Jump to content
  • Sign Up

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'disease'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Celiac Disease: Diagnosis, Recovery, Related Disorders & Research
    • Gluten-Free and Celiac Disease Calendar of Events
    • Celiac Disease - Pre-Diagnosis, Testing & Symptoms
    • Celiac Disease - Post Diagnosis, Recovery/Treatment(s)
    • Celiac Disease - Related Disorders & Research
    • Dermatitis Herpetiformis
    • Gluten Intolerance and Behavior
  • Celiac Disease Support & Help
    • Celiac Disease - Coping With
    • Celiac Disease - Parents of Kids or Babies With Celiac Disease
    • Gab/Chat Room - To Discuss Anything BUT Celiac Disease / Gluten-Free Diet
    • Celiac Disease - Doctors
    • Celiac Disease - Teenagers & Young Adults Only
    • Celiac Disease - Pregnancy
    • Celiac Disease - Friends and Loved Ones of Celiacs
    • Celiac Meeting Room
    • Celiac Disease - Sleep
    • Celiac Disease - Support Groups
  • Gluten-Free Lifestyle
    • Gluten-Free Foods, Products, Shopping & Medications
    • Gluten-Free Recipes - Baking & Cooking Tips
    • Gluten-Free Restaurants
    • Gluten-Free Ingredients & Food Labeling Issues
    • Celiac Disease - Publications & Publicity
    • Gluten-Free Travel
    • Gluten-Free Diet & Weight Issues
    • Gluten-Free International Room (Outside USA)
    • Gluten-Free Sports and Fitness
  • When A Gluten-Free Diet Just Isn't Enough
    • Other Food Intolerance and Leaky Gut Issues
    • Super Sensitive Celiacs & Gluten Sensitive
    • Alternative Diets
  • Forum Technical Assistance
    • Board/Forum Technical Help
  • DFW/Central Texas Celiacs's Events
  • DFW/Central Texas Celiacs's Groups/Organizations in the DFW area

Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Categories

  • Celiac.com Sponsors
  • Celiac Disease
  • Safe Gluten-Free Food List / Unsafe Foods & Ingredients
  • Gluten-Free Food & Product Reviews
  • Gluten-Free Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: American & International Foods
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Biscuits, Rolls & Buns
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Noodles & Dumplings
    • Gluten-Free Dessert Recipes: Pastries, Cakes, Cookies, etc.
    • Gluten-Free Bread Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Flour Mixes
    • Gluten-Free Kids Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Snacks & Appetizers
    • Gluten-Free Muffin Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Pancake Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Pizza Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Soups, Sauces, Dressings & Chowders
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Cooking Tips
    • Gluten-Free Scone Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Waffle Recipes
  • Celiac Disease Diagnosis, Testing & Treatment
  • Miscellaneous Information on Celiac Disease
    • Additional Celiac Disease Concerns
    • Celiac Disease Research Projects, Fundraising, Epidemiology, Etc.
    • Conferences, Publicity, Pregnancy, Church, Bread Machines, Distillation & Beer
    • Gluten-Free Diet, Celiac Disease & Codex Alimentarius Wheat Starch
    • Gluten-Free Food Ingredient Labeling Regulations
    • Celiac.com Podcast Edition
  • Celiac Disease & Gluten Intolerance Research
  • Celiac Disease & Related Diseases and Disorders
    • Lists of Diseases and Disorders Associated with Celiac Disease
    • Addison's Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Anemia and Celiac Disease
    • Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia and Celiac Disease
    • Arthritis and Celiac Disease
    • Asthma and Celiac Disease
    • Ataxia, Nerve Disease, Neuropathy, Brain Damage and Celiac Disease
    • Attention Deficit Disorder and Celiac Disease
    • Autism and Celiac Disease
    • Bacterial Overgrowth and Celiac Disease
    • Cancer, Lymphoma and Celiac Disease
    • Candida Albicans and Celiac Disease
    • Canker Sores (Aphthous Stomatitis) & Celiac Disease
    • Casein / Cows Milk Intolerance and Celiac Disease
    • Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Celiac Disease
    • Cognitive Impairment and Celiac Disease
    • Crohn's Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Depression and Celiac Disease
    • Dermatitis Herpetiformis: Skin Condition Associated with Celiac Disease
    • Diabetes and Celiac Disease
    • Down Syndrome and Celiac Disease
    • Dyspepsia, Acid Reflux and Celiac Disease
    • Epilepsy and Celiac Disease
    • Eye Problems, Cataract and Celiac Disease
    • Fertility, Pregnancy, Miscarriage and Celiac Disease
    • Fibromyalgia and Celiac Disease
    • Flatulence (Gas) and Celiac Disease
    • Gall Bladder Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Gastrointestinal Bleeding and Celiac Disease
    • Geographic Tongue (Glossitis) and Celiac Disease
    • Growth Hormone Deficiency and Celiac Disease
    • Heart Failure and Celiac Disease
    • Infertility, Impotency and Celiac Disease
    • Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Intestinal Permeability and Celiac Disease
    • Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Celiac Disease
    • Kidney Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Liver Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Lupus and Celiac Disease
    • Malnutrition, Body Mass Index and Celiac Disease
    • Migraine Headaches and Celiac Disease
    • Multiple Sclerosis and Celiac Disease
    • Myasthenia Gravis Celiac Disease
    • Obesity, Overweight & Celiac Disease
    • Osteoporosis, Osteomalacia, Bone Density and Celiac Disease
    • Psoriasis and Celiac Disease
    • Refractory Celiac Disease & Collagenous Sprue
    • Sarcoidosis and Celiac Disease
    • Scleroderma and Celiac Disease
    • Schizophrenia / Mental Problems and Celiac Disease
    • Sepsis and Celiac Disease
    • Sjogrens Syndrome and Celiac Disease
    • Skin Problems and Celiac Disease
    • Sleep Disorders and Celiac Disease
    • Thrombocytopenic Purpura and Celiac Disease
    • Thyroid & Pancreatic Disorders and Celiac Disease
    • Tuberculosis and Celiac Disease
  • The Origins of Celiac Disease
  • Gluten-Free Grains and Flours
  • Oats and Celiac Disease: Are They Gluten-Free?
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2018 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2018 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2018 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2018 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2017 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2017 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2017 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2017 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2016 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2016 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2016 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2016 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2015 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2015 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2015 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2015 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2014 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2014 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2014 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2014 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2013 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2013 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2013 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2013 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2012 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2012 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2012 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2012 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2011 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2011 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2006 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2005 Issue
  • Celiac Disease Support Groups
    • United States of America: Celiac Disease Support Groups and Organizations
    • Outside the USA: Celiac Disease Support Groups and Contacts
  • Celiac Disease Doctor Listing
  • Kids and Celiac Disease
  • Gluten-Free Travel
  • Gluten-Free Cooking
  • Gluten-Free
  • Allergy vs. Intolerance
  • Tax Deductions for Gluten-Free Food
  • Gluten-Free Newsletters & Magazines
  • Gluten-Free & Celiac Disease Links
  • History of Celiac.com
    • History of Celiac.com Updates Through October 2007
    • Your E-mail in Support of Celiac.com 1996 to 2006

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Interests


Location

Found 1,259 results

  1. Celiac.com 05/22/2015 - The fact that celiac disease is commonly misdiagnosed will come as little surprise to anyone who's ever gone through what can often be a long, circuitous process of getting diagnosed. Celiac symptoms can be vague, and can mirror symptoms of numerous other conditions. Even though celiac awareness is improving, and blood screens are becoming more common, misdiagnosis remains common for people who are eventually diagnosed with celiac disease. Can you guess the most common misdiagnoses that doctors make for patients with celiac disease? The most common misdiagnoses include: Irritable bowel syndrome: People with celiac disease are often told that they have irritable dowel syndrome when they actually have celiac disease. In fact, IBS is the most common misdiagnosis for people with celiac disease. Inflammatory bowel disease: Coming in a close second to IBS, inflammatory bowel disease is another common misdiagnosis for people who actually have celiac disease. Gastro-esophageal reflux disease: People with GERD don't have any higher rates of celiac disease than the rest of the population. However, to be fair, a pretty high percentage of newly diagnosed celiac patients have reflux and/or esophageal dysmotility; which might explain the high prevalence of reflux symptoms in celiac disease patients, and the common misdiagnosis of GERD. Ulcers: Ulcers are often wrongly suspected, well before celiac disease is finally diagnosed. Viral gastroenteritis: Another very common thing doctors suspect long before they suspect celiac disease, is viral gastroenteritis. Chronic fatigue syndrome: Fatigue is a common complaint of many people with celiac disease, so maybe it's understandable why many people with celiac disease find themselves with a misdiagnosis of chronic fatigue, rather than an accurate diagnosis of celiac disease. Allergies: Many people find themselves wrongly diagnosed with environmental allergies long before they are diagnosed with celiac disease. Parasitic infection: Celiac disease symptoms can mirror symptoms of certain gut parasites, which is one reason that many people with celiac disease find themselves being checked for parasites long before they get checked for celiac disease. Gallbladder disease: Celiac disease symptoms can mirror symptoms of gallbladder disease, which is why many people who actually have celiac disease find themselves diagnosed with gallbladder problems. Colitis: Another common culprit for misdiagnosis is colitis, which shares many symptoms with celiac disease. Cystic fibrosis: Many people don't realize that in a number of cases, the symptoms of celiac disease can lead doctors to suspect cystic fibrosis, rather than celiac disease, thus prolonging diagnosis, treatment and recovery. Psychological dysfunction: In many cases, celiac disease symptoms can be so hard to pin down that doctors find themselves wondering if the symptoms aren't really in the patient's head. In their quest for diagnosis, many people with celiac disease have been referred to a psychologist, rather than evaluated for celiac disease. Lactose intolerance: Lactose intolerance is a common misdiagnosis in celiac patients, because the mucosal damage from gluten leaves them unable to digest lactose-containing products. In addition to being frustrating and painful, misdiagnosis of celiac disease is a big deal because, left unaddressed, the damage done by the disease continues unabated, and can snowball into further health and wellness problems. Have you, or anyone you know, suffered through misdiagnosis before being diagnosed with celiac disease? Share your story in our comments section. Source: US Pharmacist. 2014;39(12):44-48.
