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Found 68 results

  1. Hello, My name is Bryan and I'm 23 years old. I've never made an account on any website to talk about this, so this is my first because I have a lot to say and I have been avoiding this. I guess I'll start off giving some history of the issues that I have been having. When I was 18 I was getting pretty serious about lifting weights. I started off at about 160 lbs and got to about 180 when I was about 20. Once I hit 20 years old I injured my back pretty bad to where I was in bed for 3 months, and during the time I started to have some GI symptoms around this time. At the time I thought I was literally having heart attacks due to a serious pain in my chest. It would show up sometimes when I ate food, and especially when I drank caffeine (I never really cared for caffeine, but at this time a preworkout Jack3D got me hooked on it). However, I ended up going to Dr. and he ended up telling me I had GERD within 10 minutes, shortly after that he left the room and came back with Nexium (had to be prescribed at the time). I took Nexium for a while and it helped, but once I got off things were worse. I also couldn't take it anymore because I had a SERIOUS pain in the center of my lumbar spine that would only go away if I went #2. So, I tried the holistic path to get rid of this heartburn. Good news is that I beat heartburn, it's been years since I ever even had it. This event was from about 19 to 20 years of age (Just turning 20 it ended). On the flip side, right when I was turning 21 something else slowly started to happen. I first started off with symptoms of being EXTREMELY TIRED 30 minutes eating a lot of the time. When I was 21, I was working at a dollar store and the first time I noticed one of these episodes I was so tired that I couldn't stand up. So, I just sat on the floor. It felt like a tiredness that was almost induced from a drug, it was a different kind of tired. I worked at this dollar store about 2-3 times a week for 3 years, until I was 23. Me and my boss had subway for probably about 90% of our lunches through the course of these 3 years. Subway 2-3 times a week, every week (I eat NO other fast food, just how I was raised). After I noticed this tiredness I started to pay attention to my stool. It was yellow, inconsistent, and I was going anywhere from 2-5 times a day. Once I was aware of being being tired and not being able to go to the bathroom right, I started to get this shoulder tightness that started from under my right scapula at the rib cage. It crept up from my rib under my scapula, to the rhomboid, to my rear deltoid and scapula, and finally to my neck. This shoulder irritation got so bad I considered death thousands of times. Sometimes I was so happy thinking about death that I would literally smile about it, realizing that this would all one day end. Mentally at this point I have developed a serious anxiety. Everyday I woke up as if I had a grenade go off in my head, as if I was drinking ALL night. I would get a full 8 hours without waking up once just to wake up each morning to have a messed up head. Somewhere down the line I started to experience something very strange with my head. Many times before I ate my head would feel "jared". It's like my eyes wanted to roll back into my head and have a seizure, but what would I know, I never had one. Sometimes I thought I would fall on the ground. This would also happen when I would hear something loud or high pitch, a baby screaming, motorcycle going by, or if someone were to throw a beer bottle away in the garbage if it hit another bottle (making the glass hitting each other). I don't drink, smoke, or do any drugs. I have quit caffeine completely out of my life since the beginning of 2016. I forgot to mention, but caffeine and me no longer get along. It is as if I have a complete intolerance to it. I have had -Endoscopy -Colonoscopy -Blood tests for H-Pyl, Celiac, others I can't remember -Taken antibiotics for SIBO -Gallbladder scan -Liver scan -Pancreas is fine If I remember right -I will update more if I remember anything else. This all came up clear. I have had 2 different General Practitioners tell me that I have anxiety. For a long time I put off anxiety medication and have told them I'm not interested. Eventually I caved and got on zoloft, but I started to have bad side effects. Then they put me on Wellbutrin, currently on 300mg a day. Wellbutrin helps, but I feel it's not the answer. I still get tight shoulder issues, bathroom problems, and I forgot to mention that I have a throat clearing issue that's so consistent that it's simply ruining my life. I have tried gluten free 2 different times, both times I've lasted two weeks being 100% gluten-free. My symptoms are still there, but I don't THINK they are as severe. However I caved Sunday 11/6/2016 (ending my two week and two day streak), gluten-free Monday, and caved again yesterday (being Tuesday). Tuesday was the only day I noticed anything, I was super bloated/gassy/tight shoulder/bad head space. I was just unsure how to feel about it seeing as I only had symptoms on Tuesday when I caved and not Sunday. I'm sorry this is long and so jumbled, still have bad head space. Symptoms: Right shoulder tightness, bloating, gas, food cravings for sweets/chocolate (very noticeable while gluten-free), waking up tired, anxiety, symptoms 30 minutes after eating, will add more as I remember and experience them.
  2. I've been struggling with a lot of symptoms for over 7 years now. I've gone on many wild goose chases to get a diagnoses, but I always seem to wind up with negative test results, or an answer that doesn't account for most of my symptoms. Most of my symptoms first started when I was in my sophomore year of high school (I am 23 years old now). I started to experience disassociation, brain fog, and fatigue first, shortly followed by visual snow. I developed tinnitus in both ears around this time also. Since then, none of these symptoms have alleviated; my visual snow and tinnitus have become a constant for me, though they are thankfully relatively easy to ignore. I've experienced headaches commonly throughout my life, but for years now they have become much more frequent. I used to rarely (if ever) experience tension headaches, but now I have tension headaches much more frequently than vascular ones. I also experience (thankfully rare) ocular migraines where I lose portions of my vision for 30 minutes to an hour in both eyes. I've become extremely sensitive to light and stimuli (especially visual and auditory). I've always been sensitive to loud noises and bright colours, but now I can hardly walk through a colourful, fluorescent-lit store without walking out feeling fatigued and in a fog. The enamel on my front teeth has been shot since I was a child, and I've always been prone to canker sores. I have very stubborn dark circles under my eyes, and rough, bumpy skin on my upper arms. My joints feel too stiff and sore for my age, and I have very painful periods (that may skip a month occasionally). My memory is poor, and I struggle with OCD, tourettes, anxiety, and depression. What lead me to look into celiac, however, was the development of gastrointestinal issues. I can't remember when these issues first started-- I think they've been slowly working into my system for years-- but they became much more pronounced over the last year or two. I feel bloated nearly all the time, and frequently have either diarrhea or constipation. I also have acid reflux, as well as frequent abdominal pain and discomfort. My diet is very heavy in foods that contain gluten, and I've noticed my gastrointestinal symptoms definitely worsen when I increase my intake of these foods. Just a couple of days ago, a pb&j sandwich and poptart were all that I ate in the evening; I went to sleep with abdominal discomfort, and woke up with much worse discomfort and diarrhea. Each flareup seems to be similarly marked by consuming gluten. I've had a CT scan of my head, several in-depth eye exams, tests for diabetes, iron and vitamin deficiencies, and high blood pressure. I've had an x-ray of my neck and spine, an MRI of my jaw (for TMJD), an EEG-- all came back negative, except for one that determined I have hypothyroidism and the MRI that showed a deformity in the right side of my jaw, neither of which account for most of my symptoms. I also had one single test for celiac (I believe it was the tTG test), which also came back