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Found 68 results

  1. Celiac.com 12/17/2012 - On Friday, December 7th, 2012, KQED public radio hosted an hour-long program on celiac disease and gluten-sensitivity called: Going Gluten-free. The program was part of the regular KQED program, Forum, and was hosted by veteran KQED personality Dave Iverson. KQED has the largest listener audience of any public radio station in the nation, so this presents a welcome opportunity to spread awareness of celiac disease, gluten-intolerance, and gluten-free issues to a wide audience. KQED's tagline for the show was: If you're gluten-free, going to the grocery store used to mean spending hours reading labels to avoid anything with wheat, barley or other grains. But with the rising number of people with celiac disease and gluten intolerance, more stores and restaurants are offering gluten-free foods. We'll discuss the rise of gluten-free diets. The guests for the one-hour program were: Dr. Neilsen Fernandez-Becker, associate director of the Celiac Management Clinic at the Stanford School of Medicine Jefferson Adams, writer at Celiac.com Melinda Dennis, dietician and nutrition coordinator with the Celiac Center at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, sufferer from celiac disease, and co-author of "Real Life with Celiac Disease: Troubleshooting and Thriving Gluten-Free" Sadie Scheffer, owner and founder of BreadSRSLY.com, which delivers gluten-free breads around San Francisco. You can listen to an archive of the broadcast at KQED.com.
  2. IMMCO Diagnostics serves the entire US and is located in Buffalo, NY. Their phone number is 800-537-TEST. IMMCO sends specimen collection kits free of charge to doctors, clinics, etc. nationwide. When the sample is taken, the doctor places it in the appropriate tube, seals it, and returns it either by business reply mail or FedEx. Results are generated within 24 hours of receipt. Each collection kit includes a Test Request Form which lists the entire catalog of tests and a Fee Schedule. IMMCO was established in 1971. The staff prides itself on depth of knowledge and expertise in this field. Most of the tests have been established on the basis of original research, and IMMCO continues to invest a great deal of its resources in R&D. President, Dr. Vijay Kumar, is one of the foremost experts in autoimmunity. Kevin Lawson can supply more information about the company. They have newsletters and technical information available for interested parties, and, of course, are eager to supply interested doctors with collection kits. You can contact him at: IMMTEST@AOL.COM IMMCO Diagnostics, Inc., Specializing in Autoimmune Disease Diagnosis.
  3. Hi. I have recently realized I am gluten intolerant. I do not believe I have Celica's b/c I had no symptoms previously and I absorb food just fine. However, gluten now gives me a painful arthritic flu as well as triggers asthma. By the way, something like 1/2 of asthmatics have food allergies with wheat being one of the big ones. Although I'm not allergic, but intolerant. It's all related though imo. I wanted to share a few things I've done that help in the hopes they will aid others here. I haven't seen them mentioned and I came to them more through my history of asthma and adrenal insufficiency than from the Celiac/GI side of things. I have been on a low carb low sugar low gluten diet for years because I'm prediabetic from all the steroids used to treat the asthma. When I eat what I call 'stupid carbs' I have learned to mitigated the 'carb hangover' by taking Alpha Lipoic Acid in high doses. This is a neat anti-oxidant because it is both fat and water soluble and thus can enter our cells at twice the rate. This cuts the carb hangover by about 60-70% (for me at least, your mileage may vary). Over the last year though, I've developed a rash (eczema) and have had some flashes of joint pain after consuming carbs. Nothing serious and I wasn't too worried about it since I was rather busy having an adrenal crisis and recovering from that. Now, looking back, I believe this was the gluten intolerance showing its face. Then last week, I ate a bunch of stupid carbs (a situation brought about by an empty fridge on grocery shopping day) and ran out of Alpha Lipic Acid. For the first time in years, I got the full bore gluten flu. OMG. It was horrific and sidelined me for more than a week. I spent a lot of time goolging how to recover and reading Celiac websites. No one mentioned using 'nutraceuticals' to assist in recovery from gluten exposure. I don't know if there's a reason for that or not, but I do want to encourage folks to look into this avenue of possible help. Alpha Lipoic Acid has great anti-inflammatory effects. I've used it orally for years and this past year started getting it via IV from an Integrative MD who specializes in alternative therapies. I buy it at Vitamin World which often has buy 1 get 1/2 off the second bottle or get the second for a penny. There are different forms of ALA and you need to the R form if you want to try it. A great place to research vitamins is ConsumerLabs.com (although you do have to pay, it's not free.). My other suggestion for those of you battling with doctors is to look for Integrative or