Jump to content
  • Sign Up

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'celiac'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Celiac Disease: Diagnosis, Recovery, Related Disorders & Research
    • Gluten-Free and Celiac Disease Calendar of Events
    • Celiac Disease - Pre-Diagnosis, Testing & Symptoms
    • Celiac Disease - Post Diagnosis, Recovery/Treatment(s)
    • Celiac Disease - Related Disorders & Research
    • Dermatitis Herpetiformis
    • Gluten Intolerance and Behavior
  • Celiac Disease Support & Help
    • Celiac Disease - Coping With
    • Celiac Disease - Parents of Kids or Babies With Celiac Disease
    • Gab/Chat Room - To Discuss Anything BUT Celiac Disease / Gluten-Free Diet
    • Celiac Disease - Doctors
    • Celiac Disease - Teenagers & Young Adults Only
    • Celiac Disease - Pregnancy
    • Celiac Disease - Friends and Loved Ones of Celiacs
    • Celiac Meeting Room
    • Celiac Disease - Sleep
    • Celiac Disease - Support Groups
  • Gluten-Free Lifestyle
    • Gluten-Free Foods, Products, Shopping & Medications
    • Gluten-Free Recipes - Baking & Cooking Tips
    • Gluten-Free Restaurants
    • Gluten-Free Ingredients & Food Labeling Issues
    • Celiac Disease - Publications & Publicity
    • Gluten-Free Travel
    • Gluten-Free Diet & Weight Issues
    • Gluten-Free International Room (Outside USA)
    • Gluten-Free Sports and Fitness
  • When A Gluten-Free Diet Just Isn't Enough
    • Other Food Intolerance and Leaky Gut Issues
    • Super Sensitive Celiacs & Gluten Sensitive
    • Alternative Diets
  • Forum Technical Assistance
    • Board/Forum Technical Help
  • DFW/Central Texas Celiacs's Events
  • DFW/Central Texas Celiacs's Groups/Organizations in the DFW area

Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Categories

  • Celiac.com Sponsors
  • Celiac Disease
  • Safe Gluten-Free Food List / Unsafe Foods & Ingredients
  • Gluten-Free Food & Product Reviews
  • Gluten-Free Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: American & International Foods
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Biscuits, Rolls & Buns
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Noodles & Dumplings
    • Gluten-Free Dessert Recipes: Pastries, Cakes, Cookies, etc.
    • Gluten-Free Bread Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Flour Mixes
    • Gluten-Free Kids Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Snacks & Appetizers
    • Gluten-Free Muffin Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Pancake Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Pizza Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Soups, Sauces, Dressings & Chowders
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Cooking Tips
    • Gluten-Free Scone Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Waffle Recipes
  • Celiac Disease Diagnosis, Testing & Treatment
  • Miscellaneous Information on Celiac Disease
    • Additional Celiac Disease Concerns
    • Celiac Disease Research Projects, Fundraising, Epidemiology, Etc.
    • Conferences, Publicity, Pregnancy, Church, Bread Machines, Distillation & Beer
    • Gluten-Free Diet, Celiac Disease & Codex Alimentarius Wheat Starch
    • Gluten-Free Food Ingredient Labeling Regulations
    • Celiac.com Podcast Edition
  • Celiac Disease & Gluten Intolerance Research
  • Celiac Disease & Related Diseases and Disorders
    • Lists of Diseases and Disorders Associated with Celiac Disease
    • Addison's Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Anemia and Celiac Disease
    • Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia and Celiac Disease
    • Arthritis and Celiac Disease
    • Asthma and Celiac Disease
    • Ataxia, Nerve Disease, Neuropathy, Brain Damage and Celiac Disease
    • Attention Deficit Disorder and Celiac Disease
    • Autism and Celiac Disease
    • Bacterial Overgrowth and Celiac Disease
    • Cancer, Lymphoma and Celiac Disease
    • Candida Albicans and Celiac Disease
    • Canker Sores (Aphthous Stomatitis) & Celiac Disease
    • Casein / Cows Milk Intolerance and Celiac Disease
    • Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Celiac Disease
    • Cognitive Impairment and Celiac Disease
    • Crohn's Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Depression and Celiac Disease
    • Dermatitis Herpetiformis: Skin Condition Associated with Celiac Disease
    • Diabetes and Celiac Disease
    • Down Syndrome and Celiac Disease
    • Dyspepsia, Acid Reflux and Celiac Disease
    • Epilepsy and Celiac Disease
    • Eye Problems, Cataract and Celiac Disease
    • Fertility, Pregnancy, Miscarriage and Celiac Disease
    • Fibromyalgia and Celiac Disease
    • Flatulence (Gas) and Celiac Disease
    • Gall Bladder Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Gastrointestinal Bleeding and Celiac Disease
    • Geographic Tongue (Glossitis) and Celiac Disease
    • Growth Hormone Deficiency and Celiac Disease
    • Heart Failure and Celiac Disease
    • Infertility, Impotency and Celiac Disease
    • Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Intestinal Permeability and Celiac Disease
    • Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Celiac Disease
    • Kidney Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Liver Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Lupus and Celiac Disease
    • Malnutrition, Body Mass Index and Celiac Disease
    • Migraine Headaches and Celiac Disease
    • Multiple Sclerosis and Celiac Disease
    • Myasthenia Gravis Celiac Disease
    • Obesity, Overweight & Celiac Disease
    • Osteoporosis, Osteomalacia, Bone Density and Celiac Disease
    • Psoriasis and Celiac Disease
    • Refractory Celiac Disease & Collagenous Sprue
    • Sarcoidosis and Celiac Disease
    • Scleroderma and Celiac Disease
    • Schizophrenia / Mental Problems and Celiac Disease
    • Sepsis and Celiac Disease
    • Sjogrens Syndrome and Celiac Disease
    • Skin Problems and Celiac Disease
    • Sleep Disorders and Celiac Disease
    • Thrombocytopenic Purpura and Celiac Disease
    • Thyroid & Pancreatic Disorders and Celiac Disease
    • Tuberculosis and Celiac Disease
  • The Origins of Celiac Disease
  • Gluten-Free Grains and Flours
  • Oats and Celiac Disease: Are They Gluten-Free?
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2018 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2018 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2018 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2018 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2017 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2017 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2017 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2017 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2016 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2016 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2016 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2016 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2015 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2015 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2015 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2015 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2014 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2014 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2014 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2014 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2013 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2013 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2013 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2013 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2012 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2012 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2012 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2012 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2011 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2011 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2006 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2005 Issue
  • Celiac Disease Support Groups
    • United States of America: Celiac Disease Support Groups and Organizations
    • Outside the USA: Celiac Disease Support Groups and Contacts
  • Celiac Disease Doctor Listing
  • Kids and Celiac Disease
  • Gluten-Free Travel
  • Gluten-Free Cooking
  • Gluten-Free
  • Allergy vs. Intolerance
  • Tax Deductions for Gluten-Free Food
  • Gluten-Free Newsletters & Magazines
  • Gluten-Free & Celiac Disease Links
  • History of Celiac.com
    • History of Celiac.com Updates Through October 2007
    • Your E-mail in Support of Celiac.com 1996 to 2006

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Interests


Location

Found 1,857 results

  1. Celiac.com 12/11/2018 - In most people without celiac disease or other gluten sensitivities, the gut does a pretty good job of processing gluten, and helps to prevent local inflammatory and immune responses. However, in about one percent of the population, gluten proteins from wheat and related cereals trigger an HLA DQ2/8‐restricted TH1 immune and antibody response, which triggers celiac disease. A team of researchers recently set out to assess the role of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in orchestrating gliadin activities in celiac disease. The research team included Valeria R Villella, Andrea Venerando, Giorgio Cozza, Speranza Esposito, Eleonora Ferrari, Romina Monzani, Mara C Spinella, Vasilis Oikonomou, Giorgia Renga, Antonella Tosco, Federica Rossin, Stefano Guido, Marco Silano, Enrico Garaci, Yu‐Kai Chao, Christian Grimm, Alessandro Luciani, Luigina Romani, Mauro Piacentini, Valeria Raia, Guido Kroemer, Luigi Maiuri. Researchers understand that epithelial stress and innate immune activation are necessary for overcoming oral tolerance to the gluten gliadin. However, exactly how gliadin subverts host intestinal mucosal defenses is poorly understood. In their study, the research team shows that the α‐gliadin‐derived LGQQQPFPPQQPY peptide (P31–43) reduces the activity of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), an anion channel pivotal for epithelial adaptation to cell‐autonomous or environmental stress. P31–43 binds to, and reduces ATPase activity in, the nucleotide‐binding domain‐1 (NBD1) of CFTR, thus interferes with CFTR function. This process creates epithelial stress, tissue transglutaminase and inflammasome activation, NF‐κB nuclear translocation and IL‐15 production, all of which can be blocked by potentiators of CFTR channel gating. The CFTR potentiator VX‐770 reduces gliadin‐induced inflammation and increases tolerance in gluten‐sensitive mice and cells from celiac patients. The team’s study shows that CFTR plays a central role in orchestrating gliadin activities, and presents potentially powerful new treatment direction for celiac disease. Source: The EMBO Journal (2018) DOI 10.15252/embj.2018100101 | Published online 29.11.2018 The researchers are variously affiliated with the European Institute for Research in Cystic Fibrosis, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy; the Department of Comparative Biomedicine and Food Science, University of Padova, Padova, Italy; the Department of Molecular Medicine, University of Padova, Padova, Italy; the Department of Health Sciences, University of Eastern Piedmont, Novara, Italy; the Department of Experimental Medicine, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy; the Pediatric Unit, Department of Translational Medical Sciences, Regional Cystic Fibrosis Center, Federico II University Naples, Naples, Italy; the Department of Biology, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Rome, Italy. Department of Chemical, Materials and Production Engineering, Federico II University Naples, Naples, Italy; the Department of Food Safety, Nutrition and Veterinary Public Health, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Roma, Italy; the University San Raffaele and IRCCS San Raffaele, Rome, Italy; the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Munich (LMU), Munich, Germany; the Institute of Physiology CH, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland; the National Institute for Infectious Diseases IRCCS “L. Spallanzani”, Rome, Italy; the Centre de Recherche des Cordeliers, Equipe labellisée Ligue Nationale Contrele Cancer, Paris, France; the Centre de Recherche des Cordeliers, INSERM U, Paris, France; the Université Paris Descartes, Paris, France; the Metabolomics and Cell Biology Platforms, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France; the Pôle de Biologie, Hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou, AP‐HP, Paris, France; and the Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institute, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