negative. The negative test result I had for celiac has not convinced me that gluten isn't to blame for my issues, however. I feel that too many of my symptoms line up with celiac disease to not at least treat it as a high possibility. I've also read about the possibility of the test I had showing false negatives, which gives me some hope that my negative test result for celiac wasn't just another dead end. I'm not sure where to move from here, however. I truly feel that I have reasonable cause to suspect celiac, but I've also felt that way with many other tests that provided no answers. I wonder, though, if I should pursue more testing for celiac, or just try a gluten-free diet for a few months and see if it improves my symptoms. I am not interested in having an endoscopy; I feel that a positive blood test, or positive results from a gluten-free diet are all I want for answers (plus, sedatives and anesthesia give me wicked anxiety). I guess I'm making this forum for two reasons-- 1. I would like to know if people here that have been formally diagnosed with celiac feel that I have reason to suspect celiac based on my symptoms; 2. I would also like an opinion on trying the diet vs getting a diagnosis prior I'd also love a full list of tests that I should look into if the primary one came back negative Thank you to anyone that reads and/or replies to this, and sorry for how wordy this is ahhh
  3. Celiac.com 02/27/2006 - Gluten Intolerance Group (GIG) applauds McDonald’s for providing proof that their French fries are safe for persons with celiac disease and gluten intolerances, states Cynthia Kupper, RD, Executive Director of GIG. Kupper, who has worked with large corporate chain restaurants for many years to provide gluten-free menu options, states McDonald’s took the best action possible by having the fries tested by one of the leading independent laboratories in food allergens. McDonald’s has provided the reassurance those persons with celiac disease need, to feel confident they can eat the fries without getting sick. Outback Steak House was the first large restaurant chain Kupper worked with to develop gluten-free menus. “We definitely made some new friends!” stated Thomas C. Kempsey, Director of Culinary for Cheeseburger in Paradise, speaking of the gluten-free menu Kupper helped the chain launch in February. Cameron Mitchell’s Fish Market, Bone Fish Grill, Carrabba’s, Bugaboo Creek, and many others have worked with GIG to develop gluten-free menus. The program has been very successful for restaurants involved with GIG’s outreach project, states Kupper. The patrons are happy and the restaurants see a growing number of loyal customers. GIG promotes safe and healthy dining through education of restaurants and consumers. Many restaurants have developed gluten-free menu options. Some individual restaurants are part of a program GIG will soon manage called the Gluten-Free Restaurant Awareness Program (www.glutenfreerestaurants.org). Both this program and GIG’s corporate program have strict guidelines for inclusion. Many restaurants have the potential to meet the needs of persons with food sensitivities, however not all are willing to take the extra steps necessary to do so. Many people with celiac disease are afraid to eat away from home for fear of getting sick according to research. To know that restaurants offer gluten-free choices, verified by trusted sources is a big deal for these people. For people who travel, places like McDonalds and Outback become their safety nets and they will not eat anywhere else, states Kupper. Parents want their children to have options like other kids, so McDonald’s is a perfect fast food choice. Not all fast food restaurants use dedicated fryers and some use fries that are treated with wheat flour – an absolute ‘must avoid’ for celiacs. Unlike other acute allergies, such as peanut allergies, celiac disease is a chronic condition that can cause damage to the intestines, malabsorption and malnutrition by eating gluten (proteins found in wheat, rye, barley and hybrids of these grains). Celiac disease is a life-long disease that can be diagnosed at any age. The only treatment for the disease is the strict avoidance of gluten. Celiac disease affects nearly 3 million people in the US and 1:250 people worldwide, yet it is the most misdiagnosed common disorder today. The Gluten Intolerance Group, based in Seattle WA, is a national nonprofit organization providing support and education to persons with gluten intolerances in order to live healthy lives. GIG is the leading national organization for gluten intolerances with a dietitian on staff daily to work with consumers. Gluten Intolerance Group (GIG) works with restaurants to offer gluten-free dining options for persons with celiac disease.
  4. My 15 yr old daughter had her endoscope today. The stomach showed signs of gastritis and she's starting some meds for that. The esophagus and intestine looked fine according to the doc. I've done some searching here and have read that I can't really have any thoughts on whether this might imply no celiac but will just wait for the results in a week. I've started her on a "gluten free" diet today, in quotations because I'm allowing "made on shared equipment". If she turns up with a gluten intolerance diagnosis, any thoughts on whether this is a good or bad idea? Her GI doc said if not celiac, we will have to find out what level of exposure she can have without having symptoms. We are still going under the assumption that gluten-free will help her because it has in the past. Obviously I'm grasping at straws because the waiting for results is painful as you all know.
  5. I am a 50 year old woman, in shape, exercises regularly and I have had edema in my ankles for about 25 years. I have done so many tests over the years. My doctors told me that I am healthy and I might never find out why. I did notice when I drastically reduced my sodium intak, drank lots of water and wore support hose that I could control the edema but not get rid of it. In the summer I can not wear heals because my ankles swells immediately. It's very embarrassing and I wear clothing so people can't notice my swollen ankles. I started noticing that the less carbohydrates I eat the better my ankles looked and started suspecting gluten could be the problem. Not one doctor even suggested that could be the problem. I did allergy test as well as blood work testing me for celiac and they came back normal. I checked my thyroid and that came back normal as well. As I did research I believe I have a gluten sensitivity. My only symptoms are swollen ankles and I get tired very easily. A week ago I started a gluten free and dairy free diet. Was very excited because each day my ankles looked better and better but today my ankles are swelling again and I don't believe I had any gluten, I have been very careful. Is this normal that I will have flare ups before I get completely better and how long does it take for my ankles not to swell and I can wear heels without support hose for swelling?...I appreciate anyone's input.
  6. Hello everyone. Desperate for answers! 6 years ago I started with two end expulsion when I ate wheat, it started with spaghetti. Then shortly after that, 2 months maybe, barley had the same effect. A few months after that rye followed then spelt. Now I can't eat oatmeal doesn't matter if it's gluten free, I end up with cramps and pain. So I just avoid. Went to dr - he tested me (blood test) for celiac whilst I had been gluten free for over a year. Obviously it was negative. I'm also lactose intolerant. Fast forward to two years ago,4 years of gluten free, tried the gluten challenge to have a blood test done again. 6 weeks one slice of bread a day, it was horrific! I ended up with blisters on my bot and elbows. My elbows looked like DH - blood Negative. So my question is, I got glutened four weeks ago, I had blisters on my thighs and fingers this time. Sides of my fingers, pin prick type blisters. I was as sick as a dog, both ends. I had a stool sample done and it revealed lots of fat globules which explains my floating waste but no bacteria/parasites. I have hypothyroid, secondary adrenal insuffiency all well managed. No hashis. Otherwise ok. Other than the horrendous brain fog since the gluten incident. I had high IgA in my saliva but low in blood. Should I opt for biopsy? Apparently I'm not allergic which is good, as I have multiple allergies. appreciate any kind of advice you can offer! thank u!
