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Found 1,859 results

  1. The following was taken from THE SPRUE-NIK PRESS, September 1995. The University of Maryland School of Medicine sponsored a conference on July 14-15, 1995 entitled Celiac Disease: The Dark Side of the Gastrointestinal Planet, by Salvatore Auricchio, MD, summarized by Jim Lyles. Dr. Auricchio is Professor and Chairman of Pediatrics at the University Frederico II in Naples, Italy. celiac disease manifests itself in the small intestine. A distinct pattern of abnormalities has been observed [comments in braces have been added by Jim Lyles]: Villous atrophy [partial or complete flattening of the finger-like projections in the small intestine] Hyperplasia of the crypts of Lieberkuhn [the crypts under the villi become highly elongated when compared with normal crypts] Increased plasma cell and lymphocyte infiltration of the lamina propria [more lymphocytes under the epithelial or outer layer of the villi. Lymphocytes are the cells that fight off viruses, etc.] Increased intraepithelial lymphocytes [more lymphocytes within the epithelial cells. The epithelial cells form the outer layer of the intestine and allow nutrients to pass through from the intestine into the bloodstream] Abnormalities in the epithelial cells which become flattened, cuboidal, and pseudo- stratified [layered].
  2. This information came to me from Michael Walker (xix25@dial.pipex.com) of Genesis Diagnostics Ltd. Press Release: Genesis Diagnostics Ltd, Cambridge, UK have announced the development of a new and sensitive test for celiac disease. The test will be available through hospital laboratories. The test is based on detecting antibodies to an enzyme called transglutaminase in blood. The new test is more specific for celiac than currently available tests and should result in speedier diagnosis. Genesis Diagnostics is a manufacturer of ELISA based kits for autoimmune diagnosis. We already produce kits for gliadin IgG and IgA antibodies, which have been used for the past 5 years as the main test for celiac disease. The new test for transglutaminase was an obvious development of our experience in this area. We will continue to develop and improve blood tests in this area. We will be seeking FDA approval for the transglutaminase test kit in 1999. In the mean time it can be used for research only.
  3. Authors Rivabene R. Mancini E. De Vincenzi M. Source Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Molecular Basis of Disease. 1453(1):152-160, 1999 Jan 6. Abstract: Coeliac disease (celiac disease) is an inflammatory disorder of the upper small intestine in which gluten acts as an essential factor in its pathogenesis. Although it is generally accepted that cereal protein activation of the immune system is involved in celiac disease progression, a non-immunomediated cytotoxic activity of gliadin-derived peptides on the jejunal/duodenal tract cannot be excluded. In this work, considering that (a) little has been reported about the intracellular metabolic events associated with gliadin toxicity, and ( an important role for free radicals in a number of gastrointestinal disease has been demonstrated, we investigated the in vitro effects of gliadin-derived peptides on redox metabolism of Caco-2 intestinal cells during a kinetic study in which cells were exposed to peptic-tryptic digest of bread wheal up to 48 h. We found that the antiproliferative effects displayed by gliadin exposure was associated with intracellular oxidative imbalance, characterized by an increased presence of lipid peroxides, an augmented oxidized (GSSC)/reduced (GSH) glutathione ratio and a loss in protein-bound sulfhydryl groups. Significant structural perturbations of the cell plasma membrane were also detected. Additional experiments performed by using the specific GSH-depleting agent buthionine sulfoximine provide evidence that the extent of gliadin-induced cell growth arrest critically depends upon the basal redox profile of the enterocytes. On the whole, these findings seem to suggest that, besides the adoption of a strictly gluten-free diet, the possibility for an adjuvant therapy with antioxidants may be considered for celiac disease patients. © 1999 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. [References: 38]
  4. You just need to ask them to check for the DR haplotype. HLA testing is more expensive when you check more haplotypes - there any many to check. Its a poor analogy, but when looking at a car engine, you can just check the oil, or you can also check the radiator, spark plugs and carburetor. there are two DR types for each person - one from each parent. If even one of the two is DR3, then the person is at risk for celiac disease. But remember that around 25% of the entire population has DR3, too. If you are a celiac (or your husband), and your child has DR3, then the risk is something like 25%. We have a file on this called CEL-HLA on the main listserv which is available for you to download. If the result is DR5 on one side and DR7 on the other, then the child has the same risk as if they simple had one DR3. Its complicated why thats true, you can read it in the above file. If the child has NEITHER of the above scenarios, it is very very, very unlikely they will ever get celiac disease. Most good commercial labs can run HLA, its much more common of a test than regular celiac testing (endomysial test).
  5. Vijay Kumar, M.D., Research Associate Professor at the University of Buffalo and President and Director of IMMCO Diagnostics: If the test is negative and there is a strong suspicion of celiac disease, it must be repeated after several weeks (3-4 weeks), especially after a high gluten intake. We did a study of two cases with DH who were serologically negative. However, a gluten challenge 1g/Kg body wt/day resulted in positive serology; the results became normal on a gluten free diet. If you are a relative of a celiac disease patient and are on a regular diet and the serology performed by an experienced laboratory is negative then there may not be any need for retesting until and unless clinically justified. Karoly Horvath, M.D., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Pediatrics; Director, Peds GI & Nutrition Laboratory; University of Maryland at Baltimore: There is no rule for it. If a family member with previous negative tests experiences any gastrointestinal symptoms associated with celiac disease, he/she should undergo serological testing as soon as possible. It is well known that up to 15% of the family members of a patient with celiac disease may have the asymptomatic (latent or silent) form of celiac disease, although they have positive serological tests and have the pathological changes in the upper part of the small intestine. It is also evident that there are at least three developmental stages of mucosal lesions (Marsh MN. Gastroenterology 1992;102:330-354) and celiac disease may manifest at each period of life. That is why we recommend a repeat test every 2-3 years in first degree relatives of celiac patients.
  6. Vijay Kumar, M.D., Research Associate Professor at the University of Buffalo and President and Director of IMMCO Diagnostics: It is important for the serum tests to be negative in patients with celiac disease. These tests provide strong indicators that the gluten free diet followed is effective and is free of gluten. Sometimes drugs or other intakes may be contaminated with gluten that may continue sensitization and the disease process which may be subclinically. We and others believe once the diagnosis of celiac disease is confirmed and the patient is on a gluten free diet, repeat tests once in 3-6 months may be sufficient. Karoly Horvath, M.D., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Pediatrics; Director, Peds GI & Nutrition Laboratory; University of Maryland at Baltimore: If a patient has histologically (endoscopy) and serologically (antibody tests) proved celiac disease, and his/her symptoms disappeared on a gluten-free diet, a repeat biopsy is not necessary. The serological tests are useful tools for estimating the effectiveness of the diet after 3-6 months on a gluten-free diet. The disappearance of antibodies from the blood takes months, if there was not any accidental gluten challenge (dietary mistake).
  7. Dermatitis herpetiformis (DH) is a severely itchy skin condition that often starts abruptly, affecting the elbows, knees, buttocks, scalp, and back. It usually starts as little bumps that can become tiny blisters and then are usually scratched off. DH can occur in only one spot, but more often appears in several areas. The condition is related to IgA deposits under the skin. These occur as a result of ingesting gluten. These deposits take a long time to clear up, even when the patient is on a gluten-free diet. While most individuals with DH do not have obvious GI symptoms, almost all have some damage in their intestine. They have the potential for all of the nutritional complications of celiac disease. It is believed by some GI professionals that most DH patients do indeed have celiac disease. It is unusual to develop DH after a celiac patient starts a gluten-free diet. About 5% of celiac patients will develop DH, either before being diagnosed or within the first year on the diet. The fact that DH can develop even after starting the diet is probably due to the long lasting nature of the IgA deposits. For more information see the Dermatitis Herpetiformis page.
  8. Scott Adams