  2. Celiac.com 12/10/2018 - More and more people are eating gluten-free for non-medical reasons. These days, people with celiac disease make up a small percentage of overall gluten-free food sales. However, the effects of eliminating or reducing wheat, barley and rye ingredients from the diets of in healthy adults have not been well studied. A team of researchers recently set out to assess the effects of a gluten-free diet in healthy adults. To make their assessment, the researchers conducted a randomized, controlled, cross-over trial of 60 middle-aged Danish adults with no known diseases. The trial included two 8-week assessments comparing a low-gluten diet of 2 grams of gluten per day, and a high-gluten diet of 18 grams of gluten per day, separated by a washout period of at least six weeks with habitual diet including 12 grams of gluten per day. Compared with a high-gluten diet, the data show that a low-gluten diet triggers slight changes in the intestinal microbiome, increases food and drink intake and postprandial hydrogen exhalation, and reduces self-reported bloating. The team’s data indicate that results of a low-gluten diet in non-celiac adults are likely triggered by qualitative changes in dietary fiber. Studies like this are important for understanding the effects of a gluten-free diet in both celiacs and non-celiacs alike. Better understanding of a gluten-free diet will help doctors, celiac patients, and healthy individuals to make better, more informed dietary decisions. Source: Nature Communications; volume 9, Article number: 4630 (2018) The research team included Lea B. S. Hansen, Henrik M. Roager, Nadja B. Søndertoft, Rikke J. Gøbel, Mette Kristensen, Mireia Vallès-Colomer, Sara Vieira-Silva, Sabine Ibrügger, Mads V. Lind, Rasmus B. Mærkedahl, Martin I. Bahl, Mia L. Madsen, Jesper Havelund, Gwen Falony, Inge Tetens, Trine Nielsen, Kristine H. Allin, Henrik L. Frandsen, Bolette Hartmann, Jens Juul Holst, Morten H. Sparholt, Jesper Holck, Andreas Blennow, Janne Marie Moll, Anne S. Meyer, Camilla Hoppe, Jørgen H. Poulsen, Vera Carvalho, Domenico Sagnelli, Marlene D. Dalgaard, Anders F. Christensen, Magnus Christian Lydolph, Alastair B. Ross, Silas Villas-Bôas, Susanne Brix, Thomas Sicheritz-Pontén, Karsten Buschard, Allan Linneberg, Jüri J. Rumessen, Claus T. Ekstrøm, Christian Ritz, Karsten Kristiansen, H. Bjørn Nielsen, Henrik Vestergaard, Nils J. Færgeman, Jeroen Raes, Hanne Frøkiær, Torben Hansen, Lotte Lauritzen, Ramneek Gupta, Tine Rask Licht and Oluf Pedersen. They are variously affiliated with the National Food Institute; the Department of Biotechnology and Biomedicine, Technical University of Denmark; the Department of Bio and Health Informatics; the Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering at the Technical University of Denmark in Lyngby, Denmark; the Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences; the Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports; the Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports; and the Department of Veterinary Disease Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen in Frederiksberg, Denmark; the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark; the Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Copenhagen University Hospital Hvidovre in Hvidovre, Denmark; the Department of Radiology, Bispebjerg Hospital in Copenhagen, Denmark; the Department of Autoimmunology & Biomarkers, Statens Serum Institut in Copenhagen, Denmark; the Department of Biology and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology in Gothenburg, Sweden; the School of Biological Sciences, The University of Auckland in Auckland, New Zealand; the Bartholin Institute, Rigshospitalet in Copenhagen, Denmark; the Research Centre for Prevention and Health, The Capital Region of Denmark in Frederiksberg, Denmark; the Research Unit and Department of Gastroenterology, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, the Capital Region of Denmark in Herlev, Denmark; with Clinical-Microbiomics A/S in Copenhagen, Denmark; the Department of Microbiology and Immunology, KU Leuven–University of Leuven, Rega Institute; and VIB, Center for Microbiology in Leuven, Belgium; with Biostatistics, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen in Copenhagen, Denmark; the Laboratory of Genomics and Molecular Biomedicine, Department of Biology; the Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Basic Metabolic Research; the Department of Radiology, Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark; and the Department of Biomedical Sciences; and the department of Biostatistics at the Department of Public Health at the University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
  3. Celiac.com 12/07/2018 - What do hypertension, obesity, smoking and celiac disease have in common? They’re all important risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD), a disease that kills more than a half a million people annually in the U.S. alone.(1) Based on emerging research, celiac disease may be a major contributor to heart disease in the Western world –making celiac disease an even greater public health threat than is currently understood. CHD and Celiac Disease: A Brief History The connection between CHD and celiac disease has a 35-year history. It began with a 1976 study conducted by Southampton University Hospital researchers, who found that there was an “… apparent protective effect of coeliac disease on CHD risk which “…might result from malabsorption of dietary lipids.”(2) However, this study had a number of significant flaws including a small sample size of only seventy seven. The most significant confounder in this study was the mortality rate of young subjects, which precluded them from the privilege of living long enough to develop CHD. Additionally, our understanding of CHD has undergone a paradigm shift since the low-fat 1970’s. CHD is not the result of excess dietary fat consumption, but instead is a manifestation of prolonged inflammation.(3) Based on this study and two others published around the same time period which found no link between CHD and celiac disease, researchers largely stopped investigating the heart health of people with celiac disease. The assumption was that celiac disease provided protection or, at the very least, was benign in terms of CHD risk. Then came a paper published in the July 2003 Archives of Internal Medicine which reported that celiac disease patients had a sixty percent increased risk of CHD death.(4) More recently, in a January 2011 Circulation paper, Swedish researchers published eye-catching results from an investigation of more than 15,000 individuals with celiac disease.(5) The key finding from this research was an approximately twenty percent increased risk of CHD death in people with celiac disease. While this research remains in its infancy, the biological connections between celiac disease and CHD are crystal clear, bolstering the epidemiological findings that people with celiac disease are at heightened CHD risk. CHD Today Before delving into the physiological link between CHD and celiac disease, it’s crucial to understand the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, or narrowing of the heart’s arteries. Atherosclerosis begins with an injury to the endothelial lining of the coronary artery. A hyperactive response by immune cells, particularly macrophages and inflammatory cytokines, causes macrophage cells to become lodged inside the injured endothelium. Through a complex cascade of cell signaling, “trapped” macrophages transform into what are known as foam cells. These foam cells take in circulating blood lipids, especially low density lipoproteins (LDL). Over time this LDL/foam cell mishmash transforms into the arterial plaque most people are familiar with.(6) Inflammation fuels atherosclerosis from start to finish –from the initial injury to the development and accumulation of plaque. The Inflammation Connection Unfortunately, inflammation is something that people with celiac disease have more than enough of. Serum C-reactive protein (CRP) is a commonly used parameter for celiac disease diagnoses –suggesting that nearly all uncontrolled celiac disease patients have elevated inflammation levels.(7) CRP also happens to be a more sensitive indicator of impending heart disease risk than serum cholesterol. Cleveland Clinic cardiologist Eric Topol claims that “…in the past, people talked about their cholesterol levels. In the next decade everyone will need to know their C-reactive protein level (a marker of inflammation).”(8) Other inflammatory mediators –such as IL-6 and TNF-a—are also present in greater amounts in celiac disease patients compared to the general population. In addition to the inflammatory response to ingested gluten, a March 2009 genetic analysis found that individuals with celiac disease were more likely to have polymorphisms that promote inflammatory cytokine production. (9) Other Links in the Chain And, there’s more to this celiac disease/CHD story than inflammation. People with celiac disease tend to have comorbidities that compound celiac disease’s damage to the cardiovascular system. Fat Malabsorption Dietary fats are a heart-health double edged sword. Excessive intake of trans fats are strongly linked to dyslipidemia and heart disease. However, a recent American Journal of Clinical Nutrition meta-analysis which included over 340,000 research subjects in its analysis found no connection between saturated fat and heart disease. (10) Monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats are protective against atherosclerosis. Omega-3 fats appear to confer a particularly strong cardiovascular disease prevention benefit.(11) Adequate intake and absorption of fats is crucial for CHD prevention. Indeed, a low-fat dietary pattern was shown to increase heart disease risk in a large-scale randomized control trial involving more than 48,000 subjects.(12) Absorption of dietary fats is severely impacted by celiac disease due to villous atrophy, pancreatic insufficiency and dysbiosis. Lewis et al found that untreated celiac disease patients had approximately twenty one percent lower serum cholesterol levels compared to the general population, suggesting severe fat malabsorption.(13) Based on this research and others it’s conceivable that many celiac disease patients don’t absorb the dietary fats required to combat heart disease. Vitamin Malabsorption Suboptimal nutrient absorption is a near-universal issue in celiac disease patients – even for individuals consuming a gluten free diet. Fat soluble vitamin absorption is particularly affected by celiac disease.(14) Poor absorption of fat soluble vitamins E and D has been tied to increased heart disease risk in several studies. (15) Homocysteine Homocysteine is an amino acid that becomes elevated in cases of vitamin B6, folic acid or vitamin B12 deficiency. Poor B-complex vitamin absorption is common in both newly diagnosed celiac disease and in celiac disease patients following a gluten free diet.(16) An October 2002 Meta-analysis found that homocysteine levels twenty five percent above normal levels boosted heart attack risk by eleven percent.(17) Due to its strong correlation with heart disease, the American Heart Association suggests that individuals with malabsorption symptoms, including celiac disease, should be screened for homocysteine.(17) Simone Saibeni, MD and her University of Milan colleagues justified this recommendation by finding that celiac disease patients were 3.5 times more likely to have elevated hyperhomocysteinemia than the general population.(16) Type 1 Diabetes (DM1) Approximately five percent of people with celiac disease also suffer from DM1.(18) Hyperglycemia promotes inflammation, endothelium stiffness and arterial plaque formation. Rheumatism Symptoms of rheumatism, especially Sjogrens syndrome and unexplained joint pain, are common symptoms of undiagnosed celiac disease. Lubrano et al found that twenty five percent of individuals with celiac disease also have arthritis.(19) A 2008 population study discovered that people with rheumatoid arthritis have double the heart attack and stroke risk of the general population.(20) Whole Grain Intake Whole grain intake is strongly associated with a decreased risk of CHD.