  7. Celiac.com 11/13/2012 - Going gluten-free seems to be the newest dietary trend that many people are following, even if it is not mandatory for one’s health. This trend was brought on by an increased number of cases of celiac disease, and gluten sensitivity, also referred to as gluten intolerance. Both diagnoses come with the recommendation of avoiding gluten-containing foods (wheat, rye, barley), however both are different in the way the body is affected. Celiac disease, also known as gluten sensitive enteropathy, is an autoimmune disease that affects the small intestine causing it to become inflamed when gluten is digested. The immune system then generates an abnormal response to gluten and attacks its own intestinal tissue. This leads to the wasting away of the villi that line the small intestine, malabsorption of nutrients and thus malnutrition. Symptoms may include anemia, osteopenia, lactase deficiency, diarrhea, constipation, delayed growth, and weight loss due to malabsorption of nutrients. Other symptoms that may present are arthritis, dermatitis, infertility, muscle weakness, and constant fatigue. A series of tests and evaluations are performed including an examination of one’s family history as genetic predisposition is common, blood tests, and the final confirmation of an intestinal biopsy. Once confirmed a strict adherence to a gluten free diet is necessary. Non-celiac gluten sensitivity is often interchanged with gluten intolerance. There are cases where symptoms are less severe, which may be considered gluten sensitivity, whereas severe cases would be labeled as gluten intolerance due to the intensity and length of time symptoms last. Gluten sensitivity differs from celiac disease in that the body views gluten as an invader causing a direct response in the form of inflammation inside and outside of the digestive tract, and with this disorder one's own tissue (lining of small intestine) is not attacked, as we see with celiac disease. Once gluten is removed from the body, the inflammation goes away unlike the symptoms associated with celiac disease. Symptoms include bloating, abdominal discomfort, and diarrhea due to the inflammation of the digestive tract. Headaches, lethargy, attention-deficit disorder, hyperactivity, muscle weakness/disturbances and joint pain may present as well. Tests performed for a diagnosis of celiac disease are usually done with the findings not showing the indicators necessary, leading to a trial gluten-free diet. With the diet, symptoms will disappear, and a diagnosis of gluten sensitivity will be given. Unfortunately celiac disease and gluten sensitivity are becoming increasingly prevalent. Thus it is important to know how each diagnosis affects the body, and the reasons for being put on a gluten free diet. With more research being done, there may soon be more answers as to why more cases continue to emerge.
  8. I am pretty desperate to just hear from anyone with a similar experience whether it be a parent of a child or an adult experiencing symptoms themselves. Our daughter was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes last April. We had her stool tested with Entero Lab which showed extreme gluten intolerance with a plethora of other food intolerances. She also tested positive for both genes associated with celiac. This summer we noticed a bloated belly show up accompanied with an increase in hunger. She did have a rapid weight gain post diagnosis which isn't uncommon due to the drop in weight prior to her diagnosis. I've always been interested in reading about healing foods, I had the GAPS book, Autoimmune Protocol, Amy Myers, etc books before my daughter was even born. She's always eaten an extremely healthy diet with fermented foods, no processed, gluten free since 2, etc. and yet, despite all of that, she tested positive for Sibo in December 2015 after working with a pediatric gi since September. I'm distraught. She's going to be 4 next month, she has a bloated belly, slightly overweight now, fatty stools, gassy, hungry ALL the time (even after eating), and she doesn't seem to be getting any relief. We've done 2 rounds of Flagyl followed by bio Gaia probiotics, but it doesn't seem to be helping. Thoughts? Anyone experienced anything similar? I cannot believe my 3 year old has everything I've tried to avoid with nutrition(leaky gut, autoimmune condition, Sibo, etc) how did this happen? How can I fix it?
  9. Hi there, Hoping to get some thoughts from others out there who are familiar with the range of symptoms and issues associated with celiac disease (or gluten intolerance). My story is sad and complicated, but basically starts with the fact that I'm 26 and have had 5 early miscarriages in the past year. Testing was inconclusive, until finally my RE found that I have an autoimmune thyroid condition (anti-thyroid antibodies/hashimotos). He started me on a low dose of synthroid to boost me up (even though my current TSH is considered "normal". Anyways, in reading more about autoimmune thyroid conditions, I found out that they are highly related to celiac disease and that they can also respond to a gluten-free diet. So I decided to go gluten-free because, well, at this point I'm willing to try anything to be able to have a healthy baby. After doing all this reading, I've done done more reflecting and an convinced I have done kind of gluten intolerance issue. I did blood testing a couple of days after first deciding to try gluten-free, and the clinic said that should still be Ok for identifying the antibodies/tissue transglutaminase). I'll find out in January. Anyway, my symptoms include: - recurrent pregnancy loss (infertility) - thyroid autoimmunity - skin rashes (Not DH), possibly eczema or chronic hives - dairy intolerance developed in the last few years (this has *completely* improved since going gluten-free 2 weeks ago) - stomach gurgling, gas and bloating (also stopped on going gluten-free) - chronically loose, smelly stool (sorry TMI! But, my BMs have been completely normal on going gluten-free!) - grandmother recently told me my uncle "was celiac as a child but grew out if it" (right. ) It seems fairly compelling to ne, especially given my digestive improvements. I'm even thinking that if the blood test comes back negative, I might just stay gluten-free to see how it goes (with pregnancy, thyroid condition, digestive health, etc). What do you think? Thoughts, insights, or advice greatly appreciated! Thanks
  10. hello- I'm looking for help here! For the past 15 months my now 5 yr old has suffered from severe abdominal pain, bloating and diarrhea . It has gotten so severe in the past few months he has been hospitalized 3x needing an NG tube and rectal tube to decompress his intestines from all the air. At first we thought it was a constipation issue but he only ever had loose foul smelling stools.at his last hoapital discharge I was instructed to insert a rectal tube every 6 hours and flush with saline to keep his bowels from distending with air! We did that for 3 months straight?! What torture for my poor boy. And X-rays confirmed there was no blockage. He has had test after test , X-rays, MRI,CT, EGD and biopsy twice , colonoscopy, ultrasounds and even cystic fibrosis testing. Only thing that has shown up in blood work is anemia and elevated c-r protein. His GI dr is stumped ( even after conferring with colleagues cannot figure this out) and says she has never seen a kid so severe, even with celiac( although he has tested negative) . Now here's the interesting thing- I. Put him on a gluten-free diet after the testing was all done and within 2 weeks he started having somewhat formed BMs on his own with no laxatives or suppositories . His bloating disappeared and his behavior improved ( he is also mildly autistic) . So even though the dr was doubtful gluten could be a problem she is saying maybe it's an intolerance. Anyone have a kiddo with such a severe non- celiac intolerance?
