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Found 1,859 results

  1. Celiac.com 07/18/2018 - Despite many studies on immune development in children, there still isn’t much good data on how a mother’s diet during pregnancy and infancy influences a child’s immune development. A team of researchers recently set out to assess whether changes in maternal or infant diet might influence the risk of allergies or autoimmune disease. The team included Vanessa Garcia-Larsen, Despo Ierodiakonou, Katharine Jarrold, Sergio Cunha, Jennifer Chivinge, Zoe Robinson, Natalie Geoghegan, Alisha Ruparelia, Pooja Devani, Marialena Trivella, Jo Leonardi-Bee, and Robert J. Boyle. They are variously associated with the Department of Undiagnosed Celiac Disease More Common in Women and Girls International Health, Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America; the Respiratory Epidemiology, Occupational Medicine and Public Health, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom; the Section of Paediatrics, Department of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom; the Centre for Statistics in Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom; the Division of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom; the Centre of Evidence Based Dermatology, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom; and Stanford University in the USA. Team members searched MEDLINE, Excerpta Medica dataBASE (EMBASE), Web of Science, Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), and Literatura Latino Americana em Ciências da Saúde (LILACS) for observational studies conducted between January 1946 and July 2013, and interventional studies conducted through December 2017, that evaluated the relationship between diet during pregnancy, lactation, or the first year of life, and future risk of allergic or autoimmune disease. They then selected studies, extracted data, and assessed bias risk. They evaluated data using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE). They found 260 original studies, covering 964,143 participants, of milk feeding, including 1 intervention trial of breastfeeding promotion, and 173 original studies, covering 542,672 participants, of other maternal or infant dietary exposures, including 80 trials of 26 maternal, 32 infant, or 22 combined interventions. They found a high bias risk in nearly half of the more than 250 milk feeding studies and in about one-quarter of studies of other dietary exposures. Evidence from 19 intervention trials suggests that oral supplementation with probiotics during late pregnancy and lactation may reduce risk of eczema. 44 cases per 1,000; 95% CI 20–64), and 6 trials, suggest that fish oil supplementation during pregnancy and lactation may reduce risk of allergic sensitization to egg. GRADE certainty of these findings was moderate. The team found less evidence, and low GRADE certainty, for claims that breastfeeding reduces eczema risk during infancy, that longer exclusive breastfeeding is associated with reduced type 1 diabetes mellitus, and that probiotics reduce risk of infants developing allergies to cow’s milk. They found no evidence that dietary exposure to other factors, including prebiotic supplements, maternal allergenic food avoidance, and vitamin, mineral, fruit, and vegetable intake, influence risk of allergic or autoimmune disease. Overall, the team’s findings support a connection between the mother’s diet and risk of immune-mediated diseases in the child. Maternal probiotic and fish oil supplementation may reduce risk of eczema and allergic sensitization to food, respectively. Stay tuned for more on diet during pregnancy and its role in celiac disease. Source: PLoS Med. 2018 Feb; 15(2): e1002507. doi: 10.1371/journal.pmed.1002507
  2. Hello all! I'm fairly new to this community. Although I've been reading many posts on here for a while, this is only my second posting! I am pre-diagnosis, although I am almost 100% certain that I am at least gluten sensitive. Due to time, I'll make another post later on detailing more of my symptoms and my experiences on this crazy journey. Currently on a gluten-free diet because it is not worth the suffering (cheated enough times that now just looking at a cookie makes my everything hurt). This question is more towards anybody who has a good understanding of genes, alleles, etc. I have finally coughed up the dough to get genetic testing done, and my alleles are HLA-DQ 8 and HLA-DQ 3. To my very elementary understanding, HLA-DQ 8 is one of the two HLA genes associated with the development of celiac disease. There is also some controversial and currently unreplicated data suggesting that HLA-DQ 3 is associated with gluten sensitivity. Regardless of that controversial piece, it is also my understanding that HLA-DQ 8 is a "form" of the HLA-3 allele. If HLA-DQ 8 is a form of HLA-DQ 3, what is the difference between HLA-DQ 3 and HLA-DQ 8, that I have both of them? In other words, what makes it HLA-DQ 3, instead of one of its sub-categories or forms? Not sure if the question makes sense, or if anybody knows! Thanks for any info!!
  3. I’ve been gluten free for a year now and I would never go back. But making friends is so difficult. Anyone 20-40 in the Columbus area? Looking for a brunch buddy!
  4. Hi, I have been using makeup for about a year now. I was officially diagnosed with a gluten sensitivity about 6 months ago, though I have been avoiding gluten for about 4 years. I am having trouble finding safe, affordable makeup. I have been using mainly ELF and Rimmel, but I want to branch off into some more brands. I have been trying to research about L'Oreal, CoverGirl, and Maybelline, but I have come up empty handed as every site says something different. I specifically would like to find more foundations and concealer, though verifying the safety of a brand would suffice as well. I am currently recovering from an allergic reaction, I used a concealer that has made my face extremely red and dry -- my skin is almost pealing like after a sunburn. Please help me find more safe makeup brands.