(21). Avoidance of fortified whole grains by people with celiac disease may impact dietary intake of B-vitamins, dietary fiber and antioxidants. How People With Celiac Disease Can Fight CHD Preventing CHD in the celiac disease population isn’t dramatically different from what’s typically recommended to the general population. Maintaining a healthy body weight, eating adequate amounts of dietary fiber, staying physically active, avoiding trans fats and consuming monounsaturated fats regularly are the keys to cardiovascular health whether or not one has been diagnosed with celiac disease. However, there are a few important heart health caveats that those with celiac disease should keep in mind. Gluten-Free Diet The importance of a 100 percent gluten free diet for CHD risk reduction and overall health cannot be emphasized enough. Not only is it the most effective treatment for celiac disease, but it is also critical for limiting the inflammatory response that promotes atherosclerosis.(22,23) Additionally, a strict gluten free diet allows the intestine to heal and recover, boosting absorption of nutrients necessary for cardiovascular health. Multivitamin Supplementation Multivitamin/Multimineral supplementation is standard treatment for celiac disease today.(24) Supplementation helps partly compensate for malabsorption and suboptimal intake of vitamins and minerals. A multivitamin supplement for CHD prevention should include at least 100 percent of the RDA for folic acid, vitamin B12, vitamin B6, and fat-soluble vitamins D and E. Dietary Fats “Fat is the most commonly and severely affected nutrient in celiac disease,” reports Jay W. Marks, M.D., of Baylor University College of Medicine.(25) Individuals with celiac should aim to consume at least twenty five percent of their calories in the form of dietary fat. Healthy monounsatured and polyunsatured fat sources such as extra virgin olive oil, nuts, legumes, fatty fish, and seeds should form the foundation of a heart healthy celiac disease diet. Pancreatic enzymes may be used to aid lipid absorption and reduce gastrointestinal symptoms like diarrhea and bloating. Omega-3 Fats Omega-3 fats reduce inflammation, increase HDL cholesterol and make cardiovascular arteries resistant to injury. Zhang et al discovered that habitual fish consumption was associated with a forty percent reduction in CHD mortality in healthy populations.(26) Omega-3 fatty acids may have additional benefits for celiac disease patients, especially acceleration of intestinal healing. Celiac disease patients should consume fatty fish like mackerel and salmon at least twice weekly. Conclusion Celiac disease needn’t be an automatic CHD death sentence. Although the connection between heart disease and celiac disease is very real, lifestyle changes can dramatically reduce the chances that someone with celiac disease will develop CHD. Simply eating a gluten-free diet, supplementing with vitamins, minerals and pancreatic enzymes and consuming omega-3 fats –four measures that those with celiac disease should be doing anyway – will shield the cardiovascular system from much of the celiac disease-derived damage that can lead to CHD. In fact, this new link can ultimately become a net positive for many celiac disease patients as it can motivate them to become more proactive and aggressive in their self-care. References: 1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Heart Disease Facts; Available at: https://www.cdc.gov/heartdisease/facts.htm. Accessed April 18th 2011. 2. Whorwell PJ, Foster KJ, Alderson MR, Wright R. Death From Ischaemic Heart-Disease and Malignancy in Adult Patients With Celiac Disease. Lancet 1976;113-114. 3. Pearson TA, Mensah GA, Alexander RW, et al. Markers of inflammation and cardiovascular disease, application to clinical and public health practice: a statement for healthcare professionals from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American Heart Association. Circulation [serial online].2003;107:499-511 4. Peters U, Askling J, Gridley G, et al. Causes of death in patients with celiac disease in a population-based Swedish cohort. Arch Intern Med. 2003;163:1566–1572. 5. Ludvigsson JF, James S, Askling J, Stenestrand U, Ingelsson E. Nationwide cohort study of risk of ischemic heart disease in patients with celiac disease. Circulation. 2011 Feb 8;123(5):483-90 6. Gotta A, Farmer F. Atherosclerosis: Pathogenesis, Morphology, and Risk Factors. Cardiovascular Medicine. 3rd Edition, Springer, London, pp. 1593-1613. 7. Lahat N, Shapiro S, Karban A, et al. Cytokine profile in coeliac disease. Scand J Immunol 1999;49:441–446 8. Role of inflammation-Growing proof inflammation is a major risk factor for heart disease. Available at: http://www.clevelandclinic.org/heartcenter/pub/news/hot/inflammation8_02.asp?firstCat=1&secondCat=429&thirdCat=524. Updated 8/02. Accessed April 18th 2011. 9. Dema B, Martínez A, Fernández-Arquero M, The IL6-174G/C polymorphism is associated with celiac disease susceptibility in girls. Hum Immunol 2009;70:191-4 10. Siri-Tarino SW, Sun Q, Hu FB, Krauss RM. Meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies evaluating the association of saturated fat with cardiovascular disease. Am J Clin Nutr [serial online]. 2010;91:535-546. 11. Perez-Jimenez F, Lopez-Miranda J, Mata P. Protective effect of dietary monounsaturated fat on arteriosclerosis: beyond cholesterol. Atherosclerosis 2002;163:385–98 12. Howard BV, Van Horn L, Hsia J, et al. Low-fat dietary pattern and risk of cardiovascular disease: the Women’s Health Initiative Randomized Controlled Dietary Modification Trial. JAMA. 2006; 295:655-66 13. Lewis NR, Sanders DS, Logan RF, Fleming KM, Hubbard RB, West J. Cholesterol profile in people with newly diagnosed coeliac disease: a comparison with the general population and changes following treatment. Br J Nutr. 2009 Aug;102(4):509-13 14. Hallert C, Grant C, Grehn S, Granno C, Hulten S, Midhagen G, Strom M, Svensson H, Valdimarsson T. Evidence of poor vitamin status in coeliac patients on a gluten-free diet for 10 years. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2002;16:1333–1339 15. Sesso HD et al.Vitamins E and C in the prevention of cardiovascular disease in men: the Physicians’ Health Study II randomized controlled trial. JAMA. 2008 Nov 12;300(18):2123-33 16. Saibeni S, Lecchi A, Meucci G, et al. Prevalence of hyperhomocysteinemia in adult gluten-sensitive enteropathy at diagnosis: role of B12, folate, and genetics. Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol 2005;3:574e80 17. Malinow MR, Bostom AG, Krauss RM. Homocyst(e)ine, diet, and cardiovascular diseases: a statement for healthcare professionals from the Nutrition Committee, American Heart Association. Circulation. 1999;99:178–182 18. Ludvigsson JF, Olsson T, Ekbom A, Montgomery SM. A population-based study of coeliac disease, neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory diseases. Aliment Pharmacol Ther 2007; 25:1317 19. Lubrano E, Ciacci C, Ames PR, et al. The arthritis of celiac disease: prevalence and pattern in 200 adult patients. Br J Rheumatol 1996;35:1314-8 20. Dhawan SS, Quyyumi AA. Rheumatoid arthritis and cardiovascular disease. Curr Atheroscler Rep. 2008;10:128-133 21. Jensen MK, Koh-Banerjee P, Hu FB, et al. Intakes of whole grains, bran, and germ and the risk of coronary heart disease in men. Am J Clin Nutr. 2004;80(6):1492-1499 22. Meresse B, Cerf-Bensussan N. Celiac disease: from oral tolerance to intestinal inflammation, autoimmunity and lymphomagenesis. Mucosal Immunol. 2009;2:8e23 23. Popa C, Netea MG, van Riel PL, van der Meer JW, Stalenhoef AF. The role of TNF-a in chronic inflammatory conditions, intermediary metabolism, and cardiovascular risk. J Lipid Res. 2007;48:751–62 24. See J, Murray JA. Gluten-free diet: the medical and nutrition management of celiac disease. Nutr Clin Pract. 2006;21(1):1-15. 25. Marks, J. “Celiac Disease (Gluten Enteropathy)”Available at: https://www.medicinenet.com/celiac_disease_gluten_enteropathy/article.htm. Accessed April 29th 2011. 26. Zhang J, Sasaki S, Amano K, et al. Fish consumption and mortality from all causes, ischemic heart disease, and stroke: an ecological study. Prev Med. 1999; 28: 520–529.
  4. Celiac.com 12/06/2018 - The growing popularity of gluten-free foods has led to numerous new products for consumers, but it has also led to some problems. One recent study showed that up to one-third of foods sold as gluten-free contain gluten above 20ppm allowed by federal law. Other studies have shown that restaurant food labeled as “gluten-free” is often contaminated with gluten. The problem of gluten in commercial food labeled gluten-free is not isolated to the United States. Recent studies abroad show that the problem exists in nearly every gluten-free market in every country. In Australia, for example, researchers from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute in Melbourne found detectable gluten in almost 3% of 256 commonly purchased “gluten-free” manufactured foods, a study published in the Medical Journal of Australia on Monday says. Furthermore, the study shows that nearly 10% of restaurant dishes sold as "gluten-free" contain unacceptable levels of gluten. Now, the Australians have a stricter standard than nearly anyone else, so look for them to be on top of potential problems with gluten contamination in gluten-free products. The study did not name the food manufacturers responsible for the contaminated products, but did note that better, more frequent gluten testing by manufacturers would make gluten-free foods safer for people with celiac disease. In a related study, the same researchers found in May that nearly one in ten samples of “gluten-free” dishes from restaurants within the City of Melbourne contained gluten levels in excess of the official Food Standards Australia New Zealand definition of gluten-free. “It’s troubling to think that these foods could be hindering the careful efforts of patients trying their best to avoid gluten,” an author of the study, Dr Jason Tye-Din, said. A spokeswoman from Coeliac Australia said the organization was taking the findings seriously. “The research team that conducted this study has liaised with the food companies and is following up the positive samples with further retesting to ensure the issue is resolved,” she said. In addition to urging consumers to be diligent in reading labels, and to report any suspect products, “Coeliac Australia advises all people with coeliac disease to have regular medical check-ups as they do have a serious autoimmune condition and medical assessment is important to determine that their gluten-free diet is going well and no complications are developing.” Read more at: TheGuardian.com
  5. Celiac.com 12/05/2018 - Everyone with celiac disease has their war stories. Stories of uncomfortable of painful symptoms. Stories of tough, slow diagnosis. Of accidental gluten ingestion. Picture the worst case of celiac disease you can imagine with bad symptoms and a seemingly endless quest for a diagnosis. Now imagine you’re ten years old and that worst case is you. That’s the story of 10-year-old Lillian Bordoni, whose positive attitude is helping her to recover from the worst case of Celiac Disease that Children’s Hospital Colorado has ever seen, and inspiring even the doctors she credits with saving her life. Bordoni’s book, “Cecilia the Celiac Superhero,” tells the story of her long and complicated fight with celiac disease, and she prevailed via a diagnosis, a gluten-free diet, and eventually, a change of location. She hopes to someday share her story with others. It’s a story that starts when Lillian was around four years old and living with her family in Kansas. Lillian suffered from what were, in retrospect classic symptoms of celiac disease. However, a diagnosis remained elusive. The family saw numerous doctors until they found a doctor who tested her for celiac disease and made a formal diagnosis. Even after the whole family cut out gluten, Lillian will still unable to keep food down, and lacked the energy to play outdoors. Eventually, the Bordonis traveled to the celiac clinic at Children’s Hospital Colorado, where Dr. Edward Hoffenberg helped them to figure out that Lillian’s problems were being aggravated by the fact that the family lived “in the heart of wheat country,” said Lillian’s mom, Miriah Bordoni. “There was wheat farming all around us. There were four of the largest grain elevators within blocks of our house that were processing wheat 365 days a year.” Breathing gluten every day was not an option, so the family moved to Colorado. Ever since then, Lillian has been healthy. Her experience has inspired her to write a book about her challenges with celiac disease. Of her book, Lillian says “It’s about Cecilia which is this girl here, and she has to beat gluten and cross contamination, which I had to beat too, but I turned it into like a superhero story so that it would be fun and interesting for all kids.” Lillian is in the beginning stages of having her book published. Once that happens, Children’s Hospital Colorado will distribute copies to all newly diagnosed celiac patients. Read more.