Functional Medicine MDs. I think they are much more attuned to situation like yours--they are not as quick to ignore patient experience ime. Nutritional IVs may also speed up healing once you've gone gluten free. Sometimes these docs are independent and don't take insurance, but it's not completely unaffordable. You'll pay $199 for the first office visit and between $100-250 for each IV. This area of medicine also has a better understanding of nutrition and uses it as a treatment a lot. Last, for the heart burn...I am a GERD girl. It runs in my family big time. I have had great luck with digestive enzymes from the Integrative MD.However, I don't think my digestive enzymes are gluten free, so you'd really want to talk to a doc who uses them and who can figure out which ones are safe for you. It's cheaper than Prilosec and there are all sorts of ancillary health benefits from using them. Thanks for all the info you have posted here. I am reading it avidly and I hope my post offers some help to you. M
  4. Celiac.com 12/23/2011 - A research team recently sought to figure out the basic level of awareness of celiac disease and gluten sensitivity among the general public and trained and untrained chefs, and to compare dining habits of people with celiac disease and gluten-sensitivity to those of the general public. In face-to-face interviews, and via internet survey, researchers asked people about their knowledge of celiac disease and gluten sensitivity. They also asked people with celiac disease and gluten sensitivity about their dining habits, in addition to asking chefs about their levels of training and education. In all, the researchers surveyed 861 persons from the general public. They found that 47% had heard of celiac disease, 67% had heard of gluten sensitivity, and 88% had heard about peanut allergy. They surveyed 790 people with either celiac disease (82%, n=646), or gluten sensitivity (18% n=144). The vast majority of respondents to the study were female, making up 83% of those with celiac disease, and 90% of those with gluten sensitivity. Those with celiac disease and gluten sensitivity were older than the general public respondents, 57% of the patients were over 45 years of age compared with just 32% of the general public respondents (p< 0.0001). The 200 chefs who were surveyed showed a much higher awareness of celiac disease, with 77% of chefs having heard about celiac disease compared to less than half of the general population. Interestingly, many more people in both groups had heard of gluten sensitivity, with 89% for chefs, and 67% for the general population, respectively. Still, the chefs, like the general public, had a tendency to underestimate celiac disease was underestimated by both chefs (56%) and the general public (69%) while peanut allergy was overestimated by 55% of the general public and 60% of chefs. People with celiac disease may not be surprised to learn that a large majority, 63% of the 790 following a gluten-free diet reported avoiding restaurants more, and eating take-out food much less often than the general public. One important finding was that the level of training had a great deal of impact on a chef's knowledge of celiac disease. Overall, trained chefs were much more likely to be familiar with celiac disease compared with untrained chefs (83% vs. 52%) Also, there was a direct connection between the average price of a meal and the likelihood that the chef was familiar with gluten-free concerns. The more expensive the restaurant, the more likely the chef was familiar with celiac disease and gluten-free concerns. Restaurants with an average check below $25 had a 64% rate of awareness, while the rate for restaurants with a check over $65 had a 94% awareness of gluten-free concerns (p<0.0001). In general, the survey team was impressed by what they saw as a fairly high degree of awareness of gluten-related concerns. Interestingly, both trained and untrained chefs were more likely to have heard of gluten sensitivity than of celiac disease. Most people with celiac disease avoid restaurants, and eat out the home far less often than the general public. Still, many do eat out, and they do so by making sure they get their needs met. The simple take away is that chefs are generally pretty aware of gluten-intolerance and celiac disease, and that chefs with better training and higher-end restaurants are more likely to deliver a gluten-free dining experience. As always, communication goes a long way toward ensuring a pleasant and successful restaurant experience for anyone with celiac disease. Knowing your needs, sharing your concerns, and asking your server and/or chef about their gluten-free options and preparation methods can go a long way toward a smooth gluten-free dining experience. Source: http://www.journals.elsevierhealth.com/periodicals/yeclnm/article/PIIS1751499111000527/fulltext
