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Found 2,701 results

  1. Celiac.com 10/11/2018 - Halloween is upon us once again, and that means it’s time for Celiac.com’s Safe Gluten-Free Halloween Candy list for 2018. This year, we’ve added candies to both the SAFE Gluten-Free Halloween Candy list, and to our UNSAFE Non-Gluten-Free Halloween Candy list. We’ve also added more manufacturer contact information to make getting answers to gluten-free questions easier. Taken together, we think it’s the best, most comprehensive and most up-to-date list of safe, gluten-free Halloween candies, and other candies to watch out for. Below our SAFE, GLUTEN-FREE Halloween candy list, you will find a list of UNSAFE, NON–GLUTEN–FREE candies, along with a partial list of major candy makers, links to their company websites, and other resources. As always, Celiac.com strives to make the Safe Gluten-Free Halloween Candy List as comprehensive as possible, please keep in mind that the list is by no means complete, or definitive, and should only be used as a guideline. Before eating any candy on the list, always read labels, check manufacturer information, and choose according to your own sensitivity levels, or those of your children. Feel free to comment below if you see any issues, or if you'd like us to take note of any information you may have about a product. Lastly, manufacturer information can change. That means that a product this is safely gluten-free at one point may suddenly be made with gluten ingredients. The opposite is also true, as many manufacturers are doing what they can to make products gluten-free when possible. That means it’s important to read labels, and check manufacturer websites for information on changes to any specific products. As always, Celiac.com wishes you and your loved ones a safe and happy gluten-free Halloween 2018! Gluten-Free Halloween Candy 2018: 3 Musketeers fun size 3 Musketeers Mint with dark chocolate A Act II Popcorn Balls Adams & Brooks Fun Pops Scooby Doo Ingredients free of: peanuts, tree nuts, egg, milk, wheat/gluten, soy Albert's Gummy Eyeballs Albert's Iced Halloween pops (lollipops) Alien Pop, Baseball Pop, Basketball Pop, Boo Pop, Carousel Pop, ColorBlaster Pop, Football Pop, Happy Heart Pop, Hoppin' Pop, Lickin' Lips Pop, Lolliday Pop, Lollinotes, Pop—A—Bear, Soccer Pop, Alien Glow Pop, Buggin' Glow Pop, Burstin Bits, and Ghostly Glow Pop Almond Joy — All Except ALMOND JOY PIECES Candy Almond Joy fun size bars Altoids (except for Altoids Smalls Peppermint) Amanda's Own Confections Chocolate shapes and chocolate lollipops Annie's Organic Bunny Fruit snacks Andes mints and candies Alter Eco Dark Twist Chocolate Bar Alter Eco Dark Truffle with Mint Filling Alter Eco Organic Salted Caramel Chocolate Truffle Alter Eco Organic Sea Salt Chocolate Truffle Alter Eco Salted Burnt Caramel Chocolate Bar Amella Agave Caramels Amella Carmel Bar with Roasted Almonds Amella Chocolate Fudge Caramels Amella Gingerbread Caramels Amella Gray Sea Salt, Milk Caramel Amella Gray Sea Salt, Dark Caramel Amella Naked Honey Gray Sea Salt Caramels Amella Naked Honey Salted Chocolate Caramels Amella Naked Honey Lavender Caramels Amella Naked Honey Vanilla Caramels Amella Naked Candy Cane Amella Peppermint Caramels Amella Roasted Almond Caramels Amella Siracha Original Spicy Caramels Amella Vegan Sea Salt Caramels Amella  Walnut Fudge Caramels Angell Crisp Candy Bar Dark Angell Candy Bar Snow Angell Candy Bar Applehead, Grapehead, Cherryhead B Baby Ruth original and fun size Barrels of Candy Bazooka Big Mix (includes bubble gum, bubble gum filled candy, candy chews, and bubble gum filled lollipops) Bazooka Ring Pops Bazooka Push Pops Bazooka Baby Bottle Pops Betty Crocker Fruit by the Foot Wicked Webs Berry Wave mini feet Betty Crocker Halloween fruit flavored snacks, including Fruit Gushers, Fruit Roll–ups, and Mini Rolls Bit•O•Honey Big Blow bubblegum Black Forest Gummy Tarantulas Black Forest Gummy Fun Bugs Juicy Oozers Black Forest Organic Berry Medley Organic Fruit Snacks Black Forest Organic Caramel Hard Candy Black Forest Organic Fruit Chews Black Forest Organic Gummy Bears Black Forest Organic Gummy Cherries Black Forest Organic Gummy Cola Black Forest Organic Gummy Exotic Fruits Black Forest Organic Gummy Soda Black Forest Organic Gummy Tea Black Forest Organic Gummy Worms Black Forest Organic Halloween Mix Black Forest Organic Lollipops Black Forest Organic Mixed Fruit Hard Candy Black Forest Organic Sour Heads Little Monsters Black Forest Organic Sour Watermelon Black Forest Organic Sour Heads Brookside Dark Chocolate Acai and Blueberry Flavors Brookside Dark Chocolate Blood Orange and Peach Flavors Brookside Dark Chocolate Chardonnay Grape and Peach Flavors Brookside Dark Chocolate Covered Almonds Brookside Dark Chocolate Covered Blueberries Brookside Dark Chocolate Covered Cranberries Brookside Dark Chocolate Fruit & Nut Bar Blueberry with Açai Flavor and Other Natural Flavors Brookside Dark Chocolate Fruit & Nut Bar Cherry with Pomegranate Flavor and Other Natural Flavors Brookside Dark Chocolate Fruit & Nut Bar Cranberry with Blackberry Flavor and Other Natural Flavors Brookside Dark Chocolate Goji and Raspberry Flavors Brookside Dark Chocolate Mango and Mangosteen Flavors Brookside Dark Chocolate Merlot Grape and Black Current Flavors Brookside Dark Chocolate Pomegranate Flavor Brookside Milk Chocolate Covered Almonds Bubbly lollipop and gum Buckleberry Foods Chocolate Almond Butter Cups Buckleberry Foods Chocolate Mint Truffles Butterfinger bar, original and fun size C Cadbury Adams Swedish Fish Cadbury Adams Sour Patch Kids and Sour Patch Extreme Candy Checkers (made for Target) Caramel Apple Pops (made by Tootsie Roll) Carmit Caramel clusters Carmit Gold Coins Carmit Raisin Clusters Cary's Of Oregon Coconut Toffee Bites Cary's Of Oregon Dark Chocolate Almond Toffee Cary's Of Oregon Dark Chocolate Coconut Toffee Cary's Of Oregon Dark Chocolate Espresso Toffee Cary's Of Oregon Dark Chocolate Hazelnut Toffee Cary's Of Oregon Milk Chocolate Coconut Toffee Cary's Of Oregon Milk Chocolate Vanilla Toffee Cary's Of Oregon Milk Chocolate Almond Toffee Cary's Of Oregon Milk Chocolate Chai Toffee Cary's Of Oregon Toffee Bites Cella's Milk Chocolate Covered Cherries Cella's Dark Chocolate Covered Cherries Charleston Chew original and fun size Charms Blow Pops and Blow Pop Minis—may contain milk or soy Charms Pops Charms Squares Charms Sour Balls Charms Super Blow Pops Charms Candy Carnival Package—Blow Pops, Sugar Babies, Zip a Dee mini pops, Sugar Daddy, Pops, Sugar Mama Caramel, Tear Jerkers sour bubble gum, Blow Pop Bubble Gum—may contain milk or soy Charms Fluffy Stuff Spider Web cotton