  11. Celiac.com 07/04/2012 - It is becoming increasingly clear that celiac disease (or some form of gluten sensitivity) affects many more people in the world than estimates from the past few decades suggested. In the 1950s, celiac disease was estimated as affecting 1 in 8000 individuals worldwide, while today that number has grown to 1 in 100. Seeking to explain why this sizable portion of our population cannot tolerate gluten, Professor David Sanders, who is a Consultant Gastroenterologist at the Royal Hallamshire Hospital and University of Sheffield, looks to evolution for answers. It is hard to think of a world without bread, as even Ancient Romans harvested grain. But wheat is actually a new food for us: it was only widely introduced into the human diet roughly ten thousand years ago, which is a very small percentage (0.4%) of the 2.5 million years our species has walked the planet. So what were we eating that other 99.6% of our life as a species? We ate things that are edible raw, without the need for processing or refinement (which wheat is not). Our ability to process grains to an edible form was a technological development that did not occur until a relatively recent chapter in our history. In a sense, then, our ingenuity is ahead of our biology. As Dr. Sanders says, “... it makes sense that our bodies are still adapting to this food, and more specifically, the gluten it contains.” After millions of years of what is essentially gluten-free dieting, our bodies might be ill-equipped to process gluten, as it is still a relatively foreign substance. Source: http://www.science20.com/news_articles/being_glutenfree_determined_evolution_says_gastroenterologist-91578
  12. The following was posted by Kemp Randolph on the Celiac Listserv news group krand@pipeline.com: The difference is that between two immune related reactions, allergy and intolerance. I asked the question of the technical difference between the two some time ago and got no response. Its not based on overt symptoms, thats for sure. Were also not talking about the difference between latent celiac disease and overt weight-loss, apple belly celiac disease. You can be allergic and intolerant of the same substance or food In the case of milk, its lactose(milk carbohydrate) intolerance and milk protein allergy. My non-professional stab at the difference between intolerance and allergy then. Both can lead to intestinal damage. Theres a table in Marshs book showing that --page 155 , figure 6.13. Type 3 damage (flat destructive ) can occur from milk, soy, egg.... as well as celiac disease. The reaction to an intolerance seems to be that the substance is not digested. The immune part of the response involves only the circulating immunoglobins IgA, maybe IgG and related immune cells, receptors. The immune reaction to an allergy involves IgE. The substance may still be digested, but there may be allergic responses elsewhere outside the gut. Apple belly celiac disease is an intolerance. The problems elsewhere in the body, except for cancer, are related to nutritional deficiencies. The link to other autoimmune diseases is statistical genetics when two (or more) genes for each of two conditions are close together. For more information see the Allergy vs. Intolerance page.
  13. So I think I have a gluten intolerance/sensitivity. I say I think because I have not seen a doctor about it yet, and I only noticed that something was wrong with my body about two weeks ago. Everybody knows how their body feels and works and mine all of a sudden just was not behaving normally. Let me preface this by stating all my existing conditions/problems: 20 year old female, lactose intolerant (have been for about a year now), on daily medications for ADHD, anxiety/depression, and birth control. I've just moved back to college for my last year of school, and I'm mourning the recent loss of my father. Now about the gluten problem. I just noticed new signs about two weeks ago when I would be eating lunch at work. Usually I had a sandwich (white or wheat), sometimes it was pasta. Almost immediately after I began eating, my stomach would develop a sour feeling - no other way to describe it other than an achey, upset, crampy, bloated feeling in my lower abdomen. The urge to go to the bathroom (though it was not always necessary), gassier than I've ever been in my life, I'd feel very drowsy and slow, and randomly my joints started hurting (knees, hips and ankles). At first I thought it might be excess stomach acid so I started taking Rolaids throughout the day and drank more water and had a snack in between breakfast and lunch. And the bad feelings would last so long I wouldn't have the appetite for dinner. I ruled out stomach acid, as I wasn't having heartburn or indigestion. In the mornings I usually have a bagel or two pieces of toast or something bready, since I don't have cereal anymore and never had time to make anything fancier than that. I've been eating bread my whole life so why all of a sudden does it bother me? But now I'm thinking that maybe I always had signs of it, but I was just treating those like they were the result of eating too much pizza or a big sandwich on a bagel and just thinking "oh my stomach just hurts because it's full". So I decided to try avoiding gluten for a period to see if I felt any better. During this time I moved back to school, and moved into a new apartment with my boyfriend. I did some research about what kind of foods to get, but here in this small college town, your two grocery options are either Walmart or Giant (and I'm on a tight college kid budget so I unfortunately chose Walmart). I thought I was pretty good about reading the labels and ingredients of things, but I wasn't as good as I thought because I still came back with bad stuff. And later after shopping for hours I was so hungry and slipped and got Chipotle (a big tortilla quesadilla to be exact) and got soo sick from it. So I think it's definitely an intolerance or a sensitivity. Could any experienced people here give me some advice? I'm also struggling on what to eat. I cut gluten out of my diet so abruptly, that I'm definitely experiencing withdrawal. I feel like a zombie. Always hungry, extremely low energy but not tired enough to sleep, unmotivated and frankly pretty depressed. Is this just what happens when someone makes a sudden change in diet? Will it go away? For lack of proper knowledge and optimal resources, all I've had to eat today was applesauce, a banana, some lemon yogurt, a small serving of brown rice and celery with cream cheese on them, and water. I'm sure my blood sugar is low, and I am depriving myself of the proper nutrients which is not what I want to do at all! I want to be happy, healthy and free of pain and discomfort. Please help!!