  5. Just wanted to share that there’s a gluten-free nail lacquer brand that’s made by a Celiac. It’s called Lazzara Gluten-Free Nail Lacquer. I was so excited because my favorite (former) brands have hydrolyzed wheat in them. It’s also cruelty-free, vegan and made in the USA. The only drawback is that it’s more expensive but I think it’s worth it because I know it’s being made by someone who’s a Celiac and I love the quality. http://Lazzara.ca
  6. Celiac.com 07/09/2018 - In a seemingly innocuous case of gluten-contamination, an Australian woman was hospitalized with serious health issues after mistakenly eating a waffle she thought was gluten-free. The incident began when Williams and her husband Scott dined at a local Perth restaurant where they had eaten before. This time, though, after eating a meal of chicken and what she took to be gluten-free waffles, she became ill. The mistake caused her to lose consciousness several times, and resulted in mild kidney failure. Diagnosed as celiac at 12 months of age, the 27-year old Williams is a CrossFit fanatic, a fact she believes helped her to survive. “If I was already sick or if I was an elderly person and I had this sort of reaction, I could have died,” Ms Williams said. Williams wants to help spread the word that, for some people, celiac disease is a serious and potentially life-threatening medical condition. The owner of the restaurant seems to be taking the incident seriously, and has said she would be investigating what went wrong that day. “I’m trying to find out what happened because we’ve never had an issue with this,” she said, and that she “would never want to hurt anyone at all.” While the Perth restaurant’s menu did carry a disclaimer that gluten-free items may contain traces of gluten. The owner said the gluten-free options were not recommended for people who are “coeliac or really gluten intolerant.” The restaurant has offered Ms Williams a $40 refund with a confidentiality clause, which she intends to decline so she can speak out and educate others about the risks of dining out. Coeliac Australia’s Cathy Di Bella said restaurants can’t use a “may contain traces of” disclaimer to offset a claim that food is gluten-free. Any restaurant that advertises gluten-free food should take necessary measures to ensure that their gluten-free items are if fact free of gluten. This is an important point, as this incident comes amid recent news reports that indicate nearly one out of ten meals sold as gluten-free at cafes and restaurants across Melbourne were contaminated with gluten. For Ms Williams’ part, she said she has “lost faith in going out for dinner and it’s going to take me a long time to be able to go out and do that without fear of this happening.” Do you or a loved one have a gluten-free horror story to tell? Share it in our comments below. Read more at: Thewest.com.au
  7. Hello! I am a 59-year-old, newly diagnosed with allergies (I also suspect that i have some form of celiac or gluten intolerance). I haven't done the food allergy tests or challenges yet - but from what i've read, i may have OAS when it comes to certain foods, but i'm not sure. I'm not sure I would do a celiac test at this point, because that would require me eating mostly gluten - i've been eating mostly gluten-free - i don't know what else to do and i need some tips - HELP!
  8. Celiac.com 07/16/2018 - Did weak public oversight leave Arizonans ripe for Theranos’ faulty blood tests scam? Scandal-plagued blood-testing company Theranos deceived Arizona officials and patients by selling unproven, unreliable products that produced faulty medical results, according to a new book by Wall Street Journal reporter, whose in-depth, comprehensive investigation of the company uncovered deceit, abuse, and potential fraud. Moreover, Arizona government officials facilitated the deception by providing weak regulatory oversight that essentially left patients as guinea pigs, said the book’s author, investigative reporter John Carreyrou. In the newly released "Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup," Carreyrou documents how Theranos and its upstart founder, Elizabeth Holmes, used overblown marketing claims and questionable sales tactics to push faulty products that resulted in consistently faulty blood tests results. Flawed results included tests for celiac disease and numerous other serious, and potentially life-threatening, conditions. According to Carreyrou, Theranos’ lies and deceit made Arizonans into guinea pigs in what amounted to a "big, unauthorized medical experiment.” Even though founder Elizabeth Holmes and Theranos duped numerous people, including seemingly savvy investors, Carreyrou points out that there were public facts available to elected officials back then, like a complete lack of clinical data on the company's testing and no approvals from the Food and Drug Administration for any of its tests. SEC recently charged the now disgraced Holmes with what it called a 'years-long fraud.’ The company’s value has plummeted, and it is now nearly worthless, and facing dozens, and possibly hundreds of lawsuits from angry investors. Meantime, Theranos will pay Arizona consumers $4.65 million under a consumer-fraud settlement Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich negotiated with the embattled blood-testing company. Both investors and Arizona officials, “could have picked up on those things or asked more questions or kicked the tires more," Carreyrou said. Unlike other states, such as New York, Arizona lacks robust laboratory oversight that would likely have prevented Theranos from operating in those places, he added. Stay tuned for more new on how the Theranos fraud story plays out. Read more at azcentral.com.
  9. Celiac.com 07/12/2018 - Previous research has shown that the oral administration of Bifidobacterium infantis Natren Life Start super strain (NLS-SS) reduces of gastro-intestinal symptoms in untreated celiac disease patients. The reduction of symptoms was not connected with changes in intestinal permeability or serum levels of cytokines, chemokines, or growth factors. Therefore, researchers suspected that the reduction of symptoms might be related to the modulation of innate immunity. To test that hypothesis, a team of researchers set out to assess the potential mechanisms of a probiotic B.infantis Natren Life Start super strain on the mucosal expression of innate immune markers in adult patients with active untreated celiac disease compared with those treated with B. infantis 6 weeks and after 1 year of gluten-free diet. The research team included Maria I. Pinto-Sanchez, MD, Edgardo C. Smecuol, MD, Maria P. Temprano,RD, Emilia Sugai, BSBC, Andrea Gonzalez, RD, PhD, Maria L. Moreno,MD, Xianxi Huang, MD, PhD, Premysl Bercik, MD, Ana Cabanne, MD, Horacio Vazquez, MD, Sonia Niveloni, MD, Roberto Mazure, MD, Eduardo Mauriño, MD, Elena F. Verdú, MD, PhD, and Julio C. Bai, MD. They are affiliated with the Medicine Department, Farcombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada; the Small Intestinal Section, Department of Medicine and the Department of Alimentation at Dr. C. Bonorino Udaondo, Gastroenterology Hospital and Research Institute at the Universidad del Salvador in Buenos Aires, Argentina. The team determined the numbers of macrophages and Paneth cells, along with the expression of a-defensin-5 expression via immunohistochemistry in duodenal biopsies. Their results showed that a gluten-free diet lowers duodenal macrophage counts in celiac disease patients more effectively than B. infantis, while B. infantis lowers Paneth cell counts and reduces expression of a-defensin-5. This study documents the differential innate immune effects of treatment with B. infantis compared with 1 year of gluten-free diet. The team calls for further study to better understand the synergistic effects of gluten-free diet and B. infantis supplementation in celiac disease. Source: J Clin Gastroenterol
  10. Celiac.com 07/03/2018 - The vast majority of celiac disease remain undiagnosed, and clinical testing is usually done on a case by case basis. Factor in vague or atypical symptoms, and you have a recipe for delayed diagnosis and unnecessary suffering. What determines who gets tested, and are current screening methods working? A team of researchers recently set out to assess the factors that determine diagnostic testing, along with the frequency of clinical testing in patients with undiagnosed celiac disease. The research team included I. A. Hujoel, C. T. Van Dyke, T. Brantner, J. Larson, K. S. King, A. Sharma J. A. Murray, and A. Rubio‐Tapia. They are variously affiliated with the Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, the Division of Internal Medicine, at the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. For their case‐control study the team identified 408 cases of undiagnosed celiac disease from a group of 47,557 adults with no prior diagnosis of celiac disease. Their team identified undiagnosed cases through sequential serology, and selected unaffected age‐ and gender‐matched controls. They made a comprehensive review of medical records for indications for and evidence of clinical testing. Over time, people with undiagnosed celiac disease were more likely than control subjects to present with symptoms or conditions that invite testing. This study makes a strong case that current clinical methods are ineffective in detecting undiagnosed celiac disease. Accordingly, the researchers urge the development and adoption of more effective methods for detecting celiac disease. Source: Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics.