  5. Celiac.com 11/16/2011 - Researchers still don't know very much about the natural history of celiac disease and whether it may increase or decrease in prevalence over time. A research team recently set out to determine whether loss of tolerance to gluten may develop at any age, to investigate possible long-term changes in celiac disease prevalence, and to better understand other celiac-related issues. The research team consisted of C. Catassi, D. Kryszak, B. Bhatti, C. Sturgeon, K. Helzlsouer, S. L. Clipp, D. Gelfond, E. Puppa, A. Sferruzza, A. Fasano. They are affiliated with the Center for Celiac Research and Mucosal Biology Research Center at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore. The team analyzed 3,511 subjects with matched samples from 1974 (CLUE I) and 1989 (CLUE II). For their study, the team chose and followed 3,511 subjects from two large groups of more than 20,000 Americans aged 13-80 in 1974 and 1989. To see if there was an observable change in rates of celiac disease among the subjects over time, they took blood samples in 1974 and again 15 years later in 1989. They gave follow-up questionnaires to the subjects every 2 or 3 years from 1996 to 2007 to compile health status updates on the participants. Researchers conducted antibody testing on the blood samples. These tests showed just seven subjects with antibodies specific to celiac disease in 1974, for a disease rate of 1 in 501 subjects. By 1989, nine more samples showed markers for celiac disease, for a rate of 1 in 219 subjects; more than double the 1974 rate. The study also looked at another 804 samples from subjects who died after the 1974 survey and found two more likely cases of celiac disease. To counter any selection bias regarding survival, the team also assessed 840 CLUE I participants who died after the 1974 survey. Since the individuals who provided the original samples did not undergo biopsy, and thus cases of celiac disease remain unconfirmed. Also, the study sample was not nationally representative by age, race, and gender, which may also have impacted the findings. The researchers state that this increase may be partly due to increased awareness of the disease. Still, many cases continue to go undiagnosed. In fact, only 11% of the study subjects who had celiac disease-specific antibodies in both the 1974 and 1989 surveys had actually been clinically diagnosed with the disease by their doctors. Also, the study found two subjects in their 50s who tested negative in 1974, but positive in 1989, when in their 60s. This indicates that the disease can strike at any age. This finding is supported by a study from Finland that found that celiac disease was more common among the elderly. Source: Ann Med. 2010 Oct;42(7):530-8.
  6. Celiac.com 03/09/2010 - Celiac disease is a vastly growing epidemic. Those suffering from celiac have varying levels of difficulty digesting wheat, rye and barley; as celiac primarily affects the small bowel and is considered to be an autoimmune intestinal disorder. However, compounding new evidence sited in the March 2010 edition of the The Lancet Neurology, suggests that celiac disease also affects the nervous system, indicating a wider systemic disorder than previously thought. Thanks to modern science and years of testing, many neurological disorders are now being directly associated with gluten intolerance. The most common associations have been demonstrated to be, cerebellar ataxia and peripheral neuropathy. Although gluten has also been shown to impact drug resistant epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, dementia, and stiff-man syndrome among others. To accurately determine the effects gluten has on neurological health, testing by Hadjivassiliou and colleagues was done in three areas: serology, genetics, and clinical response to gluten withdrawal. As far as serological tests are concerned, IgG antibodies to gliadin (AGA) have long been considered the most accurate indicators of neurological gluten sensitivity. However, researchers are now finding that IgG AGA is no longer a relevant test for gluten sensitivity, and it is now being replaced with more dependable tests. In fact, researchers recently became aware of IgG DGP AGA as an nearly absolute marker for the connection between gluten sensitivity and celiac disease. Initial data also indicates that TG6 are markers for gluten sensitivity, while TG3 appears to be markers for dermatitis herpetiformis. Additionally, IgA antibodies to TG2, if they are detectable in the intestine, have also been shown to effectively connect neurological disease with gluten intolerance. Genetics is another important correlation between gluten intolerance and neurological disorders. Clinically speaking, the recognition of HLA DQ2 combined with a positive serology, increases the probability that gluten plays a roll in the manifestation of neurological pathogenesis. Evaluating gluten withdrawal is crucial when establishing the gluten/neurological abnormalities connection. The link has been clearly noted in patients newly diagnosed with cerebellar ataxia or peripheral neuropathy. After establishing a gluten-free diet, the patients showed considerable improvement of their neurological symptoms. However, patients that had neurological symptoms lasting longer than 12 months, did not typically show signs of neurological improvement once a gluten-free diet was initiated. The reason for this is thought to be a result of irreversible neural cell damage, such as a loss of Purkinje cells accompanied by prominent T-lymphocyte, as seen in patients with ataxia. While the findings of these studies indicated that gluten is a major factor associated with neurological disorders, further studies are needed to show conclusive evidence of the direct correlation between the two. Such findings may provide the key to determining if autoimmunity is fundamental in evoking gluten-sensitive neurological impairment. Source: The Lancet Neurology, Volume 9, Issue 3, Pages 233 - 235, March 2010