candy Cherryhead Chewy Atomic Fireballs Chewy Lemonheads and Friends Child's Play Chocxo 37% Milk Chocolate Coconut and Almond Snaps Chocxo 37% Milk Chocolate Hazelnut Butter Cups Chocxo 37% Milk Chocolate Peanut Butter Cups Chocxo 37% Milk Chocolate Salted Peanut Snaps Chocxo 70% Dark Chocolate Hazelnut Butter Cups Chocxo 70% Dark Chocolate Peanut Butter Cups Chocxo Double Dark Hazelnut Quinoa Cup Chupa Chups Fruit Lollipops Circus Peanuts by Spangler Cliff—Fruit Rope, all flavors "gluten-free" Coastal Bay Confections Candy Corn, Mellocreme Pumpkins, Autumn Mix Colombina Scary Eyeballs bubblegum Colombina Fizzy Pops Comix Mix Candy Sticks—Tom and Jerry, Flintstones, Scooby Doo, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Popeye Cracker Jack caramel coated popcorn and peanuts Crispy Cat Mint Coconut Candy Bar Crispy Cat Toasted Almond Candy Bar Crispy Cat Chocolate Marshmallow Candy Bar Crows CVS Brand Candy Bracelet with Pendant D Dagoba Products—All Daggoba Chocolate products are gluten-free Disney Halloween Candy Mix—jelly beans, gummies, candy bracelets and characters from Cars, Tinkerbell and Toy Story Dots Gumdrops—including Candy Corn Dots, Ghost Dots, and Bat Dots Dove pieces—Dark Chocolate, Milk Chocolate, Peanut Butter Milk Chocolate, Caramel Milk Chocolate Dream Almond Dark Chocolate Bar Dream Creamysweet Chocolate Bar Dream Pure Dark Dark Chocolate Bar Dream Raspberry Dark Chocolate Bar Dream Rice Crunch Chocolate Bar Dubble Bubble bubblegum Dum Dum Chewy Pops Dum Dum Lollipops (including Shrek Pops) E Enstrom Cappucino-Tiremisu Truffle Enstrom Cinnamon Truffle Enstrom Dark Chocolate Almond Belle Enstrom Dark Chocolate Almond Toffee Enstrom Dark Chocolate Almond Toffee Petites Enstrom Dark Chocolate Butter Toffee Enstrom Dark Chocolate Denver Mint Enstrom Dark Chocolate Espresso Belle Enstrom Dark Chocolate Espresso Toffee Enstrom Dark Chocolate Peanut Toffee Enstrom Dark Chocolate Peppermint Belle Enstrom Dark Chocolate Toffee Crumbs Enstrom Limoncello Truffle Enstrom Milk Chocolate Almond Toffee Enstrom Milk Chocolate Almond Toffee Petites Enstrom Milk Chocolate Butter Toffee Enstrom Milk Chocolate Denver Mint Enstrom Milk Chocolate Espresso Toffee Enstrom Milk Chocolate Mint Melt away Enstrom Milk Chocolate Peanut Toffee Enstrom Milk Chocolate Toffee Belle Enstrom Milk Chocolate Toffee Crumbs Enstrom Mint Melt away Truffle Enstrom Mixed Almond Toffee Petites Enstrom Peppermint Cookie Belle Enstrom Peppermint Truffle Enstrom Pumpkin Pie Spice Truffle Enstrom Sugar Free Milk Chocolate Almond Toffee F Farley's Kiddie Mix — Smarties, SweetTarts, Now and Later, Jaw Breakers, Super Bubble and Lolli—pops Ferrara Pan Caramels Ferrara Pan Lemonhead & Friends candy mix—including Applehead, Cherryhead, Grapehead, Chewy Lemonhead & Friends, Chewy Atomic Fireball, and Red Hots FLIX Spooky Lip Pops Lollipops, Angry Birds Lollipops, Gummy Boo Bands, Monsters, Inc. Character Candies, Lollipops and Marshmallow Eyeballs Florida's Natural Healthy Treats Nuggets, Sour String, Fruit Stiks Fright Fingers Popcorn Kit Frankford's Bugs Gummy Candy Frankford's Gummy Body Parts Frankford's Marshmallow Pals Frooties Fun Dip Fun Dip Sour G Game Night boxes of candy game pieces (includes Operation, Sorry!, Monopoly, Life, and Clue) Gimbal's Fine Candies Jelly Beans, Sour Lovers, Cherry Lovers, Cinnamon Lovers, Licorice Scotties Goldenberg's peanut chews Go Max Go Buccaneer Candy Bar Go Max Go Cleo's Candy Bar Go Max Go Mahalo Candy Bar Go Max Go Snap! Candy Bar Go Max Go Thumbs Up Candy Bar Go Max Go Twilight Candy Bar Goobers Go Picnic Sea Salt Caramel Lollipops Go Picnic Orbites Dark Chocolate and Tangerine Grave Gummies (Yummy Gummies) Greenbriar Skull and Bones Fruit Hard Candy, Spooky Lollipop Rings, Grave Gummies Gummy Brush Paint Shop Gummy Pirate Choppers H Harrison's Original Fruit Slices Harrison's Original Fruit Smiles Heath milk chocolate English toffee bar and snack size — contains almonds Hershey's Air Delight Hershey’s - Baking Bars Hershey’s Semi Sweet Baking Bar Hershey’s Unsweetened Baking Bar Hershey’s and Reese's - Baking Chips Hershey’s Butterscotch Chips Hershey’s Cinnamon Baking Chips Mini Kisses Milk Chocolates Hershey’s Milk Chocolate Chips Hershey’s Semi-Sweet Chocolate Mini Chips Hershey’s Mint Chocolate Chips Hershey’s Premier White Chips Hershey’s Semi-Sweet Chocolate Baking Chips Hershey’s Special Dark Mildly Sweet Dark Chocolate Chips Hershey’s Sugar Free Semi-Sweet Baking Chips Reese’s Peanut Butter Baking Chips Hershey’s - Cocoa Hershey’s Cocoa Hershey’s Special Dark Cocoa Hershey’s Kisses Hershey’s Hugs Candy Hershey’s Kisses Milk Chocolate Filled with Caramel Hershey’s Kisses Milk Chocolate Filled with Cherry Cordial Crème Hershey’s Kisses Filled with Vanilla Crème Hershey’s Kisses Dark Chocolate Filled with Mint Truffle Hershey’s Kisses Pumpkin Spice Flavored Candies Hershey’s Kisses Carrot Cake Flavores Candies Hershey’s Kisses Meltaway Milk Chocolates Hershey’s Kisses Milk Chocolate Hershey’s Kisses Special Dark Mildly Sweet Chocolate Hershey’s Kisses Deluxe Chocolates Hershey’s Nuggets Hershey’s Nuggets Milk Chocolates Hershey’s Nuggets Milk Chocolate with Almonds Hershey’s Nuggets Special Dark Chocolate with Almonds Hershey’s Nuggets Extra Creamy Milk Chocolate with Toffee and Almonds Hershey’s Milk Chocolate Bar (1.55oz only) Hershey’s Milk Chocolate Bar with Almonds (1.45oz only) Hershey’s Milk Duds – All Hershey’s Spreads – All Except Hershey’s Chocolate Spread with Snacksters Graham Dippers Hershey’s and Reese's Toppings Hot Tamales Hot Tamales Spray Hubba Bubba Gum Humphrey Popcorn Balls I Ice Cream Dipper (Blue Raspberry, Strawberry) J Jelly Belly beans—gluten–free, dairy–free Jolly Rancher hard candy and Doubles Candy Jolly Rancher Hard Candy Stix, Lollipops and Fruit Chews Jujy’s Junior Caramels Junior Mints Just Born Jelly Beans Just Born marshmallow treats Justin's Nut Butters dark chocolate peanut butter cups Justin's Nut Butters milk chocolate peanut butter cups Justin's Nut Butters white chocolate peanut butter cups Justin's Nut Butters mini dark chocolate peanut butter cups Justin's Nut Butters mini milk chocolate peanut butter cups K KatySweet Chocolate Dipped Strawberries KatySweet Pecan Fudge KatySweet Plain Fudge KatySweet Raspberry Lemon Almond Bark KatySweet Walnut Fudge Kellogg's Spongebob Squarepants fruit flavored snacks Kenny's Green Apple Rings Kenny's Gummi Bears Kenny's Peach Rings Kenny's Sour Gummi Bears Kenny's Sour Gummi Worms Kenny's Sour Neon Gummi Worms Kenny's Watermelon Rings Kinder Surprise Eggs Kraft Caramels Kraft Jet–Puffed Boo Mallows and Ghost Mallows Kraft Swedish Fish Kraft Sour Patch Kids and Sour Patch Extreme L Laffy Taffy