  11. Celiac.com 07/10/2018 - As part of its 50th Anniversary activities, Celiac UK has launched a research fund and accompanying fundraising appeal to support new research and development. The fund has already received an injection of £500k from Innovate UK, in addition to £250k from the charity. Together, Coeliac UK and Innovate UK have opened applications for grants from the £750,000. Researchers and businesses can apply for a grants ranging from £50k to £250k for healthcare diagnostics, digital self-care tools and better gluten free food production. Food businesses can receive grants by developing more nutritious and affordable gluten free food, by using new ingredients, improving nutritional value, flavor and/or texture, and creating better methods of preservation. The three main goals of the program are: To improve celiac disease diagnostics; to improve the quality of gluten-free foods, and to promote digitally supported self-care for people with celiac disease. The matching industry funds will bring spending for new research on the growing global gluten-free foods market to nearly £1m. Ultimately, Coeliac UK is looking to raise £5 million to improve understanding and treatment of celiac disease and gluten related autoimmune conditions. Sarah Sleet, Chief Executive of Coeliac UK said: “With the global diagnosis for coeliac disease increasing year on year, this is a chance for UK business and researchers to get ahead and develop competitive advantages in innovation which will be of benefit to a badly underserved patient group. Read more at: NewFoodMagazine.com
  12. Celiac.com 06/20/2018 - Currently, the only way to manage celiac disease is to eliminate gluten from the diet. That could be set to change as clinical trials begin in Australia for a new vaccine that aims to switch off the immune response to gluten. The trials are set to begin at Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre. The vaccine is designed to allow people with celiac disease to consume gluten with no adverse effects. A successful vaccine could be the beginning of the end for the gluten-free diet as the only currently viable treatment for celiac disease. That could be a massive breakthrough for people with celiac disease. USC’s Clinical Trials Centre Director Lucas Litewka said trial participants would receive an injection of the vaccine twice a week for seven weeks. The trials will be conducted alongside gastroenterologist Dr. James Daveson, who called the vaccine “a very exciting potential new therapy that has been undergoing clinical trials for several years now.” Dr. Daveson said the investigational vaccine might potentially restore gluten tolerance to people with celiac disease.The trial is open to adults between the ages of 18 and 70 who have clinically diagnosed celiac disease, and have followed a strict gluten-free diet for at least 12 months. Anyone interested in participating can go to www.joinourtrials.com. Read more at the website for Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre. Source: FoodProcessing.com.au
  13. Celiac.com 07/05/2018 - We’ve known for a while that dental enamel defects can be an indicator of celiac disease. Now, a new study has evaluated the pathological conditions of the stomatognathic system observed in celiac patients on a gluten-free diet, and found that non-specific tooth wear can be seen nearly 20% of celiac patients, while such wear is seen in just under 6% of non-celiac control subjects. The data come from a team of researchers that recently set out to evaluate the pathological conditions of the stomatognathic system observed in celiac patients on a gluten-free diet. The research team included Massimo Amato, Fabiana Zingone, Mario Caggiano Orcid, Paola Iovino, Cristina Bucci and Carolina Ciacci. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Medicine, Surgery and Dentistry, Medical School of Salerno in Salerno, Italy. For their study, the team consecutively recruited celiac patients on a gluten-free diet, along with healthy control volunteers, from the team’s celiac clinic. Two dentists examined all patients and controls and examined them for mouth disorders. The study included forty-nine patients with celiac disease, and 51 healthy volunteer subjects. The team found recurrent aphthous stomatitis in 26 patients (53.0%) and in 13 (25.5%) controls. They found dental enamel disorders in 7 patients (14.3%) and in 0 controls (p = 0.002), with no cases of geographic tongue. They found non-specific tooth wear, characterized by loss of the mineralized tissue of the teeth, in 9 patients (18.3%) and in 3 (5.9%) controls. From this data, the team notes that recurrent aphthous stomatitis and enamel hypoplasia are “risk indicators” that indicate the possible presence of celiac disease. Among patients with celiac disease, the team found high rates of non-specific tooth wear that can be caused by several factors such as malocclusion, sleep bruxism, parafunctional activity, and age. This study, and previous studies on dental enamel defects, confirms that non-specific tooth wear and enamel defects can be strong indications of celiac disease, and may lead to a more active role for dentists in helping to spot and diagnose celiac disease. Source: mdpi.com
  14. Jefferson Adams

    What Exactly is Gluten, Anyway?

