problems that go along with celiac disease, it can be hard to see any benefits to having the disease. However, it would seem that such benefits do exist: a recent study in Sweden shows that women suffering from celiac disease are actually at a decreased risk of developing breast, endometrial and ovarian cancer. Data was collected from 28 Swedish pathology departments, identifying 17,852 biopsy-diagnosed women diagnosed with celiac disease between the years of 1969 and 2007. Women in the celiac group were age-matched and compared with a control group of 88,400 women. Risk of breast, endometrial and ovarian cancer were all estimated using the Cox regression model in both groups. Results showed an inverse relationship between celiac disease and all three forms of cancer. With breast cancer rates, women with celiac disease had a hazard ratio of 0.89 (meaning for every 100 women in the control group, only 89 in the celiac disease group developed breast cancer). Women with celiac disease also had a hazard ratio of 0.89 for ovarian cancer. For endometrial cancer, the decreased risk was even more pronounced with a hazard ratio of 0.6. All calculations carried a confidence interval of 95%. These numbers became even more pronounced after omitting the first year of followup after diagnosis (presumably the gluten-free diet 'adjustment period'). Breast cancer's hazard ratio fell to 0.82, ovarian cancer's hazard ratio fell to .72 and endometrial cancer's hazard ratio fell to 0.58. The study suggests that this negative correlation could be a result of shared risk factors or early menopause associated with celiac disease. Looking at the numbers though, particularly the 'adjustment period' drop off, one has to wonder if the gluten-free diet has some part to play in this as well. Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21953605
  20. Celiac.com 04/14/2018 - There is a revolutionary new book about gluten sensitivity and celiac disease, written by Dr. Gordon Heinrichs, D.C. (whose article appears in this issue). His careers as a medical laboratory technologist, then a chiropractor, have uniquely located him to see gluten's impact on health in an entirely new way. His book critiques relevant scientific explorations and discoveries and the ensuing clinical practices. Titled "Celiac Disease & Gluten Sensitivity: A troubled past, but a promising future", this exciting book is a breath of fresh air in the field of gluten sensitivity and celiac disease. Dr. Heinrichs' thoughtful analysis of relevant data combined with the application of practical common sense explodes some of the common medical myths that claim to distinguish gluten sensitivity from celiac disease. He also explores conventional wisdom around dietary experimentation, and offers a rational approach to diagnosing gluten sensitivity. The evidence Heinrichs provides raises questions about the view that we should continue to eat gluten until we can visit a gastroenterologist and get a biopsy taken. He also challenges the belief that HLA analysis is beneficial for those who are aware that gluten causes some or all of their health problems. After a preview of the final draft, I can confidently predict that anyone who is interested in thoughtful, objective, and health promoting insights into gluten's impact on human health will be intrigued and motivated by the offerings of this inexpensive, powerful new ebook. I recommend it without reservation. It is very well researched and written and is now available on Amazon. I hope it will become the new best seller among books that explore the gluten syndrome.
  21. Celiac.com 04/12/2018 - Some parents are are apparently feeding their children a dangerous bleach-like concoction in an effort to ‘cure’ autism. The concoction, misleadingly called miracle mineral solution or master mineral solution or MMS, has been around for many years, with proponents claiming it can cure multiple illnesses and medical conditions. It cannot. There is currently no cure for autism, just as there is currently no cure for celiac disease. While researchers have found no direct link between autism and celiac disease, studies have confirmed a strong association between autism and the presence of antibodies to gluten. There is also at least one case of celiac disease presenting as autism. In fact, the most commonly requested dietary intervention for Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a gluten-free and casein free diet. Among medical professionals however, the top treatment choice for autism still remains Applied Behavior Analysis. Still, those medical realities don’t seem to stop people from making dangerously false claims about the alleged benefits of MMS, including the false claim that MMS can ‘cure’ autism. Those false claims have led to well-meaning, if misguided parents from using the concoction in the desperate belief that it will ‘cure’ their children of autism. Most recently, an Indiana mother recently gained media attention after allegedly using MMS on her autistic daughter in an effort to ‘cure’ her autism. According to the mother, she got the idea from a Facebook group. MMS is an unlicensed product that is basically a concoction of sodium chlorite and citric powder, known to make up chlorine bleach. It is potentially dangerous and offers no cure for autism, celiac disease, or any other medical condition. MMS is medically useless and dangerous. High doses of the product could lead to nausea, diarrhea, vomiting, and dehydration. In fact, in 2010, the FDA released a warning that describes the mixture as a potent bleach used for stripping textiles and industrial water treatment. In the warning, FDA recommends that consumers stop using the MMS immediately and throw it away. "There is no proper scientific evidence of any kind that any products 'cure' autism and these products are dangerous," says The National Autistic Society. If you or a loved one suffers from autism, or from celiac disease, please consult a medical professional. Do not use potentially dangerous home treatments, especially those you learn about online.