Plain, Stretchy & Tangy and Rope Lemonheads Lemonheads & Friends Conversation Hearts Tropical Chewy Lemonhead Chewy Lemonhead & Friends Berry Chewy Lemonhead Lifesavers LifeSavers Gummies including Big Ring Gummies, Sweet 'n' Sour, and Scary Assortment Lily's Sweets 40% Original Creamy Milk Chocolate Bar Lily's Sweets 40% Salted Almond Creamy Milk Chocolate Bar Lily's Sweets 55% Almond Dark Chocolate Bar Lily's Sweets 55% Coconut Chocolate Bar Lily's Sweets 55% Crispy Rice Dark Chocolate Bar Lily's Sweets 55% Dark Chocolate Bar with Cinnamon Lily's Sweets 55% Original Dark Chocolate Bar Lily's Sweets 70% Original Dark Chocolate Bar Lily's Sweets 70% Blood Orange Chocolate Bar Lily's Sweets 70% Candy Cane Chocolate Bar Lily's Sweets 70% Chipotle Chocolate Bar Lily's Sweets 70% Sea Salt Chocolate Bar Lily's Sweets Creamy Milk and Hazelnut Chocolate Bar Lily's Sweets Milk and Gingerbread Chocolate Bar Lily's Sweets Original Double Chocolate Crunch Bar Lily's Sweets Sour Cherry Double Chocolate Crunch Bar Lollipop Paint Shop Lovely Bananas Foster Lovely Black Licorice Lovely Caramel Apple Lovely Cashmels Lovely Chocolate Peppermint Lovely Chocolate Cherry Lovely Chewy Original Caramels Lovely Chocolate Swirl Caramels Lovely Fudgee Roll Lovely Fudgee Roll Raspberry Lovely Fruit Chews Lovely Halloween Cherry Licorice Lovely Halloween Juicy Chew Lovely Hula Chew Lovely Juicy Chew Original Lovely Juicy Chew Tropical Lovely Pumpkin Spice Lovely Salted Caramel Lovely Super fruit Chews M M&M's—original, peanut, peanut butter Manischewitz Fruit Slices Mars M&M's—except pretzel M&M's Mars Dove chocolate products (all flavors EXCEPT for milk chocolate cinnamon graham/cookies and cream, and some holiday varieties, such as milk chocolate truffles) Mars Munch Nut bar Mars Snickers, Snickers Dark bars, fun size and mini's—may contain almonds Mary Janes Mallo Cup Marvel Heroes Candy Sticks (Hulk, Spiderman, Wolverine) Mega Warheads Melster Chocolate Covered Marshmallow Melster Peanut Butter Kisses Melster Compound-Coated Marshmallow Melster Chocolate-Covered Creme Drops Melster Compound Coated Creme Drops Melster Salt Water Taffy Melster Peanut Butter Kisses Melster Circus Peanuts Melster Sanded Marshmallow Melster Coconut Toasties Milk Duds Milky Way Midnight Bar (not the original Milky Way Bar) Milky Way Caramel Bar Mike and Ike Mike and Ike Spray Mini Mentos Mini Sour Dudes Straws Monstaz Pops (jack–o–lantern lollipops) Monster Hunt plastic monster eggs filled with candy bones, skulls and pumpkins (made for Target) Mounds Bars – All Mounds dark chocolate fun size bars N Necco's Sky Bar 4 in 1 chocolate bar Necco Wafers Necco Mary Janes Necco Mary Jane Peanut Butter Kisses—does contain peanuts Necco Sweethearts Conversation Hearts (available for Valentine's Day only) Necco Canada Mint & Wintergreen Lozenges Necco Haviland Thin Mints and Candy Stix Necco Clark Bars Necco Skybars Necco Haviland Peppermint & Wintergreen Patties Necco Candy Eggs Necco Talking Pumpkins (available at Halloween only) Necco Squirrel Nut Caramels and Squirrel Nut Zippers Necco Banana Split and Mint Julep Chews Necco Ultramints Nestle Milk Chocolate fun size bars Nestle Baby Ruth Nestle Bit–O–Honey Nestle Butterfinger (NOT Butterfinger Crisp or Butterfinger Stixx) Nestle Goobers—does contain peanuts Nestle Nips (both regular and sugar–free) Nestle Oh Henry! Nestle Raisinets—made on equipment that processes peanuts Nestle Sno–Caps Nestle Toll House morsels and chunks (only if labeled gluten-free) Nestle Wonka Pixy Stix Nestle Wonka Laffy Taffy Nestle Wonka Lik–M–Aid Fun Dip Nestle Wonka Spree Nik—L—Nip wax bottles with juice Now and Later O Oh Henry! Operation Gummy Candy P Palmer Peanut Butter Cups—does contain peanuts Payday Candy – All Peanut M&M's Pearson's Bun candy—maple and roasted peanuts Pearson's Mint Patties, Pearson's Nut Goodies Pearson's Salted Nut Rolls Peeps Jack–O–Lanterns, Marshmallow Pumpkins, Marshmallow Ghosts, Marshmallow Tombstones, Chocolate Mousse Cats, Milk Chocolate Covered Pumpkins, Dark Chocolate Covered Pumpkins, and Milk Chocolate Dipped Orange Chicks—"Gluten Free" Pez candy—All PEZ products are "Gluten Free" Pop Rocks Popcorn Expressions Kettle Corn Snack Bags Pixie Stix Pure Fun Halloween Pure Pops R Rain Blo Bubble Gum Eyes of Terror Raisinets Razzles candy gum Red Bird Assorted Puffs Red Bird Dark Chocolate Peppermint Mini Red Bird Cinnamon Puffs Red Bird Cinnamon Sticks Red Bird Citrus Puffs Red Bird Cream Penny Sticks Red Bird Lemon minis Red Bird Lemon Sticks Red Bird Peppermint Puffs Red Bird Peppermint Sticks Red Hots Reese's Fast Break candy bars and snack size Reese’s Nutrageous Bar Reese's Peanut Butter Cups snack size and miniatures—Except Reese's Peanut Butter Cup Unwrapped Minis and Seasonal Shaped Items Reese's Pieces Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups – All Except Reese’s Peanut Butter Cup Unwrapped Minis and Seasonal Shaped Items Reese’s Pieces Candy - All Except Reese’s Pieces Eggs Reese’s Spreads – All Except Reese’s Spreads with Snacksters Graham Dippers Reese's Select Peanut Butter Cremes Reese's Select Clusters Reese's Whipps Riviera Spooky Candy Rings Rolo Caramels in Milk Chocolate Candies – All Except Rolo Minis Rolo chocolate covered caramels—Except ROLO Minis Russell Stover Salt Water Taffy Russell Stover Candy Corn Taffy Russell Stover Caramel Apple Taffy S Scharffen Berger Products – All Except Scharffen Berger Cocoa Powder Sidewalk Chalk Sixlets Skeleton Pops (lollipops) Skittles includes Original, Sour, Wild Berry, Fizzl'd Fruits, and Crazy Core, including fun—size Smarties—(the small pastel–colored candies sold in rolls and made by Ce De). Also Candy Money, Candy Necklace, Easter Smarties, Giant Smarties, Giant Smarties Pops, Love Hearts, Mega Smarties, Smarties in a Pouch, Tropical Smarties, Smarties Double Lollies, Smarties Mega Lollies, Smarties Parties, Smarties Pops, and X—TREME Sour Smarties. Manufacturer states: These products contains NO: gluten, milk, egg, fish, crustacean shellfish, tree nuts, wheat, peanuts, or soy. (US only, NOT gluten-free in Canada). Skor Toffee Bars - All Snickers Bars (all flavors) Snickers Fudge bar Sno—Caps Sno—Cone Soda Pop So Delicious Dairy Free Coconut Milk Candy Corn So Delicious Dairy Free Coconut Milk Peppermint Star Sour Patch Spooky Candy Rings (eyeballs, Frankenstein heads and other shapes on rings) Starburst Fruit Chews and fun—size Starburst Gummibursts and Sour Gummibursts Stonyfield Organic Mixed Berry Fruit Snacks Stonyfield Organic Strawberry Fruit Snacks Sugar Babies Sugar Daddy Caramel Pops Sugar Mama Caramels Super Bubble bubble gum Surf Sweets Gummy Worms Surf Sweets Gummy Swirls Surf Sweets Gummy Bears Surf