  6. Celiac.com 12/04/2018 - In a major development in wheat genetics, the International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium (IWGSC) recently presented the first high-quality fully annotated reference genome sequence of the bread wheat variety Chinese Spring. The IWGSC Reference Sequence (RefSeqv1.0), catalogues the location and structure of more than 107,000 genes, and 4 million markers, across all 21 chromosomes of the wheat variety - some associated with important agricultural features. According to the authors, the sequence can be used for both genetic research projects and CRISPR- based genome modification. The results of a later study appear in Science. In that study, researchers used the new reference genome to perform a genome-wide analysis of the expression of homoelogs, genetic copies that are similar, but have different origins. Mapping these genetic features will improve scientists’ understanding of the basic structures of polyploid wheat. By combining gene expression datasets with the IWGSC RefSeqv1 wheat genome sequence, the researchers demonstrated the balance of gene expression among homeologs across the various tissues, developmental stages and cultivars of wheat. The team identified tissue-specific biases in gene expression and co-expression networks during development and exposure to stress, and their work offers a way to target key genes responsible for valuable agricultural traits in wheat. In a third study that also made use of the new IWGSC reference sequence, researchers closely examined the proteins contributing to various wheat-immune diseases and allergies, such as celiac disease, baker's asthma and wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (WDEIA). Certain proteins in wheat can trigger serious allergic reactions in sensitive individuals. Celiac disease, for example, is triggered by prolamin proteins gliadin and glutenin in wheat. Moreover, respiratory or skin exposure to other types of proteins have also been implicated in adverse immune responses. However, because of the complexity of the wheat genome, and the paucity of comprehensive genome information, a detailed description of these proteins has remained out of reach until now. A research team led by Angela Juhász used the IWGSC RefSeqv1.0 wheat genome to search for the genes that encode known allergy-inducing wheat proteins and mapped each across the entire sequence. The team’s analysis revealed previously unknown genes potentially related to immune-responsive proteins. Their results show that the genes associated with celiac and WDEIA are found in wheat’s starchy endosperm, the main ingredient in baking flour. Also, several lipid transfer proteins and alpha-amylase trypsin inhibitor gene families play a role in baker's asthma. Interestingly, the study showed that temperature stress during flowering can boost wheat’s natural levels of prominent celiac and WDEIA proteins. The researchers' detailed analysis offers important insights into the role of environment and growing conditions on the levels of proteins problematic for human consumers, they say. Their work will also inform production of low allergy wheat varieties, among others useful to the food industry. The many discoveries and breakthroughs in genetic analysis and engineering promise a very bright future when it comes to understanding and treating celiac disease, and numerous other anti-inflammatory diseases. Stay tuned as more developments unfold. Read more at Eurekalert.org
  7. Celiac.com 12/03/2018 - Biomarkers in blood samples are not effective indicators for diagnosis or monitoring of celiac disease. A team of researchers recently set out to assess biomarkers of celiac disease derived from neoepitopes of deamidated gliadin peptides (DGP) and tTG fragments, and to assess their usefulness in identifying patients with celiac disease with mucosal healing. The research team included RS Choung, SK Rostamkolaei, JM Ju, EV Marietta, CT Van Dyke, JJ Rajasekaran, V Jayaraman, T Wang, K Bei, KE Rajasekaran, K Krishna, HK Krishnamurthy, and JA Murray. They are variously affiliated with the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; Vibrant Sciences LLC, San Carlos, CA, USA; and with the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. The team began by analyzing serum samples from 90 patients with biopsy-proven celiac disease, along with 79 healthy control subjects for immune reactivity against the tTG-DGP complex. They used a fluorescent peptide microarray platform to estimate the antibody binding intensity of each synthesized tTG-DGP epitope. They validated results in 82 patients with newly diagnosed celiac disease, and in 217 control subjects. They assessed the ability of the peptide panel to spot patients with mucosal healing based on histologic results and using serum samples from 85 patients with treated and healed celiac disease; 81 patients with treated but unhealed celiac disease who showed villous atrophy despite adhering to a gluten-free diet; 82 patients with untreated celiac disease; 27 disease control subjects who showed villous atrophy without celiac disease; and 217 healthy control subjects. To assess their data, they relied on principal component analysis followed by machine learning and support vector machine modeling. In all, the team found 172 immunogenic epitopes of the tTG-DGP complex. Compared with control subjects, celiac patients showed substantially higher immune reactivity against these epitopes. In the test group, neoepitopes derived from the tTG-DGP complex identified people with celiac disease with a remarkable 99% sensitivity and 100% specificity. Blood samples from untreated celiac patients showed the greatest average antibody-binding intensity against the tTG-DGP complex. Blood from patients with treated but unhealed CeD mucosa (15.1 ± 7.5) showed significantly higher average antibody-binding intensity than blood from patients with treated and healed CeD mucosa (5.5±3.4) (P<.001). The test spotted celiac patients with healing mucosa with 84% sensitivity and 95% specificity. The research team discovered immunogenic epitopes of the tTG-DGP complex, and found that a test that measures immune response to epitopes accurately identified both celiac patients and patients with mucosal healing. From this study, the team concludes that the biomarker method for celiac testing could be useful in both the detection and monitoring of celiac disease. Read more at: Gastroenterology.
  8. How long did it take you to get your blood test results? How were you notified of the results (letter, phone call etc.)?
  9. Celiac.com 11/28/2018 - Patients with gluten ataxia without enteropathy have lower levels of antigliadin antibodies (AGA) compared to patients with celiac disease. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (NAA/Cr area ratio) of the cerebellum improves in patients with gluten ataxia following a strict gluten-free diet, and is associated with an improvement in symptoms. A team of researchers recently set out to present their experience of the effect of a gluten-free diet in patients with ataxia and low levels of AGA antibodies measured by a commercial assay. The research team included Marios Hadjivassiliou, Richard A Grünewald, David S Sanders, Panagiotis Zis, Iain Croall, Priya D Shanmugarajah, Ptolemaios G Sarrigiannis, Nick Trott, Graeme Wild, and Nigel Hoggard. They are variously affiliated with the Academic Departments of Neurosciences and Neuroradiology; the Departments of Gastroenterology, the Departments of Dietetics; the Departments of Immunology, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, in Sheffield, UK. The team conducted MR spectroscopy on 21 consecutive patients with ataxia and serum AGA levels below the positive cut-off for celiac disease, but above a re-defined cut-off in the context of gluten ataxia, at baseline and after a gluten-free diet. Of the 21 included patients with gluten ataxia, the team found that ten were on a strict gluten-free diet with elimination of AGA, 5 were on a gluten-free diet, but continued to have AGA, while 6 patients did not follow a gluten-free diet. The NAA/Cr area ratio from the cerebellar vermis increased in all patients on a strict gluten-free diet, increased in only 1 out of 5 patients on a gluten-free diet with persisting circulating AGA, and decreased in all patients who did not follow a gluten-free diet. From these results, the team concludes that patients with ataxia and low levels of AGA benefit from a strict gluten-free diet. The results suggest an urgent need to redefine the serological cut-off for circulating AGA in the diagnosis of gluten ataxia. Read more in Nutrients 2018, 10(10), 1444; doi:10.3390/nu10101444
  10. Celiac.com 11/26/2018 - Many people with celiac disease suffer from headaches. A team of researchers recently set out to more thoroughly explore the relationship between celiac disease and headaches. The research team included Panagiotis Zis, Thomas Julian, and Marios Hadjivassiliou. They are variously affiliated with the Academic Department of Neurosciences, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Sheffield S10 2JF, UK, and the Medical School of the University of Sheffield in Sheffield, UK. The team's goal was to establish the relationship between headaches and celiac disease, and vice versa, to explore the role of a gluten-free diet, and to describe the imaging findings in celiac patients affected by headaches. For their systematic review and meta-analysis, the team reviewed 40 articles published in the the PubMed database between 1987 and 2017. They included information regarding study type, population size, the age group included, prevalence of celiac disease among those with headache and vice versa, imaging results, the nature of headache, and response to gluten-free diet. They found that the average pooled rate of headaches in celiac patients was 26% (95% CI 19.5–33.9%) in adult populations and 18.3% (95% CI 10.4–30.2%) in pediatric populations. The headaches usually resemble migraines. Children with headaches of unknown origin, have celiac disease rates of 2.4% (95% CI 1.5–3.7%). There is presently no good data for adult populations. In such cases, brain imaging can be normal, but can also reveal cerebral calcifications with CT, white matter abnormalities with MRI, and deranged regional cerebral blood flow with SPECT. The good news is that a gluten-free diet seems to be an effective treatment. Up to 75% of celiac patients saw their headaches resolve when they followed a gluten-free diet. Celiac patients have high rates of idiopathic headache (that is, headaches of unknown cause), and patients with such headaches have higher rates of celiac disease. Therefore, patients with headache of unknown origin should be screened for celiac disease, since they may gain symptom relief from a gluten-free diet. Source: Nutrients 2018, 10(10), 1445; doi:10.3390/nu10101445