  2. Celiac.com 05/11/2011 - People with multiple sclerosis and their first-generation relatives have higher rates of celiac disease than the general population, according to a report by a research team in Spain. For the study, a research team led by Dr. Luis Rodrigo of University Hospital, Central Asturias, Spain looked at rates of serological, genetic, and histological disease markers in 72 multiple sclerosis patients and 126 of their first-degree relatives. They then compared the results against data from 123 healthy control subjects. The team found rates of celiac disease among multiple sclerosis patients that are 5 to 10 times higher than rates for the general population worldwide, which average between 1% and 2%. The team found similar levels of HLA-DQ2 markers in both multiple sclerosis patients (29%) and controls (26%) (NS). They found eight multiple sclerosis patients (11.1%) who showed mild or moderate villous atrophy (Marsh III type) on duodenal biopsy. Results also showed that 26 of 126 first-degree relatives (32%) had celiac disease. Multiple Sclerosis patients also displayed increased frequency of circulating auto-antibodies such as anti-TPO in 19 (26%), ANA in 11 (15%) and AMA in 2 (3%). Source: BMC Neurology 2011, 11:31doi:10.1186/1471-2377-11-31
  3. Betty Wedman-St Louis, PhD, RD

    Methylation and Celiac Disease

    Celiac.com 01/31/2018 - Methylation is a biochemical reaction in the human body that requires a variety of nutrients to perform indispensable roles in neurological health, detoxification, amino acid metabolism, gene regulation and vitamin assimilation. Every person with celiac disease needs to have their methylation variants tested by their physician so they can achieve good health. How well your body can "methylate" is important to your overall health. Methylation pathways in the body are important in cardiovascular health, neuroprotection from dementia and Alzheimer's disease, cognition skills in the young and old, along with emotional wellness and cellular function. A simple blood test- MTHFR- which is available at all major laboratories can determine if common genetic variants require additional supplementation of B vitamins. The MTHFR (Methylene Tetrahydrofolate Reductase) converts folate (vitamin B9) and riboflavin (vitamin B2) into an active part of the energy production cycle. In addition, it can indicate if higher levels of Vitamin B12 are needed. Since it is a genetic factor, some clinics do not test it but every celiac needs to know what variants they have in order to optimize their nutritional needs. (Author's note: I wish I had done this testing when I first learned about it 20 years ago. It has made all the difference in the world in my health these past 8 years!) The role of methylation is to help enzymes in our body work efficiently. Enzymes are like switches for chemical reactions in cells and tissues. Inadequate methylation nutrients- folate (NOT folic acid), methylcobalamin - the active form of B12 (NOT cyanocobalamin- the cheap cyanide form), and vitamin B6 as pyridoxal-5-phosphate can improve anemia, sleep, energy production and detoxification of chemicals from gasoline fumes to ammonia odors and personal care fragrances. Research over the past twenty years has provided a wealth of knowledge about methylation. It is the responsibility of each person to know their MTHFR variants which were inherited from mom and dad. Here is a brief list of the medical conditions affected by variants in MTHFR. Neurological Disorders: Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, Dementia, Multiple Sclerosis, Autism Cardiovascular Disorders: Atherosclerosis, Pulmonary Embolisms, General Clotting Disorders Mental Dysfunction: Depression, Anxiety, Insomnia, ADD/ADHD, Bipolar, Addictive Behaviors, Schizophrenia Conception: Infertility, Recurrent Miscarriages Immune Function: Allergies, Chronic Viral Infection Diabetes: Retinopathy, Neuropathy, Nephropathy Increased Sensitivity: Chemicals, Drugs, Supplements Birth Defects: Congenital Heart Defects, Cleft Palette, Spinal Bifida, Down's Syndrome Cancer Thyroid Dysfunction Chronis Conditions: Pain, Fibromyalgia, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome These MTHFR variants are NOT uncommon but unfortunately few in the medical arena are educated to address dietary concerns related to them. A book MTHFR- Methylation Diet is available on my website www.betty-wedman-stlouis.com for those who need assistance understanding their profile and designing dietary plans. The Methylation Diet is a high protein diet with lots of folate rich vegetables. Thos individuals with MTHFR variants should avoid folic acid as a dietary supplement and foods enriched with it like cereals, breads, flour, etc.
  4. Celiac.com 02/01/2018 - To make a clinical diagnosis of celiac disease, doctors use serological testing for IgA antibodies to human tissue transglutaminase (anti-tTG) which indicate celiac disease autoimmunity. However, some tests are more highly sensitive for anti-tTG, while other tests are highly specific. So, is combining two tests a reliable strategy for screening for celiac disease in clinical practice? A team of researchers recently compared the performance of three kits used to diagnose celiac disease, and evaluated the point prevalence of celiac disease autoimmunity in a South Indian urban population. The research team included G Venugopal, J Mechenro, G Makharia, A Singh, S Pugazhendhi, R Balamurugan, and BS Ramakrishna. They are variously associated with the SRM Institutes for Medical Science, Jawaharlal Nehru Salai, Vadapalani in Chennai, India, the SRM Medical College Hospital and Research Centre, Kattankulathur, India, the All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi, India, the Kansas University Medical Center, Kansas City KS, USA, the Indian Institute of Technology, Samantapuri, Bhubaneswar, India, the SRM Institutes for Medical Science, Jawaharlal Nehru Salai, Vadapalani, Chennai, India, and with the SRM Medical College Hospital and Research Centre, Kattankulathur, India. For the first part of their study, the team performed anti-tTG testing on sera from 90 patients with documented celiac disease and 92 healthy controls using three different kits. They then tested one thousand nine hundred and seventeen healthy adults residents of the Vellore and Kancheepuram districts for celiac disease autoimmunity using a sequential two-test strategy. Based on these results, the team suggests that using first a highly sensitive test for anti-tTG followed by a highly specific test is a reliable strategy for screening for celiac disease in clinical practice. Source: Indian J Gastroenterol. 2017 Dec 22. doi: 10.1007/s12664-017-0803-z.
  5. Celiac.com 01/22/2018 - Celiac disease is marked by HLA-DQ2/8-restricted responses of CD4+ T cells to gluten from wheat, barley or rye. Currently, in order to properly diagnose celiac disease based on serology and duodenal histology doctors need patients to be on gluten-containing diets. This is a problem for many people, who prefer not to begin ingesting wheat again once they have adopted a gluten-free diet. This can present challenges for doctors attempting to diagnose celiac disease. It is known that HLA-DQ–gluten tetramers can be used to detect gluten-specific T cells in the blood of patients with celiac disease, even if they are on a gluten-free diet. The team set out to determine if an HLA-DQ–gluten tetramer-based assay can accurately identify patients with celiac disease. The research team included Vikas K. Sarna, Knut E.A. Lundin, Lars Mørkrid, Shuo-Wang Qiao, Ludvig M. Sollid, and Asbjørn Christophersen. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Immunology, Oslo University Hospital – Rikshospitalet, Norway; the KG Jebsen Coeliac Disease Research Centre, University of Oslo, Norway; the Department of Gastroenterology, Oslo University Hospital – Rikshospitalet, Norway; the Department of Medical Biochemistry, Oslo University Hospital – Rikshospitalet, Norway; and with the Centre for Immune Regulation, Oslo University Hospital – Rikshospitalet and University of Oslo, Norway. For their study, the team produced HLA-DQ–gluten tetramers and added them to peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from 143 HLA-DQ2.5+ subjects. There were a total of 62 subjects with celiac disease on a gluten-free diet, 19 subjects without celiac disease on a gluten-free diet due to perceived sensitivity, 10 subjects with celiac disease on a non-gluten-free diet, and 52 seemingly healthy individuals as control subjects. The team used flow cytometry to measure T cells that bound HLA-DQ–gluten tetramers. They then used researchers blinded to sample type, except for samples from subjects with celiac disease on a gluten-containing diet, to conduct laboratory tests and flow cytometry gating analyses. They also conducted analysis on test precision using samples from 10 subjects. They found that an HLA-DQ–gluten tetramer-based test that detects gluten-reactive T cells identifies patients with and without celiac disease with a high level of accuracy, regardless of whether patients are on a gluten-free diet. This test could conceivably allow celiac diagnosis while suspected patients are still on a gluten-free diet. The team notes that their results require a larger study for validation. Could reliable celiac diagnosis be done without making patients consume gluten? Will that become common? Stay tuned for more developments. Source: Gastrojournal.org
  6. Celiac.com 10/30/2006 - Triticum monococcum wheat is also known as Einkorn wheat and small spelt, but do not confuse it with common spelt which is not the same thing. Einkorn is the oldest and most primitive cultivated wheat, and recent studies have shown that it appears to lack gliadin toxicity and may be a safe wheat alternative for those with celiac disease. In the most recent study the researchers conclude that data show a lack of toxicity of triticum monococcum gliadin in an in vitro organ culture system, suggesting new dietary opportunities for celiac patients. If this is the case it appears that this grain is non-toxic to those with celiac disease. Scand J Gastroenterol. 2006 Nov;41(11):1305-11. Lack of intestinal mucosal toxicity of Triticum monococcum in celiac disease patients. Pizzuti D, Buda A, DOdorico A, DInca R, Chiarelli S, Curioni A, Martines D. Abstract: Objective. The treatment of celiac disease is based on lifelong withdrawal of foods containing gluten. Unfortunately, compliance with a gluten-free diet has proved poor in many patients (mainly due to its low palatability), emphasizing the need for cereal varieties that are not toxic for celiac patients. In evolutionary terms, Triticum monococcum is the oldest and most primitive cultivated wheat. The aim of this study was to evaluate the toxicity of T. monococcum on small intestinal mucosa, using an in vitro organ culture system. Material and methods. Distal duodenum biopsies of 12 treated celiac patients and 17 control subjects were cultured for 24?h with T. aestivum (bread) gliadin (1?mg/ml) or with T. monococcum gliadin (1?mg/ml). Biopsies cultured with medium alone served as controls. Each biopsy was used for conventional histological examination and for immunohistochemical detection of CD3?+?intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) and HLA-DR. Secreted cytokine protein interferon-? (IFN–?) was measured in the culture supernatant using an enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay. Results. Significant morphological changes, HLA-DR overexpression in the crypt epithelium and an increased number of CD3?+?IELs, found after bread gliadin exposure, were not observed in celiac biopsies cultured with T. monococcum gliadin. In contrast, with bread gliadin, there was no significant IFN-? response after culture with monococcum gliadin. Similarly, biopsies from normal controls did not respond to bread or monococcum gliadin stimulation. Conclusions. These data show a lack of toxicity of T. monococcum gliadin in an in vitro organ culture system, suggesting new dietary opportunities for celiac patients. Note: Celiac.com strongly advises against celiacs including these grains in their diet until more testing and research is done to verify their safety. Einkorn Breadmaking Sites: Cereal Chem. 73 (2):208-214 Breadmaking Quality of Einkorn Wheat (Triticum monococcum ssp. monococcum). http://www.aaccnet.org/cerealchemistry/backissues/1996/73_208.pdf Cereal Chem. 76 (5): Pub. no. C-1999-0804-01R Einkorn Characterization for Bread and Cookie Production in Relation to Protein Subunit Composition. http://www.aaccnet.org/cerealchemistry/abstracts/1999/0804-01r.asp