  7. Please note that this study has no biopsy confirmation, so it can only be called gluten intolerance statistics. Its findings indicate that gluten intolerance may be relatively common in the general population. AU - Arnason JA ; Gudjonsson H ; Freysdottir J ; Jonsdottir I ; Valdimarsson H TI - Do Adults with High Gliadin Antibody Concentrations have Subclinical Gluten Intolerance? LA - Eng AD - Department of Immunology, National University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland. SO - Gut 1992 Feb;33(2):194-7 AB - Gliadin antibodies of the IgG and IgA isotopes and IgG subclasses were measured in 200 adults who were randomly selected from the Icelandic National Register. Those with the highest gliadin antibody concentrations were invited with negative controls to participate in a clinical evaluation. Neither the study subjects nor the physicians who recorded and evaluated the clinical findings were aware of the antibody levels. Significantly higher proportion of the gliadin antibody positive individuals reported unexplained attacks of diarrhea (p = 0.03), and IgA gliadin antibodies were associated with increased prevalence of chronic fatigue (p = 0.0037). The gliadin antibody positive group also showed significantly decreased transferrin saturation, mean corpuscular volume and mean corpuscular hemoglobin compared with the gliadin antibody negative controls. Serum folic acid concentrations were significantly lower in the IgA gliadin antibody positive individuals. On blind global assessment, 15 of the 48 participants were thought to have clinical and laboratory features that are compatible with gluten sensitive enteropathy, and 14 of these were in the gliadin antibody positive group (p = 0.013). Complaints that have not been associated with gluten intolerance had similar prevalence in both groups with the exception of persistent or recurrent headaches that were more common in the gliadin antibody positive group. These findings raise the possibility that a sub-clinical form of gluten intolerance may be relatively common. The following chart summarizes the study: No. Randomly Selected for Study No. Selected w/ High Gliadin No. w/ Gluten Sensitive Enteropathy No. w/ GSE & High Gliadin 200 ( = 100%) 48 ( = 24%) 15 ( = 7.5%) 14 ( = 7%)
  8. Celiac.com 03/22/2010 - The main cause for gluten intolerance continues to puzzle scientists, but pathogenesis theories include both genetic susceptibility and environmental triggers, like a virus or infection. For the first time, scientists working with the Academy of Finland’s Research Program on Nutrition, Food, and Health have found genes in the body that are associated both with the immune system and with the body's ability to properly digest gluten in the intestinal tract. Gluten intolerance arises from an autoimmune reaction in the small intestine to the gluten protein found in wheat, barley and rye. Academy Research Fellow Paivi Saavalainen, a veteran researcher in hereditary risk factors for gluten intolerance, says that "some of the genes we have identified are linked with human immune defense against viruses. This may indicate that virus infections may be connected in some way with the onset of gluten intolerance.” Data shows that rates of celiac disease in America have increased more than 400% since World War II. Meanwhile, a Finnish scientist internationally known for his gluten research says that the number of people in Finland who suffer from gluten intolerance has doubled over the last two decades. Since the early 1980s, the percentage of Finns with gluten intolerance has risen from about 1 percent of adults to about 2 percent, according to Professor Markku Mäki, head of a research project in the Academy of Finland's Research Program on Nutrition, Food and Health. "We've already seen a similar trend emerge earlier on where allergies and certain autoimmune disorders are concerned. Screening has shown that gluten intolerance occurs in 1.5 per cent of Finnish children and 2.7 per cent of the elderly. The higher figure for older people is explained by the fact that the condition becomes more frequent with age," says Mäki. For the immune study, when researchers scanned the genetic maps of more than 9400 celiac patients, they found areas of immune system disturbance. Their evidence also indicated that genes connected with the inability to digest gluten were also connected with other autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis. Saavalainen and his team have succeeded in localizing risk genes in both individual patients and entire families, which adds weight to the notion that gluten intolerance is inherited. The researchers are hoping to use the genetic information to craft better screening tests for gluten intolerance, as up to 75% of people with gluten intolerance remain undiagnosed due to mild or atypical symptoms, and many with condition may unwittingly suffer damage to their intestinal villi. Professor Maki points out that many present first with iron deficient, or folic acid deficient, anemia. Source: Academy of Finland