  11. Celiac.com 11/23/2018 - The complex factors that lead to the development of celiac disease in a given individual are the subject of much research. The immune system, genetics and the environment (meaning factors in an individual’s life that would influence the development of disease) all play an important part in this process. Current research on celiac disease focuses on the immune system; scientists are working to understand the exact chain of events that occur in the gut when gluten is introduced for the first time. Understanding these events could yield insight into treatments for celiac disease that interrupt this process. Celiac disease is the only autoimmune disorder where the trigger is known: gluten. Researchers use celiac disease as a model for studying the pathogenesis of other autoimmune diseases. Other researchers are examining the role of environmental factors and the added risk they bring to an individual who already is at risk for celiac disease. These factors include the influence of breastfeeding, the timing of the introduction of cereals, intestinal infection as a precursor to celiac disease, cultural factors, geography, and more. Genetic research has determined that there are two genetic haplotypes that are necessary for the development of celiac disease; an affected individual need only to have one of these genetic haplotypes to be at risk. These factors are HLA DQ2 and HLA DQ8. HLA stands for Human Leukocyte Antigen. Antigens are substances that produce an immune response—we have many antigens in our bodies that are supposed to do that. HLA are molecules that present on the surface of cells to help the immune system to distinguish antigens that are supposed to be in the body, versus antigens that aren’t. While other genes may play a role in the process, we can conclude with virtual certainty that an individual who tests negative for DQ2 or DQ8 will not develop celiac disease. We also know that 30% of the US population has the genetic makeup for celiac disease. While it is encouraging to see a surge of interest in celiac disease research, people with celiac disease have to make choices every day that affect their health, and knowing a bit more about the immune system may make this process easier. Myths about what it means to have an autoimmune disorder are common. Knowledge about this area can help one sort out the myths and find the facts about what it means to have celiac disease. What Does the Immune System Do? The immune system provides the human body with several levels of defense from foreign invaders like bacteria and viruses. The first layer of protection is our skin. If an invader finds its way into the body, however, the second level of defense mobilizes to destroy the invader before it can replicate. Some types of invaders already replicate and invade surrounding cells before the immune system can destroy them—and there is a sophisticated type of immune response to eliminate these types of invaders. The most important decision that the immune system makes when it encounters an “invader” is to determine whether or not it is “self” (is it supposed to be in the human body?) or “non-self” (is this a virus or bacteria that will cause illness?). HLA helps the immune system by tagging cells as “self” or “non-self” to allow the immune system to attack the true invaders. In the case of celiac disease, HLA tags the antigen presenting cell as non-self, when it should be tagged as self. The human body as a house Think of the human body as a house. The exterior of the house (the roof, the brick, the door, and the windows) is like the skin of a human body, protecting everything inside. The house has an alarm system, to detect invaders. The alarm system is the body’s immune system. There is a cat inside the house, sleeping on the couch. How is the immune system supposed to work? If a burglar (who is not supposed to be in the house) comes to the side window and tries to break in, there may be a broken window, but the alarm sounds and the burglar runs away. Everything inside the house is safe. How does the immune system work when someone has celiac disease? The cat wakes up from its nap and gets a drink of water. The alarm goes off, when it’s not supposed to. The cat sets off the alarm every time it moves, but other than this, the alarm works perfectly, keeping out all of the true invaders. In other words, the immune system of an individual with celiac disease is healthy and normal in every respect, save one. The presence of gluten, and only gluten, causes a malfunction of the immune system. In our example, the cat represents gluten—it is supposed to be in the house, yet every time it moves the alarm goes off. This means that removing gluten from the diet of a person with celiac disease returns their immune system to a normal and healthy state, equal to that of someone who does not have celiac disease. Many people with celiac disease feel that they are immune compromised, which is not the case. If the house in our example represented someone with an immune compromised condition, the alarm would rarely if ever go off (invaders could enter the body without any resistance). For this reason, flu shots for people with celiac disease do not represent a concern (unless you are allergic to eggs) and people with celiac disease should receive the shot with the general population, and not the special populations who are immune compromised (the elderly, children, etc.). When should gluten be introduced to a child at risk for celiac disease? When a person with celiac disease has a baby, there is a great deal of concern regarding the child’s potential for developing celiac disease—this is understandable. One of the most troubling questions facing parents is when to introduce gluten to their child. It is a common recommendation to delay the introduction of gluten until one year of age. Unfortunately, this recommendation is based on wheat allergy, and not autoimmunity. Fortunately, recent research published in the Journal of the American Medical Association has affirmed earlier research from Finland on this subject as well as what has been a common practice throughout Europe. A protective window Researchers at the University of Colorado recently announced the results of a 10 year study on the introduction of cereals in children at risk for celiac disease. Their study demonstrated that infants who received cereals containing gluten between four to six months of age were not as likely to develop celiac disease by the age of five as were children who received gluten containing cereals at younger and older ages. The infants who received cereals between one and three months of age were five times as likely to develop celiac disease, and children who received cereals after six months of age had an elevated risk for developing celiac disease, but not to the extent of the youngest age group. Is it a gluten response? Many parents are concerned about whether or not their child will have an autoimmune response to gluten when introduced to cereals. It may help to know that it typically takes six to nine months for a child to mount an autoimmune response to gluten—if celiac disease is to occur early in their life. Therefore, a response (such as diarrhea or vomiting) shortly after cereals are introduced or eaten is usually not related to celiac disease. What about breast milk? A mother with celiac disease needs to remain on the gluten-free diet throughout pregnancy and breast-feeding. However, it is a common misconception that breast-feeding moms who are not celiac should go on a gluten-free diet while nursing. Microscopic amounts of gluten are carried in breast milk, but it is not enough to harm a child. In fact, research from Finland shows that breast milk has a protective effect in the gut when gluten is introduced to a child. This research recommends that when introducing gluten between four and six months of age, breast feeding should continue during this time to confer an added immune benefit. Understanding a bit more about the immune system may be helpful as you make decisions about your health, and the health of your family. It can be reassuring to know that the immune system of a person with celiac disease on the gluten-free diet is as healthy as an average person without celiac disease.
  12. Celiac.com 11/19/2018 - People with celiac disease cannot reliably determine whether they ate gluten or not based on symptoms, however severe those symptoms may be, according to research presented by Amanda K. Cartee, MD, of the Mayo Clinic, and her colleagues, at the American College of Gastroenterology Annual Meeting in Philadelphia. Because there is presently no FDA-approved test to confirm gluten exposure, celiac patients commonly rely on the presence or absence of gastrointestinal or other symptoms as an indicator of gluten exposure. But how reliable is that method? Not very reliable at all, says Dr. Cartee. Now, the study was small, but it was also rigorous. Dr. Cartee and her associates developed a double-blind, placebo-controlled gluten challenge to identify the rapid onset of symptoms after gluten ingestion, and to figure out if celiac patients could really tell whether they had been exposed to gluten. Researchers recruited 14 patients with celiac disease and 14 healthy controls for the trial. They then randomly assigned each patient to receive either a 6 g gluten suspension or placebo. Each patient completed a 100 mm visual analog questionnaire to assess their symptoms at baseline, every 30 minutes to 60 minutes for 6 hours and then daily for 3 days. The researchers also asked patients at each time point if they believed they received gluten. During the study, only two of the seven celiac patients who received gluten were able to correctly identify the gluten suspension. Cartee said it took a full day for one patient to come to that conclusion, while another gave varied responses sporadically throughout the study. Nausea and abdominal pain were the most common symptoms for celiac patients. Interestingly, there was no statistical difference in symptoms in the gluten celiac disease group compared with the placebo celiac disease group. That is, celiac disease patients receiving the placebo reported symptoms that the same rate as those who received actual gluten. So, not only could the celiac patients not tell when they got gluten, they also couldn’t tell when they got a placebo. Dr. Cartee said because physical symptoms are subjective and non-specific, they are largely unreliable for self-diagnosing gluten exposure. Dr. Cartee is calling for the development of a better, more objective way to identify gluten-related symptoms, especially in celiac patients with ongoing gastrointestinal symptoms. Do you have celiac disease? Would you welcome an easy reliable way to determine gluten exposure? How would you find it helpful? Source: Healio
  13. Celiac.com 11/15/2018 - Gluten-free products, marketed as such, were largely unknown 20 years ago, but the gluten-free industry is set to reach an estimated $2.34 billion in sales by 2019. That’s more than double figures for 2014. The growth has been exponential. What sets gluten-free foods apart from other culinary trends or diet fads is that they address a legitimate health concern that affects millions of people around the world. With the massive influx of gluten-free products, and the expansion of “gluten-free” restaurant options, it’s easy to forget that gluten exists in some obvious and not so obvious places that people with celiac disease need to avoid. Here are 15 foods or food ingredients that many people wrongly assume are gluten-free: Beer Light or dark, lager, IPA or Stout, traditional beer is brewed with barley, and is not gluten-free. However, a number of major and micro breweries create tasty gluten-free alternatives. There are a number of tasty, award winning beers that are brewed from gluten-free ingredients and are fully gluten-free. There are also gluten-reduced beers. These beers are brewed like traditional beers and EU regulations allow for gluten-removed beer to be labeled as gluten-free. Plenty of people with celiac disease do fine drinking these beers, but many do not. Know your beer, know your body, and drink accordingly. Read more at Celiac.com's Oktoberfest Beer Guide! Gluten-free vs. Gluten-removed Beers. Barbecue Sauce Many barbecue sauces use artificial colors, flavorings or thickeners that may contain gluten, so it’s important to check labels, and even contact a manufacturer if you're not sure about something. Couscous, Tabbouleh and Falafel Couscous and bulgar are wheat and are used in many different Middle-eastern foods, and some people do not realize that they contain gluten. Bulgar or couscous are also used to make another popular Middle-eastern dish called tabbouleh (salad). Couscous or wheat flour are sometimes used to make falafel, so be sure to ask about the ingredients before eating. Candy Always be careful about candy. Many candies are safe and gluten-free, but many candies are not. Sometimes