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Found 6 results

  1. Hello everyone and btw please excuse me if my english is bad ): ! the idea of having celiac has been around my head since a significant time ago, i have anti thyroid autoantibodies and a borderline t4 and tsh, dry eye, multiple joint and muscle pain, acid reflux, stomach pain, diarrhea alternated with constipation, floating and weird stoles, psoriasis, nausea, dizziness, vitamin A deficit, vitamin b12 decifit, vitamin D deficit, random bleeding from lady parts, not related to ovulation, menstruation or anything, im tired all the time and im done feeling like crap everyday, my medic of course suspect celiac so i have a blood work done, it come back negative, i also had what i think was herpetiform dermatitis, sadly i didn't know about it at that time and as i have psoriasis gutata too and it looks kind of similar i think it was the same thing at the beginning, they were blisters that itch a lot on my knees, i should have gone to the doctor but now its too late since they are gone so i cant, the thing is, i was gluten free almost 100% for a very long time, it was kind of intuitive, i didn't think i had celiac at that point, but notice a significant difference eating that way so i "follow my instinct", the dermatitis and psoriasis disappear, later i started consuming gluten once in a while but not in a regular way, maybe one week i eat something, the next week anything, etc etc (i had symptoms this way and thats why i went to the doctor), i was told by my doctor to eat gluten for at least two weeks before the blood work, and i was so bad that i had to go to the urgency's, a lot of stomach pain and constipation, fever, diarrhea, it was hell, so i eat as much as i can but maybe not as regular as i should, Now that i see that all antibodies are completely normal i feel lost and crazy, should i do the biopsy anyway? i dont know any other way to explain the multiple vitamin deficit since i eat really healthy, could this have to be with the fact that i was gluten free for a long time? (the absence of antibodies) even tho i consume gluten once in a while at those times? every antibody come back negative and i had a total IGA and im not deficient. I dont know what to think, i was on my period when blood work was done and i also had flu like syntoms, my immune system was hitting rock bottom as always on these days, maybe that's the reason? idk what to think really... any advice or thought
  2. my personal symptoms above. Did another blood test and results came negative again, (gene test also negative). Found something that's interesting, useful for those that receive negative results and still convinced they have celiac or have some sort of food sensitivity(like i was). http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2834720/ more links: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4479362/ http://bit.ly/1UlUTpq Kinda solved it for me, cause i personally went through all types of abuse as a child, had symptoms listed above, got better now, hardly any symptoms. As a note my siblings went through similar situations to a lesser degree, and they both have GI issues growing up. Feel free to ask, and inform people about this
  3. Celiac.com 12/16/2015 - Just a month after General Mills recalled nearly two million boxes of gluten-free Cheerios from store shelves and warehouses due to "inadvertent" gluten contamination, the company and its flagship brand Cheerios are facing yet another public relations challenge. General Mills is being sued for false advertising by a major consumer watchdog over its Cheerios Protein cereal, introduced in March, 2014, as a "healthy alternative" to both classic Cheerios and other breakfast cereals. According to an official complaint filed with the Northern California District Court by the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI), "General Mills falsely and misleadingly markets Cheerios Protein to children and adults as a high protein, healthful alternative to Cheerios." According to General Mills’ official marketing language, Cheerios Protein "offers the benefits that go along with starting the day with 11g of protein and the great taste of Cheerios that kids and parents already know and love." According to the CSPI, while Cheerios Protein does contain a tiny bit more protein than classic Cheerios, General Mills has nearly doubled the recommended serving size for Cheerios Protein, making its protein content seem much greater than it actually is. So, while the "recommended serving size" of original Cheerios is 28g, the recommended serving of Cheerios Protein is 55g. When you crunch the numbers, Cheerios Protein only has just 7/10 of a gram more protein than regular Cheerios, hardly a major source of protein, or a major improvement over regular Cheerios. In their complaint, CSPI is accusing General Mills of engaging in what amounts to marketing sleight-of-hand, to trick consumers into paying an average of 70 cents more per box than other brands of Cheerios, for a product that contains an insignificant amount of extra protein, but 17 times more sugar than classic Cheerios. Yes, even though they have about the same amount of protein by weight, a serving of original Cheerios contains just 1g of sugar, while a serving of Cheerios Protein will give you a whopping 17g of sugar; about the same as half a can of Coke. Basically, eating two bowls of original Cheerios will give you about the same amount of protein as Cheerios Protein, but with far less sugar, and at a lower cost. That's where the lawsuit comes in. Basically, CSPI is hoping to use the courts to pressure General Mills to remove or revise their marketing cliams, which CSPI says, are little more than smoke and mirrors. Stay tuned for the latest developments on this and related stories. Read more at Inquisitr.com