  9. The following is from a talk given at the Gluten Intolerance Group Annual Educational Seminar on April 1, 1995 by Dr. Alessio Fasano, Pediatric Gastroenterologist, University of Maryland School of Medicine which was also reported in the May 1995 issue of the GIG Newsletter. The findings of these experts indicate that the incidence of celiac disease in the general population could be as high as 1 in 300-500 people when one takes into account all forms of the disease. Here is a report of the meeting: The question which was brought up was How prevalent is celiac disease?. Although there is much data on the incidence of celiac disease that has been collected in Europe, there is almost no data from the United States. After compiling data on the incidence of celiac disease in Europe, something very unusual was noticed. Two cities in Europe - Malmo, Sweden and Copenhagen, Denmark, which lie only 20 miles apart, seem to have a large difference in the incidence of celiac disease. In Malmo, the incidence was 1 in 500 people, which is quite high, while in Copenhagen it was 1 out of 11,000, which is much lower. Keep in mind that these figures represent only those patients whose celiac disease had been clinically diagnosed by a small intestinal biopsy. There are three major ways in which celiac disease presents itself in patients. The first are the asymptomatic patients who have no symptoms whatsoever, but exhibit damage to their small intestines upon examination. The second are patients with the latent form which means they have blood-tested positive for celiac disease, nut no tissue damage has occurred yet. This form will later develop into the typical or atypical forms. The third is the typical presentation, which shows up when the patient is between 6 and 18 months old. These patients develop the classic symptoms: diarrhea, fatty stools, lack of weight gain, irritability and anorexia. Typical presentations of celiac disease are rather rare in comparison to the other forms, which leads to the overall under-diagnosis of celiac disease, and is illustrated by the following statistics: Clinical Presentation Cumulative Prevalence Classical (Typical) Form 1 in 2500 Atypical - Late Onset Form 1 in 1500 Asymptomatic Form 1 in 1000 Latent Form (celiac disease Associated with other Diseases) 1 in 300-500* *Researchers in Italy have reached the conclusion that the incidence of celiac disease would be more like 1 person with celiac sprue for every 300 to 500 in the general population, when looking at all forms of the disease. Serological screening using anti-gliadin and anti-endomysial antibodies allows doctors to obtain a much more accurate picture of the actual number of people affected by celiac disease. In Europe, for example, researchers have found a much higher incidence of celiac disease than expected (1 in 300!), and it is spread uniformly throughout the population. Researchers re-tested the cities of Malmo and Copenhagen and found the incidence in Copenhagen to be 1 in 300. The difference between the two cities is in the clinical presentation of the disease. In Denmark there were more people who exhibited symptoms of osteoporosis, dermatitis herpetiformis, short stature and other atypical presentations. The awareness of physicians that these presentations could be celiac disease was very low. The discussion then turned to the United States: The next question discussed at the meeting was: What is the true incidence of celiac disease in the United States? The researchers believe that the recently discovered antibody markers will help in answering this question. According to them, we should soon be able to tell whether the low estimates for celiac disease in the US are fact, or if atypical presentations of celiac disease have been overlooked, thus resulting in the extraordinary low level of diagnosed celiacs. A study conducted at the University of Maryland looked at 159 children with atypical symptoms (short stature, poor weight gain, chronic diarrhea, abdominal pain, asymptomatic relatives of celiacs). The following chart summarizes the study: Study: 159 Children With Atypical Symptoms* Symptom Group No. Screened Positive Screen Negative Screen Short stature 78 7 71 Poor weight gain 21 6 15 Chronic diarrhea 17 1 16 Abdominal Pain 8 1 7 Asymptomatic 35 2 33 *Please keep in mind that this study was not based on a random cross-section of the population, but, rather on children who already exhibited atypical symptoms. It is crucial to make the correct diagnosis, and to keep even asymptomatic people free of gluten . This is due to the associated morbidity, such as chronic ill health. With regard to the pediatric population, permanent stunted growth may result from a misdiagnosis. If the physicians fail to make a timely diagnosis, there is no time for catch-up growth, and the individual may be short forever. The same is true with skeletal disorders such as osteoporosis. Everyone with celiac sprue who experiences osteoporosis must place a certain amount of blame on the physician for not diagnosing celiac disease in time to prevent such demineralization.