    What is celiac disease?

    Celiac disease (also called coeliac, nontropical sprue, celiac sprue, gluten intolerant enteropathy, or gluten sensitive enteropathy) is a condition in which there is a chronic reaction to certain protein chains, commonly referred to as glutens, found in some cereal grains. This reaction causes destruction of the villi in the small intestine, with resulting malabsorption of nutrients. There is clear evidence of a family tendency toward celiac disease. 5-10% of the first-level relatives (parents, children, and siblings) of diagnosed celiacs may develop celiac disease. The disease affects both sexes, and it can begin at any age, from infancy (as soon as cereal grains are introduced) to later life (even though the individual has consumed cereal grains all along). The onset of the disease seems to require two components: genetic predisposition (two specific genetic markers, called HLA sub-factors, are present in well over 90% of all celiacs in America), and some kind of trigger. The trigger may be environmental (as in overexposure to wheat), situational (perhaps severe emotional stress), physical (such as a pregnancy, an operation), or pathological (a viral infection). Once thought to be a childhood disease that would be outgrown, recent evidence indicates that it is not uncommon for the symptoms of celiac disease to disappear during late childhood or adolescence, giving the appearance of a cure. Unfortunately, damage still occurs during these years of apparent health, and later in life these celiacs may find they have suffered considerable damage to the small intestine, and have for years deprived themselves of important nutrients.
  9. New England Journal of Medicine October 19, 1995 -- Volume 333, Number 16 Celiac.com 10/25/1995 - According to an article published for the week of October 19, 1995 (Vol. 333, No. 16) in the New England Journal of Medicine, it is not a problem for celiacs to eat oats (non-contaminated, of course!). The article is based on a study conducted in Finland by a group of doctors who did very rigorous testing on adult celiacs and concluded that oats can, and should be included on the celiac diet (The lead doctor for the study is also a celiac). The following is a summary of the study: 52 celiacs in remission (on a gluten-free diet for more than a year) were given duodenal-biopsies, and then fed an average of 49.9 grams of oats per day for six months. They were again given biopsies, and none of the subjects were found to have any villi damage. There was also a group of 40 newly diagnosed celiacs who underwent the same procedures, except they were studied for 12 months rather than 6. The initial biopsies with this group showed significant villi damage due to the fact that they were still on a gluten-containing diet until they began the study. This group was fed an average of 46.6 grams of oats per day, and were given biopsies at 26 and 52 weeks. Their biopsies were almost normal at 26 weeks, which means their damaged villi were able to heal while eating oats daily. At the end of the year their biopsies showed no damage to their villi. The study DID NOT test people who had severe cases of celiac disease, and therefore cannot make recommendations with regard to them. Also, three people with dermatitis herpetiformis withdrew from the study because of an increase of itching, but none of them showed any signs of dermatitis. One person withdrew because of abdominal symptoms, but they did not exhibit damaged villi. Their conclusion: Our data suggest that most patients with celiac disease, whether in remission or newly diagnosed, can add moderate amounts of oats to their otherwise gluten-free diets without any harmful subjective side effects or laboratory abnormalities. Furthermore, among the newly diagnosed patients the improvement of mucosal architecture and the disappearance of mononuclear-cell infiltration were similar, regardless of the use of oats. -NEJM There is also an editorial from England which cites positive research which has been done there regarding oats. The NEJM is the Bible of medical research, with extensive peer reviews before publication.
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