SweetsFruity Bears Surf Sweets Jelly Beans Surf Sweets Sour Worms Surf Sweets Sour Berry Bears Swedish Fish Sweet's All American Mint Taffy Sweet's Apple Fruit Sours Sweet's Banana Taffy Sweet's Black Licorice Taffy Sweet's Blue Raspberry Taffy Sweet's Bubble Gum Taffy Sweet's Buttered Popcorn Taffy Sweet's Candy Cane Taffy Sweet's Candy Corn Sweet's Candy Corn Taffy Sweet's Caramel Apple Taffy Sweet's Caramel Taffy Sweet's Cherry Cola Taffy Sweet's Cherry Fruit Sours Sweet's Cherry Hearts Sweet's Cherry Taffy Sweet's Chocolate Bridge Mix Sweet's Chocolate Cinnamon Bears Sweet's Chocolate Hazelnut taffy Sweet's Chocolate Peanut Clusters Sweet's Chocolate Peanuts Sweet's Chocolate Raisins Sweet's Chocolate Taffy Sweet's Chocolate Wonder Mints Sweet's Cinnamon Bears Sweet's Cinnamon Bunnies Sweet's Cinnamon Hearts Sweet's Cinnamon Lips Sweet's Cinnamon Santa's Sweet's Cinnamon Squares Sweet's Cinnamon Taffy Sweet's Cookie Dough Taffy Sweet's Cotton Candy Taffy Sweet's Egg Nog Taffy Sweet's Fish Sweet's Fruit Slices Sweet's Fruit Sours Sweet's Grape Fruit Sours Sweet's Guava Taffy Sweet's Gum Drops Sweet's Holiday Trees Sweet's Honey Taffy Sweet's Hot Shots Sweet's Huckleberry Taffy Sweet's Jelly Beans Sweet's Jelly Beans Sweet's Key Lime Taffy Sweet's Key lime Taffy Sweet's Lemon Fruit Sours Sweet's Marshmallow Bears Sweet's Natural Fish Sweet's Natural Lemonade rings Sweet's Natural Nummy Bears Sweet's Natural Sour Worms Sweet's Neapolitan Taffy Sweet's Orange Dark chocolate Jewels Sweet's Orange Milk chocolate Jewels Sweet's Orange Slices Sweet's Orange Slices Sweet's Orange Sticks Sweet's Orange/Vanilla Taffy Sweet's Peach Taffy Sweet's Peanut Clusters (available in both milk and dark chocolate) Sweet's Peppermint Taffy Sweet's Pink Grapefruit Sours Sweet's Raspberry Dark Chocolate Jewels Sweet's Raspberry Milk Chocolate Jewels Sweet's Raspberry Sticks Sweet's Raspberry Taffy Sweet's Red and Green fruit Sours Sweet's Red Licorice Taffy Sweet's Root Beer Taffy Sweet's Rum Taffy Sweet's S'more's Taffy Sweet's Scandinavian Swimmers Sweet's Sour Bunnies Sweet's Sour Stars Sweet's Sour Stars Sweet's Strawberry and Banana Taffy Sweet's Strawberry and Crème Taffy Sweet's Strawberry Taffy Sweet's Sugar free Cinnamon Bear cubbies Sweet's Sweet's Candy Pebbles Sweet's Vanilla Taffy Sweet's Watermelon Taffy Sweet's Wild berry Taffy Sweet's Wonder mints Sweethearts conversation hearts Forbidden Fruits (candy packaging of The Twilight Saga, New Moon the movie) Sweet's Candy Corn Taffy T Tasty Brand Fruit Gummies- Citrus Splash Tasty Brand Fruit Gummies- Smoothie Tasty Brand Fruit Gummies- Super fruit Tasty Brand Organic Fruit Snacks- Citrus Splash Tasty Brand Organic Fruit Snacks- Mixed Fruit Tasty Brand Organic Fruit Snacks- Scary Berry Tasty Brand Organic Fruit Snacks- Smoothie Tasty Brand Organic Fruit Snacks- Spooky Tasty Brand Organic Fruit Snacks- Super fruit Tasty Brand Organic Fruit Snacks- Wild Berry Tic Tacs Tootsie Caramel Apple Pops Tootsie Pops—original and mini Tootsie Fruit Rolls Tootsie Peppermint Pops Tootsie Rolls Tropical Dots Tootsie Rolls Midgies and snack bars Topps — Baby Bottle Pop, Ring Pops, Push Pops, Ring Pop Gummies, Bazooka Gum, Bazooka Gum Nuggets Trader Joe's Citrus Gum Drops Trader Joe's Mango Taffy Trader Joe's Sour Gummies Transformers Candy Mix—gummy shields, fruit chews, candy shields, gum rocks Tropical Stormz Pops TruJoy Fruit Chews TruJoy Organic Choco Chews TruSweet Jelly Beans TruSweet Gummy Bears TruSweet Fruity Hearts TruSweet Fruity Bears TruSweet Gummy Worms TruSweet Sour Worms TruSweet Sour Berry Bears TruSweet Watermelon Rings TruSweet Peach Rings TruSweet Spring Mix Jelly Beans TruSweet Spooky Spiders TruSweet Organic Fruity Bears TruSweet Organic Fruity Hearts TruSweet Organic Jelly Beans TruSweet Organic Peach Rings TruSweet Organic Watermelon Rings Twist and Glow, Twist and Glow Heart, Twist and Glow Pumpkin Two Moms in the Raw Gluten Free Almond Butter Cacao Truffles Two Moms in the Raw Almond Butter Cayenne Truffles Two Moms in the Raw Almond Butter Green Tea Vanilla Truffles U Unreal Halloween Treats Unreal Dark Chocolate Almond Butter Cups Unreal Dark Chocolate Peanut Butter Cups Unreal Dark Chocolate Peanut Butter Cups with Coconut Unreal Dark Chocolate Peanut Butter Cups with Crispy Quinoa Unreal Milk Chocolate Peanut Butter Cups Unreal Milk Chocolate Peanut Butter Cups with Crispy Quinoa V Vosges Haut Chocolate Bacon Dark Chocolate Bar Vosges Haut Chocolate Coconut & Cherry Caramel Bar Vosges Haut Chocolate Crispy Carrot Bar W Warheads Extreme Sour hard candy and Sour QBZ chewy cubes Warheads Sour Chewy Cubes Warheads Super Sour Spray, Sour Dippers, Double Drops Welches Fruit Snacks—All flavors Wild Ophelia Peanut Butter Banana Cup Wild Ophelia Peanut Butter and Cherry Cup Wild Ophelia Peanut Butter and Toasted Coconut Cup Wild Ophelia Peanut Butter and Smoked Salt Cup Wonka Bottlecaps Wonka Chocolate Laffy Taffy Wonka Giant Chewy Nerds Jelly Beans Wonka Giant Pixy Stix Wonka Gobstopper Everlasting Wonka Gobstopper Chewy Wonka Fruit Tart Chews Wonka Fun Dip and Fun Dip Sour Wonka Laffy Taffy Ropes Wonka Mix–Ups Wonka Monster Mix–Ups—SweetTarts Skulls and Bones, Spooky Nerds, Howlin' Laffy Taffy Wonka Nerds—carry a cross contamination warning on the Spooky Nerds orange and fruit punch flavors Wonka Pixy Stix Wrigley's Gum Wrigley’s Creme Savers X X–scream Mouth Morphers Fruit Gushers Y York Peppermint Patties - All Except York Pieces Candy, York Minis, and York Shapes (5 oz.)s YumEarth Organic Fruit Snacks YumEarth Gummy Fruits Z Zed Candy Skulls and Bones Zip-A-Dee-Mini Pops With all these selections, finding some good, gluten–free candy should be a snap. As always, be sure to read labels, as some ingredients can vary. **WARNING! THESE UNSAFE CANDIES CONTAIN OR MAY CONTAIN GLUTEN: AIRHEADS Packaging states that Airheads are: "Manufactured in a facility that processes wheat flour." Airheads.com FAQs state that: "Airheads do not contain gluten; however, they are processed in a facility that uses wheat flour, so the company does not guarantee that Airheads are gluten-free. Airheads Xtremes Rolls contains wheat flour ALTOIDS Contain gluten as wheat maltodextrin ANNABELLE'S Abba Zabba—contains: peanuts, soybean oil and soy lecithin, wheat/gluten Big Hunk—Package statement: "made in a facility that uses milk, egg, tree nuts, wheat and peanuts" Look—Contains: milk, peanuts, soy lecithin, eggs, wheat/gluten Rocky Road, Rocky Road Mint, Rocky Road Dark—Contain wheat/gluten Uno—Contains: milk, almonds, soy lecithin, wheat/gluten AMERICAN LICORICE CO. Sour Punch Sticks, Twists, Bits, Bites, Straws—contains wheat/gluten Red Vines—all varieties and flavors contain wheat/gluten