  14. Hello everyone, I have been on a gluten free diet for about 4 weeks now. I had originally went on this diet because I am having the same symptoms and someone that may have a gluten sensitivity bad headaches, feeling very fatigued, joint pain, depression, numbness and foggy brain I was to a point where I couldn't get the word out of my mouth that I was trying to say and that's the point where I really started to research some things. I went to a neurologist and had an M.R.I. done all came back negative the Dr. said there is nothing wrong with me. Quite frankly I cant believe this so I started doing my own research since I wasn't going to get help from that Dr. I do plan on getting a second opinion done here soon, But none the less frustrating. So I found that pretty much all the symptoms that describe a gluten sensitive individual is everything I felt as well, so I thought I might as well give this a shot. I started this diet 2 weeks in I noticed that the numbness went away for the most part the pain still lingered the foggy brain hasn't shown its ugly face still fatigued and still had the headaches. So now 4 weeks in the numbness and the pain has been coming back more frequently and the headaches are still around foggy brain is still gone for now. But as the numbness and pain intensify and start showing up more often now it kind of makes me think am I really having to do this diet, and for the record I am not one of those people that cheat diets nor thinks its okay to cheat a diet especially with this kind of health dependency. I have been very strict with this hence why the frustration with it seeming like its not helping so high. I have done my research on the hidden gluten what to look for etc I actually try to buy only certified gluten free foods that say on the packages. I mean if all I have to do is change my diet to a gluten free one and it changes my life for the better because of this i'm all on board not just half way. Some places I read 6 weeks others say 6 months before you start to add wheat back into your diet to see if it affects you in a negative way, of course only if you feel like its not working for you. I definitely don't want to do this to soon because any chance that this is helping me I would hate to ruin that. At first I thought it was helping me, But not so sure anymore. Any help advise words of encouragement opinions would be much appreciated please. Thank you so much guys to all of you for taking the time to read my story and help with what you can.
  15. Dr. Vikki Petersen D.C, C.C.N

    New Laboratory Tests for those with Gluten Intolerance

    Celiac.com 11/26/2012 - I speak to many people from across the country, and internationally, who contact me requesting help. The issues they face are summarized into three categories: individuals with celiac disease who do not have their disease under good control; those with gluten sensitivity who remain less than healthy despite their gluten-free diet; individuals, and this is a big one, who are convinced that they have a gluten problem, due to self experimentation, but who are unable to get any corroboration or support from their doctors. Having been immersed in this field for almost twenty years, it is frustrating not having a laboratory test that will reliably state whether someone has celiac disease or if gluten sensitivity has been ever present. The good news is that this situation has improved. It’s not perfect, but it’s better than it has been, and I wanted to share this data with you and those you care about. These newly available tests can have a big impact on those who need a diagnosis, as well as those who are already gluten-free but want to know why they are not enjoying the good health they desire. I have no affiliation with either of the labs I mention so there is no conflict of interest in my recommendations. The first lab, Cyrex Laboratories, is the newest lab specializing in gluten intolerance in the US. It currently offers four different profiles. There is a fifth one coming, hopefully very soon, that is also very exciting and a description of it follows. I will provide the data that the lab lists in their brochure for each test along with my personal opinion as to its benefit and use. Here at HealthNOW Medical Center we have been utilizing these tests for almost five months—the lab just opened in January after three years of research and passing governmental licensing requirements. Array 1: Gluten Sensitivity “This is a saliva test which is recommended for patients who: Are suspected of having mucosal abnormality Have relatives with celiac disease Have type 1 diabetes Have autoimmune thyroid disorder Have relatives with autoimmune disorders, especially, multiple sclerosis, diabetes and arthritis.” This is an easy screening test for those who wonder if they have gluten sensitivity or celiac disease based on their own symptoms or symptoms in their family. As a saliva test it’s very easy to perform (no blood draw is needed) and it’s the least expensive of all the tests offered. When utilizing saliva, a test is only as accurate as the strength of the salivary immune system. Due to this limitation, the lab also measures this as part of the panel. In the past, labs would not include this measurement, sometimes resulting in false negative results—something we all wish to avoid. Array 2: Intestinal Barrier Integrity Screen “Intestinal barrier integrity plays a vital role in the overall health and well-being of patients. This blood test is recommended for patients who: Have gut dysbiosis, which appears to be resistant to standard therapy Are suspected of having intestinal mucosal damage Complain of food allergy and intolerance Present multiple symptom complaints (including chronic fatigue syndrome) Suffer from abnormal immune cell count and function (including autoimmune diseases) May suffer from depression or neuroautoimmunity [including such conditions as: thyroid disease, arthritis, myocarditis, dermatitis, endocrinopathy, osteoarthritis and pernicious anemia] ” Healing a leaky gut is a very big part of regaining one’s health after a diagnosis of gluten intolerance. Gluten has caused damage to the lining of the small intestine and the presence of this damage is thought to be an initiator of the many “non-digestive” symptoms and diseases that are associated with gluten, including autoimmune disease. Prior to this test two substances have been traditionally used to measure a leaky gut: lactulose and mannitol. The disappointment of the test lay within the sensitivity, or I should say lack of sensitivity, to adequately diagnose subtle leakiness vs. gross leakiness such as that found in advanced celiac disease and complete villous atrophy. Much as an intestinal biopsy can miss the early and more subtle damage to the villi of the small intestine [its lining], so too does the lactulose/mannitol test seem to miss the more subtle changes in a leaky gut. This test will detect increased permeability through the cells that line the small intestine, as well as increased permeability between the cells. Clinically we use this test as a gauge of how we are progressing clinically rather than as a first tier diagnostic tool. There is no sense in measuring a leaky gut when it’s obviously there. But to prove that a clinical program is producing results or to perhaps show a less than compliant patient that their indiscretions are creating problem, this is an excellent test. Array 3: Comprehensive Gluten Sensitivity & Autoimmunity “To broaden the view of celiac disease and gluten sensitivity, our doctors can better diagnose the disorder by assessing antibody production against an array of protein, enzyme and peptide antigens. This blood test is recommended for patients who: Have gut dysbiosis—poor probiotic balance Are suspected of having intestinal mucosal damage—this means damage to the lining of the small intestine Complain of food allergies Complain of chemical hypersensitivity Present multiple symptom complaints (including chronic fatigue syndrome and Fibromyalgia) Suffer from abnormal immune cell count and function May suffer from depression or neuroautoimmunity [see below] Neuroautoimmune patients to consider: thyroid, arthritis, myocarditis, dermatitis, endocrinopathy, polyendocrinopathy, osteoarthritis and pernicious anemia” This panel is the broadly inclusive blood test designed to measure both celiac disease and gluten sensitivity. Because this test measures several aspects of the protein structure (rather than just the single protein fragment heretofore analyzed), we believe it will take many of the false negatives out of the picture—certainly a welcome change. Despite feeling better when removing gluten from their diets, patients like to confirm their own experience with a third party lab test. In the past, lab tests were so riddled with false negatives that we had to encourage patients not to discount their personal