  7. Celiac.com 05/11/2015 - Many people with celiac disease know that gluten exposure can cause gut damage and trouble absorbing some vitamins and minerals, which can lead to serious deficiencies. However, even celiac who follow gluten-free diets may experience similar issues, including impaired vitamin and mineral absorption. The most common vitamin and mineral deficiencies in celiac patients include the following vitamins and minerals: B vitamins, especially B12 Vitamin A Vitamin D Vitamin E Vitamin K Iron Calcium Carotene Copper Folic acid Magnesium Selenium Zinc As a result, patients with celiac disease can develop iron-deficiency anemia, including a type that resists oral iron supplementation, and may also develop osteoporosis and osteopenia due to bone loss resulting from decreased calcium and vitamin D absorption. For these reasons, it is important that patients with celiac disease be monitored regularly to ensure that they have proper levels of vitamins and minerals in their bodies. Source: U.S. Pharmacist
  8. Celiac.com 01/29/2018 - Researchers suspect that certain environmental factors, including infectious agents, might play a role in making celiac disease more prevalent and more widespread. Researchers in the USA and Sweden studying regional variation in the frequency of celiac disease have found similarities in the geographic distribution of Lyme disease, an emerging multisystemic infection caused by Borrelia burgdorferi spirochete, which invites questions about a possible connection with celiac disease. One research team recently set out to determine if infection with Borrelia contributes to an increased risk of celiac disease. The research team included Armin Alaedini, Benjamin Lebwohl, Gary P. Wormser, Peter H. Green, and Jonas F. Ludvigsson. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY USA; the Celiac Disease Center, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY USA; the Institute of Human Nutrition, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY USA; the Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; the Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY USA; the Department of Pediatrics, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; and with the Division of Epidemiology and Public Health, School of Medicine, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK. Using biopsy reports, the team identified 15,769 individuals with celiac disease. By linking to the nationwide Patient Register, they were able to compare the rate of earlier occurrence of Lyme disease in the patients with celiac disease to that in 78,331 matched controls. To further assess the temporal relationship between Borrelia infection and celiac disease, they also examined the risk of subsequent Lyme disease in patients with a diagnosis of celiac disease. The team found that twenty-five patients with celiac disease had a prior diagnosis of Lyme disease (0.16%), whereas 79 had a subsequent diagnosis of Lyme disease (0.5%). This showed a modest association between Lyme disease and celiac disease was seen both before and after celiac diagnosis, with celiac risk being highest in the first year of follow-up. So, only a small portion of the celiac disease patients had a prior diagnosis for Lyme disease. The research team asserts that the supposed association between Lyme disease and celiac disease, both before and after the diagnosis of celiac disease, is likely driven by surveillance bias, at least in part. These data show that patients with Borrelia infection do not face a substantially higher risk for developing celiac disease. Source: BMC Med. 2017; 15: 169. doi: 10.1186/s12916-017-0926-1. PMCID: PMC5599869
  9. Celiac.com 01/19/2018 - Did you know that there are so many issues and questions surrounding celiac disease that even doctors who specialize in it find that the scientific data changes every six months, and this includes research data, new diagnostic and testing recommendations, and its connections to other diseases and conditions. In fact, many of us who think we have "arrived" and know it all might actually need a refresher course on the disease. There is always something new to learn about this disease. For example, did you know that the primary proteins in wheat gluten are gluten and gliadin, and gliadin contains repeating patterns of amino acids that many humans' digestive systems cannot break down, and gluten is the only substance that contains these proteins? People with celiac disease have one or two genetic mutations that somehow cause the immune system to attack the walls of their intestines when gliadin is present. That in turn causes finger-like structures called villi that absorb nutrients on the inside of the intestines to atrophy and the intestines can become leaky, wreaking havoc. Symptoms which vary widely among people with the disease, can include vomiting, chronic diarrhea, or constipation and diminished growth rates in children. The vast majority of people who have celiac disease don't know it, and not everyone who has the genetic markers will develop it. What worries doctors is that the problem seems to be increasing. Studies on blood collected in the 1950's show that the rate of celiac disease appears to be increasing. Some blame changes in wheat for this increase, as some varieties now grown contain higher levels of gluten. Did you know that the tTg-IgA - Tissue Transglutaminase Antibodies will be positive in about 98% of patients with celiac disease who are on a gluten-containing diet. That same test will come back negative in about 95% of healthy people without celiac disease. Though it is rare this means patients with celiac disease could have a negative antibody test result. "There is also a slight risk of a false positive test results, especially for people with associated autoimmune disorders like Type I diabetes, autoimmune liver disease, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, psoriatic or rheumatoid arthritis and heart failure, who do not have celiac disease. There are other antibody tests available to double-check for potential false positives or false negatives, but because of the potential for false antibody tests results, a biopsy of the small intestine is the only way to diagnose celiac disease. If your tests were negative, but you continue to experience symptoms, please don't give up. Consult your physician and undergo further medical evaluation. Ask to be referred to the closest hospital research department that deals with celiac disease. Did you know that there is something called "silent celiac disease," also known as asymptomatic celiac disease, where patients do not have any noticeable symptoms, but still experience villus atrophy damage to their small intestine? The number of ways that celiac disease can affect patients, combined with a lack of training in medical schools and primary care residency programs contributes to poor diagnosis rates in the United States. Some estimate that 80% of celiacs remain undiagnosed. Did you know that some people with wheat/gluten sensitivity still experience symptoms such as "brain fog", depression, ADHD - like behavior, abdominal pain, bloating, diarrhea, constipation, headaches, bone or joint pain, and chronic fatigue, yet they do not test positive for celiac disease? Terms like NCGS (non-celiac gluten sensitivity), and NCWS (non-celiac wheat sensitivity) are used to refer to this condition, but only after the removal of gluten from the diet resolves their symptoms. Did you know that celiac disease research funding has been neglected in the United States, and, as I have often said, where the United States goes, Canadians soon follow. A five-year review ending in 2017 shows the NIH gave less money to celiac disease than other gastro-intestinal conditions. Additionally, the National Institute for Digestive and Kidney Diseases awarded the fewest number of grants to celiac disease research over the same period from 2011 to 2015. The review, published as commentary in the Journal of Gastroenterology (http://www.gastrojournal.org/article/S0016-5085(17)36084-5/pdf) found that NIH funding, which is the major source of research support for inflammatory gastrointestinal diseases, showed no association between the estimated prevalence or mortality rates of a disease. In general, NIH support is seen as essential for improving the understanding of health and disease. The review included celiac disease, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), Crohn's disease, eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), Barrett's esophagus and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). In fact, both IBS and NALFD, neither of which is associated with increased mortality, still receive more funding than celiac disease. According to the report: "Although there is no global metric for disease importance, it is difficult to justify on medical and scientific bases as a reason for such large and persistent funding differences . Although Crohn's disease has many available and emerging treatment options, celiac disease, for example, is more prevalent and has no current treatment to patients beyond the burdensome gluten-free diet." However, we cannot complain that celiac disease is not getting the same exposure that Irritable Bowel Disease has if we do not get involved directly and help spread the news about celiac disease, which will help others get diagnosed and treated. We also need to report erroneously labeled "gluten-free" products. Sometimes we pass the buck and hope that someone else will report an error on product label, for example I have been sold something that indicates it is gluten free when it was actually just "wheat free", which is a common error among fast food companies. What do they know about malt? Unfortunately there is no EPI-PEN for the celiac, so you must learn to be your own advocate and check whatever goes into your mouth.
  10. Untreated celiac disease can be life-threatening. Celiacs are more likely to be afflicted with problems relating to malabsorption, including osteoporosis, tooth enamel defects, central and peripheral nervous system disease, pancreatic disease, internal hemorrhaging, organ disorders (gall bladder, liver, and spleen), and gynecological disorders (like amenorrhea and spontaneous abortions). Fertility may also be affected. Some researchers are convinced that gluten intolerance, whether or not it results in full-blown celiac disease, can impact mental functioning in some individuals and cause or aggravate autism, Aspergers syndrome, attention deficit disorder (ADD), and schizophrenia. Some of the damage may be healed or partially repaired after time on a gluten-free diet (for example, problems with infertility may be reversed). Celiacs who do not maintain a gluten-free diet also stand a much greater chance of getting certain types of cancer, especially intestinal lymphoma. Untreated celiac disease can cause temporary lactose intolerance. Lactose is a sugar found in dairy products. To be digested it must be broken down by an enzyme called lactase. Lactase is produced on the tips of the villi in the small intestine. Since gluten damages the villi, it is common for untreated celiacs to have problems with milk and milk products. (Yogurt and cheese are less problematic since the cultures in them break down the lactose). A gluten-free diet will usually eliminate lactose intolerance. However, a number of adults (both celiacs and non-celiacs) are lactose intolerant even with a healthy small intestine; in that case a gluten-free diet will not eliminate lactose intolerance. Celiacs often suffer from other food sensitivities. These may respond to a gluten-free diet--or they may not. Soy and MSG are examples of food products that many celiacs have trouble with. However, it should be noted that these other sensitivities, while troublesome, do not damage the villi. As far as we know, only gluten causes this damage.