    Celiac.com 07/04/2018 - For the vast majority of people, gluten is nothing to worry about. However, for people with celiac disease, gluten triggers an immune reaction that can be uncomfortable and lead to damage of the intestinal lining, and, left untreated, other conditions, including certain types of deadly cancers. Actually, the real offender is a protein in gluten called gliadin. It's the gliadin that triggers the immune reaction in people with celiac disease. For our purposes today, I will talk about gluten, even though it's really gliadin that's the culprit. Still, avoiding gliadin means avoiding gluten, so let's just keep it simple, if a bit unscientific, for now. There are some people who are sensitive to gluten, but who don’t have celiac disease, a condition know as Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity (NCGS). When people with NCGS eat gluten, they often experience symptoms similar to those with celiac disease, yet they lack the same antibodies to gluten, as well as the intestinal damage seen in celiac disease. People with celiac disease and gluten sensitivity need to follow a gluten-free diet that excludes all products containing wheat, barley and rye ingredients. These people can still enjoy a healthy diet filled with fruits, vegetables, meats, poultry, fish, beans, legumes and most dairy products. Many delicious foods are naturally gluten-free, and safe for people with celiac disease. That said, gluten is found in a wide variety of foods, even those you wouldn’t expect, such as soy sauce and even some french fries. Foods containing wheat, barley or rye contain gluten, but the protein can also be hidden in many foods as an additive, especially processed foods. Gluten can also sometimes be found in certain medications, personal hygiene products and more. For people with celiac disease, even tiny amounts of gluten can cause damage to the small intestine and prevent nutrients from being absorbed into the bloodstream. The safest bet is to purchase naturally gluten-free grains, flours and starches labeled gluten-free and, when possible, certified gluten-free by a third party. For a more complete list, see Celiac.com’s gluten-free Safe Foods List and the non-gluten free Unsafe Foods List. What Foods and Products Contain Gluten? Gluten is found in any products with ingredients derived from wheat, barley and rye. This includes: 1) Wheat products (Triticum), including: All species of wheat contain gluten, including durum, semolina, spelt, kamut, einkorn, faro and triticale, which is a hybrid of wheat and rye. 2) Barley Products (Hordeum vulgare) 3) Rye Products (Secale) 4) Any bakery item, beer, breads, candy (not all), cereal, flour, pastas, non-dairy milk (not all), sauces (not all), soups (not all), or other product made with wheat, rye, barley, including the following ingredients: Abyssinian Hard (Wheat triticum durum) Alcohol (Spirits - Specific Types) Atta Flour Barley Grass (can contain seeds) Barley Hordeum vulgare Barley Malt Beer (most contain barley or wheat) Bleached Flour Bran Bread Flour Brewer's Yeast Brown Flour Bulgur (Bulgar Wheat/Nuts) Bulgur Wheat Cereal Binding Chilton Club Wheat (Triticum aestivum subspecies compactum) Common Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Cookie Crumbs Cookie Dough Cookie Dough Pieces Couscous Criped Rice Dinkle (Spelt) Disodium Wheatgermamido Peg-2 Sulfosuccinate Durum wheat (Triticum durum) Edible Coatings Edible Films Edible Starch Einkorn (Triticum monococcum) Emmer (Triticum dicoccon) Enriched Bleached Flour Enriched Bleached Wheat Flour Enriched Flour Farik Farina Farina Graham Farro Filler Flour (normally this is wheat) Freekeh Frikeh Fu (dried wheat gluten) Germ Graham Flour Granary Flour Groats (barley, wheat) Hard Wheat Heeng Hing Hordeum Vulgare Extract Hydroxypropyltrimonium Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein Kamut (Pasta wheat) Kecap Manis (Soy Sauce) Ketjap Manis (Soy Sauce) Kluski Pasta Maida (Indian wheat flour) Malt Malted Barley Flour Malted Milk Malt Extract Malt Syrup Malt Flavoring Malt Vinegar Macha Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Matza Matzah Matzo Matzo Semolina Meripro 711 Mir Nishasta Oriental Wheat (Triticum turanicum) Orzo Pasta Pasta Pearl Barley Persian Wheat (Triticum carthlicum) Perungayam Poulard Wheat (Triticum turgidum) Polish Wheat (Triticum polonicum) Rice Malt (if barley or Koji are used) Roux Rusk Rye Seitan Semolina Semolina Triticum Shot Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Small Spelt Spirits (Specific Types) Spelt (Triticum spelta) Sprouted Wheat or Barley Stearyldimoniumhydroxypropyl Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein Strong Flour Suet in Packets Tabbouleh Tabouli Teriyaki Sauce Timopheevi Wheat (Triticum timopheevii) Triticale X triticosecale Triticum Vulgare (Wheat) Flour Lipids Triticum Vulgare (Wheat) Germ Extract Triticum Vulgare (Wheat) Germ Oil Udon (wheat noodles) Unbleached Flour Vavilovi Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Vital Wheat Gluten Wheat, Abyssinian Hard triticum durum Wheat Amino Acids Wheat Bran Extract Wheat, Bulgur Wheat Durum Triticum Wheat Germ Extract Wheat Germ Glycerides Wheat Germ Oil Wheat Germamidopropyldimonium Hydroxypropyl Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein Wheat Grass (can contain seeds) Wheat Nuts Wheat Protein Wheat Triticum aestivum Wheat Triticum Monococcum Wheat (Triticum Vulgare) Bran Extract Whole-Meal Flour Wild Einkorn (Triticum boeotictim) Wild Emmer (Triticum dicoccoides)
  15. Celiac.com 07/02/2018 - We know from earlier studies that diagnosed celiac disease is more common in women than in men, but there isn’t much good data on sex-based differences in undiagnosed celiac disease. To address this discrepancy, Claire L. Jansson-Knodell, MD, and her colleagues at the Mayo Clinic, in Rochester, Minnesota, conducted a meta-analysis of studies that performed both a screening and confirmatory test that included either a second serological study or a small intestine biopsy, and that that provided clear and complete data regarding sex. According to data they presented at Digestive Disease Week 2018 in Washington, D.C., women are significantly more likely than men to have undiagnosed celiac disease, and the numbers are even higher for younger girls. In all, the researchers found 88 studies that met their inclusion criteria. These studies included data on nearly 300,000 patients. When they got done crunching the numbers, the research team demonstrated for the first time that women also had a higher rate of undetected celiac disease than men. When the team analyzed data from one subgroup focused on children, they found that rates of undiagnosed celiac disease were even higher in girls compared with boys. Timely diagnosis of celiac disease is important for preventing unnecessary suffering, and potential damage and disease associated with untreated celiac disease. In one recent case, a doctors found that a woman's psychotic delusions were caused by undiagnosed celiac disease and an adverse reaction to continued gluten exposure. Her condition improved quickly once she began a gluten-free diet. The research team says that their findings could change approaches to clinical screening, diagnosis and management of celiac disease. They also suggest that physicians might do well to increase their suspicion levels for celiac disease when evaluation women and girls. Source: Helio.com