BEE INTERNATIONAL Zombee Bloody Bites (glow in the dark plastic fangs with oozing candy blood bags) Zombee Candy Corn (in a tall tube with plastic pumpkin lid) Package statement: "Made in a facility that also processes milk, wheat, peanuts, tree nuts." BRACH'S All Brach's candy should be considered NOT gluten–free! Please be careful, as I have seen Brach's candies included on gluten-free safe lists! Brach's Candy Corn, Brach's Jelly Bean Nougats, and Brach's Halloween Mellowcremes ARE all processed in a facility that processes wheat. CADBURY ADAMS Sour Patch Xploderz CHUCKLES Chuckles Ju Jubes CVS Candy Corn, Autumn Mix, Candy Pumpkins Ingredients free of: wheat/gluten, milk, tree nuts, peanuts Package statement: "This product was packaged in a facility where other products containing peanuts, tree nuts, milk, wheat, soy and egg are also packaged." DOVE CHOCOLATE Milk chocolate cinnamon graham/cookies and cream, and some holiday varieties, such as milk chocolate truffles FARLEY'S AND SATHERS Harvest Mix and Candy Corn—This product is made by Brach's. All Brach's candies are considered to contain gluten. See Brach's listings. Heide candies—Jujyfruits, Jujubes, Red Raspberry Dollars, Red Hot Dollars Wild Cherry, Heide Gummi Bears Super Bubble and Super Bubble Blast Trolli Gummi Bears, Trolli Sour Brite (Frite) Crawlers "Packaged on equipment that packages products containing traces of milk, wheat, egg, peanuts, tree nuts and/or soy protein." FERRERO Ferrero Rocher Chocolates FLIX Bag of Boogers Gummies — "Manufactured in a facility that processes gluten (wheat), milk, egg, peanuts, tree nuts and soy." FRANKFORD Frankford Fun Size Mix (Peanut Butter, Caramel and Crispy Chocolate Covered Candies) Crispy Candies SpongeBob Gummy Krabby Patties GOETZE Goetze's Caramel Creams, Cow Tales—Contain wheat flour, milk, and soy HARIBO Bears (the package now says: Dextrose - wheat or corn) Black Licorice Wheels Brixx Clark Bars Fruity Pasta Konfekt and Pontefract Cakes Red Licorice Wheels Sour S'ghetti HERSHEY Hershey Snack Sized Bars — ALL Kit Kat—contains wheat Mr. Goodbar Reese's Minis Reese's Peanut Butter Pumpkins Reese's Seasonal Rolo Minis Twizzlers—contains wheat Whoppers—contains barley malt and wheat flour Hershey's Bliss (Milk Chocolate, Milk Chocolate with Almonds, Milk Chocolate with Meltaway Center, White Chocolate with Meltaway Center, Milk Chocolate with Raspberry Meltaway Center, Dark Chocolate)—No gluten ingredients, but not on Hershey's official gluten-free list. Hershey's Special Dark Bar (note that this is confusing, since several other Special Dark products are considered gluten-free, so make sure you know what you're buying) Hershey's Cookies 'N' Creme Bar Hershey's Milk Chocolate Drops Hershey's Miniatures (any flavor, including flavors that are considered gluten-free in larger sizes) Mr. Goodbar Symphony Bar Hershey's Extra Dark Chocolate Hershey's Kisses that do not appear on the gluten-free list above Hershey's Good & Plenty Hershey's Mr. Goodbar fun size Hershey's Twizzlers, Flavored Twists IMPACT CONFECTIONS Warheads Sour Twists—contain wheat/gluten, milk Warheads Sour Jelly Beans—made in facility shared with wheat, peanuts, milk, egg and soy Warheads Sour Candy Canes—contain soy; made in facility shared with wheat, peanuts, tree nuts, milk, egg, and soy Warheads Sour Coolers—contains oat fiber MARS and WRIGLEY Mars Bar Mars Combos (a snack mix) M&M White Chocolate, Mint and M&M Coconut flavors—Check individual packages to be sure M&M Pretzel flavor and some M&M seasonal flavors Milky Way—contains barley malt Twix—contains wheat NESTLE Butterfinger Crisp or Butterfinger Stixx—contains wheat flour Butterfinger Giant Bar Butterfinger Hearts Butterfinger Jingles Butterfinger Medallions Butterfinger Pumpkins Butterfinger Snackerz Butterfinger Stixx Chewy Spree Crunch—contains barley malt Everlasting Gobstopper Hundred Grand Bar—contains barley malt Kit Kat Bar 100 Grand Bar—contains barley malt Sweetarts—Contain both maltodextrin and dextrin, which can be made from wheat and barley, and are not listed on Nestle’s gluten-free candy list) Wonka Bar (all flavors) Wonka Gummies Wonka Kazoozles Wonka Nerds Wonka Oompas and the Wonka Bar are NOT gluten–free. Wonka Oompas and the Wonka Bar are NOT gluten–free. NEWMAN'S OWN Organic Dark Chocolate & Milk Chocolate Peanut Butter Cups (Made on equipment that processes products containing peanuts, tree nuts, milk, wheat, soybean and egg products.) PALMER Palmer Bag of Boo's fudge bars Palmer Tricky Treats (mix of Googley Eyes, Boneheads, and Pumpkin Patch chocolate candies) Palmer Trick or Treat Mix Palmer Peppermint Patties RUSSELL STOVER'S—Russell Stover's products are produced on equipment that also processes peanuts, tree nuts, eggs and wheat gluten. YORK York Pieces, York Minis and York Shapes WONKA Wonka Bar Wonka Chewy Runts Wonka Chewy Spree Wonka Giant and Mini Chewy SweeTarts Wonka Nerds Wonka Oompas Wonka Runts Wonka Runts Chewy Wonka SweetTarts Wonka Sweetarts (regular) Wonka Sweetarts Chew Wonka Sweetarts Chewy Twists Wonka Sweetarts Giant Chewy Wonka Sweetarts Mini Chewy Wonka Shockers Wonka Sweetarts Gummy Bugs—contains wheat/gluten Wonka Sweetarts Rope—contains wheat/gluten Wonka Sweetarts Shockers Wonka Tart N Tinys Wonka Tart N Tinys Chew Wonka SweetTarts Boo Bag Mix Additional information and lists of gluten-free safe and unsafe Halloween candies can be found at: About.com Celiac.com Celiaccentral.com CeliacSupportAssociation.org Celiacfamily.com DivineCaroline.com Foodallergyfeast Glutenawayblog.com Glutenfreefacts Gluten Intolerance Group Medpedia Surefoodliving.com Urbantastebud.com Verywellfit.com Here is a partial list of major candy manufacturers and how to contact them: Adams & Brooks American Licorice Co. BEE International Ferrara Candy Company Ferrero Rocher FLIX Gimbal's Fine Candies Goetze's Candy Company Hershey's. Here's a link to Hershey's official gluten-free list. Impact Confections Jelly Belly Just Born. Here's a link to Just Born Gluten-free FAQs Justin’s Nut Butters products are certified gluten-free by the Gluten-Free Certification Organization, which requires products to have less than 10 parts per million of gluten in them. Kraft Foods Mars Chocolate Necco Nestle USA Palmer Pearson's PEZ Pop Rocks Tootsie Roll —Tootsie Roll Industries, which also makes Charms products, says that, as of fall 2018, all of the company's confections are considered gluten-free except Andes cookies. "Tootsie does not use wheat, barley, rye, oats, triticale, spelt, or any of their components, either as ingredients or as part of the manufacturing process. Corn and soy products are used during the manufacturing process," the company says.