experience with a gluten-free diet, despite the absence of correlation with the lab test. This approach was not always successful and at times patients returned to gluten simply because they had no lab test to verify the truth. Inevitably they would return to us many months later, feeling worse than ever and ready to, once again, look at a gluten-free diet. This panel is more sensitive and specific than any we have had in the past, thereby reducing false negatives greatly. A patient does have to be consuming gluten for this profile to be accurate. Array 4: Gluten-Associated Cross-Reactive Foods Complete normalization of gut lesions is very rare in adult patients with celiac disease (8%), despite compliance with the gluten-free diet. This may be due to cross-reactions with an array of foods. This blood test is recommended for patients who: Have gluten sensitivity or celiac disease. Are non-responsive on a gluten-free diet—in other words don’t feel better. Have gut dysbiosis [not enough healthy bacteria and too many unhealthy ones], which appears to be resistant to standard therapy. Have an autoimmune disorder. This panel is very exciting and we are already seeing a dramatic impact on our patients. When one has eliminated gluten (and often dairy) from one’s diet, it obviously takes a big commitment. The last thing such a person might want to hear is that there are other foods they may also need to eliminate. Consider this: What if a temporary dietary change of eliminating foods that are confirmed as problematic on a laboratory test resulted in the difference between continued ill health and good health? Now, perhaps, it sounds like a good idea. That is exactly what we found in patients who were being extremely vigilant about their diet but still felt “glutenated” or just ill and the cause was not being found. Cross-reactive foods are foods with a protein structure similar to gluten’s that, upon ingestion, confuse one’s immune system into thinking that it has ingested gluten. The proteins are confused, one for another, and the reaction is as negative as if one has consumed gluten. This panel looks at twenty five possible foods (mostly in the grain and dairy families) to which one could be experiencing a cross-reactivity reaction. While it definitely takes a further commitment to confront more dietary change, our current patients consider it well worth it based on their health improvement. Finally, Array 5 that is not yet released, will focus on possible autoimmune reactions occurring from gluten. Autoimmune diseases can be “in the works” so to speak for well over a decade before the body experiences its first symptom. As the third leading cause of death in this country and with no known cure, any forewarning of autoimmune activity would be an excellent tool. This test provides another much needed tool for those patients who, although know they are gluten intolerant, cheat on their diet with seeming impunity—meaning they don’t feel any ill effects from having done so. Array 5 will be able to reveal what is occurring on a deeper level of the body such that the patient can see where gluten may be beginning to create autoimmune tendencies in certain organs or systems that he or she cannot feel. The second laboratory I want to mention is Enterolab. Although Enterolab is not new, they are unique. A few things make them different from all other labs I know about: You don’t have to work with a doctor to receive a lab test. Enterolab works directly with the patient on-line. They will send you a test kit after you have paid them and test results are emailed to the customer. Enterolab uses stool testing for their celiac and gluten sensitivity panels. They have a unique technology that allows them to test for these conditions even if the patient has not been eating gluten. They offer genetic testing as well as testing for other food intolerances. Once again, no doctor referral is required. I believe these tests offer benefit not only for those who need a diagnosis but also for those with a diagnosis who are not yet enjoying ideal health. I hope you found this informative. Please do feel free to contact me regarding any further questions that you may have. Our clinic, HealthNOW is a destination clinic and we treat patients from across the country as well as internationally. We are here to help. To your good health!
  16. Hi, everyone. My blood work was negative for Celiac last year, and I also had a biopsy done on my hand (palms) where I have an undiagnosed pustular psoriasis-like rash (and on the soles of my feet) and that was inconclusive for psoriasis AND DH. So I am still no further to finding out these health problems I have. I had an upper endoscopy but I don't think they took biopsies of my stomach or my duodenum. If they did, I never received a call with any results. Anyway, I'm going through a phase again of diarrhea (fluffy, weird cloud-like stools) of yellowish or light brown color most of the time, bloating, nausea and the newest issue is heart burn that is not relieved by Pepcid or Prevacid which is WEIRD for me. I have an old-ish prescription of Phenergan (from last year due to the severe nausea I had) and it's working well for my heartburn and bloating pain. I am starting to journal my food intake and I am noticing that whenever I eat something with obvious gluten I end up with this heart burn and bloating. My stomach was happy and fine when I woke up, I was up for about an hour then had breakfast. Mom made biscuits and eggs and I had an egg sandwich with one biscuit as the bread, and had a slice of American cheese on it. Within a half hour I noticed the bloating and burning way down low in my intestines, then less than 5 minutes after that I felt the heart burn appear. So I took a Phenergan. I'm feeling much better though right now it's not fully kicked in, so I still have a little bloating pain but it seems the heart burn is gone. Now here is some background: Feb 5, 2014 I quit drinking diet soda altogether. I had 3 that day by noon and around 1pm I refused to drink any more soda. I have only had water, orange juice, soy milk and 2 regular Cokes since then. I am drinking water all day with the occasional OJ for breakfast (4-8oz). About a week or so ago I noticed my PMLE (sun allergy) was horrible. It is now affecting my face first and foremost, my EYES, my arms which is typical for me but even indoors Incandescent bulbs are causing the rash on my face, and arms. That is not normal at all for me. I've been waking up with a rash all over my face, it's not super red or anything but it tends to itch. I am not noticing any swelling in my throat or anything like that. I do have rosacea and it's flared up big time on my left cheek, on the apple. Huge red blotch. So I put sunscreen (SPF 50) on my face today not long after I woke up. I have to wear my over-my-glasses sunglasses all day and until I go to sleep due to the brightness of the sun in our house, lightbulbs, TV, laptop screen cause me to have a migraine and my eyes sting and burn. I'm also having eye allergies so I've been using Zaditor which doenst work for the light sensitivity (which also causes stinging and burning) and I switched to Visine A.C. and it works better for now for the regular seasonal eye allergies. But the stinging/burning from light started prior to the eye allergies. So that is where I am at right now. I have to wear sunscreen whenever I go outside or am near a window. And even then the sunscreen doesn't seem to protect my face at all from developing the rash and the rosacea. The sunscreen is finally protecting my arms like it should but for some unknown reason it is not helping my face. So basically I am a hermit in my own home now. I am thinking I might go ahead and do the colonoscopy. But when I had the upper GI scope they didn't sedate me enough and wow it was a horrible experience to say the least. So I will tell the colonoscopy doctor and nurse that I was not sedated enough for the endoscopy I had in August (which was in Ohio, we moved to Nevada since then) so I hope they can seriously sedate me this time. I am lactose intolerant but do not have any issues with sliced cheese or sour cream that I have noticed. I can't eat cottage cheese, frozen yogurt, yogurt, milk, etc. Though I seem to be able to handle milk or cream in amounts I use for coffee every morning without having any issues. I have no known food allergies other than Kiwi and fresh pineapple. That causes burning on my lips and tongue but no systemic reactions as of last time I had those foods. If you can give any advice or anything please feel free to reply. I have a dermatologist appointment tomorrow to address the skin rash. I'm seriously thinking of going gluten-free but I live with my parents and they do not have gluten intolerances. Our kitchen would be full of gluten and skillets, pans, oven, toaster, pantry, etc would all be contaminated all the time. Thank you.