  11. Celiac.com 06/26/2013 - Do people with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and celiac disease die younger than people with T1D who do not have celiac disease? Do celiac patients without T1D live longer than those with T1D? Currently, not much is known about how celiac disease might influence mortality rates in people with T1D. A team of researchers recently set out to examine rates of death in patients with both T1D and celiac disease. The researchers include K. Mollazadegan, D.S. Sanders, J. Ludvigsson, and J.F. Ludvigsson. The are variously affiliated with the Clinical Epidemiology Unit of the Department of Medicine, Solna, Karolinska Institutet, and with St. Erik Eye Hospital, Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, Sweden. The research team set out to examine mortality in patients with both type 1 diabetes (T1D) and celiac disease. For their study, the team used biopsy reports to identify all people diagnosed with celiac disease between 1969 and 2008, within all 28 pathology departments in Sweden. They defined T1D as a diagnosis of diabetes recorded in the Swedish National Patient Register between 1964 and 2009 in individuals aged ≤30 years. Their follow-up showed 960 patients with both T1D and celiac disease. For each individual with T1D and celiac disease, they selected up to five subjects with T1D alone (no celiac disease) as a reference group of 4608 individuals. They then matched all reference individuals for sex, age and calendar period of diagnosis. The team used stratified Cox regression analysis with celiac disease as a time-dependent covariate to estimate the risk of death in patients with both T1D and celiac disease compared to those with T1D alone. The results showed that celiac disease was not a risk factor for death in patients with T1D in the first 5 years after celiac disease diagnosis [hazard ratio (hazard ratio) 0.87, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.43-1.73]. However, with the passage of time, that reality changed, and mortality risk rose in direct relation to follow-up time (5 to In the end, for people with T1D, having a celiac disease diagnosis for at least 15 years was associated with a 2.80 times greater risk of death (95% CI 1.28-6.12). Source: J Intern Med. 2013 May 23. doi: 10.1111/joim.12092.
  12. Celiac.com 01/15/2018 - Cerebellar ataxia with sensory ganglionopathy is a disabling combination of neurological dysfunction that usually occurs as part of certain hereditary ataxias. However, some patients present this combination with no apparent genetic cause. A team of researchers recently set out to if autoimmunity might have a role to play in SG. The research team included Panagiotis Zis, Ptolemaios Georgios Sarrigiannis, Dasappaiah Ganesh Rao, Nigel Hoggard, David Surendran Sanders, and Marios Hadjivassiliou. They are variously affiliated with the Academic Department of Neurosciences, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Sheffield, UK; the University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK; the Department of Neuroradiology, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundaiton Trust, Sheffield, UK; the University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK; and the Academic Unit of Gastroenterology, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Sheffield, UK. The team reviewed records of all patients that have been referred to the Sheffield Ataxia Centre who had neurophysiological and imaging data suggestive of SG and cerebellar ataxia respectively. We excluded patients with Friedreich's ataxia, a common cause of this combination. All patients were screened for genetic causes and underwent extensive investigations. They found 40 patients with combined cerebellar ataxia and sensory ganglionopathy. The majority of patients were initially diagnosed with cerebellar dysfunction, and about one-third were initially diagnosed with sensory ganglionopathy. For that one-third, the two diagnoses were made together. The average time between the two diagnoses was 6.5 ± 8.9 years, ranging from 0 up to 44 years. The most common initial symptom was unsteadiness, in 77.5% of patients, followed by patchy sensory loss in 17.5%, and peripheral neuropathic pain in 5%. Nineteen patients had gluten sensitivity, of whom 3 patients had biopsy proven celiac disease. Other abnormal immunological tests were present in another 15 patients. Six patients had malignancy, which was diagnosed within 5 years of the neurological symptoms. Only 3 patients were classified as having a truly idiopathic combination of cerebellar ataxia with sensory ganglionopathy. This study shows that immune pathogenesis plays a significant role in patients with the unusual combination of cerebellar ataxia and sensory ganglionopathy. Source: Cerebellum & Ataxias 20174:20
  13. Dr. Scot Lewey

    Celiac Disease Genetics

    This article appeared in the Spring 2008 edition of Celiac.com's Scott-Free Newsletter. Celiac.com 08/17/2008 - Are you confused about genetic testing for celiac disease? Do you want to know what tests you should request and which laboratory to use? Have you already had celiac DQ genetic testing but are not sure what the results mean or what your risk is of developing celiac disease or gluten sensitivity? These are the questions I will answer in the next few pages. What is HLA DQ celiac genetic testing? To understand celiac DQ genetics and the risk estimates you must also understand how the DQ types are determined and some basic terminology. Each of us has 46 chromosomes, 23 pairs received from our parents. We all have two copies of chromosome 6, one from each parent. Homozygous is when a person has two copies of the same gene, one from each parent. Our white blood cells (leukocytes) have proteins called human leukocyte antigens or HLA proteins that are inherited from our parents. The genetic code that determines our HLA patterns resides on chromosome 6. We all have two DQ patterns, one from each of parents, such that we are all DQx/DQx, where x is a number between 1 and 9. I am DQ2/DQ7 and my wife is DQ2/DQ5. We are both therefore heterozygous for DQ2. That is, we have only one copy of DQ2. Scott Adams, the founder of celiac.com is DQ8/DQ8. He is homozygous for DQ8. There are several HLA patterns. Some are proteins that reside within cells and others are on the outer surface of cells, and are called class II. The class II HLA proteins have very important immune functions. There are several class II HLA protein types but DQ have been found to be important in celiac disease, specifically DQ2 and DQ8. What does it mean to be homozygous or heterozygous for celiac genes? Homozygous means that you have two copies e.g. DQ2/DQ2, DQ8/DQ8 whereas heterozygous means you have one copy of DQ2 or DQ8. Some people have one copy of DQ2 and one of DQ8 (DQ2/DQ8) and they have a greater risk for celiac disease than someone with only one copy of either DQ2 or DQ8 but not as great a risk as someone with two copies of DQ2 (DQ2/DQ2). Since DQ2 is associated with a greater risk of celiac disease than DQ8, then one copy of DQ2 plus a DQ8 (DQ2/DQ8) indicates a higher risk than having two copies of DQ8 (DQ8/DQ8). Hopefully, I have not lost you yet but if I have please continue to read on because the information that follows will still be helpful to you. What is this alpha and beta subunit typing and why is it important? HLA DQ typing consists of two subunits of the DQ molecule, an alpha and beta subunit. So, both DQ types that indicate a risk of celiac disease, DQ2 and DQ8, are made up of two protein subunits designated alpha and beta. They determine the complex letter and number combinations reported. For example, the full DQ2 molecule is typically HLA DQA1*05xx DQB1*02xx. The A1 is the alpha unit and the B1 is the beta subunit. The beta subunit is the most important component of the DQ molecule, but the alpha subunit has also been shown to carry an increased risk for celiac disease. Unfortunately, since testing for both is more complicated and expensive it is not always done. Also, some think that since the beta subunit carries most of the risk and the alpha unit only minor risk, testing for only the beta subunit is adequate. Several clinical laboratories have chosen this approach. They only test for, and report on, DQ2 and DQ8 based on beta subunit types, so their results typically look like this: HLA DQB1*02 detected, DQ2 positive, etc. This is the policy of the laboratory at Bonfils, who also does testing for Quest Diagnostics and Enterolab as well as many hospitals. However, the alpha subunit of DQ2 also carries some risk for celiac disease. What if you are positive for the beta subunit of DQ2 or DQ8 by testing from Bonfils, Enterolab or Quest? If the beta subunit is present then Bonfils, Enterolab and Quest tests will report DQ2 and/or DQ8 positive. Sometimes the report will just report DQ2 negative and DQ8 negative, especially when a hospital is reporting the results obtained from Bonfils. However, when the beta subunit is not present and they report DQ2 negative and/or DQ8 negative, it is still possible that an alpha subunit could be present. Results reported in this manner are, in my opinion, potentially misleading. I believe they can lead a doctor to assume that an individual is not at increased risk for, or cannot have celiac disease, when this may or may not be true. Unfortunately, the patient in such circumstances may be told that they can not have celiac disease, yet they may not only be at risk for the disease, they may well have it while being told it is impossible or extremely improbable. What does Prometheus do and how do they report their results? Prometheus, like Kimball and LabCorp, includes alpha and beta subunit typing. In the past they did not indicate whether there was one or two copies of DQ2 or DQ8 if someone was positive. If a patient was DQ2 and DQ8 positive then these labs reported their full genetic DQ type. However, if one or the other was negative, their exact genotype was not reported. Recently, not only has Prometheus started reporting the full DQ2 and DQ8 genotype, but they are now reporting whether someone is homozygous or heterozygous as well. They are also reporting the relative risk for celiac disease based on the pattern shown by testing. However, they are still not reporting the other DQ types. What is the advantage of the new Prometheus reporting? Since Prometheus results now include a calculation of the individual’s risk of celiac disease, compared with the general population, the patient can see how high their risk of celiac disease is, as well as being able to estimate the risk for their parents and their children. As you can see, the risk of celiac disease has a wide range of possibilities, which depend on the individual’s DQ results. This risk can be below 0.1% if you do not have any portion of the high-risk genes DQ2 and DQ8. On the other hand, the risk may be very high (more than 31 times the risk of the general population) if you have two copies of the full complement of DQ2 molecule. Again, I would like to point out that if you have DQ2/DQ2, DQ2/DQ8, or DQ8/DQ8, then both of your parents and all of your children have to have at least one copy of an at-risk celiac gene. Your child’s complete type will depend on the DQ contribution from their other parent. What other laboratories do both alpha and beta subunit testing? Kimball Genetics and LabCorp also report both alpha and beta subunit results but the advantage of their testing is that they report the other specific DQ types detected. Gluten sensitivity is found in all DQ types except DQ4. Other DQ types, particularly DQ1, DQ5, are associated with a risk of gluten related neurological and skin problems. Microscopic colitis, food allergies and oral allergy syndrome reactions are also found in association with other DQ types. Though Enterolab does report other DQ types, including these markers of risk for gluten sensitivity, they do not test for, or report, alpha subunits since their DQ testing is done by Bonfils. Based on the limited data I have accumulated so far, DQ2 and DQ8 also seem to carry a risk of mastocytic enterocolitis. What if you do not have DQ2 or DQ8? According to data accumulated, but as of February 2008, not yet published by Dr. Ken Fine, unless you are DQ4/DQ4 you are still at risk for being sensitive to or intolerant of gluten. According to Fine’s fecal gliadin antibody data all DQ types except for DQ4 carry a risk of gluten sensitivity. My clinical experience supports this claim. The presence of one copy of DQ1, DQ3, DQ5, DQ6, DQ7, or DQ9, even with one DQ4, is associated with a risk for elevated stool gliadin antibody and symptoms of gluten sensitivity that responds to a gluten free diet. What if your genetic testing was done by Enterolab, Quest, Bonfils or a hospital that utilized Bonfils, and it indicated that you were DQ2 and DQ8 negative? Since Bonfils does not test for the alpha subunit and they perform the testing for Enerolab and Quest, you may not be completely negative for DQ2 or DQ8. You do not have the beta subunits associated with the highest risk for celiac disease. For example, you could be “half-DQ2” positive and still be genetically at risk for the autoimmune form of gluten sensitivity that we know as celiac disease, along with all of its risks. What if you have not yet had celiac DQ genetic testing? I recommend that everyone have the testing. I realize that most insurance companies and doctors, including some celiac experts, would disagree with me. However, the value of DQ testing is that it can provide a great deal of information about