  4. Celiac.com 01/30/2012 - Over the last decade, many companies are adding labels to their products like: "gluten-free," "low gluten," "no gluten," "no gluten ingredients used," "naturally gluten-free" and "celiac friendly." To many celiacs and individuals with gluten intolerance, the idea of companies labeling products without gluten is refreshing. To experts on celiac disease and gluten intolerance, the gluten labeling currently happening in the United States is frightening. United States versus Other Countries' Gluten Free Labeling Laws Many countries diligently regulate gluten-free labeling. A few months ago, an exchange student from Italy stopped by our Gluten Free Specialty Market and told me that she was horrified by the gluten-free labeling laws in the United States. For the first time in her life, she was being contaminated by products that weren’t safe for her to eat. After purchasing bakery products that were manufactured in a non-dedicated gluten-free environment, she became deathly ill for more than a week and told me she was only just starting to feel like she could travel more than a few steps from the nearest restroom. “I’m afraid to eat anywhere,” she told me, “Every time I eat out in this country, I get sick. I can’t wait to be home where I don’t have to worry like this.” This is not the first or even the 100th time I’ve heard a story like this. For 4 years, I have heard story after story of individuals eating what appeared to be a ‘gluten-free’ product and getting violently ill. So what does gluten-free mean? What Does Gluten Free Mean? According to the FDA, as of September 2011, gluten-free labeled products should (a) not include ingredients from gluten or gluten derivatives and ( maintain a status of less than 20ppm of gluten for all gluten-free labeled products. For more information about the FDA’s Gluten Free Food Labeling Request, go to: http://www.fda.gov/Food/LabelingNutrition/FoodAllergensLabeling/GuidanceComplianceRegulatoryInformation/ucm111487.htm#q9 Though many companies try to follow the FDA's current gluten-free recommendation, mistakes are often made. In food manufacturing, companies are driven by supply and demand. Right now, the supply of gluten-free product options is low and the demand for gluten-free products is high. For this reason, companies are jumping on the band wagon trying to produce options to fill the demand. Some companies are started by an individual that is gluten intolerant, gluten allergic or has celiac disease. Other companies are producing gluten-free products solely for profit. While companies do their best to provide gluten-free products to the public, they often don’t understand what gluten-free actually means. Common Mistakes Made by Product Manufacturers While product manufacturers are trying to produce safe products, mistakes are often made. Most mistakes occur due to lack of education regarding what "gluten-free" really means and what it takes to prevent cross-contamination. The Product is Gluten Free Enough for Me Many gluten free products are created by individuals that have celiac disease, gluten intolerance or a gluten allergy. Many of these products are made to be safe enough for the individual that made the product. This is a problem because, experts like Dr. Alessio Fasano from the Stanford Celiac Center, estimate that only 1% of the population diagnosed with celiac disease is aware that they are being contaminated. In other words, contamination may be affecting the health of an individual with celiac, even when they are not experiencing blatant symptoms. Example 1: A brownie company produced their product in a facility that also produced regular gluten products. The company is asked if they test their products for gluten, and they answer, "no, we don’t need to. If the product wasn’t gluten-free someone would have let us know by now. We’ve been in business for 4 years." Example 2: A pie company reports that their product is "celiac safe," and the company reports that they use a flour that tests above the safe range of 20ppm and the pies are made in a facility that produces gluten. Research presented by the Celiac Sprue Association has shown that facilities that use gluten flours generally create products that contain gluten. Heterogeneous Mixtures Versus Homogeneous Mixtures This problem sometimes happens when gluten-free companies are trying to keep the price down on their products. Flours produced in facilities that produce gluten are often times cheaper than flours produced in dedicated facilities and tested on import and export. Companies often believe that when you mix one flour that’s above 20ppm with another flour that’s non-detectable at 5 or 10ppm, then the outcome of the flour blend will be below 20ppm. This is not true because flour mixtures are not homogenous, they are heterogenous. In other words, if you have a chocolate chip size morsel of gluten in one bag of flour, even if you mix it with a another flour that doesn’t have any gluten in it, the morsel of gluten still exists. Therefore, the flour is not gluten-free. Example 1: Customers were reporting contamination after consuming a specific product from a gluten-free bakery. The facility was visited and it was found that both flours and corn meal were being made in facilities that produce gluten. Additionally, those facilities had reported that their flours routinely test above the safety zone of 20ppm. When the bakery was questioned about the flours, it was reported that they knew that some of their flours were above 20ppm