  16. Long read......Hi, I’m seeking some guidance here because I’m suspicious that I have at least a gluten intolerance because of constipation, bloating, tiredness, and hives. Here’s some background: I’m 18 years old. When I was 16, I started suffering from chronic hives that seemed to have no cause. We changed soaps, detergents, medicines, avoided allergens, etc, but I only got worse. I had extensive blood work which turned out normal in every area and eventually was sent to a counselor and put on Prozac (unrelated) for anxiety. After awhile, I just assumed the hives were caused by stress. I’ve had hives nearly every day since. 3-4 months ago, I had horrible sore throats that resembled strep. I developed horrible exhaustion to the point where I nearly fell asleep in class and took naps every day, which I never could do, and went to bed at 9:30-10. The strep tests came back negative twice, and eventually I was tested for mono which also came back negative. Soon after, I developed random bouts of canker sores all over my tongue, lips, and cheeks. Once one went away, another would develop. Now, I get them all over my tonsils as well, and I have pimple-like bumps in the back of my throat. I went gluten free for a week and the hives went away completely. I saw my doctor after this and explained the sores, hives, and exhaustion, and she shrugged all of it off, saying I needed to “eat better” because it would fix all of it. She would not test me for any conditions (celiac, hypothyroidism, Hashimoto’s, deficiencies, etc) and said I shouldn’t go into college self diagnosing myself with something I don’t have. I’ve reintroduced gluten and for two weeks I was fine, but lately I’ve been sleeping up to 12 hours at night and then taking 4-5 hour naps during the day. All I do anymore is sleep and I feel like it’s actuallyruining my life, on top of the horrible mouth sores!! How can I be tested? Do you have any ideas what the problem might be?
  17. Celiac.com 06/26/2018 - Gliadin is an alcohol-soluble wheat protein that is toxic for people with celiac disease. Gliadin toxicity is not lowered by digestion with gastro-pancreatic enzymes. It’s been documented that an innate immunity to gliadin plays a key role in the development of celiac disease. This is mainly due to an immune response that induces epithelial stress and reprograms intraepithelial lymphocytes into natural killer (NK)-like cells, leading to enterocyte apoptosis and an increase in epithelium permeability. A team of researchers recently set out to elaborate on the role played by innate immunity to gliadin in the development of celiac disease by assessing the in vitro effects of enzymatic digested gliadin on the functionality of the process of autophagy, or natural cell destruction. The research team included Federico Manai, Alberto Azzalin, Fabio Gabriele, Carolina Martinelli, Martina Morandi, Marco Biggiogera, Mauro Bozzola, and Sergio Comincini. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Biology and Biotechnology, and with the Pediatrics and Adolescentology Unit in the Department of Internal Medicine and Therapeutics at University of Pavia, Fondazione IRCCS, Pavia, Italy. They reported recently that the administration of enzymatically digested gliadin (PT-gliadin) in in Caco-2 cells significantly reduced the expression of the autophagy-related marker LC3-II. Moreover, analysis by electron and fluorescent microscope suggests a compromised functionality of the autophagosome apparatus. The team established the rescue of the dysregulated autophagy process, along with a reduction of PT-gliadin toxicity, by using a starvation induction protocol, and by 3-methyladenine administration. Rapamycin, a well-known autophagy inducer, did not trigger significant improvement in the clearance of extra- and intra-cellular fluorescent PT-gliadin amounts. These results show the potential role of the autophagy process in the degradation and reduction of extra-cellular gliadin peptides, and provides new molecular targets for counteracting adverse gliadin reactions in celiac patients. Source: Int J Mol Sci. 2018 Feb; 19(2): 635. doi:  10.3390/ijms19020635
  18. Celiac.com 06/18/2018 - Celiac disease has been mainly associated with Caucasian populations in Northern Europe, and their descendants in other countries, but new scientific evidence is beginning to challenge that view. Still, the exact global prevalence of celiac disease remains unknown. To get better data on that issue, a team of researchers recently conducted a comprehensive review and meta-analysis to get a reasonably accurate estimate the global prevalence of celiac disease. The research team included P Singh, A Arora, TA Strand, DA Leffler, C Catassi, PH Green, CP Kelly, V Ahuja, and GK Makharia. They are variously affiliated with the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Lady Hardinge Medical College, New Delhi, India; Innlandet Hospital Trust, Lillehammer, Norway; Centre for International Health, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Gastroenterology Research and Development, Takeda Pharmaceuticals Inc, Cambridge, MA; Department of Pediatrics, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona, Italy; Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; USA Celiac Disease Center, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; and the Department of Gastroenterology and Human Nutrition, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India. For their review, the team searched Medline, PubMed, and EMBASE for the keywords ‘celiac disease,’ ‘celiac,’ ‘tissue transglutaminase antibody,’ ‘anti-endomysium antibody,’ ‘endomysial antibody,’ and ‘prevalence’ for studies published from January 1991 through March 2016. The team cross-referenced each article with the words ‘Asia,’ ‘Europe,’ ‘Africa,’ ‘South America,’ ‘North America,’ and ‘Australia.’ They defined celiac diagnosis based on European Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition guidelines. The team used 96 articles of 3,843 articles in their final analysis. Overall global prevalence of celiac disease was 1.4% in 275,818 individuals, based on positive blood tests for anti-tissue transglutaminase and/or anti-endomysial antibodies. The pooled global prevalence of biopsy-confirmed celiac disease was 0.7% in 138,792 individuals. That means that numerous people with celiac disease potentially remain undiagnosed. Rates of celiac disease were 0.4% in South America, 0.5% in Africa and North America, 0.6% in Asia, and 0.8% in Europe and Oceania; the prevalence was 0.6% in female vs 0.4% males. Celiac disease was significantly more common in children than adults. This systematic review and meta-analysis showed celiac disease to be reported worldwide. Blood test data shows celiac disease rate of 1.4%, while biopsy data shows 0.7%. The prevalence of celiac disease varies with sex, age, and location. This review demonstrates a need for more comprehensive population-based studies of celiac disease in numerous countries. The 1.4% rate indicates that there are 91.2 million people worldwide with celiac disease, and 3.9 million are in the U.S.A. Source: Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2018 Jun;16(6):823-836.e2. doi: 10.1016/j.cgh.2017.06.037.
  19. Celiac.com 05/30/2018 - One of the key aspects of non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) is that patients are diagnosed partly by the absence of celiac disease. That is, patients with NCGS, whatever their symptoms, do not have celiac disease. But could those patients still have some kind of gut damage, or permeability issues? Do people with non-celiac gluten sensitivity have distinct duodenal histological features? Researchers are seeking a better understanding of this still undefined condition. Some researchers have suggested that histology may play a key role in NCGS, but there is still no consensus. A recent review by Bardella et al. revealed that histology is not always reported in NCGS studies, and exclusion of celiac disease is generally done by showing negative serology and/or genetic typing. In June 2015, researchers published what is now called the Salerno Experts’ criteria, which proposes a double (or single)-blind, placebo-controlled, (DBPC), crossover gluten challenge as the gold standard to NCGS diagnosis In order to investigate histological findings of people with suspicion of NCGS, we retrospectively evaluated duodenal biopsies of a cohort of patients undergoing clinical diagnostic algorithm for NCGS as proposed by the Salerno consensus. The research team included B Zanini, V Villanacci, M Marullo, M Cadei, F Lanzarotto, A Bozzola, and C Ricci. They are variously affiliated with the Gastroenterology Unit, Department of Clinical and Experimental Sciences, University of Brescia, Viale Europa 11, 25123, Brescia, Italy; and with the Institute of Pathology Spedali Civili, Piazzale Spedali Civili 1, 25123, Brescia, Italy. Their team’s main goal was to underline that the peculiar IEL distribution and the increased eosinophil count may represent a valid warning that help to identify patients with NCGS, given the absence of serological markers for NCGS. The team also performed a CD3 immunohistochemical evaluation of T lymphocytes confirming that the IEL numbers were normal, but their distribution is peculiar, as noted by the clusters of T lymphocytes in the superficial epithelium and linear disposition of T lymphocytes in the deeper part of the mucosa above the muscularis mucosae. They also note that their failure to fully match study subjects with placebo challenge is a limitation of this study, but stress the current uncertainty of the actual clinical diagnostic algorithm as supported by recent reviews of the literature. The team’s observations led them to note that histology may play a similar role in NCGS diagnosis as it does in celiac diagnosis. Researchers do know that, unlike with celiac disease, there is an absence of damage or change to intestinal mucosa in patients with NCGS, especially an absence of villous atrophy. In addition, the morphological exclusion of celiac disease is a crucial assessment, because some patients classified as NCGS show increased duodenal IEL count (> 25 IELs/100 enterocytes), corresponding to Marsh I, or grade A lesions of celiac histological classification. To properly diagnose NCGS, the team says it’s very important to confirm these features, to rule out any type of organic malabsorption diseases, and to definitively rule out celiac disease, via a negative celiac disease serology. Taken as a whole, the team’s results provide evidence that both intraepithelial lymphocytes and eosinophils play a role in the physiopathology behind NCGS. They are calling for more studies to confirm their findings and to determine whether the results they observed were specific to NCGS. Source: Virchows Arch. 2018 Apr 4. doi: 10.1007/s00428-018-2346-9
  20. Celiac.com 06/19/2018 - Could baking soda help reduce the inflammation and damage caused by autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, and celiac disease? Scientists at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University say that a daily dose of baking soda may in fact help reduce inflammation and damage caused by autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, and celiac disease. Those scientists recently gathered some of the first evidence to show that cheap, over-the-counter antacids can prompt the spleen to promote an anti-inflammatory environment that could be helpful in combating inflammatory disease. A type of cell called mesothelial cells line our body cavities, like the digestive tract. They have little fingers, called microvilli, that sense the environment, and warn the organs they cover that there is an invader and an immune response is needed. The team’s data shows that when rats or healthy people drink a solution of baking soda, the stomach makes more acid, which causes mesothelial cells on the outside of the spleen to tell the spleen to go easy on the immune response. "It's most likely a hamburger not a bacterial infection," is basically the message, says Dr. Paul O'Connor, renal physiologist in the MCG Department of Physiology at Augusta University and the study's corresponding author. That message, which is transmitted with help from a chemical messenger called acetylcholine, seems to encourage the gut to shift against inflammation, say the scientists. In patients who drank water with baking soda for two weeks, immune cells called macrophages, shifted from primarily those that promote inflammation, called M1, to those that reduce it, called M2. "The shift from inflammatory to an anti-inflammatory profile is happening everywhere," O'Connor says. "We saw it in the kidneys, we saw it in the spleen, now we see it in the peripheral blood." O'Connor hopes drinking baking soda can one day produce similar results for people with autoimmune disease. "You are not really turning anything off or on, you are just pushing it toward one side by giving an anti-inflammatory stimulus," he says, in this case, away from harmful inflammation. "It's potentially a really safe way to treat inflammatory disease." The research was funded by the National Institutes of Health. Read more at: Sciencedaily.com