trusted products can change. Read labels, check websites, contact manufacturers as needed, and be careful! If you’re not sure, Celiac.com’s Annual Safe Gluten-Free Halloween Candy List is a good place to start. Cookie Dough This might seem obvious, but cookie dough, unless specifically gluten-free, almost always contains standard wheat flour and is not gluten-free. Dried Spices Some manufacturers actually use flour to keep their spices from clumping. Pay special attention to spice blends and mixes, including curry powders, which may contain wheat. Gravies, Soups, Sauces and Mixes—Packaged, Canned, or Jarred If you’ve ever made gravy from scratch, you might recall that it involves making a roux, a paste of butter and flour which thickens the gravy and gives it a nice sheen. Well, roux is also used as a thickening agent in many packaged, canned or jarred gravies, soups, sauces and mixes. Even some fresh soups may contain wheat or flour. Gazpacho, for example, can be made gluten-free, but most recipes call for a piece of bread soaked in sherry vinegar and blended into the soup. When it comes to gluten in soup, eater beware! Hot Dogs & Sausages The bun is an obvious source of gluten, but the dog itself can contain traces of wheat as well in the form of both filler and binder. So check labels, know the ingredients, and double-check when it comes to hot dogs and sausages. Ice Cream Although many ice creams are gluten-free, some may contain wheat in the form of added ingredients, like cookie dough, toppings or candy pieces. Double-check the ingredients to be safe. Packaged Deli Meats, Marinated or Pre-Seasoned Meats & Vegetable Proteins Packaged, marinated meat, fish, chicken, or other meats may contain gluten as a binder or hidden ingredient. Some vegetable-based proteins like Seitan contain gluten. Also, many deli meats claim to be gluten-free, but the same companies have released specific lines of gluten-free meats, raising the question of why they needed a separate product in the first place. Deli meats are controlled by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, not the Food and Drug Administration, which currently uses a different gluten-free standard. Prescription Drugs, Vitamins and Supplements Even though they are not technically foods, and they are meant to keep you healthy, prescription drugs, vitamins and supplements may contain gluten as binders, typically in the form of wheat starch. Ask you pharmacist for guidance, read labels closely, and make phone calls to companies or visit their Web sites to be sure. Salad Dressings Many salad dressings have updated their recipes to exclude any wheat or barley-derived additives, but some still contain gluten, especially the powdered mix kind. Soy Sauce Most soy sauces contain wheat and should be avoided. Be sure to find a gluten-free soy sauce. Sushi Although raw fish by itself is gluten-free, there are many ingredients in sushi rolls and other items that contain soy sauce and other sources of gluten. The seaweed wrappers in sushi may contain soy sauce, and the wasabi or fake crab may contain gluten. Teriyaki sauce is another source of gluten because it is made with soy sauce. See our How to Safely Order Sushi article for more info. Teriyaki Sauce Teriyaki is nearly always made with made with soy sauce, and most commercial brands contain wheat, so be careful. Read more on: Celiac.com UNSAFE Food List Celiac.com SAFE Food List Celiac.com's SAFE and UNSAFE Halloween Candy List
  14. Celiac.com 11/13/2018 - Ubiquitin is highly conserved across eukaryotes and is essential for normal eukaryotic cell function. The bacterium Bacteroides fragilis is part of the standard human gut microbiome, and the only bacterium known to encode a homologue of eukaryotic ubiquitin. The B. fragilis gene sequence points to a previous horizontal gene transfer from a eukaryotic source. The sequence encodes a protein (BfUbb) with 63% identity to human ubiquitin, which is exported from the bacterial cell. Is molecular mimicry of human ubiquitin by gut microbe linked to autoimmune diseases like celiac disease? A team of researchers recently set out to determine if there was antigenic cross‐reactivity between B. fragilis ubiquitin and human ubiquitin and also to determine if humans produced antibodies to BfUbb. The research team included L. Stewart, J. D. M. Edgar, G. Blakely and S. Patrick. They are variously affiliated with the School of Biological Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK; the School School of Biological Sciences, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast, UK; the Regional Immunology Laboratory, Belfast Health and Social Care Trust, Belfast, UK; and the Wellcome‐Wolfson Institute for Experimental Medicine, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast, UK. Molecular model comparisons of BfUbb and human ubiquitin predicted likely structural similarity with 99.8% confidence. The team used linear epitope mapping to identify cross-reacting epitopes in BfUbb and human ubiquitin. Also, at least one epitope of BfUbb does not cross‐react with human ubiquitin. The team used enzyme‐linked immunosorbent assay to compare the reaction of human serum to BfUbb and human ubiquitin from 474 subjects among four groups: (1) newly autoantibody‐positive patients, (2) allergen‐specific immunoglobulin (Ig)E‐negative patients, (3) ulcerative colitis patients and (4) healthy volunteers. The team’s data show that the exposure to BfUbb into the human immune system triggers the creation of IgG antibodies. Patients referred for first‐time autoimmune disease testing are more likely to have a high levels of antibodies to BfUbb than are healthy volunteer subjects. From this, the team concludes that molecular mimicry of human ubiquitin by BfUbb could be a trigger for autoimmune disease. Finding and understanding potential triggers for autoimmune conditions helps to take us one step further to understanding and potentially curing celiac disease. Stay tuned for further developments in their arena. First published: 04 August 2018 https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/cei.13195
  15. Celiac.com 11/12/2018 - Here’s an uplifting celiac story. Now, this happened a while back, but it's all just coming to light in the way that so many warm and fuzzy family stories do. It starts like this: Once upon a time, a simple check for celiac disease opened the door to parenthood for couple. Just over ten years ago, AnnMarie Bradley from Celbridge, Co Kildare, thought she’d never become a mother. After two devastating miscarriages over a decade, Bradley, who is 47 years old, and her husband Christopher (48) were at wit’s end. "I was just heartbroken,” said Ms Bradley. Then, a simple visit to her doctor changed everything. A blood test indicated she might have celiac disease, which further evaluation confirmed. She began a gluten-free diet, and less than a year later, Bradley was pregnant with her son, Cameron. “Being a mother had been everything I'd wanted," she said. Cameron is nearly 16 now, and has an 11-year old sister, Emily. And they all lived happily and gluten-free ever after. In the UK, the Coeliac Society advises women struggling to conceive to consider celiac testing. Read more at: Independent.ie
  16. Celiac.com 11/07/2018 - A team of researchers recently set out to explore the relationship between dermatitis herpetiformis, as a common extraintestinal manifestation of celiac disease, and a gluten-free diet as a path to overall dermatitis herpetiformis improvement. The research team included Timo Reunala, Teea T. Salmi, Kaisa Hervonen, Katri Kaukinen and Pekka Collin. They are variously affiliated with the Celiac Disease Research Center, Faculty of Medicine and Life Sciences at the University of Tampere, the Department of Dermatology, Tampere University Hospital, the Department of Internal Medicine, Tampere University Hospital, and with the Department of Gastroenterology and Alimentary Tract Surgery, Tampere University Hospital in Tampere, Finland. Dermatitis herpetiformis is a condition marked by itchy papules and vesicles on the elbows, knees, and buttocks. Dermatitis herpetiformis is a common in people with celiac disease. People who have just dermatitis herpetiformis alone rarely have obvious gastrointestinal symptoms. Dermatitis herpetiformis is easily diagnosed by immunofluorescence biopsy showing pathognomonic granular immunoglobulin A (IgA) deposits in the papillary dermis. One theory currently in play is that dermatitis herpetiformis is triggered by celiac disease in the gut and eventually develops into an immune complex deposition of high avidity IgA epidermal transglutaminase (TG3) antibodies, together with the TG3 enzyme, in the papillary dermis. The age at which people are diagnosed with dermatitis herpetiformis has risen steeply in recent decades to the current average of 40–50 years. The researchers found that the ratio of dermatitis herpetiformis to celiac disease is 1:8 in Finland and the United Kingdom (U.K.). Additionally, the incident rates of dermatitis herpetiformis are currently 2.7 per 100,000 in Finland and 0.8 per 100,000 in the U.K., is decreasing, whereas incidents of celiac disease are on the rise. One positive finding is that Dermatitis herpetiformis patients who are on a gluten-free diet face an excellent long-term outlook, with an even lower mortality rate than the general population. Read more in: Nutrients 2018, 10(5), 602; doi:10.3390/nu10050602
  17. Celiac.com 11/06/2018 - Autoimmune pancreatitis is a rare disorder whose association with celiac disease (celiac disease) has never been investigated, although celiac patients show high rates of both endocrine and exocrine pancreatic affections. To address this lack of information, a team of researchers recently set out to evaluate the frequency of celiac disease in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis and in further medical pancreatic disorders. The research team included G De Marchi, G Zanoni, MC Conti Bellocchi, E Betti, M Brentegani, P Capelli, V Zuliani, L Frulloni, C Klersy, and R Ciccocioppo. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Medicine, the Department of Pathology and Diagnostics, the Gastroenterology Unit, the Immunology Unit, and the Pathology Unit of the Department of Pathology and Diagnostics; and the Gastroenterology Unit of the Department of Medicine, AOUI Policlinico G.B. Rossi, University of Verona in Verona, Italy; the Clinica Medica I, Department of Internal Medicine, IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo Foundation in Pavia, Italy; and the Clinical Epidemiology & Biometry Unit, IRCCS Fondazione Policlinico San Matteo; Pavia, Italy. They screened for celiac disease by looking for tissue transglutaminase (tTG) autoantibodies in the blood of patients retrospectively enrolled and divided in four groups: autoimmune pancreatitis, chronic pancreatitis, chronic asymptomatic pancreatic hyperenzymemia (CAPH), and control subjects with functional dyspepsia. In patients with borderline or positive anti-tTG values, the team also looked at anti-endomysium autoantibodies. They offered duodenal biopsy to all patients with positive results. They found just one patient out of 72 (1.4%) with autoimmune pancreatitis who had already been diagnosed with celiac and was following a gluten-free diet, while one case out of 71 (1.4%) with chronic pancreatitis and one out of 92 (1.1%) controls were found to have celiac disease. They found no celiac disease in the CAPH group. By contrast, a high prevalence of cases with ulcerative colitis was found in the AIP group (13.8%). Despite an alleged connection between celiac disease and several autoimmune disorders, the data in this study do not support celiac screening for autoimmune pancreatitis patients. Celiac screening may be useful in other pancreatic disorders, but further study is needed to make a determination. Source: Nutrients. 2018 Aug 24;10(9). pii: E1157. doi: 10.3390/nu10091157.