  10. The Gluten Intolerance Group of North America, also known as GIG, is a 501©(3) non-profit organization funded by private donations including the Combined Federal Campaign, United Way Designated Giving, Employer Matching Funds; proceeds from memberships, the sale of products and our educational resources. We rely on your contributions, which are tax deductible. 85% or more of our revenue is used to support our programs. GIG is at the forefront of innovative action and is respected globally as a powerful leader in the celiac community. GIGs volunteers, staff, and Board are knowledgeable and our materials and resources are credible. Our Mission is to provide support to persons with gluten intolerances, including celiac disease, dermatitis herpetiformis, and other gluten sensitivities, in order to live healthy lives. GIG Branches help to fulfill GIGs mission on a local and regional level through programs tailored to their community. GIG VISION The vision of the Gluten Intolerance Group of North America is one of mutual support, acceptance, and respect for all persons living with gluten intolerances and working with this community. GIG envisions a united gluten intolerant community in which all persons feel they are healthy, are positively nurtured to live life to the fullest, and are involved and contributing citizens. GIG PROGRAMS FULFILLING THE MISSION GIG fulfills its mission of supporting persons living with gluten intolerances through programs directed to consumers, health professionals and the public. GIGR programs provide: Support and education Awareness and advocacy Research awareness and support GIG is dedicated to providing accurate, scientific, evidence-based information. Cynthia Kupper, RD, celiac disease, Executive Director 31214 - 124 Ave SE Auburn WA 98092 Phone: 253-833-6655 Fax: 253-833-6675 Web sites: www.gluten.net; www.GFCO.org; www.GlutenFreeRestaurants.org Email: info@GLUTEN.net
  11. The Gluten Intolerance Group (G.I.G.) produces an excellent news letter. Their address is: The Gluten Intolerance Group of North America, Contact: Cynthia Kupper, C.R.D., C.D.E 15110 - 10 Ave SW, Suite A Seattle WA 98166-1820 Phone: 206-246-6652, Fax: 206-246-6531 Email: gig@accessone.com
  12. TI- Klinika nietolerancji biaLek mleka krowiego i glutenu u dzieci. AU- Kaczmarski M JN- Pol Tyg Lek; 44 (4) p86-8 PY- Jan 23 1989 AB- In two comparative groups of 50 children with cow milk proteins and 45 children with gluten intolerance retrospective analysis of initial symptoms was carried out. The initial symptoms of intolerance included: vomiting, loss of appetite, recurrent diarrhea, and weight gain disorders. These symptoms closely correlated with the type of nutrition (mixed, artificial) and the duration of exposition to harmful component of the food. The symptoms appeared within first days after birth with peak intensity in 6-8 weeks of life in the group with cow milk proteins intolerance. The symptoms of intolerance were most frequent in children of group II in 7-12 months of life. To prevent food intolerance in Polish children, it is recommended to feed them naturally as long as possible and to introduce flour and 4 basic grains late (after the 6th months of life).
  13. TI- Proba prowokacyjna u dzieci z nietolerancja biaLek mleka krowiego i glutenu: ocena reakcji klinicznych i zmian w bLonie sluzowej jelita cienkiego. AU- Kaczmarski M CS- Kliniki Chorob Zakaznych Dzieci AM w BiaLymstoku. JN- Pol Tyg Lek; 45 (8-9) p161-5 PY- Feb 19-26 1990 AB- Provocation test (re-introduction of the noxious protein) was carried out in two groups of patients: (a) with intolerance to the cow-milk proteins (41 children) treated with milk-free diet for 6-24 months, and ( with gluten intolerance (26 children) treated with gluten-free diet for 6-36 months. The following parameters were compared: type and frequency of the clinical symptoms seen in these patients prior to the introduction of allergen-free diet. Moreover, the type of observed morphological changes in the small intestine mucosa following provocation test were analyzed in the groups of 7 patients. A two-year elimination of milk from the diet produces milk tolerance in about 61% patients; clinical symptoms in the remaining children are diversified. Re-introduction of gluten with the diet (provocation test) produces recurrence of gluten intolerance in 96% of children treated with gluten-free diet for 2-3 years. Recurrence of the disease was accompanied by the atrophy of the intestinal villi.
  14. TI- The Contribution of Some Constitutional Factors (Genetic) to the Development of Cows Milk and Gluten Intolerance in Children. AU- Kaczmarski M; Kurzatkowska B CS- Department of Childrens Infectious Diseases, Medical Academy in BiaLystok, Poland. JN- Rocz Akad Med Bialymst; 33-34 p167-76 PY- 89 1988 AB- The role of genetic factors in the development of cows milk and gluten intolerance among hospitalized children was the subject of analysis made by the authors. The patients were hospitalized at the Clinic of Infectious Diseases of Children during 1973-1982. The first group consisted of 45 children whose ages ranged from 5 months to 5 years (gluten intolerance group), and the second group consisted of 50 children whose ages ranged from 2 months to 5 years (cows milk intolerance group). The study found that symptoms of the trait appeared in 34% of the family members of the children with milk intolerance, and 4.4% of the family members of the children with gluten intolerance. Coeliac disease was observed in 13.3% of the family members of the gluten intolerance group, and 10.8% psychic and/or diabetes disease was found in the same group. The data suggests that the illnesses discussed occur more frequently in members of the same family compared to control groups. This finding can speak for the participation of genetic factors in the development of these types of intolerance among family members. Study: Factors of Cows Milk and Gluten Intolerance* Symptom Group Family Members w/ Same Symptoms Family Members w/ Psychic and/or Diabetes Disease Family Members w/ Celiac Disease 45 Children w/ Gluten Intolerance 4.4% 10.8% 13.3% 50 Children w/ Cows Milk Intolerance 34% N/A N/A
  15. AU- Kaczmarski M; Lisiecka M; Kurpatkowska B; Jastrzebska J JN- Acta Med Pol; 30 (3-4) p129-39 PY- 1989 AB- Quantitative estimation of the infiltration by intraepithelial lymphocytes and eosinophils of the mucosa was carried out in 21 children with cows milk and 35 children with gluten intolerance. Before dietary treatment, a statistically significant increase in the infiltration by LIE in children with milk intolerance to the mean value of 34.1 cells and in children with gluten intolerance to 39.0 cells was found, what statistically significantly differed from the mean value of LIE for the control group (19.0 cells/100 epithelial cells). The eosinophilic infiltration in this phase of the disease was noted in 38% of children with cows milk intolerance (16.9 cells/mm2) and in 27% of children with gluten intolerance (28.6 cells/mm2). After 8-24 months of elimination diets--a decrease in the mean value of the LIE infiltration in the mucosa was revealed in both treated groups.