  2. Celiac.com 10/09/2018 - Remember that time George Clooney handcuffed himself to David Letterman, and Tom Waits showed up and stole the show and then spun into that wild riff on gluten, and everybody had a good laugh? We do. Tom Waits has long been a favorite, but when he shows up on David Letterman, fun times are guaranteed for all. Even when Waits pokes some of his chronic hipster brand fun at gluten. In case you missed it, it’s one of those great moments of television that just keeps on giving, and we can take the jokes. At well over half a million views and counting on one YouTube channel alone, the episode continues to please. The fun starts at 5:27: Get more on Tom Waits, including the latest Tom Waits news, album and concert information at: Tomwaits.com.
  3. Celiac.com 10/03/2018 - Gluten-related disorders include the full spectrum of adverse clinical symptoms and conditions triggered by eating gluten. A team of researchers recently set out to review the available medical literature concerning MDs and gluten sensitivity with and without enteropathy. The research team included A Vinagre-Aragón, P Zis, RA Grunewald, and M Hadjivassiliou, with the Academic Department of Neurosciences, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Sheffield, South Yorkshire, UK. Celiac disease or gluten sensitive enteropathy is the most common manifestation, but clinicians have reported a number of extra-intestinal manifestations, which may occur without enteropathy. Gluten sensitivity is another term that has been used to include all gluten-related disorders, including those where blood tests show antibodies to gluten in the absence of any enteropathy. Gluten ataxia is the most common extra-intestinal neurological manifestation, and has been well documented. Clinicians have reported movement disorders related to gluten sensitivity. To assess the current medical literature on movement disorders and gluten sensitivity, both with and without enteropathy, the team conducted a systematic search on the PubMed database, and included 48 articles that met the inclusion criteria into the present review. This review demonstrates that the range of gluten related movement disorders goes beyond gluten ataxia, and shows that the majority of patients with gluten-related disorders benefit from a gluten-free diet. Read the full review at: Nutrients. 2018 Aug 8;10(8). pii: E1034. doi: 10.3390/nu10081034.
  4. Celiac.com 09/20/2018 - Some people with celiac disease experience extreme symptoms when they eat gluten. These folks adopt various strategies for navigating the world. One of those strategies involves getting a gluten-sniffing service dog. We’ve done a few stories on gluten-sniffing dogs over the years. Dogs like Zeus and Hawkeye are famous for helping their owners sniff out gluten before they can eat it. Can Gluten-Sniffing Dogs Help People with Celiac Disease? The stories are always popular. People love the stories, and people love the dogs. After all, pretty much anyone with celiac disease who has ever read about gluten-sniffing dogs would love to have one. Who could say no to a warm, fuzzy dog that can take a sniff of your food and signal you when it contains gluten? The stories almost always generate plenty of feedback and more than a few questions. To answer some of those questions, we’ve decided to do an article that provides some facts about gluten-sniffing dogs. Here are a few factors to keep in mind about gluten-sniffing service dogs: Gluten-free Dog Status: One thing to remember is that proper gluten-sniffing dogs are professionally trained service animals, much like seeing-eye dogs or hearing-ear dogs. As professional service animals, the dogs must be trained and certified as service animals. The dogs may then accompany their master pretty much anywhere they go, and are available to assess all food and snacks. Gluten-free Dog Training: Proper training takes time, which equals money. Professional trainers might only train one or two dogs, and the training can take about a year. There are very few trainers for gluten-sniffing dogs, and there are also currently no official guidelines or certification. Gluten-free Dog Cost: In our recent story on the gluten-sniffing black Lab, Hawkeye, we noted that the dog cost $16,000, not including food, and vet bills. Gluten-free Dog Reliability: Nimasensor.com notes that “[g]luten-sniffing dogs may detect gluten in amounts as small as .0025 parts per million with 95 percent to 98 percent accuracy.” The Mercola.com website says that Willow, a gluten-sniffing German shorthaired pointer in Michigan, can detect gluten with 95 percent to 98 percent accuracy. Read more on gluten-sniffing dogs: Gluten-Sniffing Dogs Are Game Changers for People With Celiac Disease Gluten-sniffing dogs help people with celiac disease What to Know About Gluten-Sniffing Dogs Gluten-Sniffing Assistance Dog Helps Celiac Sufferer Lead Normal Life
  5. Celiac.com 10/06/2018 - In a recent discussion of Dangerous Grains, we (Mike and Ron) began to speculate about future prospects for those who are gluten sensitive. We talked about future directions for research into how gluten impacts on human health, the growing focus on celiac disease excluding gluten sensitivity, and whether grain consumption is a factor in health problems among those who are not gluten sensitive (according to currently available testing). This inevitably led to debate about whether gluten grains are harmful to all humans. In the context of this discussion, we agreed to write this article inviting further discussion of this matter and offering some suggestions to researchers and contributors to gluten-related research. These include several of our personal concerns and a number of questions that remain unanswered. Where is the research taking us? Perhaps the most important lesson that current research teaches is that a great deal more research is needed if we are to fully understand this ubiquitous hazard to human physical and mental health. There are several emerging trends in the research literature that warrant our attention and further investigation. For instance, celiac disease research has been conducted on the margins for so long that the recent, very rapid expansion of this field may have helped foster neglect of related and equally important research into non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Previous issues of the Scott-Free Newsletter have contained articles outlining the importance of extensive and appropriate testing (and subsequent dietary compliance) for those who have non-celiac gluten sensitivity as identified by a variety of tests including IgG ELISA testing for common food allergies. Further, our growing reliance upon endomysium or tissue transglutaminase antibody testing alone risks overlooking a significant portion of the population with celiac disease. Several reports indicate that in cases where serology testing is negative but symptoms and signs suggest celiac disease, a series of jejunal biopsies should also be taken and assessed by a pathologist who is familiar with celiac disease and uses the Marsh system for evaluating intestinal biopsies. Research into the oats question reveals that known toxic proteins in celiac disease are absent from oats. Yet one small study showed that a significant percentage of celiac patients will develop intestinal lesions characteristic of celiac disease from eating pure oats in the context of an otherwise gluten-free diet. This suggests that we have not yet identified all of the toxic proteins in gluten grains. Some current research is also aimed at developing similar grains without the toxic proteins found in regular gluten grains. The problems associated with oats research have a clear bearing on this issue as well. If celiac patients are developing intestinal lesions from pure oats, which have repeatedly been shown to lack the known toxic proteins, then we do not yet know all the harmful proteins. Thus, genetic development of “safe” wheat is not yet possible. Still, this research may help in the identification of additional toxic proteins. Current research has also led to a growing awareness, among the medical community and the general public, of the connections between gluten consumption and type I diabetes, epilepsy, thyroid disease, osteoporosis and a host of previously unsuspected autoimmune ailments. This is raising many questions about the potential value of a gluten-free diet as part of the treatment protocol for many of these ailments. Current research into zonulin may be one of the most exciting areas of investigation. The work of Dr. Fasano and many others in this important area may well lead to a better understanding of the impact of gluten on schizophrenia, attention deficit disorder, autism, bi-polar disorder, and a variety of ailments that have shown improvement on a gluten-free, dairy-free diet. Where would we like to see the research go? Gluten research is largely overlooked by many of today’s scientists. Despite the growing body of research that discredits gluten grains as healthy foods, the widespread, erroneous assumption of their nutritional value continues to foster gluten consumption. There is a pressing need to dispel the myths that protectively shroud this issue. Our first priority is to see a clear delineation of the gluten-derived proteins and peptides that are currently known to threaten human health. The next logical step would be to initiate an extensive investigation of the various other gluten proteins and peptides in order to identify all of the harmful substances in gluten. The relevance of gluten research reaches far beyond the concerns of academia and the individuals diagnosed with gluten sensitivity or celiac disease. We now know that many health problems could be wholly or partly the result of gluten, making this field worthy of investigation as well. The driving force for people to pursue research of these topics might well be found in a broader awareness of the preliminary findings that connect this wide variety of health conditions to gluten consumption. Further research