  18. Celiac.com 11/05/2018 - ImmusanT, Inc. is a clinical stage company looking to deliver innovative peptide-based immunomodulatory vaccine therapies to patients with autoimmune diseases, initiated enrollment in Australia and New Zealand for its celiac disease vaccine. Along with Nexvax2, ImmusanT is working to develop vaccines for other HLA-associated autoimmune diseases, including type 1 diabetes. The Phase 2 trials will assess the safety, tolerability and efficacy of its celiac vaccine, Nexvax2, on celiac patients who carry the immune recognition genes for HLA-DQ2.5. Carriers of HLA-DQ2.5 account for approximately 90% of people with disease, and Nexvax2 is designed to protect these patients from the effects of gluten exposure. Nexvax2 is currently the only disease-modifying therapeutic candidate in clinical development for patients with celiac disease. Injections of Nexvax2 are designed to reprogram T cells that trigger an inflammatory response to gluten, thereby suppressing inflammation in patients with celiac disease. Phase 1 studies showed Nexvax2 to be safe and well-tolerated at even its highest dose levels. In Phase 2 clinical trials, ImmusanT hopes to confirm clinical efficacy of Nexvax2 administered by injection into the skin for treatment of celiac disease. The study plan consists of an initial screening period of 6 weeks, an approximately 16 week treatment period, and a 4 week post-treatment observational follow-up. The trials will be conducted at sites in Melbourne, Perth, Adelaide and Brisbane, in addition to sites in New Zealand. For the U.S. study researchers will enroll approximately 150 patients across the U.S., Australia and New Zealand. Phase 2 is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical study of Nexvax2 in adults with confirmed celiac disease who have followed a gluten-free diet for at least a year prior to screening. “This trial is important in establishing clinical proof-of-concept for a treatment that would provide benefit beyond that of the gluten-free diet,” and will “test if Nexvax2 can specifically target the immune response to gluten in people with celiac disease and modify associated symptoms,” said Jason Tye-Din, MBBS, Ph.D., principal investigator at the Royal Melbourne Hospital and head of celiac research at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research in Melbourne, Australia. For more information about RESET CeD, including inclusion and exclusion criteria, please visit www.clinicaltrials.gov (Identifier: NCT03644069).
  19. Celiac.com 10/30/2018 - Products with “gluten-free” were unknown just 20 years ago. Now, driven by new labeling standards and demand that far exceeds those on medical diets, the market for gluten-free foods is expected to hit $2.34 billion in sales by 2019. That’s more than double the 2014 level. How has the influx of new gluten-free products in the last few years changed the experience of people with celiac disease? A team of researchers recently set out to investigate how the recent proliferation of the gluten‐free industry has affected individuals living with celiac disease, with a primary focus on their social lives and relationships. The research team included J. A. King, G. G. Kaplan, and J. Godley. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Sociology, Faculty of Arts, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada, and the O’Brien Institute for Public Health, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. The team employed interpretive phenomenology for study design and analysis. Team members held semi‐structured interviews with 17 adults with clinically diagnosed celiac disease in Calgary, Alberta. They recorded the interviews and transcribed them for analysis. These 17 Canadians living with celiac disease reported that they perceive the growth of the gluten‐free industry as a "double‐edged sword." Although they are grateful for more readily available, more palatable gluten‐free options, they are increasingly faced with misunderstandings about the severity of celiac disease as a perceived result of many non-celiac disease individuals subscribing to the gluten‐free diet. Participants also felt they may be perceived or even perceived themselves differently, such as "high maintenance," etc. To help mitigate these social ramifications of following the gluten‐free diet, participants utilized various strategies. According to the study’s authors, simply telling celiac patients to adopt a gluten‐free diet ignores the regular challenges faced by those patients. The authors of the report are calling for doctors to consider the indirect burdens for celiac patients who must adopt a gluten-free diet when making their recommendations. But how? The report says nothing about what exactly doctors are supposed consider, or what they should tell patients about the challenges of a gluten-free diet. People with celiac disease probably do need more information up front as they begin to follow a gluten-free diet, but clearly far more input and study are needed. This study tells us that seventeen people in Alberta, Canada say that being gluten-free by medical necessity is both easier and more challenging than it was in the past. That it was both more manageable, but also more stressful, because gluten-free fad dieters are confusing everything. What are we to make of this? Talking informally with 17 celiac patients and writing up the results may not rise to the level of a solid study, and their input doesn’t really tell us much about how to improve their situation. Also, blaming the popularity of the gluten-free diet as a cause of confusion or stress in people with celiac disease could be an overreaction. Remember, ten or twenty years ago when most people had nearly zero awareness of celiac disease or the gluten-free diet? That included doctors who were trying to diagnose it. To have these inconvenient misunderstandings, people must first have some idea that celiac disease exists, and that a gluten-free diet is part of it. Is it possible that, as annoying as such misunderstandings may be, they represent progress, however incremental? Perhaps the annoyances are real, perhaps they are perceived. Perhaps they are a reflection of slowly rising awareness levels. But the study doesn’t tell us any of these important details. Again, there’s little question that people with celiac disease need more information up front as they begin to follow a gluten-free diet, but clearly more input and study is needed so that we can come up with an accurate picture of the challenges and provide the best ways to meet them. What’s your experience of the rapidly changing gluten-free landscape? Read more at: JOURNAL OF HUMAN NUTRITION & DIETETICS. First published: 02 October 2018 https://doi.org/10.1111/jhn.12597
  20. Celiac.com 10/19/2018 - Work to develop a vaccine for celiac disease could soon lead to a vaccine for diabetes. After successful phase 1 studies of Nexvax2, their peptide-based therapeutic vaccine for celiac disease, ImmusanT has seen a significant investment from venture philanthropy organization JDRF T1D. ImmusanT's peptide therapy program for celiac disease may provide lessons for a similar therapeutic treatment for Type 1 diabetes. The investment will support ImmusanT as it attempts to develop a vaccine to prevent Type 1 diabetes, based on the early success of its peptide immunotherapy program for celiac disease, the two entities announced in a press release. ImmusanT’s celiac peptide therapy program works by identifying antigens that trigger an inflammatory responses in people with autoimmune diseases. Once identified, the peptide therapy is used to neutralize the autoimmune response. This celiac disease program goes back to 1998, when Anderson first began his efforts to find and identify the peptides. The findings were published in 2010, and the company was founded shortly afterward by Leslie Williams, BS, RN, MBA, director, president and CEO of ImmusanT. From there, ImmusanT conducted five phase 1 trials for its celiac therapy. Those trials have proven very promising, and the latest investment into a similar drug for diabetes is proof of that promise. In the case of celiac disease, the drug works by “targeting T cells in patients. Those T cells that are engaged as peptides are distributed throughout the body after the injection, and we see evidence that the T cells are being activated about 2 hours later,” Robert Anderson, BMedSc, MB, ChB, PhD, FRACP, chief scientific officer for ImmusanT, told Endocrine Today. “We found that if we gradually increase the dose in patients building up to a maintenance dose level, they become non-reactive to those peptides.” With much of the early research targeted towards demonstrating the drug’s safety, and getting the right dose and dose regimen, the development of a version targeted at diabetes, says Anderson, “should be more streamlined due to the lessons learned during the celiac disease program. That’s partly because the team knows “a lot more going into Type 1 diabetes about how peptide therapy works and how to optimize it than we did when we started celiac disease, where it was a blank slate.” This is really exciting news. A vaccine for celiac disease is exciting, to be sure, but a viable vaccine for diabetes would be a major development in disease prevention. Stay tuned for more news as the story develops. Read more at Healio.com
  21. Celiac.com 10/16/2018 - Apparently, local St. Louis radio station Z1077 hosts a show called “Dirty Little Secret.” Recently, a woman caller to the show drew ire from listeners after she claimed that she worked at a local bakery, and that she routinely lied to customers about the gluten-free status of baked goods. The woman said she often told customers that there was no gluten in baked goods that were not gluten-free, according to local tv station KTVI. Apparently the woman thought this was funny. However, for people who cannot eat gluten because they have celiac disease, telling people that food is gluten-free when it is not is about as funny as telling a diabetic that food is sugar-free when it is not. Now, of course, eating gluten is not as immediately dangerous for most celiacs as sugar is for diabetics, but the basic analogy holds. That’s because many people with celiac disease suffer horrible symptoms when they accidentally eat gluten, including extreme intestinal pain, bloating, diarrhea, and other problems. Some people experience more extreme reactions that leave them in emergency rooms. As part of a story on the “joke” segment, KTVI interviewed celiac sufferer Dana Smith, who found the punchline to be less than funny. “It’s absolutely dangerous, somebody could get very sick,” said Smith. KTVI also interviewed at least one doctor, Dr. Reuben Aymerich of SSM St. Clare Hospital, who pointed out that, while celiac disease is “not like diabetes where you can reduce the amount of sugar intake and make up for it later, it’s thought you need to be 100 percent compliant if you can.” For her part, Smith sought to use the incident as a teaching moment. She alerted the folks at Z1077 and tried to point out how serious being gluten-free is for many people. Mary Michaels, owner of Gluten Free at Last Bakery in Maryville, Illinois, says it’s time people became more respectful. “I wouldn’t make fun of you if you had diabetes or a heart condition it’s kind of like that,” Michals said. We will likely never know if the radio station caller was telling the truth, or just putting listeners on. The Z1077 morning team did post a follow-up comment, which stated that they take celiac disease seriously, and that they did not intend to offend anyone. One host said his mom has celiac disease. It’s good to see a positive response from the radio station. Their prank was short-sighted, and the caller deserved to be called out on her poor behavior. Hopefully, they have learned their lesson and will avoid such foolishness in the future. Let us know your thoughts below.