  21. Celiac.com 06/12/2018 - A life-long gluten-free diet is the only proven treatment for celiac disease. However, current methods for assessing gluten-free diet compliance are lack the sensitivity to detect occasional dietary transgressions that may cause gut mucosal damage. So, basically, there’s currently no good way to tell if celiac patients are suffering gut damage from low-level gluten contamination. A team of researchers recently set out to develop a method to determine gluten intake and monitor gluten-free dietary compliance in patients with celiac disease, and to determine its correlation with mucosal damage. The research team included ML Moreno, Á Cebolla, A Muñoz-Suano, C Carrillo-Carrion, I Comino, Á Pizarro, F León, A Rodríguez-Herrera, and C Sousa. They are variously affiliated with Facultad de Farmacia, Departamento de Microbiología y Parasitología, Universidad de Sevilla, Sevilla, Spain; Biomedal S.L., Sevilla, Spain; Unidad Clínica de Aparato Digestivo, Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocío, Sevilla, Spain; Celimmune, Bethesda, Maryland, USA; and the Unidad de Gastroenterología y Nutrición, Instituto Hispalense de Pediatría, Sevilla, Spain. For their study, the team collected urine samples from 76 healthy subjects and 58 patients with celiac disease subjected to different gluten dietary conditions. To quantify gluten immunogenic peptides in solid-phase extracted urines, the team used a lateral flow test (LFT) with the highly sensitive and specific G12 monoclonal antibody for the most dominant GIPs and an LFT reader. They detected GIPs in concentrated urines from healthy individuals previously subjected to gluten-free diet as early as 4-6 h after single gluten intake, and for 1-2 days afterward. The urine test showed gluten ingestion in about 50% of patients. Biopsy analysis showed that nearly 9 out of 10 celiac patients with no villous atrophy had no detectable GIP in urine, while all patients with quantifiable GIP in urine showed signs of gut damage. The ability to use GIP in urine to reveal gluten consumption will likely help lead to new and non-invasive methods for monitoring gluten-free diet compliance. The test is sensitive, specific and simple enough for clinical monitoring of celiac patients, as well as for basic and clinical research applications including drug development. Source: Gut. 2017 Feb;66(2):250-257.  doi: 10.1136/gutjnl-2015-310148.
  22. Hello! Hoping some of the more well versed Celiacs here may have a bit of input on my recent situation. Additional and relevant details also included. Quick Celiac Backstory: Mother and sister were diagnosed with Celiac circa 2003. I at the time was blood tested (borderline results) and scoped (negative, no noticeable damage to cilia / villi). I've went through life on a non-gluten free diet as any guy that was told they don't have Celiac would do, am now just shy of turning 30, and decided to get another blood test (this time a newer antibody one). The results were a very strong positive for Celiac, which isn't surprising given my family history. I haven't gotten scoped as I see little actual point in it; I don't doubt I have Celiac. This was about May 1st. I've eaten Gluten Free since then. Relevant Background Information: Main reason how I've went undiagnosed for so long is I've been by and large asymptomatic. My mom and sister were super sick and a wreck GI wise, that's what led to their diagnosis. I probably poop a little more than the average person, but of a normal Type 4/5 Bristol scale (important for later!). My bowel movements don't typically disrupt my life. I didn't feel foggy, nauseous, swollen, or the typical other symptoms. I do have acne flare ups and a hand rash on a few fingers, but not sure they're Celiac related (not sure they aren't, also.) In April I decided I was a bit overweight. I was 5'9", 185 lbs. I started counting calories and eating mostly healthy food. Lot of rice, chicken, and vegetables. I have comfortably lost 10 pounds in 2.5 months, a very safe rate to lose weight. In mid-May I started also cutting added sugars and simple carbs, like white bread, etc. I wouldn't say I was eating Gluten-Free at that point, but definitely a lot less than I ever had before. Around this time of cutting out sugars, my stool started getting a bit softer, and while not diarrhea, definitely a 5-6 on the Bristol scale. I had considered it could be some sort of Candida / yeast / gut flora rebalancing. The soft stool also contains some solids in it, which I later determined to be what I believe is rice husks. I also eat granola with gluten-free oats daily for breakfast with yogurt. After cutting out all gluten, it's looking even a little less solid. I think that today I saw some oat-y looking things in there. While not yellow, it's definitely more yellow-brown than it used to be. My question is this. Does it make sense for my stool to get softer and exhibit the characteristics above while switching to a gluten free diet, or has anyone perhaps experienced this and know what might be up? The only reason I started cutting added sugars and simple carbs in the first place was in attempts to get healthier. I have been eating rice regularly and also greek yogurt and granola for literally years almost day. (Though it wasn't gluten-free granola before.) So it's not a change in the types of fiber going through me. My plan is to cut out oats for a bit as I hear that's a good suggestion for people starting gluten-free diets. I still don't feel ill, nauseous, or really any different than before I went gluten free. Around the time I cut sugars, my stomach was considerably more bubbly and gassy, which I attributed to a change in diet. Unless something stands out to someone as telltale signs of something else, I think it's completely reasonable to carry on with everything else that I've been doing for a month or two and monitor the progress. Thanks for the long read and thanks for any input or advice!