  17. Celiac.com 02/14/2014 - A 43-year-old UK mother of two, who turned up at a hospital complaining of severe stomach cramps, first thought she was suffering a case of "acute wheat intolerance," until doctors told her that she was in fact pregnant and in labor. The woman, Teresa Howard, had no idea that she was expecting the son she delivered just hours later. Because her sister is gluten-intolerant, and not realizing she was pregnant, the woman attributed what were clearly pregnancy-related stomach problems to adverse gluten reactions. Howard experienced standard symptoms with both of her prior pregnancies, and so thought she knew the standard things to look for. Until now, Howard says, she was one of those people who definitely wondered how any woman could fail to realize she was carrying a baby until she was actually delivering it. For her part, Howard said, she thought she had just gained some weight by over-snacking and being a bit sedentary, and had been working out to tone up in the weeks before giving birth. Source: Daily Mail
  18. Hey! So I'm kind of new to this, but have been lurking for a while, and have a couple of questions... For the past couple of years I'd been having issues with bloating and D (sorry), tiredness, anxiety and brain-fog, all of which got increasingly bad during last spring (to the point where I was feeling sick when eating, feeling shaky, uncoordinated and, a lot of the time, almost 'drunk' with brain-fog and lightheadedness). I went gluten-free about 2 months ago after lots of internet-browsing, and so far the bloating/D have disappeared, the anxiety and brain-fog have decreased, and I feel better within myself than I have for years! However, I'm still feeling very tired, and 'weird'. Yesterday and the day before, eg, I had just enough energy to slump around the house all day! Today I had a bit more energy (enough to go for a short cycle) but I'm still feeling quite light-headed, and it's still nowhere near the level of energy I should have. The whole summer has pretty much been a bit like this - I'm due to go back to uni in a couple of weeks, and am feeling a bit apprehensive about having enough energy to cope. I'm aware I've eaten gluten at least once (max. two times) since going gluten-free, which was definitely a bit of set-back. I haven't been diagnosed (and am really unwilling to go back to gluten for 6 weeks to take the test), so it's difficult to talk about with the doctor. I'm also a little worried because I have a friend who was recently diagnosed with Chronic Fatigue, and it's slightly disconcerting how similar my symptoms are to her's before she got really sick! So, I guess what I'm asking is; - Which symptoms did you find cleared up quickly, and which stuck around for a while? - How long did it take you to feel any difference from going gluten-free, and how long did it take you to feel completely better? - Is there any difference (in your experience/opinion) between Coeliac and Gluten Intolerance, in relation to the above two questions? - Any other tips/info/inside knowledge for a gluten-free newbie? Thanks guys! This forum's pretty much been my only source of real info so far, so I'm already pretty grateful.
  19. Celiac.com 02/14/2011 - In what may seem for some like an obvious finding, a team of Australian researchers has shown that people can suffer gluten intolerance without having celiac disease. Their study is published in The American Journal of Gastroenterology. I say obvious, because many in the celiac and surrounding community have long understood and accepted the concept of gluten-intolerance as distinct from celiac disease. Surprisingly, there has been very little scientific research to establish the existence of gluten-intolerance as distinct from celiac disease. That is changing, and the recent Australian study offers some support for gluten-intolerance as distinct from celiac disease. For their study, a team of researchers led by Peter Gibson, professor of medicine at Eastern Health Clinical School at Monash University in Australia, recruited 34 people with irritable bowel syndrome, but who were clinically proven to be free of celiac disease. All participants had previously benefited from a gluten-free diet. The 34 volunteers were all fed bread and muffins, half of which contained gluten, half of which were gluten-free. Nearly 70 per cent of the volunteers who ate the gluten reported pain, bloating, toilet problems and extreme tiredness. ''Gluten is indeed a trigger of gut symptoms and tiredness,'' the researchers concluded. Professor Gibson said: ''These symptoms have a big impact on quality of life. But conservative medicine has not been so good at dealing with this because we haven't had any evidence.'' A number of the volunteers had sought help from alternative health practitioners, a fact that impaired recruitment of volunteers, as many of these folks had adopted a gluten-free diet without proving or disproving celiac disease via colonoscopy and biopsy. It was important for the team to exclude celiac disease for several reasons, including the fact that although it was safe to use gluten to test people who may have an intolerance, it could harm people with celiac disease. "If you go back on gluten while you have celiac disease - even if you only eat a few pieces of bread - you will damage your body and undo many months of healing," Professor Gibson said. For that reason, and also to prove gluten intolerance alone was the symptom cause, the team recruited people clinically proven to be free of celiac disease, and who were already on gluten-free diets. For those patients with irritable bowel syndrome, excluding celiac disease, who were symptomatically controlled on a gluten-free diet, the team crafted a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled re-challenge trial. Participants received either gluten or placebo in the form of two bread slices plus one muffin per day with a gluten-free diet for up to 6 weeks. The team evaluated symptoms using a visual analog scale and markers of intestinal inflammation, injury, and immune activation monitoring. A total of 4 men and 30 women between the ages of 29–59-years old completed the study as per protocol. Overall, 56% showed human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DQ2 and/or HLA-DQ8. Adherence to diet and supplements was very high. Of 19 patients (68%) in the gluten-consuming group, 13 reported that symptoms were not adequately controlled compared with 6 of 15 (40%) on placebo (P=0.0001; generalized estimating equation). On a visual analog scale, patients were significantly worse within one week of consuming gluten for overall symptoms (P=0.047), pain (P=0.016), bloating (P=0.031), satisfaction with stool consistency (P=0.024), and tiredness (P=0.001). In no cases did gluten-consumption trigger anti-gliadin antibodies. Moreover, there where were no significant changes in fecal lactoferrin, levels of celiac antibodies, highly sensitive C-reactive protein, or intestinal permeability. There were no differences in any end point in individuals with the DQ2/DQ8 and those without. Gibson calls the general lack of research into gluten intolerance "almost unbelievable." He plans to now investigate the prevalence of non-celiac gluten intolerance, why it occurs and whether low levels of gluten can be eaten safely. Source: American Journal of Gastroenterology: 11 January 2011. doi: 10.1038/ajg.2010.487
  20. I need help and don't know what to do next. I have been tested for allergies and came back positive for milk, wheat, peanut and egg allergies. On a scale of 0-5 (5 being worst)wheat is a 2. The other allergies are 2 or below as well. Wheat is the only one I have reactions to. When I eat wheat I get migranes, joint pain in knees, elbows, and ankles, I feel tired and weak, within the past 3 months I have started to get stomach cramps that last for days and blood in my stool, sometimes so much it looks like I've gotten my period. I even get the rash that is common with gluten intolerance dermatitis herpetiformis. To me this seems a little more serious than an allergy. I had a blood test for celiacs and it was negative. I wasn't eating gluten at the time and I hear that can give a false negative. All my doctors say it's just an allergy and they couldn't even diagnose my rash I had to look it up online. It's definately what I have when I don't eat wheat it disappears. Should I insist on further testing?