into this field would reveal many aspects of our current lifestyle. For instance, why are we facing such a widespread variety and increasing rates of psychoses? And how does gluten relate to the multitude of diseases, seldom seen until the advent of agriculture? Gathering more information about gluten and its effect on both gluten sensitive and non-gluten sensitive individuals may provide a greater understanding of modern illnesses. For instance, Dr. Hadjivassiliou’s extensive investigations of neurological diseases of unknown origin, in association with gluten sensitivity, reveal several important research concerns which include: Does current testing identify all important immune reactions to gluten? What other, as yet unidentified proteins are toxic to celiac patients? How often is gluten sensitivity/celiac disease considered in the context of these related ailments? What portion of the population is at risk of developing gluten sensitivity? What portion of the population is at risk of developing celiac disease? What other problems may be associated with gluten consumption? What is the cost-benefit of our escalating consumption of gluten? What vested interests are inhibiting the widespread recognition of health hazards associated with gluten consumption? Concurrent with this research, we would like to see investment in the development of safe, healthy, alternative food sources. Realistically, everyone would probably be better off on a diet of fruits, vegetables, and various meats. But is this possible for the world’s overwhelming and growing population? The necessary resources, including the cost to the consumer, would be prohibitive by current standards and methods of food production. New, more efficient food sources must be found, developed, and widely adopted. These foods must be a better fit with our evolutionary adaptations. This search will require considerable investment and social resolve. What questions should have priority? The question on peoples’ minds is how the research will directly affect them. This means that the research will have to explain the relevance of gluten proteins to such diseases as cancer, autoimmune disorders, obesity and food addiction. Each of these food-related topics is a common concern, widely discussed, and a key topic for gluten-related research. The many applications of food addiction research will attract widespread attention and discussion. The current spotlight on dieting in the popular press reflects a great deal of personal concern, among the general public, regarding this topic. Cancer and autoimmunity have been examined in great detail and a universal cure is still a distant dream. Yet the high rate of gluten sensitivity among these patients suggests a pressing need for research. Such investigations could provide a monumental step toward finding the causes and the explanations for these widespread, devastating health problems. Since these topics have yet to be explored, mainly due to limited research funding, a shift in research focus may yield the solutions to many of these conditions that plague our society. An important hurdle to overcome There is a dichotomy between governmental dietary recommendations that encourage gluten grain consumption and the growing body of research that discredits grains as a healthy food for a significant portion of the population. Unfortunately this is an area where progress is necessary for gluten research to really thrive. Since grain production, processing, and consumption constitute huge portions of various state economies, it is in the best interests of governing bodies to keep grains on everyone’s plate for many years to come. It will require a truly overwhelming body of knowledge, based on solid research proving the hazards of grains to topple the current, flawed structure of governmental dietary recommendations. Conclusion Without this vast array of research, leading to widespread recognition of the hazards of gluten, we can expect little social change. Thus, future prospects for gluten sensitive individuals may be somewhat dim. Increasing population densities may lead to escalating competition for finite food resources. Cheap and available foods derived from gluten grains will become increasingly attractive. Future generations of our families (remember that gluten sensitivity and celiac disease have a large genetic component) will be at risk. The best answer, as we see it, is to fund research aimed at the questions posed here, as well as those that arise out of these investigations. We have offered several directions that we consider important. Whether or not you agree with our priorities, we hope you agree that we need further research into the human health hazards posed by gluten grain consumption. This article was co-written by Mike Pearson.
  6. Celiac.com 10/05/2018 - This short quiz includes basic celiac facts, recent celiac and gluten-free news and other information that appeared in the last few months on Celiac.com. The answers are in the section below the quiz, so don't peek! True or False? A tainted gluten-free meal nearly killed an Australian woman. Bifidobacterium infantis NLS super strain reduces a-Defensin-5 expression in celiac disease patients. Vitamin A and D deficiency common in kids with newly diagnosed celiac disease. New UK fund promotes celiac research and gluten-free food improvement. Easy to spot tooth wear and enamel defects point to celiac disease. Undiagnosed celiac disease more common in women and girls. Research indicates 1.4% of humans have celiac disease. A new urine test can spot gluten in the blood of people with celiac disease. Women's diet during pregnancy has little impact on celiac disease risk in their infants. Gluten-Free condoms are available for people concerned about topical exposure to gluten. A Phoenix realtor recently advertised a house as 'gluten-free.’ Current screening methods miss significant cases of celiac disease. A new vaccine makes it safe for people with celiac disease to safely consume gluten. A long-distance conversation with a guru can help treat your celiac disease. Food made with gluten-free ingredients is safe for people with celiac disease. Celiac disease is a food allergy. Celiac disease rarely affects people of non-European ancestry. Celiac disease is a children’s condition. Celiac disease can be painful, but isn't life-threatening. A little gluten is okay for people with celiac disease and gluten-intolerance to eat. ANSWERS Here are the answers for our short quiz above on basic celiac facts, recent celiac news and other information. True or False? A tainted gluten-free meal nearly killed an Australian woman. TRUE Bifidobacterium infantis NLS super strain reduces a-Defensin-5 expression in celiac disease patients. TRUE Vitamin A and D deficiency common in kids with newly diagnosed celiac disease. TRUE New UK fund promotes celiac research and gluten-free food improvement. TRUE Easy to spot tooth wear and enamel defects point to celiac disease. TRUE Undiagnosed celiac disease more common in women and girls. TRUE Research indicates 1.4% of humans have celiac disease. TRUE A new urine test can spot gluten in the blood of people with celiac disease. TRUE Does Diet During Pregnancy Have Any Impact on Celiac Disease Risk in Infants? TRUE Gluten-Free condoms are available for people concerned about topical exposure to gluten. TRUE A Phoenix realtor recently advertised a house as 'gluten-free.’ TRUE. Phoenix realtor Mike D’Elena recently advertised a house as 'gluten-free’. Current screening methods miss significant cases of celiac disease. TRUE A new vaccine makes it safe for people with celiac disease to safely consume gluten. FALSE. While several such vaccines are under development, with some even undergoing clinical and human trials, no such drug has been proven to work and approved by the FDA. Hopefully the clinical tests will work and this will one day be an alternative for some people. A long-distance conversation with a guru can help treat your celiac disease. FALSE Food made with gluten-free ingredients is safe for people with celiac disease. FALSE. Just because food is made with gluten-free ingredients does not necessarily make it safe for people with celiac disease. Case in point, Domino’s Pizza recently introduced gluten-free pizza crusts. However, these pizzas are prepared in the same areas and ovens as Domino’s regular pizzas, and may be contaminated with gluten from wheat flour. These pizzas are not considered safe for people with celiac disease. There are many similar cases in the restaurant world. Contamination is a serious issue for some celiacs, so buyers be aware and be wary. Celiac disease is a food allergy. FALSE. Celiac disease is not a food allergy or an intolerance, it is an autoimmune disease. People with celiac disease suffer damage to the lining of the small intestine when they eat wheat, rye or barley. They also face higher risks for many other auto-immune conditions. Celiac disease rarely affects people of non-European ancestry. FALSE. Celiac disease is more common in people of northern European ancestry, but it affects all ethnic groups and is found in southern Asia, the Middle East, North Africa and South America. Celiac disease is a children’s condition. FALSE. Celiac disease can develop at any age. In fact, celiac disease is most commonly diagnosed in people aged 40-60 years old. Celiac disease can be painful, but isn't life-threatening. FALSE. It’s true that classic celiac disease symptoms, like stomach pain, bone pain, fatigue, headaches, skin rash, and digestive issues, won’t kill patients outright. However, undiagnosed or untreated, celiac disease can trigger other autoimmune disorders, and leave patients at much greater risk of developing certain types of deadly cancer. A little gluten is okay for people with celiac disease and gluten-intolerance to eat. FALSE. Gluten levels above 20 parts per million can cause adverse immune reactions and chronic damage in people with celiac disease. Read more about celiac disease, gluten, gluten-free and gluten intolerance facts at Celiac.com.