your risk, especially if you have testing done for both alpha and beta subunits. I recommend that you have testing done by Kimball Genetics, LabCorp or Prometheus if you have not yet had genetic testing done. If your insurance or budget does not allow for this more expensive testing, but does cover testing by Quest or Bonfils or you can afford the $159 that Enterolab charges, then I still recommend that you get DQ testing using one of these laboratories. You just need to be aware of the limitations of the results as I have reviewed them here. What are the advantages of DQ testing through Kimball Genetics? Kimball can perform testing on either blood or mouth swab samples. The tests can be ordered without a doctor’s order. You can purchase testing on mouth swab sample for $345. The advantages of Kimball’s tests include alpha and beta subunit testing and full DQ typing to determine if you carry the other gluten sensitive DQ patterns besides DQ2 and DQ8. What about LabCorp? LabCorp also provides both alpha and beta subunit testing and they report the other DQ types. They only provide testing on blood samples, a doctor must order the testing, and preauthorization is required. Do health insurance companies cover celiac DQ genetic testing? Many but not all health insurance companies cover HLA DQ testing and almost all require preauthorization. The ICD9 diagnostic codes that typically are honored are V18.5 genetic predisposition for gastrointestinal disease; V84.8, genetic predisposition for other diseases; and 579.0, celiac disease. Why are the genetics so difficult to understand and why are so many doctors either unaware of the testing or reluctant to order the tests? I write and speak about DQ genetic testing frequently, and try to get testing for as many of my patients as possible. However, many insurance companies will not cover the cost of these tests. Most primary care doctors and even some GI doctors are completely unaware of the existence of a genetic test for celiac disease. The testing is difficult to understand and the reporting by some labs is very confusing and even misleading. I realize that understanding the DQ genetics is difficult for the average layperson. Most scientists and doctors don’t understand this information, so don’t despair if you are having difficulty following this or understanding your results, and don’t be surprised if your doctor does not understand them either. However, you do not need to completely understand the complexities of HLA typing to locate your DQ types and determine your risk of celiac disease, non-celiac gluten sensitivity, etc. Then what do you need to know or remember about celiac DQ genetics? Hopefully, you now understand enough to know that you should consider having celiac DQ testing, if possible, especially if you have symptoms, laboratory tests, or an intestinal biopsy that is suggestive of celiac disease. You should also know that the testing can be done on blood or mouth swabs, and many insurance companies will cover the testing but most require pre-authorization. You should also be aware that the testing is available without a doctor’s order, if you are willing to pay for it, and that some tests are better than others. I also hope you understand that the tests can help you determine your risk for celiac disease or if you are at risk for non-celiac gluten sensitivity. You should also know that your results, especially when combined with those of one or more family members, may help you determine, to some degree, the risks for your parents and your children. You should also know what laboratories offer testing, what test codes your doctor should use to order the tests, and that the absence of DQ2 or DQ8 does not exclude risk of gluten sensitivity or intolerance. Depending on what laboratory conducts your DQ testing, your results also may fail to exclude your risk of celiac disease. What if I am still confused or I don’t know how to interpret my genetic results or my previous evaluation for celiac disease? If you are still confused by your test results or want more a personalized review of your results, symptoms or diagnostic tests I recommend that you see a physician who is an expert in celiac disease and understands these tests. I also offer on-line consultation for a reasonable fee through a secure consultation site, www.medem.com. You simply register (registration is free) for secure on-line communication and request a consultation. The consultation fee is $50, and some insurance companies will cover on-line communication. I also see many patients from outside of Colorado Springs for consultation if you are willing to travel here.
  14. Celiac.com 12/05/2017 - It's not uncommon for people with celiac disease to have other medical conditions, including liver disease, glossitis, pancreatitis, Down syndrome, and autism. By the same token, people with one or more of these associated disorders can be at greater risk for having or developing celiac disease. Until recently, though researchers didn't have much good data on the numbers behind those risk levels. A new database study of more than 35 million people changes that. The study found that, for example, people with autism have celiac disease at rates that are 20 times higher than those without autism. You read that right. People with autism are 20 times more likely to have celiac disease than people from the general population. Reporting on his team's findings at the World Congress of Gastroenterology 2017, lead investigator Daniel Karb, MD, a second-year resident at University Hospitals Case Medical Center in Cleveland, says that doctors who treat autistic patients may want to keep an eye out for celiac-like symptoms. "If you have a patient who is autistic and they have all these unusual symptoms, you might want to screen them for celiac disease," said Karb. Researchers have long known that people with celiac disease can present with unusual symptoms that fall outside the classic celiac symptoms of malabsorption, steatorrhea, malnutrition, abdominal pain, and cramping after eating, "but this is putting numbers to it," said Dr Karb. For their study, Dr. Karb and his colleagues searched the Explorys database, which aggregates electronic health record data from 26 major integrated healthcare systems in the United States. Combing through the records of 35,854,260 people in the database from 2012 to 2017, they found 83,090 celiac disease diagnoses. The investigators uncovered significant connections between celiac disease and 13 other autoimmune disorders, such as type 1 diabetes, Crohn's disease, and ulcerative colitis. In fact, the team found that, except for a condition called primary biliary cholangitis, "[e]very autoimmune disease [they] looked at is associated with celiac disease," Dr. Karb reported. The study indicates that "there is a large undiagnosed burden of celiac disease," he explained. "And a lot of it is probably because of these atypical presentations." As research continues, look for more connections between celiac disease and other inflammatory conditions to be more fully detailed. For more on the World Congress of Gastroenterology 2017. Source: Medscape.com
  15. Celiac.com 12/22/2017 - Venture capital firms Arch Venture, and Vatera are betting big on biotech startup ImmusanT, the makers of potential celiac disease vaccine Nexvax2. Arch and Vatera have funded a $40 million B round that will support ImmusanT's development of their celiac treatment through Phase II testing. Full data are expected in mid-2019. As part of it's efforts, Arch Venture partner and former head of research at Celgene, Tom Daniel, will join the board at ImmusanT. Additionally, renowned immunologist and Arch managing director Steven Gillis will also join the board at ImmusanT. Nexvax2 is the first prong in ImmusanT's efforts to develop a treatment that creates immune system tolerance to thwart autoimmune diseases. If they are successful in tackling celiac disease, the company is looking to expand the technology to include treatments for type 1 diabetes and other ailments. Celiac disease is a great place to start, says ImmusanT CEO Leslie Williams, because scientists already know the antigen that triggers the disease. Williams says that her company has scoured 17,000 peptides to "create a hierarchy of the key components that trigger the T cell response" in celiac disease. Nexvax2 is designed to work by slowly coaxing the immune system to ignore the trigger. Patients exposed to Nexvax2 react as if they have eaten gluten, says Williams. The goal is to harness that immune reactions and to modulate it. Williams is looking to double the size of the company's tiny 7-person staff as the ImmusanT journeys through a mid-stage trial. She will then look to an expanded set of programs as well as the data to determine the best direction for the company. Williams says that all options are currently open, including another funding round, an IPO or even a strategic deal. Read more at: endpts.com
  16. Celiac.com 12/25/2017 - In the very near future, your personal microbiome may be the key to creating a customized treatment for celiac disease. That's because new advances in genome studies are promising to help create a customized, individual approach for treating numerous disorders, including celiac disease. Such individualized treatments may also help to reduce adverse events, and decrease health care costs. So far, a similar approach for optimizing preventive and therapeutic approaches in cancer using human genome sequencing has proven successful. Writing in the Mayo Clinic Proceedings, ad team of researches expounded on this approach. The research team included Purna C. Kashyap, Nicholas Chia, PhD, Heidi Nelson, MD, Eran Segal, PhD, and Eran Elinav, MD, PhD. They are variously affiliated with the Enteric Neuroscience Program, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN; the Department of Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN; the Department of Computer Science at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel and with the Department of Immunology, at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel. Your personal microbiome is the sum total of all the microbes that reside within and upon you, along with all their genetic elements. Using genome sequencing allows doctors to design highly personal, highly focused treatments and therapeutic strategies. In their review for the Mayo Clinic Proceedings, the team highlights the importance of the microbiome in all aspects of human disease, including pathogenesis, phenotype, prognosis, and treatment response. The microbiome also plays a crucial role as a diagnostic and therapeutic biomarker. The team's report describes the role to be played by next-generation sequencing in helping to provide precision microbial identification of infectious diseases, and helping to elucidate the nature and function of microbial communities. Basically, as we further unlock the human genome, we can begin to better understand the role played by the myriad microbes that make up the human microbiome. As we unlock the role of various parts of the microbiome, look for major advances and refinements to diagnosing, treating, and even conquering conditions like celiac disease, and many others. And, with advances coming at breakneck speed, look for this to happen sooner, rather than later. Source: PlumX Metrics - mayoclinicproceedings.org
  17. Celiac.com 07/28/2016 - Celiac disease is an immune-mediated enteropathy triggered by gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. Researchers know that innate immunity plays a role in triggering celiac disease, but they don't understand the connection very well at all. Although previous in vitro work suggests that gliadin peptide p31-43 acts as an innate immune trigger, the underlying pathways are unclear and have not been explored in vivo. The research team included RE Araya, MF Gomez Castro, P Carasi, JL McCarville, J Jury, AM Mowat, EF Verdu, and FG Chirdo. They are variously affiliated with the Instituto de Estudios Inmunológicos y Fisiopatológicos (IIFP)(CONICET-UNLP), Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, La Plata, Argentina; the Catedra de Microbiología, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, La Plata, Argentina; the Farncombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada; the Centre for Immunobiology, Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom; and with the Instituto de Estudios Inmunológicos y Fisiopatológicos (IIFP)(CONICET-UNLP), Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, La Plata, Argentina. Their team observed that introduction of p31-43 into the gut of normal mice causes structural changes in the small intestinal mucosa consistent with those seen in celiac disease, including increased cell death and expression of inflammatory mediators. The effects of p31-43 were dependent on MyD88 and type I IFNs, but not Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), and were enhanced by co-administration of the TLR3 agonist polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid. Together, these results indicate that gliadin peptide p31-43 activates celiac-related innate immune pathways in vivo, such as IFN-dependent inflammation. These findings also suggest a common mechanism for the potential interaction between dietary gluten and viral infections in the pathogenesis of celiac disease, meaning that certain viral infections may pave the way for celiac disease to develop. Source: Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol. 2016 Jul 1;311(1):G40-9. doi: 10.1152/ajpgi.00435.2015. Epub 2016 May 5.