  21. Hi guys, I'm new here and just wanted some advice. I'm gluten intolerant (pretty sure I've been all my life but it only became apparent until it got really bad at the beginning of last year). I had colic when i was a baby (don't know if this is a connection), I've had keratosis pilaris since i was 5 (it progessively got worse and spread all across my entire body) and constipation for as long as I can remember. I'm now 19 and I've had severe constipaton for about 2 years (go less than once a week and it's painful) i have an ENORMOUS amount of gas and get really bloated to the point that I'm on the floor in pain because my stomach is so huge and I only get some relief if I'm able to release some gas. I've also recently started noticing undigested food particles and I've just started developing eczema. I've got chronic fatigue syndrome and a hormone imbalance and a range of nutritional deficiencies. I've had the blood test for celiac disease twice, but both times it comes back negative for the celiac antibodies but i have a high C-reactive protein. Going gluten free has in no way cured me, and I find that i only get some relief when I don't eat starchy or sugary things. Basically what I'm wondering is whether I should be on the Specific Carbohydrate Diet (normal/advanced) or the GAPS diet? I have no clue and my doctor is extremely unhelpful! Everything I'm reading is relating to celiac disease and diarrhoea, but nothing talks about constipation. If I do either diet, am i still supposed to cook the veges etc or should I be having it raw so there's more fibre? Any advice would be much appreciated!!!
  22. Hi everyone, I am brand new here and I have a couple of questions. I think that my daughter and I have either celiac, or gluten intolerance of some sort. I am 30 years old and she is 7. Here are our issues - Me - hypothyroid weight gain irritability sadness/emotional extreme gluten and sugar cravings arthritis stress fractures many, many spine problems including completely dessicated discs and broken vertabrae with no known cause joint, bone, and muscle pain various intenstinal problems bleeding ulcer vertigo depression panic attacks memory issues brain fog acid reflux blood clots frequent migraines strange allergic reactions VERY FREQUENT illnesses and infections - This last year alone I have had the flu around 10 times, bronchitis, pink eye, severe sinus infection, numerous skin, tooth, and wound infections, several colds, and I even had MRSA and I'm sure I have forgotten some things my daughter - mood issues panic attacks discolored teeth despite good dental health routines breathing issues constant cravings for food, especially gluten containing food memory issues heart problems and low oxygen saturation We eat healthy most of the time, are pretty active, spend a lot of time outside and generally live a heathy lifestyle. I feel like I am falling apart here. I don't have the money to go in and get tested but I would imagine if we went gluten free for a while and most of the symptoms disappear that would pretty much answer my question. How long does it take to see symptom improvement? Does this sound like a gluten issue to you? Thanks so much for reading....
  23. Hi all, My first post here. First, I tested negative for Celiac Disease. I do think, however, that I am sensitive to gluten nonetheless. I have little to no G.I. symptoms. All of my symptoms are neurologically based. The main ones are... -Horrible brain fog (this is the main symptom) -Occasional migraine-like headaches -Fatigue -Dysautonomia (chronic orthostatic hypotension) -Loss of hunger (when its really bad) -Dizziness I've decided to start on an elimination diet and eat plain rice for a week or so. Then hopefully I'll see some improvement. I'm just wondering if anyone else out there has experienced a similar set of symptoms and could tell me their story. I'm wondering if this is 100% curable and how long it might take to get appreciably better. Thanks for your time and consideration.
  24. Hi all, I was diagnosed with a gluten intolerance this past fall (positive serology, but inconclusive biopsy), and I have been on a gluten free diet ever since. All was fine until I recently began to react a lot more severely when exposed to gluten, I went from have the "regular stomach issues" to having such extreme stomach pains/cramps that I nearly called for an ambulance. In addition I will have something that looks like acne all over my face for the following 7-10 days. I will also get extremely fatigued for several days following, as well as lightheaded. I also appear to react to much smaller quantities of gluten, initially I would be fine eating something that was prepared on the same surface as something that contained gluten, but now cross-contamination is a big problem. More recently I have also begun to suffer from itchy skin and throat, which is why I was referred to see an allergy specialist, where it was determined that I do not have any food allergies. Now it appears that I might have some issue with my mast cells, I found out today that I have Dermatographic urticaria, and I am being tested now to see if this somehow correlates to my increased stomach pains. Has anyone had a similar experience? Is there a correlation between gluten sensitivity and a possible mast cell disorder? Is it possible that I my gluten intolerance has been just "hiding" a mast cell issue? I obviously don't expect anyone to have any concrete answers on the issue, but from what I can make of it, there does not appear to be a whole lot of information about this out there... which is why any personal experience on the issue would be appreciated Thanks!
  25. From the UK Daily Mail, after the ridiculous story in the Daily Beast earlier this week, "When Going Gluten Free is Dangerous" http://www.thedailyb...angerous.html�� comes yet another one of these slams on the necessity of a gluten free diet for those with gluten intolerance, even if one has not been formally diagnosed with celiac disease, claiming that it is the equivalent of an eating disorder. The Daily Mail conveniently quotes a Daily Beast story with the same theme. link: "Are gluten free dieters just hiding an eating disorder ? How self diagnosis of serious food allergy can help take diet to extremes" 1/28/2013 by Sadie Whitelocks http://www.dailymail...t-extremes.html This Dr Mark Borigini was also quoted in the earlier Daily Beast as a writer for Psychology Today. I looked up "Dr Mark Borigini" to see what his field of practice is, and he is - get this - indeed trained in rheumatology. He is listed online in medical doctor directories as that being his practice field. Not only that, but he has published online articles which quote him as an expert on addiction, has worked for the Veterans Administration in southern CA, and currently works for the NIH - National Institute of Health via the National Institute of Arthritis. I'm sure that there could be a reason a Federal government employee of the American VA (that's the Dept of Defense wing which also runs the veteran's medical care) and NIH, who specializes in rheumatology is getting quoted as an expert in celiac and gluten intolerance diet necessity, and spreading misinformation, in the British tabloid media the same week that Daily Beast ran their hit piece, but it would be speculation to ask why, wouldn't it, other than the publisher of Daily Beast is also Tina Brown ? The Daily Mail quotes the Daily Beast about a woman who went gluten free without being tested by a doctor: (bolding mine.) Obviously, one is supposed to then conclude, according to the Daily Mail and Daily Beast, that it could be up to 80% of Americans are fad dieting when they eat gluten free. And here we come to the heart of the matter: The FDA has yet to release the new regulations. And certainly everyone wants to get the last word in on that, whether or not it's a good word or a sort of "neeyah, we don't really need this anyway, since the majority of gluten free eaters could be merely neurotic people trying to lose weight."
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