but they didn’t use very much of them in the flour blend so it shouldn’t matter. If a Product Contains Gluten, it Contains Gluten If you put gluten in a product, it contains gluten. If your tests show results below 20ppm, they (1) might be read or performed inaccurately, (2) multiple samples could result in discrepancies (in other words, some samples may show higher than 20ppm and others lower). Example: A barbecue sauce has gluten as an ingredient and states "gluten free*" on their product label. At the bottom of the label the product states: "*tested below 20ppm for gluten." Though the end product might test as non-detectable, the product still contains gluten and should not be labeled gluten free. Manufacturer Produces Gluten, but the Product has "No Gluten Ingredients Used" on the Label Many manufacturers produce both gluten-containing and non-gluten containing products in their facilities. When a product is produced on machinery that produces gluten or in a facility that has flour dust in the air, the product should be tested for its gluten status before it is labeled gluten-free. Example 1: A clam chowder company labels it’s product as gluten-free and reports that the soup is gluten-free. Then later reports that wheat flour is used in other soups they make and that there is no allergen sterilization that occurs between the soup with wheat flour and the clam chowder without wheat flour. The company does not test for gluten status, but decides to label their soups as gluten free anyway. It is very possible that the soup will not test below 20ppm. Example 2: A flour company produces flours that appear to be gluten-free, but the flours are made in a facility that produces gluten-containing flours and are produced on equipment with gluten and exposed to gluten flour dust from the air. To cut back on the amount of gluten in their product, the company throws away the initial batches of flour and only keeps later batches. The later batches on average test around 30-35ppm. The flour is not labeled as gluten-free, nor does it state on the label made in a facility that produces gluten. Labeling Mishaps Lawyers often recommend that products not be recalled even when a gluten-free labeled product is determined to contain gluten. Example 1: Wellshire Farms products were sold with a gluten-free label despite having tests showing a ppm reading far above 20ppm. Example 2: A chocolate fitness bar was certified to be below 20ppm. The ingredients changed and wheat starch was added instead of corn starch. The starch was listed on the ingredients as “starch” and the product was labeled as “gluten-free” and noted to be tested below 20ppm. The Product is "Naturally Gluten-Free" Oftentimes, companies report that their product is gluten-free, because they use naturally gluten-free ingredients. The problem with this statement is that even a naturally gluten-free ingredient can become contaminated with gluten through production, storage or shipment. Example 1: A chia beverage company reports on their label that their product is naturally gluten-free. When informed that chia is often cross-contaminated with gluten, the company stated that "our chia tests at 30ppm, but since chia is naturally gluten-free they can still place gluten-free on their label." Example 2: To protect their consumers, Kettle Cuisine soups tests "naturally gluten-free" ingredients before using them in their manufactured products. More than once their cumin and coriander tested above 20ppm, and Morjoram tested above 5ppm. As a side note the company reports that they have had no problems with their current supplier of organic spices. So far, the organic spices have been consistently testing below 5ppm. Like many companies attempting the safest standards possible for their customers, Kettle cuisine requires that both the ingredients going into their product and the final product test below 5ppm. This allows even the most sensitive of gluten reactors to feel safe consuming their products. Many gluten-free product manufacturers regularly test their ingredients for gluten status. Naturally gluten-free products that should always be double checked for their parts per million (ppm) status include: vinegar, chia seed, hemp seed, oats, buckwheat, spices, produce stored with flour, flours or grains made in a facility producing gluten, B vitamins, E vitamins, modified food starch (should be listed as wheat if from wheat, but this doesn’t always happen). Offering Safe Gluten-Free Options to the Community At the Gluten Free Specialty Market in Sacramento, California we work hard to educate the community and manufacturing companies regarding the need for safe products. Local companies often ask us for information on how to provide safe gluten-free options. Nachez, a dairy free and vegan Nacho cheese sauce, contacted us last year while setting up the manufacturing of their cheese sauce. After speaking with us, it was decided that the product would be produced by a company that regularly batch tests the product to be below 20ppm. It is very empowering to feel like we, as a market, are activists for the health and wellness of our customers. In the past four years we have learned vast amounts of information on the manufacturing of gluten-free products throughout the United States. In 2012, we hope to press local legislators to help us do this by creating a gluten-free labeling standard for California. We hope that if the FDA doesn’t pass a gluten-free labeling law in the next year, California will pass a state law to help protect us. In the meantime, we continue to drill gluten-free manufacturers on their products and do our best to provide the safest gluten-free options to our customers.