  18. Will a new treatment enable people with celiac disease to ditch a gluten-free diet? About one in a hundred people in the United States is affected by celiac disease. If you're one of them, you know how hard it can be to maintain a strict gluten-free diet. Everyone's got their horror stories about trying to simply eat a meal, only to have a tiny amount of gluten wreck havoc on their digestive system. There are currently no therapeutics on the market to treat celiac disease, says Sydney Gordon, a scientist at Ab Initio Biotherapeutics. Sure, there are other over-the-counter enzyme treatments, Gordon adds, but most are slow to act, or don't break down enough gluten to prevent a reaction. "There are no other enzymes on the market for celiac disease," said Justin Siegel, the co-founder of PvP Biologics and an assistant professor of chemistry, biochemistry and molecular medicine at UC Davis. "There is nothing that is approved by the FDA for celiac disease. Nothing has made it through clinical trials. There are pills on the market that cause degradation of gluten, but there is no clinical evidence that they are effective." "We wanted to design an enzyme […] a protein that would act as a therapeutic for celiac disease. We came up with a design using a protein modeling tool called FoldIt," said Ingrid Pultz, a co-founder of PvP Biologics. PvP Biologics enzyme therapy works by targeting the exact triggering molecule, the immunogenic epitope, before it gets to the intestine and causes an immune reaction. To do this, PvP Biologics uses kumamolisin, a naturally occurring enzyme that, unlike some other enzymes, can survive the acidity of the stomach. By modifying the amino acid sequence in the original kumamolisin enzyme, researchers were able to specifically target the epitope causing the reaction. If the therapy proves successful, many celiac patients won't have to worry about minute amounts of cross-contamination when eating outside. Those are pretty strong claims. Many people with celiac disease might likely say that it sounds too good to be true. Still, the company is moving in a direction that few others have gone. No word on if or when we might expect to see a finished treatment come to market. For all the company's claims, there is much to work out, and a long, winding road to get FDA approval. Stay tuned to see if the evidence from trials and from potential consumer use supports those claims. Read more at TheAggie.org. Editor's note: We've received a correction on this story from PvP Biologics, makers of KumaMax, which states that their product is designed for accidental gluten ingestion, and not as a replacement for a gluten-free diet in people with celiac disease. Their enzyme could lessen the effects of accidental consumption of small amounts of gluten.
  19. Celiac.com 01/03/2018 - A recent study indicates that symptoms for some autoimmune disease can vary depending on the time of day. A substance called transcription factor BMAL1 plays a crucial role in the human molecular clock, regulating biological pathways that drive 24 hour circadian rhythms in behavior and physiology. The molecular clock has a major influence on innate immune function, and disturbances in circadian rhythms are associated with increases in multiple sclerosis (MS), for example. But, researchers just don't have much good information on the factors that influence this association. A team of researchers recently set out to better understand the factors that influence this association. The research team included Caroline E. Sutton, Conor M. Finlay, Mathilde Raverdeau, James O. Early, Joseph DeCourcey, Zbigniew Zaslona, Luke A. J. O'Neill, Kingston H. G. Mills, and Annie M. Curtis. They are variously affiliated with the Immune Regulation Research Group, Trinity Biomedical Sciences Institute, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland; the Inflammatory Research Group, School of Biochemistry and Immunology, Trinity Biomedical Sciences Institute, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland; and with the Department of Molecular and Cellular Therapeutics, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI), Dublin, Ireland. In a recent study, the research team found that BMAL1 and time-of-day regulate the accumulation and activation of various immune cells in a CNS autoimmune disease model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). In myeloid cells, BMAL1 maintains anti-inflammatory responses and reduces T cell polarization. Loss of myeloid BMAL1 or midday immunizations to induce EAE create an inflammatory environment in the CNS through expansion and infiltration of IL-1β-secreting CD11b+Ly6Chi monocytes, resulting in increased pathogenic IL-17+/IFN-γ+ T cells. These findings show the important role played by the molecular clock in processing innate and adaptive immune crosstalk under autoimmune conditions. Understanding the exact ways in which the human molecular clock influences innate immune function, and by extension, autoimmune diseases, will help doctors to better understand these disease, and to develop better approaches to treatment, among other things. Source: Nature.com
  20. Celiac.com 12/21/2017 - After a lot of trial and error we celiacs learn, often the hard way, to eliminate foods that are poisonous to our bodies. Sadly, we often forget about what "goes onto" our skin. Since the skin is the living outer layer of our bodies it absorbs not only water and oils, it also absorbs cosmetics that can be poisonous to our celiac bodies, most specifically those of us afflicted with dermatitis herpetiformis (often called celiac disease of the Skin). Men, before you set this article aside, thinking it's only for women and you are exempt, please read on. One of 133 Americans has a wheat-related allergy according to CNN.com. We have a tendency not to group toothpaste and lip-glosses with cosmetics, and we usually ignore vitamins and medications when researching celiac disease and dermatitis herpetiformis. We forget to ask our hairdresser what products they are using and whether they contain wheat or gluten, and glibly apply night creams (to absorb into our skin as we sleep) and mud packs that promise similar benefits. Inquiring into the gluten content of cosmetics, I contacted more than twenty leading companies, then I waited. I was discouraged, particularly by the blatant rudeness of some of the responses I received. Meanwhile, I had to learn whether gluten could be absorbed through the skin. Some websites answered that question with a direct "no". Even some physicians responded saying "no". However, since the skin is the largest living organ in the body and it does absorb various oils and emollients, listing gluten-containing components of medicinal and non-medicinal ingredients allows consumers with celiac disease (celiac disease) or wheat allergies to make informed choices when purchasing and/or consuming natural health products. It enables them to avoid gluten in quantities that may trigger adverse reactions. There are numerous articles on dermatitis herpetiformis and celiac disease making claims so contradictory that it is no wonder we are confused. And I'm not talking about accidental ingestion of gluten. Some such articles claim that trace amounts of gluten One article insists that the skin is not going to absorb gluten, even though our skin is a living organism that can absorb suntan lotions, trans-dermal drugs, etc. It is so susceptible to absorption that when you place a slice of onion in your sock you will taste it in your mouth the following day. How can these websites make such contrary claims? The skin absorbs flavors as well as creams containing gluten. On the other hand, "Glutino" had an article on record, written on September 14, 2010, regarding "Hidden Gluten in Health and Beauty Products". It states that if you apply hand lotion that contains gluten and then prepare food you are exposing yourself to accidental ingestion and your food to cross contamination. They suggest a site called: naturallydahling.com, a site that lists gluten-containing ingredients commonly used in cosmetics. Research proving the full extent of how much your skin absorbs is still unavailable, but to those who believe that "what goes on, goes in", the cosmetic industry is full of unknowns. The size of gluten molecules suggests that they may not be able to pass through the skin, but chemicals and technology designed to enhance skin absorption are already present, if not prevalent, in the cosmetic industry. These chemicals are potentially dangerous and often go untested for negative health effects, yet are widespread in lotions, antiperspirants, perfumes and the "Great Mother Market" anti-wrinkle cosmetics. Since the cosmetic industry is self-regulated it is more important than ever to carefully read labels and use natural or organic products whenever possible. If you find yourself reacting to a particular cosmetic, it is possible that you may have an increased sensitivity to gluten, an allergy or even dermatitis herpetiformis. But wait a minute! Aren't we told that gluten cannot pass through the skin? I suffered terribly from the use of an "Anti-Frizz" product for my hair that caused a massive outbreak of dermatitis herpetiformis. I should have read the label all the way down to the end. I would have found, in very small print, "wheat germ oil". When researching for this article, I wrote to the company and mentioned my problems with their product. I received an apology and a sample of their "new and improved" "Frizz-Ease" product. They obviously do not know their own products and the fancy names they use are as confusing to them as they are to me. The "new and improved" product contained Avena Sativa, the Latin name for OAT. I was also told that I likely just had "hives" on the back of my scalp, as oats are still somewhat controversial. Some research suggests that oats in themselves are gluten free, but that they are virtually always contaminated with other grains during cultivation, harvest, distribution or processing. Recent research indicates that a protein naturally found in oats (avenin) contains peptide sequences closely resembling some peptides from wheat gluten. The oat peptides caused mucosal inflammation in significant numbers of celiac disease sufferers. Some examination results show that even oats that are not contaminated with wheat particles may be dangerous. Again, I was told not to introduce oats into my diet, or use oatmeal as a facial mask until I had been free of a dermatitis herpetaformis outbreak for at least a year. Thus far I have not been able to get relief for that long. It seems the celiac or those who suffer from dermatitis herpetiformis {and let's face it, most people suffering from dermatitis herpetaformis have celiac disease} have to apply the rule of "caveat emptor" - Let the buyer beware. Tolerance to gluten varies among individuals with celiac disease and there are limited clinical scientific data on a threshold for the amount of gluten required to initiate or maintain an immunological reaction in celiac disease patients. "Therefore there is no clear consensus on a safe gluten threshold level." The Dermatologist I see at The University of British Columbia Hospital has told me to tell people in restaurants that gluten is poison to my system and I can become very ill from ingesting gluten. They are a little more careful before telling me a dish is gluten free, and hopefully through