  16. The abstract below will be published in the April, 1996 issue of Gastroenterology. It was accepted for poster presentation for the Annual meeting of the American Gastroenterological Association. The poster section will be on May 22, 1996 (12-2:30 PM) in Hall D, at the Moscone Center, San Francisco, CA. ENDOMYSIUM ANTIBODIES IN BLOOD DONORS PREDICTS A HIGH PREVALENCE OF CELIAC DISEASE IN THE USA. T. Not, K. Horvath, *I.D. Hill, A. Fasano, A. Hammed, +G. Magazz=F9. Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology & Nutrition,= University of Maryland School of Medicine, *The Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, & The University of Messina, Italy. Several epidemiological studies in Europe using antigliadin (AGA) and endomysium antibodies (EmA) for initial screening report the prevalence of celiac disease (celiac disease) to be about 1 out of 300 in the general population. The EmA is most reliable for screening with greater than 99% positive predictive-value in subsequent biopsy-proven cases. There are no comparable scientific data for the USA yet, and celiac disease is considered rare in this country. Lack of awareness could result in significant under-diagnosis of celiac disease in the USA. Aim: To determine the prevalence of positive serological tests for celiac disease in healthy blood donors in USA. Methods: Sera from 2000 healthy blood donors were screened for IgG and IgA AGA using ELISA test. All those with elevated AGA levels (IgA >18 units or IgG >25 units) and those with high normal levels (IgA 10-18 units or IgG 15-25 units) were tested for EmA by indirect immunofluorescence using both monkey esophagus (ME) and human umbilical cord (HUC). Results: The mean age of blood donors was 39 years, with 52% being men, 87% being Caucasian, 11.5% African American, and 1.5% Asian. 95 (4.75%) of the subjects had elevated AGA levels (IgG and/or IgA). A total of 44 (2.2%) had an elevated IgA AGA. Of these, 7 were also positive for EmA. No patient with only raised levels of IgG AGA was positive for EmA. Of the subjects with high normal AGA levels, one (IgA 12 units, IgG 1.8 units) was positive for EmA. Among the total of 8 subjects with elevated EmA levels, seven were Caucasian and one was African American. There was a 100% correlation between ME and HUC for positivity (8 samples) and negativity (288 samples). Conclusions: The prevalence of elevated EmA levels in healthy blood donors in USA is 1:250 (8/2000). This is similar to that reported from countries in Europe where subsequent small intestinal biopsies have confirmed celiac disease in all those with EmA positivity. Based on a positive predictive value of >99% for celiac disease in patients with elevated EmA levels, it is likely that the 8 blood donors identified in this study have celiac disease. These data suggest that celiac disease is not rare in the USA and may be greatly under-diagnosed. There is need for a large scale epidemiological study to determine the precise prevalence of the disease in the USA.