  22. Celiac.com 10/15/2018 - If you’re on a gluten-free diet for medical reasons, then you’re probably already cautious about eating out. A new study tells us exactly why people with celiac disease and other gluten-sensitive conditions have reason to be very careful about eating out. According to the latest research, one in three foods sold as "gluten-free" in U.S. restaurants actually contain trace levels of gluten. This is partly due to the fact that the gluten-free diet has become popular with many non-celiacs and others who have no medical need for the diet. That has led many restaurants to offer gluten-free foods to their customers, says study author Dr. Benjamin Lebwohl, of Columbia University's Celiac Disease Center. But, if this research is any indication, too many restaurants don’t do a good job with gluten-free. For the study, more than 800 investigators set out to assess the true gluten content of dishes listed as "gluten-free" on menus. Armed with portable gluten sensors, they tested for gluten levels that met or exceeded 20 parts per million, the standard cutoff for any gluten-free claim. Based on more than 5,600 gluten tests over 18 months, the investigators determined that 27 percent of gluten-free breakfast meals actually contained gluten. At dinner time, this figure hit 34 percent. The rise could reflect a steady increase in gluten contamination risk as the day unfolds, the researchers said. Off course, the risk is not all equal. Some restaurants are riskier than others. Unsurprisingly, the biggest culprit seems to be restaurants that offer gluten-free pastas and pizzas. Nearly half of the pizza and pasta dishes from those establishments contained gluten, according to the study. Why is that? Well, as most folks with celiac disease know all too well, kitchens aren’t really set up to segregate gluten, and "sharing an oven with gluten-containing pizza is a prime setting for cross-contamination," says Lebwohl. Also, too many restaurants use the same water to cook gluten-free pasta as they do for regular pasta, which contaminates the gluten-free pasta and defeats the purpose. Moreover, although the U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulates gluten-free labels on packaged food products, there is currently no federal oversight of gluten-free claims in restaurants. The results of the study will be presented today at a meeting of the American College of Gastroenterology, in Philadelphia. Research presented at meetings is usually considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed medical journal. In the absence of federal enforcement at the restaurant level, the burden for making sure food is gluten-free falls to the person doing the ordering. So, gluten-free eaters beware! These results are probably not surprising to many of you. Do you have celiac disease? Do you eat in restaurants? Do you avoid restaurants? Do you have special tactics? Feel free to share your thoughts below. Read more at UPI.com
  23. Celiac.com 10/10/2018 - The Technical University in Vienna has announced a new remedy for celiac disease symptoms that they say can “alleviate or even completely eliminate the symptoms of celiac disease.” It should be available commercially in only a few years. Because most current efforts to treat celiac disease affect the immune system, possible side effects must therefore be fully assessed. This means years of study, and a long approval process. However, the TU Wien research team worked in collaboration with the industrial partner Sciotech Diagnostic Technologies GmbH to create a different approach. Their team based its approach for a celiac disease treatment on using only the part of the antibody that binds to gluten, which allowed them to create a product that works extremely well, but does not rely on triggering an immune response. Instead of a drug that works on the immune system, TU Wien created a simple medical product that directly attacks the gluten molecules to render them harmless. This makes the approval process much simpler, meaning that the product should be available in ordinary pharmacies as early as 2021. According to Professor Oliver Spadiut, head of the Integrated Bioprocess Development Research Group at TU Wien, “bodies produce antibodies that fit intruding antigens precisely, like a key to a lock. This immune response makes these antigens harmless.” He goes on to say that “If a new antibody fragment is found and produced that docks to and blocks the invading gluten molecule without triggering the immune system, the symptoms of celiac disease can be suppressed." The goal of their research project was to produce a complex of two such antibody fragments that envelop the gluten molecule at a molecular level, so that it can no longer have any further effects in the intestines. The result is a groundbreaking treatment for celiac disease and gluten intolerance. The process is complicated, and requires the team to re-program certain bacteria so that they produce exactly the desired antibody fragment. The full process took a while to iron out, but, says Spadiut, it “can be easily reproduced, can be scaled up to industrial application and delivers a very good yield of the desired product." This is very exciting news. Aside from efforts toward an outright vaccine, this is the first news of a potential treatment that can negate the effects of gluten without affecting the immune system itself. If all goes well, Spadiut says, the product “will be available in ordinary pharmacies in a few years.” Stay tuned for news about ongoing developments of this interesting treatment for celiac disease. Read: Additional scientific information Source: TUWien.ac.at
  24. Celiac.com 10/08/2018 - A new population based study reveals that celiac disease is associated with a wide range of medical conditions, including liver disease, glossitis, pancreatitis, Down syndrome, and autism, according to a database study of more than 35 million people. Moreover, people with autism have celiac disease at rates almost 20 times higher than in those without autism, reported lead investigator Daniel Karb, MD, a second-year resident at University Hospitals Case Medical Center in Cleveland. That raises the question of whether people with autism should be screened for celiac disease, and whether they might benefit form a gluten-free diet. "If you have a patient who is autistic and they have all these unusual symptoms, you might want to screen them for celiac disease," Dr. Karb told the World Congress of Gastroenterology last year. It is known that there are unusual symptoms of celiac disease, which include anything outside the classic symptoms of malabsorption, steatorrhea, malnutrition, abdominal pain, and cramping after eating, "but this is putting numbers to it," said Dr Karb. For their study, Karb and his fellow researchers used the Explorys database to pull health record data from 26 major integrated healthcare systems in the United States. Their search covered the period from 2012 to 2017. Of 35,854,260 people in the database, they found 83,090 with diagnosed celiac disease. Overall, the age-adjusted prevalence of celiac disease in that group was 0.22%, which is much lower than the 1% to 2% range previously estimated. Those numbers are not unusual, said Dr. Karb says that the researchers “don't think there are fewer people with celiac disease, just that it may be under-diagnosed.” The rates are, he says, “what you might expect when you screen asymptomatic people." Overall, the team found a significant connection between celiac disease and 13 other autoimmune disorders, such as type 1 diabetes, Crohn's disease, and ulcerative colitis. Moreover, celiac disease is associated with every autoimmune disease the team looked at, except for primary biliary cholangitis, Dr Karb says. This is some pretty startling study data. We knew that celiac disease was linked to other autoimmune conditions, and there has been some surprising data about gluten-free diets helping patients with autism, but these numbers are enlightening. It seems that people with autism should definitely be screened for celiac disease, and placed a gluten-free diet, if tests confirm celiac disease. Stay tuned for more information on this important celiac disease topic. Source: World Congress of Gastroenterology 2017
  25. Celiac.com 10/05/2018 - This short quiz includes basic celiac facts, recent celiac and gluten-free news and other information that appeared in the last few months on Celiac.com. The answers are in the section below the quiz, so don't peek! True or False? A tainted gluten-free meal nearly killed an Australian woman. Bifidobacterium infantis NLS super strain reduces a-Defensin-5 expression in celiac disease patients. Vitamin A and D deficiency common in kids with newly diagnosed celiac disease. New UK fund promotes celiac research and gluten-free food improvement. Easy to spot tooth wear and enamel defects point to celiac disease. Undiagnosed celiac disease more common in women and girls. Research indicates 1.4% of humans have celiac disease. A new urine test can spot gluten in the blood of people with celiac disease. Women's diet during pregnancy has little impact on celiac disease risk in their infants. Gluten-Free condoms are available for people concerned about topical exposure to gluten. A Phoenix realtor recently advertised a house as 'gluten-free.’ Current screening methods miss significant cases of celiac disease. A new vaccine makes it safe for people with celiac disease to safely consume gluten. A long-distance conversation with a guru can help treat your celiac disease. Food made with gluten-free ingredients is safe for people with celiac disease. Celiac disease is a food allergy. Celiac disease rarely affects people of non-European ancestry. Celiac disease is a children’s condition. Celiac disease can be painful, but isn't life-threatening. A little gluten is okay for people with celiac disease and gluten-intolerance to eat. ANSWERS Here are the answers for our short quiz above on basic celiac facts, recent celiac news and other information. True or False? A tainted gluten-free meal nearly killed an Australian woman. TRUE Bifidobacterium infantis NLS super strain reduces a-Defensin-5 expression in celiac disease patients. TRUE Vitamin A and D deficiency common in kids with newly diagnosed celiac disease. TRUE New UK fund promotes celiac research and gluten-free food improvement. TRUE Easy to spot tooth wear and enamel defects point to celiac disease. TRUE Undiagnosed celiac disease more common in women and girls. TRUE Research indicates 1.4% of humans have celiac disease. TRUE A new urine test can spot gluten in the blood of people with celiac disease. TRUE Does Diet During Pregnancy Have Any Impact on Celiac Disease Risk in Infants? TRUE Gluten-Free condoms are available for people concerned about topical exposure to gluten. TRUE A Phoenix realtor recently advertised a house as 'gluten-free.’ TRUE. Phoenix realtor Mike D’Elena recently advertised a house as 'gluten-free’. Current screening methods miss significant cases of celiac disease. TRUE A new vaccine makes it safe for people with celiac disease to safely consume gluten. FALSE. While several such vaccines are under development, with some even undergoing clinical and human trials, no such drug has been proven to work and approved by the FDA. Hopefully the clinical tests will work and this will one day be an alternative for some people. A long-distance conversation with a guru can help treat your celiac disease. FALSE Food made with gluten-free ingredients is safe for people with celiac disease. FALSE. Just because food is made with gluten-free ingredients does not necessarily make it safe for people with celiac disease. Case in point, Domino’s Pizza recently introduced gluten-free pizza crusts. However, these pizzas are prepared in the same areas and ovens as Domino’s regular pizzas, and may be contaminated with gluten from wheat flour. These pizzas are not considered safe for people with celiac disease. There are many similar cases in the restaurant world. Contamination is a serious issue for some celiacs, so buyers be aware and be wary. Celiac disease is a food allergy. FALSE. Celiac disease is not a food allergy or an intolerance, it is an autoimmune disease. People with celiac disease suffer damage to the lining of the small intestine when they eat wheat, rye or barley. They also face higher risks for many other auto-immune conditions. Celiac disease rarely affects people of non-European ancestry. FALSE. Celiac disease is more common in people of northern European ancestry, but it affects all ethnic groups and is found in southern Asia, the Middle East, North Africa and South America. Celiac disease is a children’s condition. FALSE. Celiac disease can develop at any age. In fact, celiac disease is most commonly diagnosed in people aged 40-60 years old. Celiac disease can be painful, but isn't life-threatening. FALSE. It’s true that classic celiac disease symptoms, like stomach pain, bone pain, fatigue, headaches, skin rash, and digestive issues, won’t kill patients outright. However, undiagnosed or untreated, celiac disease can trigger other autoimmune disorders, and leave patients at much greater risk of developing certain types of deadly cancer. A little gluten is okay for people with celiac disease and gluten-intolerance to eat. FALSE. Gluten levels above 20 parts per million can cause adverse immune reactions and chronic damage in people with celiac disease. Read more about celiac disease, gluten, gluten-free and gluten intolerance facts at Celiac.com.
×