education the cosmetic industry is going to improve its testing and cease glibly stating things as "fact" when they simply do not know. Industries that produce over-the-counter medications and vitamin supplement, especially those that may contain gluten as a binding agent, should also be scrutinized. We have come a long way, but large challenges are still ahead. One of our biggest challenges is reading the labels on these products. One almost needs to carry a magnifying glass when shopping. Cosmetics, which include hair products, soaps, perfumes and toothpastes also run us into problems, often big, "itchy" problems. The male celiac/dermatitis herpetaformis experience can also include outbreaks from any product that comes into contact with the skin and particularly those that "stay" on the hair or skin. Who would have known that sun tan lotions could contain wheat germ oil? It is difficult enough to eliminate words such as "triticum vulgare" the Latin name of wheat or "wheat germ" containing ingredients! In preparation for this article, I contacted the following companies: Avon, Clairol, Clarins, Clinique, Coty, Covergirl, Estee Lauder, Garnier, John Frieda, John Paul Mitchell, L'Oreal, Mabelline, Marcelle, Neutrogena, Olay, Pantene, Revlon, and companies that go under general all-encompassing headings such as "Life Brand". This can be a daunting task, and "gluten free" and "wheat free" are not the same thing. Some of the things that I learned in this rather massive undertaking include the rule of "Pac Man". Companies are sometimes taken over by bigger companies and when this occurs their rules change. A company that at one time did not test on animals or use machines that were cleaned prior to using products claiming to be gluten free are now glibly adopting the "new bigger and better". I was shocked to find out that some of the containers from the smaller company were still being used after these PAC MAN take-overs, to save on manufacturing costs. And, remember, once several ingredients are combined the "organic" ingredient probably ceases to be "organic". Some women (and men, you are not exempt here) expect to pay a higher price for a luxury brand assuming that the gorgeous bottle of eye cream sold at Saks for $60.00 is going to work better than the $1.99 tube on the clearance rack of a local store. Just ensure the product has not reached its "sell by" date because it may all be psychological. What you have to concern yourself about, as a celiac patient or a person with dermatitis herpetiformis, is whether there is gluten or wheat in that product. Before you splurge on an expensive product take the time to compare it to a similar product from one of their sister brands. Usually an online store (like Drugstore.com) will list the ingredients. Or you can check on a site like "Makeup Alley" which is a great resource, offering numerous reviews and you can ask questions of the extremely knowledgeable posters on this message board. Another great resource is a large paperback book, titled "Do not go to the Drugstore Without Me" written by Paula Begoin. When I purchased the books in 2001 it was in its 5th Edition. NB: This is not a book specifically for celiac disease or dermatitis herpetiformis, but it was in this book that I found out about "Glutamic Acid". It is derived from wheat gluten and is an amino acid that can have water binding properties for the skin. It also explains glycerylesters that form a vast group of ingredients that are a mixture of fatty acids, sugars, and non-volatile alcohols. These fats and oils are used in cosmetics as emollients and lubricants as well as binding and thickening agents. At the back of this book is a list of the companies that do not test on animals and those that do, but again, the PAC MAN Rule applies. I purchased the book for myself, my daughter, and daughter-in-law, specifically because when my daughter was in her twenties she seemed to think she simply must buy her shampoo from the hairdresser because only $45.00 shampoo was good enough for her hair. It was a big eye opener when she moved out of home and had to purchase it herself! I believe that the more we know about beauty products and the beauty industry the wiser our purchases will be. Consider, for instance, the cost of research and development for say, L'Oreal who develop formulas that can be used in Garnier Shampoos ($3.99) and Kerastase shampoo ($29.99) It doesn't take long to realize that it is a good idea to compare products at different ends of the price scale. Sometimes, two products from two different brands will have the same patent number. The difference is in the non-active ingredients, which give it a unique texture, scent and/or color. Also, it is wise to photo-copy, and even apply plastic covering to lists of "safe" beauty products, just as it is wise to keep a copy of "safe" and "unsafe" foods on hand when you go shopping. When you cannot even pronounce some of the words used in foods and beauty products how can you be expected to remember what is safe to apply to your hair and skin? I received a very nice letter from Teresa Menna, Manager at L'Oreal in Quebec who told me that L'Oreal has abolished gluten in the composition of L'Oreal products. However, on reading more literature I find that Garnier is a mass market cosmetic brand of L'Oreal, and L'Oreal is part of the Group P&G. P&G stands for Proctor and Gamble and P&G Beauty brands can be found on the site:_ http://pgbeautygroomingscience.com/product.php {The Company Garnier Laboratories was started in 1906 and acquired by L'Oreal in the 1970's}. I was unaware prior to researching this article that L'Oreal owned Kerastase, or that L'Oreal had purchased the MAC Cosmetic line, or that the KAO Brands Company owns Ban, Biore, Jergens and John Frieda. Here are some of the ingredients you might find in cosmetics that could indicate wheat or gluten: Avena Sativa {Latin name of oat, or "oat" term containing ingredients Hordeum distichon {Latin name of barley, or "barley" term containing ingredients} Hydrolyzed malt extract Hydrolyzed wheat protein Hydrolyzed vegetable protein Wheat germ Vitamin E Cyclodextrin Barley extract Fermented grain extract Oat (Avena sativa) Samino peptide complex Secale Cereale (Latin name of rye, or "rye" term containing ingredients) Stearyldimoniumhydroxypropyl Phytosphingosine extract Triticum vulgare {Latin name of wheat, or "wheat" term containing ingredients} Dextrin Dextrin palmitate Maltodextrin Sodium C8-16 Isoalkylsuccinyl Wheat Protein Sulfonate Yeast extract Anything with wheat in the name Thoughts: Some cute person gave the warning to ensure your lipstick is gluten free even if you don't have any skin issues. You could swallow some lipstick and get gluten in your system! Another person adds at the bottom of their e-mail to be sure to check guidelines regularly because company policies can change yearly and the list is only to be considered as "guidelines" and make-up ingredients can change each time a company changes or the scientists within that company decide to add to or delete certain products. {Makes you feel very safe as a celiac/dermatitis herpetaformis person doesn't it?} Another e-mailer suggested that mascara labeled as a "thickening agent" should be fearfully evaluated by the celiac/dermatitis herpetaformis person because the thickening agent is often "flour" and can sometimes cause eyelashes to fall out! Who knew? Noted on one e-mail, ‘So-called luxury brands can be laden with synthetic ingredients that do not cost more than their not so luxurious counterparts. True natural products that do perform, and there are a few such brands on the market, are authentic natural products that actually deliver what they promise and they truly do cost more to make because raw ingredients are much higher in cost. In fact, the cost is significantly higher when pure high grade ingredients are used. Letter received: " We have compiled a list of gluten free beauty products available on sephora.com. These products do not contain any wheat, rye or barley derivatives, and they were made in gluten-free laboratories so there is no chance of cross-contamination. But since you cannot be too careful, discontinue use of any product that triggers an attack." Letter received from Clairol:- "Gluten is a protein found in wheat, rye and barley. Although it is not added directly to our product, it may be present in fragrances. Due to the difficulty of tracing the source ingredients for the variety of fragrances used in manufacturing our products, we cannot provide specific levels of gluten content for any of our fragrance blends. Be aware that even products labeled "unscented" will still contain masking scent, therefore they may potentially contain gluten." Advertisement: World's Top Ten Cosmetic Companies : "Beauty begins on the inside, check out our post on ‘The Top Five Foods for Amazing Skin'" - Posted by The Greenster Team "I finally got up the nerve to go through my own (their) personal care products and look them up on "SKIN DEEP" and was very disappointed. The Company that makes my mascara (L'Oreal) tests on animals as does the company that makes my eyeliner (Covergirl) and my under eye concealer (Made by Physician's Formula) contains parabens" THE GREENSTER TEAM creates great articles, list the top ten cosmetic companies, what portion of the world's market they share and their hazard range. Letter received from Mabelline:- "Please find below most ingredients containing gluten (wheat and other grains). We invite you to take this list and compare it to our ingredient listings every time you buy a new product. When in doubt, do not hesitate to do your own research or contact your doctor." {Caveat Emptor} REMEMBER:- The truth is that there is no such thing as gluten free. The FDA has proposed a less than 20 ppm gluten -free standard in 2006. That was its first attempt to define the term gluten free, but the agency has yet to finalize it. The USDA is awaiting the FDA's decision before moving ahead. STILL WAITING. With the number of products making unregulated gluten free claims on the rise, the marketplace can be scary for consumers with gluten sensitivity and wheat allergies. Why hasn't the FDA finalized its 2006 definition of gluten free? As part of sweeping legislation known s FALCPA the Food Allergen Labelling and Consumer Protection Act of 2004, Congress ordered the FDA to define and permit the voluntary use of the term gluten free on the labeling of foods by August 2008. As directed, the FDA issued proposed gluten-free regulations on schedule but seems to have failed to follow through with a final ruling. There has been no explanation for the delay. Since the Cosmetic Industry is a self-regulating body it seems {appears, is assumed} that we the consumers are on our own as far as researching what goes on our skin and in our hair, because some of the letters I have received leave it to the celiac or dermatitis herpetiformis sufferer to research their own products. Even a letter from Avon states:- "Although Avon sells quality products, there is always possibility of contamination during manufacturing or changes/substitutions of ingredients. As with everything related to celiac disease, dermatitis herpetiformis and gluten Intolerance, products, ingredients and preparation may change over time. Your reactions to a specific product, ingredient may be different from the reactions of others. Like eating at a restaurant, you have to make