  5. Dig Dis Sci. 2004 Apr;49(4):546-50 Celiac.com 08/27/2004 – Dr. Peter Green and colleagues at the Department of Medicine, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, New York, conducted a study designed to determine the sensitivity of the various serological tests used to diagnose celiac disease. To do this they looked at 115 adults with biopsy-proven celiac disease who fulfilled strict criteria which included serological testing at the time of their diagnosis, and a positive response to a gluten-free diet. Out of those studied, 71% had total villous atrophy, and 29% had partial villous atrophy. Serological results indicated that only 77% of those with total and 33% of those with partial villous atrophy actually tested positive for celiac disease, and it did not matter whether the patients presented with classical or silent symptoms. All patients who were positive for anti-tissue transglutaminase had total villous atrophy. The researchers conclude: Seronegative celiac disease occurs. Endomysial antibody positivity correlates with more severe villous atrophy and not mode of presentation of celiac disease. Serologic tests, in clinical practice, lack the sensitivity reported in the literature.
  6. Vijay Kumar, M.D., Research Associate Professor at the University of Buffalo and President and Director of IMMCO Diagnostics: The three serological tests that are used for diagnosing celiac disease are: Anti-endomysial antibody (EMA) Anti-reticulin antibody (ARA) Anti-gliadin antibody (AGA) Each of these three tests provide a certain degree of reliability for diagnosing celiac disease. Of these, endomysial antibody is the most specific test. The following table is taken from our studies (Lerner, Kumar, Iancu, Immunological diagnosis of childhood coeliac disease: comparison between antigliadin, antireticulin and antiendomysial antibodies). % of Sensitivity % of Specificity Predictive Value % Pos Predictive Value % Neg EMA 97% 98% 97% 98% ARA 65% 100% 100% 72% IgG AGA 88% 92% 88% 92% IgA AGA 52% 94% 87% 74% The following definitions related to sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values may help: Sensitivity is the probability of a positive test result in a patient with disease. Specificity is the probability of negative test result in a patient without disease. Positive predictive value is the probability of disease in a patient with positive test result. Negative predictive value is the probability of no disease in a patient with negative test result. Karoly Horvath, M.D., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Pediatrics; Director, Peds GI & Nutrition Laboratory; University of Maryland at Baltimore: The summary below shows the results of the main serological tests based on several publications including 388 patients with celiac disease, and 771 healthy subjects. SENSITIVITY- the proportion of subjects with the disease who have a positive test. It indicates how good a test is at identifying the diseased: Percentage of - IgA AGA Percentage of - IgG AGA Percentage of - IgA EMA Average 78% 79% 97% Range 46-100% 57-94% 89-100% SPECIFICITY- the proportion of subjects without the disease who have a negative test. It indicates how good a test is at identifying the non-diseased: Percentage of - IgA AGA Percentage of - IgG AGA Percentage of - IgA EMA Average 92% 84% 98.5% Range 84-100% 52-98% 97-100% POSITIVE PREDICTIVE VALUE- the probability that a person with positive results actually has the disease: Percentage of - IgA AGA Percentage of - IgG AGA Percentage of - IgA EMA Average 72% 57% 92% Range 45-100% 42-76% 91-94% NEGATIVE PREDICTIVE VALUE- the probability that a person with negative results does not have the disease: Percentage of - IgA AGA Percentage of - IgG AGA Percentage of - IgA EMA Average 94% 94% 100% Range 89-100% 83-99% 100% References: McMillan SA, Haughton DJ, Biggart JD, Edgar JD, Porter KG, McNeill TA. Predictive value for coeliac disease of antibodies to gliadin, endomysium, and jejunum in patients attending for jejunal biopsy. Brit Med J 1991;303:1163-1165 Ferreira M, Lloyd Davies S, Butler M, Scott D, Clark M, Kumar P. Endomysial antibody: is it the best screening test for coeliac disease? Gut 1992;33:1633-1637. Khoshoo V, Bhan MK, Puri S, Jain R, Jayashree S, Bhatnagar S, Kumar R, Stintzing G. Serum antigliadin antibody profile in childhood protracted diarrhea due to coeliac disease and other causes in a developing country. Scand J Gastroenterol 1989;24:1212-1216. Chan KN, Phillips AD, Mirakian R, Walker-Smith JA. Endomysial antibody screening in children. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr 1994;18:316-320. Bode S, Weile B, Krasilnikoff PA, Gdmand-Hyer E. The diagnostic value of the gliadin antibody testing celiac disease in children: a prospective study. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr 1993;17:260-264. Calabuig M, Torregosa R, Polo P, Tom s C, Alvarez V, Garcia-Vila A, Brines J, Vilar P, Farr C, Varea V. Serological markers and celiac disease: a new diagnostic approach ? J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr 1990;10:435-442.
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