  22. Celiac.com 04/03/2018 - A gluten-free diet is crucial to avoiding problems associated with celiac disease. However, many gluten-free foods come with drawbacks that are important to understand. Also, not all gluten-free food is created equal, not all gluten-free foods are healthy, and simply going gluten-free may not resolve all of your issues. Here are some things to keep in mind about a gluten-free diet: Gluten-Free food is more expensive than food made with wheat flour. In fact, gluten-free substitutes are about twice as expensive as standard foods. They are more costly to make, and they sell in lower volume, which pushes up retail prices. Like many of their non-gluten-free counterparts, gluten-free foods can be highly processed. Processed foods can promote inflammation, which is one of the things that people with celiac disease are trying to avoid. Gluten-Free does not automatically mean nutritious. In fact, gluten-free food is generally less nutritious than similarly processed foods made with wheat flour. Foods that are naturally gluten-free will generally be healthier than gluten-free substitutes. That may seem obvious, but if you look at the gluten-free food aisle in your local store, you will see many highly processed foods that are not any better than their gluten-containing counterparts in terms of general nutrition. Gluten-free foods are often higher in carbohydrates and calories than their non-gluten-free counterparts. Gluten-Free food is higher in salt than its non-gluten-free counterparts. Recent products tests show that most gluten-free snacks tested are far saltier than their non-gluten-free alternatives. Of 106 products surveyed, researchers found that many gluten-free snacks have up to five times more salt than non-gluten-free counterparts. Gluten-Free food is higher in fat than its non-gluten-free counterparts. Gluten-Free food is higher in sugar than its non-gluten-free counterparts. Gluten-Free ingredients don’t always mean gluten-free food. The news is riddled with stories about gluten contamination in restaurants, pizza joints, etc., that claim to use gluten-free ingredients. Examples of companies that rolled out gluten-free pizza only to be met with complaints by people with celiac disease include: California Pizza Kitchen, Domino’s pizza, and Papa John’s, among others. The longer you avoid gluten, the more sensitive you may become. For many people with celiac disease, the longer they avoid gluten, the more sensitive they become. This can mean stronger, more lengthy reactions to seemingly minor gluten ingestion, so be careful. A gluten-free diet will not reverse osteoporosis, or iron and calcium deficiency. If your celiac disease progressed for a long time before your diagnosis, then the odds are much more likely that you have suffered from osteoporosis, iron and calcium deficiency. A gluten-free diet alone will not reverse osteoporosis, or calcium deficiency. In such cases, you will need to consult your doctor for proper treatment. Osteoporosis is especially problematic in women with celiac disease.
  23. Celiac.com 04/02/2018 - Exactly how hard is it for people with celiac disease to faithfully follow a gluten-free diet? Anyone who’s ever tried to completely avoid gluten for any length of time likely has a story to tell about accidental gluten consumption, and the consequences that follow. It’s not at all uncommon for gluten-free celiacs to be exposed to low levels of gluten that can trigger symptoms and cause persistent intestinal histologic damage. To gain an understanding of gluten consumption across a wide population of celiac patients, a team of researchers recently set out to determine how much gluten people eat when they are trying to follow a gluten-free diet. The team included Jack A Syage, Ciarán P Kelly, Matthew A Dickason, Angel Cebolla Ramirez, Francisco Leon, Remedios Dominguez, and Jennifer A Sealey-Voyksner. They are variously affiliated with ImmunogenX in Newport Beach, CA, the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center at Harvard Medical School in Boston MA, and with Biomedal in Seville, Spain. The team began by analyzing data from previous clinical studies. That meta-analysis focused on data from a clinical study of gluten in stool and urine in celiac patients, a second study on non-celiac populations; and an analysis of data from trials for the investigational therapeutic latiglutenase. As part of the stool and urine studies the team included controlled gluten challenges. They then applied a calibration factor that allowed normal ingestion of gluten to be computed from the urine and stool measurements. They determined gluten consumption by estimating how much gluten was eliminated from patients’ diets due to a trial effect that resulted in improved histology, even in the placebo group. Using the stool test, the team estimated the average inadvertent exposure to gluten by celiac disease individuals on a GFD to be about 150–400 mg/d, while they estimated the median exposure to be about 100–150 mg/d. Using the urine test, those numbers showed an average exposure of about 300–400 mg/d, with a median of about 150 mg/d. Meanwhile, data analyses showed that celiac patients with moderate to severe symptoms showed that patients ingested substantially more than 200 mg/d of gluten. The data indicate that many gluten-free celiacs regularly consume enough gluten to trigger symptoms and perpetuate gut damage. Source: The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Volume 107, Issue 2, 1 February 2018