a choice whether to consume/use a product. The list is meant to be a "guide" and does not guarantee that a product is 100% free of gluten. Dacia Lehman, Avon and GIG assume no responsibility for its use and any resulting liability or consequential damages is denied." LETTER: - Proctor and Gamble "The WHMIS rating is designed to rate raw materials and not formulated products such as ours. Nor are our consumer products required to be labeled under the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Hazard Communication Standard. Thus labelling of our products with WHMIS ratings or any other hazard rating should not be required by any state health and safety regulatory agencies." That letter is signed by Asela for the Pantene Team. LETTER:- May 2, 2012 - xyz@ca.loreal.com - "We have received your message and we will get back to you as soon as possible. Web Sites: Gluten-free Lifestyle: glutenfree-lifestyle.com (Gives gluten free products by type and by company) i.e.: deodorants, face & body wash, make-up, suntan lotion, toothpaste, moisturizer, lotion, shampoo & conditioner, shave cream, gels, after shave, laundry products, cleaners, soap, etc. Beauty Industry: Who Owns What? Glutino - Hidden Gluten in Health Products - Glutino & Gluten Free Pantry Blogs: www.gluten-free-cosmetic-counter.org Beauty Blogging Junkie Ebates Shopping Blog In The Makeup Lipstick Powder n'Paint Shop With a Vengeance Smarter Beauty Blog The Beauty Brains Sephora Sephora's iGoogle Beauty Portal References: Codex Standard for Foods for Special Dietary Use for Persons Intolerant to Gluten. Codex STAN 118 - 1979 ROME Government of Canada 2008 - Regulations Amending the Food and Drug Regulations (1220- Enhanced Labeling for Food Allergen and Gluten Sources and Added Sulphites) Health Canada 2007 - celiac disease and the Safety of Oats Labeling of Natural Health Products Containing Gluten - Health Canada Notice 2010
  21. Celiac.com 03/14/2017 - Recent studies of adult celiacs have suggested that complete, not just partial, mucosal recovery and healing is possible, but, in many cases, may take longer than is currently understood. Recently Dr. Hugh James Freeman of the Department of Medicine, Gastroenterology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada, conducted a study to assess healing time in celiac patients. In this study, 182 patients (60 males, 122 females) referred for evaluation of symptoms, including diarrhea and weight loss, were selected only if initial biopsies showed characteristic inflammatory changes with severe architectural disturbance. All patients were treated with a strict gluten-free diet, and diet compliance was regularly monitored. Up to 90% or more of patients showed a complete mucosal response or healing, many within 6 months. However, most patients required up to 2 years for full healing and recovery to take place in the gut. In this evaluation, women in each of 4 different age ranges showed better mucosal response and healing than men, while elderly celiacs had lower rates overall. Such factors should be considered before labeling a patient with "non-responsive" disease. However, celiacs who are diagnosed later, start a gluten-free diet later, and who have inflammatory changes with persistent gut damage may be at increased risk for a later small bowel complication, including lymphoma. The overall good news here is that full mucosal healing can and does occur in most people with celiac disease. Some people may take longer to heal, but the evidence shows that most do eventually heal. Source: International Journal of Celiac Disease, 2017, Vol. 5, No. 1, xx. DOI:10.12691/ijcd-5-1-4
  22. Celiac.com 12/14/2017 - Can enzyme supplements help people with gluten sensitivity, including those with celiac disease? An Australian company is touting the results of a recent randomized, double blind study that supports enzyme supplements might be helpful for celiac patients in certain circumstances. The enzyme supplement was designed for people with celiac disease to use when facing likely or possible exposure to gluten, such as when traveling or eating food prepared outside their direct control. The company is careful to state that "enzyme supplementation won't cure celiac disease, and sufferers still need to avoid gluten." But the evidence from the two most recent studies does suggest that the product does help digest dietary gluten and could make life much easier for many people with celiac disease. The product, called GluteGuard, is based on a papaya fruit enzyme called caricain. This enzyme is shown to be helpful for celiac patients. A 2015 study showed adding caricain to bread dough reduced gluten toxicity to gluten by 90% for celiac patients. GluteGuard was recently evaluated in two clinical studies in Poland. The first study looked at 20 patients with celiac disease who were in clinical remission on a gluten-free diet. In that study, all patients ate one gram of gluten, equal to about one slice of bread, each day for 42 days, with 14 patients also taking GluteGuard and six taking a placebo tablet. Patients noted their symptoms and well-being each day, and received biopsies both before and after the study. Thirteen of the 14 celiac patients (93%) taking GluteGuard showed no adverse changes in clinical symptoms, biopsy results or well-being throughout the 42 day trial. Only one GluteGuard patient withdrew due to celiac-associated symptoms, while 4 of 6 taking placebo withdrew after 14 days due to adverse celiac symptoms. The second Polish study looked at the effectiveness of GluteGuard in patients with dermatitis herpetiformis, a gluten-triggered skin condition common in celiac patients. As with the first study, all patients in these study were in clinical remission. Patients consumed around six grams of gluten daily for seven days, with ten patients also receiving GluteGuard tablets and ten getting a placebo. The GluteGuard showed better results compared with the placebo group, with 81% showing no increase in areas of skin lesions and 71% showing a reduction in the appearance of skin lesions. The GluteGuard group also showed a 38% reduction in skin itchiness. Of the seven patients who withdrew from the study due to gluten symptoms, six were taking placebo. Both clinical trials met high scientific standards. In both studies, participants were randomly allocated to receive the treatment or placebo, and neither the participants nor the researchers knew owhich patient was receiving which intervention. So, yes, enzyme supplements may provide some help for people with celiac disease, especially as a hedge against minor or occasional gluten ingestion. So far though, they are not a magic bullet, and cannot replace a gluten-free diet. Read more at Medicalexpress.com.
  23. Celiac.com 11/30/2017 - Talk about handling a celiac disease diagnosis in style. This past summer, "Us" star Mandy Moore showed us how its done, when she documented the process of working with her doctor to determine if she had celiac disease. She even posted a photo of her endoscopy visit for her Instagram followers. Moore captioned the post: "Grog city. Just had an upper endoscopy to officially see whether or not I have celiac (only way to officially diagnose)…things are looking 👌)." Later, and also on Instagram, she revealed that she had been diagnosed with celiac disease. "Well, this definitely takes the (now gluten free cake) for bummer news," she wrote on her Instagram story at the time. "Any celiac sufferers out there with any helpful tips??" Maybe consider looking at Celic.com for helpful tips and information on living with celiac disease and eating gluten-free? Later, she posted another message, thanking her fans for sharing their knowledge with her, adding that there were "so many lovely humans out there. My heart is full." Moore seems to be embracing the realities of a gluten-free diet. Later, in an Instagram post celebrating her engagement to Taylor Goldsmith, Moore thanked her friends and family for their support, and noted that she planned to "enjoy some delightful gluten-free tea sandwiches (and 🥂) like ladies do." Best of luck to Mandy Moore in dealing with her new found celiac disease diagnosis.
  24. Celiac.com 11/13/2017 - ImmusanT, Inc., the company working to develop a therapeutic vaccine to protect HLADQ2.5+ patients with celiac disease against the effects of gluten, presented data that shows a way to tell the difference between celiac disease and non-celiac gluten-sensitive (NCGS) based on cytokine levels. Professor Knut Lundin, University of Oslo, presented the data at United European Gastroenterology (UEG) Week 2017. The results are important, in part because many people go on a gluten-free diet before they ever get diagnosed with celiac disease. It's hard for doctors to ask these people to start eating gluten again so that they can be properly diagnosed. But that's how it currently works. If there are no anti-gliadin antibodies in your blood, current tests are not accurate. These data suggest that it is possible to spot celiac disease through plasma or blood test. Along with easier, more accurate celiac diagnoses, a blood test would be a major breakthrough because "patients would only be required to consume gluten on one occasion and would still achieve accurate results," said Robert Anderson, MBChB, Ph.D., Chief Scientific Officer of ImmusanT. The test may also help people who do not have celiac disease, but find symptom relief on a gluten-free diet. For these people, gluten may not be the cause of their symptoms and a gluten-free diet may be totally unnecessary. The latest data support the company's approach to "developing a simple blood test for diagnosing celiac disease without the discomfort and inconvenience of current testing methods. This would be the first biomarker for measuring systemic T-cell immunity to gluten," said Leslie Williams, Chief Executive Officer of ImmusanT. As development is ongoing, further tests are expected to flesh out the details. Source: Immusant
  25. Celiac.com 12/07/2017 - Amaranth is naturally gluten-free and usually safe for people with celiac disease or gluten sensitivity. Amaranth is not actually a grain, but is considered a pseudo-cereal like it's cousin, quinoa. Both are part of the same large family that includes beets, chard and spinach. Amaranth is highly nutritious, and contains about one-third more protein than rice, sorghum, or rye. It also contains high levels of calcium, iron, potassium, magnesium, and fiber, together with a nearly perfect amino acid profile. So, amaranth is good to include in just about any diet, but especially for gluten-free folks looking for more nutritious options. Cooked amaranth is very similar to cooked quinoa, with similar nutty taste and chewy texture, although cooke amaranth is not quite as fluffy as quinoa. Like quinoa, it's important to soak amaranth thoroughly before cooking. As with buckwheat and quinoa, you can also bake with amaranth flour. If you're looking for something more nutritious than brown rice and other flours, then amaranth flour may be a good fit. Here are some recipes that use amaranth flour. Also, amaranth is more comparable to wheat in terms of the chewy, sticky characters needed for baking, so it's a good addition to many gluten-free breads. You'll likely still need xanthin gum, but probably less of it. Like rice, or quinoa, amaranth goes great in soup. Here's a recipe for stuffed chicken breasts with oatmeal and amaranth.
×