  17. Sites by National Support Organizations The Celiac Disease Foundation (USA): http://www.celiac.org/ The Celiac Sprue Association (USA): http://www.csaceliacs.org The Gluten Intolerance Group of North America (USA): http://www.gluten.net/ Canadian Celiac Association: http://www.celiac.ca/ The Coeliac Society of Ireland: http://www.coeliac.ie/ Association of European Coeliac Societies (AOECS) http://www.aoecs.org The Coeliac Society of Australia http://www.coeliac.org.au Celiac Research Centers University of Maryland Center for Celiac Research Center for Celiac Research: http://www.celiaccenter.org/ The Mayo Clinic has a good section on celiac disease on their site: http://www.mayoclinic.org/celiac-disease/index.html Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University: http://www.celiacdiseasecenter.columbia.edu/CF-HOME.htm The University of Chicago Hospitals Celiac Disease Progam http://www.uchospitals.edu/specialties/celiac/index.html William K. Warren Medical Research - Center for Celiac Disease http://celiaccenter.ucsd.edu/index.html Medical Journal Articles Dr. Joseph Murray of the Mayo Clinic has written an excellent general article about celiac disease (recommended reading for all - American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 69, No. 3, 354-365, March 1999): http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/content/full/69/3/354 Dr. Harold Pruessner has written an excellent article about celiac disease titled Detecting Celiac Disease in Your Patients (American Family Physician, March 1, 1998/Volume 57, Number 5): http://www.aafp.org/afp/980301ap/pruessn.html Conleth Feighery, Professor (Department of Immunology, St Jamess Hospital, Dublin 8, Ireland) has written an excellent general article titled Coeliac Disease (BMJ 1999;319:236-239 - 24 July): http://www.bmj.com/cgi/content/full/319/7204/236 Another great article by M. Hadjivassiliou, et. al., discusses the broad range of symptoms celiac disease can present, and what its effects can be - Gluten Sensitivity: A Many Headed Hydra. Heightened Responsiveness To Gluten Is Not Confined To The Gut. (BMJ 1999;318:1710-1711 - 26 June): http://www.bmj.com/cgi/content/full/318/7200/1710 Sites by Individuals The collected writings of Dr. Reichelt contain papers on the connection between Mental Disease, Autism, Allergies, etc., and Celiac Disease: http://www.gluten-free.org/reichelt.html The collected writings of Ron Hoggan contain papers on many a large variety of disorders that are related to and Celiac Disease: http://www.panix.com/~donwiss/hoggan/ Don Wiss has created a comprehensive collection of celiac disease links: http://www.panix.com/~donwiss/ Danna Korn will soon open a site for kids with celiac disease at: http://www.celiackids.com/ Autism Network for Dietary Intervention by Lisa Lewis and Karyn Seroussi: http://www.autismndi.com/ The Dermatitis Herpetiformis Online Community: http://www.dermatitisherpetiformis.org.uk The Gluten File http://jccglutenfree.googlepages.com Notes, Links, and Essays on Gluten Intolerance & Celiac Disease by Harold Kraus http://www.members.cox.net/harold.kraus/gluten.htm#_Disclaimer Dr. Rodney Ford - The Food Doctor http://www.thefooddoctor.org/FoodDoctor/RodneyFord.html Dr. Scott Lewey - the food doc http://www.thefooddoc.com Recipe, Food & Drug Sites These sites provides gluten-free restaurant cards in many different languages including: Chinese, Dutch, English, German, French, Italian, Turkish and Spanish: http://members.aol.com/zoeliak http://www.enabling.org/ia/celiac/basic.html#cards http://www.sci.fi/~keliakia/tiedote/kielet.htm The USDA has a searchable nutrient database at: http://www.rahul.net/cgi-bin/fatfree/usda/usda.cgi Food and Drug Administration - Information about nutrition and drugs from the FDA: http://www.fda.gov/ The CODEX ALIMENTARIUS COMMISSION has a web site where you can find more information about the organization and its procedures: http://www.codexalimentarius.net/web/index_en.jsp The Codex Standard for Gluten-Free Foods: http://www.codexalimentarius.net/download/standards/291/CXS_118e.pdf Food Allergy Survivors Together (FAST) http://www.angelfire.com/mi/FAST/ Healing Foods Reference Database http://www.healingfoodreference.com International Food Information Council (IFIC) - Food Ingredients, Colors, Additives http://ific.org/publications/brochures/foodingredandcolorsbroch.cfm Pictures of Dermatitis Herpetiformis The following are links to sites have of DH. Some of the photos are biopsies as seen through a microscope, and some are regular photographs of people with DH, some of which are quite graphic. Pictures and an excellent article on DH by Harold T. Pruessner, M.D., University of Texas Medical School at Houston: http://www.aafp.org/afp/980301ap/pruessn.html The University of Iowa: http://tray.dermatology.uiowa.edu/DPT/Hist/DH-H-01.jpg http://tray.dermatology.uiowa.edu/DPT/Hist/DH-DIF-01.jpg The Gastrolab Image Gallery: http://www.gastrolab.net/ng016.htm Dept. of Dermatology - University of Iowa College of Medicine: http://tray.dermatology.uiowa.edu/DH-001.htm http://tray.dermatology.uiowa.edu/DH-002.htm Pictures of Celiac Disease Biopsies The University of Utah: http://www-medlib.med.utah.edu/WebPath/GIHTML/GI152.html
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