  23. Celiac.com 06/11/2018 - Untreated celiac disease causes damage to the small intestine, which can interfere with proper nutrient absorption. Most patients can recover proper nutritional absorption via vitamins and mineral therapy, according to the CDF. Avoiding gluten is key. However, many people with celiac disease may not know that their pharmacist might just be one of their best allies in the fight to avoid gluten. Currently, there are no rules that require drug manufacturers to disclose the source of medication ingredients. Consumers can contact the manufacturer directly with questions, and some drug companies strive for clear, helpful answers, but getting correct information can be challenging. Many times though, an answer won't address possible cross contamination during the manufacturing process. This is where pharmacists can be a strong ally for patients with celiac disease. Here are a few way that pharmacists can help people with celiac disease to avoid hidden gluten in their prescriptions and over-the-counter drugs. The first thing pharmacists can do is to check ingredients on prescription medications these patients are taking. They can also share related information to help educate patients, and to improve their choices, and speak with drug manufacturers on patients’ behalf. In addition to assisting with prescription medicines, pharmacists can offer recommendations on vitamins and supplements. As with prescription drugs, both doctors and patients should do their best to review the ingredients used to manufacture vitamins and supplements, and to share this information with celiac patients. So, if you have celiac disease, definitely consider enlisting your pharmacist in an effort to get complete drug and supplement information. This simple tactic can help you to remain gluten-free during your course of drug treatment, however long that may last? Do you have a story about gluten in prescription drugs or supplements? Do you use your pharmacist to help you better understand your gluten-free drug and supplement options? Share your story with us. Source: medscape.com
  24. Celiac.com 11/15/2010 - Fermentation of wheat flour with sourdough lactobacilli and fungal proteases decreases the concentration of gluten in wheat. Depending on the level of hydrolyzation, gluten levels can be reduced as low as 8 parts per million. A team of researchers recently conducted a small study to assess whether people with celiac disease can eat baked goods made with wheat flour that is hydrolyzed via sourdough lactobacilli and fungal proteases during food processing. The team included L. Greco, M. Gobbetti, R. Auricchio, R. Di Mase, F. Landolfi, F. Paparo, R. Di Cagno, M. De Angelis, C. G. Rizzello, A. Cassone, G. Terrone, L. Timpone, M. D'Aniello, M. Maglio, R. Troncone, S. Auricchio. They are affiliated with the Department of Pediatrics and European Laboratory for the Study of Food Induced Diseases, University of Naples, Federico II in Naples Italy. The team evaluated the safety of daily administration of baked goods made from this hydrolyzed form of wheat flour for patients with celiac disease. Patients who volunteered for the study were assigned at random to consume 200 grams per day of baked goods from one of three groups. The did so every day for 60 days. The first group of six patients ate natural flour baked goods (NFBG), with a gluten content of 80,127 ppm gluten. The second group of 2 patients ate baked goods made from extensively hydrolyzed flour (S1BG), with a residual gluten content of 2,480 ppm. The third group of patients ate baked goods made from fully hydrolyzed flour (S2BG), with just 8 ppm residual gluten. In the first group, two of the six patients consuming baked goods made with natural flour (NFBG) discontinued the challenge because of adverse symptoms. All six patients in this group showed increased levels of anti-tissue transglutaminase (tTG) antibodies and small bowel deterioration. The two patients who ate baked goods made from extensively hydrolyzed flour (S1BG) had no clinical complaints, but biopsy showed intestinal damage in the form of subtotal villous atrophy. The five patients who ate baked goods made with made from fully hydrolyzed flour (S2BG), at just 8 ppm residual gluten had no clinical complaints. Also, they showed no increase in anti-tTG antibodies, and Marsh grades of their small intestinal mucosa showed no adverse change. Evidence with this small 60-day dietary study shows that people with celiac disease can safely consume baked goods made from fully hydrolyzed wheat flour, manufactured with sourdough lactobacilli and fungal proteases. This flour shows no toxicicity to patients with celiac disease. The team notes that a combined analysis of serologic, morphometric, and immunohistochemical parameters is the most accurate method to assess new therapies for this disorder. The results need to be borne out by further study, but, in the future, baked goods made with fully hydrolyzed wheat flour, manufactured with sourdough lactobacilli and fungal proteases may become another option for people with celiac disease. Source: Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2010 Oct 15. doi:10.1016/j.cgh.2010.09.025
  25. J Allergy Clin Immunol 2004;113:1199-1203. Celiac.com 07/30/2004 - According to a study by Italian researchers published in the June edition of the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, the prevalence of atopic dermatitis is much more common in those with celiac disease. The researchers looked at 1,044 adults with untreated celiac disease at the point of their diagnoses, as well as 2,752 of their relatives, and 318 of their spouses. They also looked at the prevalence of allergies in celiacs after one year on a gluten-free diet. The subjects filled out a standardized questionnaire upon their diagnosis, and those who reported having an allergy were tested for it using a standard makeup of 20 antigens for serum specific IgE. The researchers found that one celiac in 173 (16.6%) had at least one additional allergy, compared with 523 of their relatives (19%), and 43 of their spouses (13.5%). Patients with celiac disease were also more likely (3.8%) to have atopic dermatitis than their relatives (2.3%) or their spouses (1.3%). The amount of time that the celiac patients went undiagnosed and therefore untreated did not seem to influence the presence of allergy or atopic dermatitis. It is possible that a longer period of time on a gluten-free diet could influence the prevalence of allergy in those with celiac disease, and more research needs to be done to determine if being gluten-free longer can decrease allergies in those with celiac disease.
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