  24. Celiac.com 06/15/2015 - It's well-documented that people with active celiac disease are more likely to have osteoporosis and increased risk of fractures. High-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) allows for three-dimensional exploration of bone micro-architecture, including measurement of cortical and trabecular compartments, and providing detailed information on bone disease pathophysiology and fracture. Using HR-pQCT, research team recently set out to assess the volumetric and micro-architectural characteristics of peripheral bones. that is the distal radius and tibia, in adult pre-menopausal women with active freshly diagnosed celiac disease. The research team included María Belén Zanchetta, Florencia Costa, Vanesa Longobardi, Gabriela Longarini, Roberto Martín Mazure, María Laura Moreno, Horacio Vázquez, Fernando Silveira, Sonia Niveloni, Edgardo Smecuol, María de la Paz Temprano, Hui Jer Hwang, Andrea González, Eduardo César Mauriño, Cesar Bogado, Jose R. Zanchetta, an dJulio César Bai. They are variously affiliated with the IDIM, Instituto de Diagnóstico e Investigaciones Metabólicas, and with the Cátedra de Osteología y Metabolismo Mineral, Universidad del Salvador, Buenos Aires, Argentina. For the study, their team prospectively enrolled 31 consecutive premenopausal women with newly diagnosed celiac disease (median age 29 years, range: 18–49) and 22 healthy women of similar age (median age 30 years, range 21–41) and body mass index. Using HR-pQCT, the team was able to successfully identify significant deterioration in the micro-architecture of trabecular and cortical compartments of peripheral bones. HR-pQCT revealed that most bone micro-architecture parameters were substantially reduced in celiac disease patients compared to a control group. Twenty-two patients showed symptomatic celiac disease. These patients had a greater bone micro-architectural deficit than those with sub-clinical celiac disease. Impaired bone micro-architecture could be one cause of diminished bone strength and higher risk of fractures seen in many celiac patients. The researchers are looking to conduct a follow-up of this group of patients. They want to know whether bone micro-architecture recovers with a gluten-free diet, and, if so, how quickly and to what extent. Source: BONE July 2015, Volume 76, Pages 149–157. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bone.2015.03.005
  25. Celiac.com 04/09/2018 - Children with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) often have enlarged tonsils and adenoids. Additionally, lymphatic hyperplasia, an increase in the number of normal cells that are contained in lymph nodes, is common to both OSA and celiac disease. Lymphoid hyperplasia is usually due to an infection with bacteria, viruses, or other types of germs and is part of the body's reaction to the infection. A team of researchers recently set out to investigate the effect of a gluten-free diet on OSA symptoms in children with celiac disease. The research team included A Yerushalmy-Feler, R Tauman, A Derowe, E Averbuch, A Ben-Tov, Y Weintraub, D Weiner, A Amir, H Moran-Lev, and S Cohen. They are variously affiliated with the Pediatric Gastroenterology Unit, the Pediatric ENT Unit, and the Pediatric Sleep Center at "Dana-Dwek" Children's Hospital, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center in Tel Aviv, Israel; and the Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel. The team recruited children with celiac disease from ages 2-18 before the children began a gluten-free diet. As a control group, the team included children with negative celiac serology who underwent gastrointestinal endoscopies for other reasons. All participants completed a validated OSA-related symptoms questionnaire and the pediatric sleep questionnaire (PSQ) at the start of the study, and again 6 months later. The team recruited thirty-four children with celiac disease, along with twenty-four control subjects. Both groups were similar in terms of gender, body mass index or season at recruitment between the two groups. The control group showed more OSA-related symptoms compared to the celiac group, both at recruitment and at the 6-month follow-up. Both groups showed significant improvement in PSQ scores at the 6-month follow-up, but improvement was significantly higher in the celiac group compared to the control group. Kids with celiac disease had fewer OSA-related symptoms than control subjects, but they had much higher levels of symptom improvement once they were on a gluten-free diet. Overall, the data from this study suggests that a gluten-free diet provides strong improvement of OSA-related symptoms in children with celiac disease. Source: BMC Pediatr. 2018 Feb 7;18(1):35. doi: 10.1186/s12887-018-1039-5.
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