  7. Celiac.com 09/25/2018 - In a patent application that could have a huge impact on the gluten-free industry, General Mills, Inc. has described its method and system for removing foreign, gluten-containing grains to establish gluten-free oats. Current FDA guidelines require all products labeled gluten-free to have a maximum gluten content of 20 parts per million (ppm). Published August 23rd, patent application No. US 20180236453 A1 details a method for producing oat grains with gluten levels below 20 ppm and, more preferably, below 10 ppm. Natural oats generally do not contain gluten, but after harvest, transport and storage, large batches of raw oats may contain small amounts of gluten-containing grains, such as wheat, barley, rye and triticale. These can sometimes occur at levels exceeding 20 ppm. The General Mills patent application describes a method of arranging mechanical oat sorting operations in series, or in both series and parallel operations. The multi-step process best includes width grading, multiple length grading steps, along with a potential de-bearding step. The resulting oats will be gluten-free to under 20 ppm, and possibly to under 10 ppm, and are suitable for the production of gluten-free oat food products, including cereals and granolas. To receive a patent, General Mills will have to prove that their process does what they say it does. A successful patent for General Mills could have a huge effect on the gluten-free oat foods industry. For one, it may allow General Mills to become a major supplier of gluten-free oats for other manufacturers. The benefits of larger scale, more economical gluten-free oat production could include more, and more readily available, gluten-free oat products, along with lower prices for both manufacturers and consumers. Stay tuned for more developments on this and related stories. Read more at Justicia.com
  8. Celiac.com 10/01/2018 - A team of researchers recently set out to establish the rates of epilepsy in patients with celiac disease or gluten sensitivity and vice versa and to characterize aspects of the epileptic syndromes presented by these patients. The research team included Thomas Julian, Marios Hadjivassiliou, and Panagiotis Zis. They are variously affiliated with the Sheffield Institute for Translational Neuroscience University of Sheffield in Sheffield, UK; and the Academic Department of Neurosciences Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust Sheffield, UK. The team conducted a systematic computer-based literature search on the PubMed database, and gathered information on rates, demographics and epilepsy phenomenology. Patients with celiac disease are nearly twice as likely to have epilepsy as the general population. Celiac disease is twice as common in epilepsy patients as in the general population. Researchers still need to do more studies to assess rates of gluten sensitivity in epilepsy patients. The data indicate that the prevalence of celiac disease or gluten sensitivity is higher for certain epilepsy scenarios, including childhood partial epilepsy with occipital paroxysms, adult patients with fixation off sensitivity (FOS) and those with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) with hippocampal sclerosis. Epilepsy in the context of gluten-related disorders is a syndrome of celiac disease, epilepsy and cerebral calcification (CEC syndrome), which is frequently described in the literature. The good news is that gluten-free diet helps to control epilepsy in 53% of cases, either reducing seizure frequency, enabling reduced doses or even termination of anti-epileptic drugs. Patients with epilepsy of unknown cause should receive blood tests for markers of gluten sensitivity, and may benefit from a gluten-free diet. Read more at: Springer.com
  9. Celiac.com 06/22/2015 - Currently available digestive enzymes do not fully degrade gluten, and are thus of questionable use for people with celiac disease or gluten intolerance, say a team of researchers. Prior research had shown that post-proline cutting enzyme effectively degrade the immunogenic gluten peptides. Several existing digestive enzyme supplements claim to promote gluten degradation. The research team set out to assess the degradation of immunogenic gluten epitopes by currently available digestive enzymes. The team included G. Janssen, C. Christis, Y. Kooy-Winkelaar, L. Edens, D. Smith, P. van Veelen, and F. Koning. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Immunohematology and Blood Transfusion, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands, DSM Food Specialties in Delft, The Netherlands, and DSM Food Specialties in South Bend, Indiana, USA. For their study, they assessed five commercially available digestive enzyme supplements along with purified digestive enzymes. They assessed these enzymes using enzyme assays and mass spectrometric identification. They monitored gluten epitope degradation using R5 ELISA, mass spectrometric analysis of the degradation products, and T cell proliferation assays. They found that the enzyme supplements leave the nine immunogenic epitopes of the 26-mer and 33-mer gliadin fragments largely intact. This is due to the high proline content of gluten molecules, which prevents gastrointestinal proteases from fully degrading them, leaving large proline-rich gluten fragments intact, including an immunogenic 33-mer from α-gliadin and a 26-mer from γ-gliadin. These latter peptides can trigger pro-inflammatory T cell responses resulting in tissue remodeling, malnutrition and a variety of other complications. In contrast, the pure enzyme AN-PEP effectively degraded all nine epitopes in the pH range of the stomach at much lower dose. From these results, the team concludes that most of the currently available digestive enzyme supplements are ineffective in degrading immunogenic gluten epitopes, but the AN-PEP do effectively degrade gliadin fragments. Source: PLoS One. 2015 Jun 1;10(6):e0128065. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0128065.
  10. Celiac.com 09/24/2018 - A team of researchers recently set out to investigate the degradation of gluten in rye sourdough products by means of a proline-specific peptidase. The research team included Theresa Walter, Herbert Wieser, and Peter Koehler, with the Deutsche Forschungsanstalt für Lebensmittelchemie, Leibniz Institut in Freising, Germany. Their team monitored gluten content of rye sourdough during fermentation using competitive ELISA based on the R5 antibody. The team noted a decrease in gluten over time, but found that even prolonged fermentation did not bring gluten levels below 20 ppm requirement for gluten-free foods. Interestingly, they did find that Aspergillus niger prolyl endopeptidase (AN-PEP) extensively degraded gluten concentrations of up to 80,000 mg/kg in rye flour, rye sourdough, and sourdough starter under specific temperatures and pH values. Nor did the enzyme inactivate the microorganisms in the sourdough starter. Gluten-free rye flour alone or in combination with sourdough starter was used to produce gluten-free bread, which the team then assessed for its sensory characteristics. Whereas gluten-free sourdough bread lacked any of the favorable qualities of conventional rye bread, the replacement of sourdough by egg proteins yielded gluten-free bread comparable to the conventional rye, and with better qualities than bread made with naturally gluten-free ingredients. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using ANPEP treatment to produce high-quality gluten-free sourdough bread from originally gluten-containing cereals, such as rye. Rye products rendered gluten-free in this manner have the potential to increase the choice of high-quality foods for celiac patients. Source: European Food Research and TechnologyMarch 2015, Volume 240, Issue 3, pp 517–524
  11. Celiac.com 09/14/2018 - Celiac.com was all set to do a story on the latest peer-reviewed data on the Nima gluten testing device, when along comes Gluten-Free Watchdog with another of their famous non-recommendations. Gluten-Free Watchdog says they cannot recommend the Nima gluten test kit because of alleged flaws. But what does the science say? The latest Nima article and Gluten-Free Watchdog’s complaint both focus on the science, so let’s start there. Nima makes two different food sensors: one detects gluten, the other detects peanuts. Each sensor comprises a small, handheld electronic device and a cartridge. To test food, consumers place a pea sized amount into the cartridge, place the cartridge inside the sensor, and run the device. They then receive a smiley face or wheat symbol with "gluten found," depending on whether or not the Nima device detected the allergen. Nima reported their original data in a peer-reviewed scientific journal. Among the conclusions: “Compared with reference R5, Nima antibodies (13F6 and 14G11) had 35- and 6.6-fold higher gliadin affinities, respectively. Nima demonstrated device performance using a comprehensive list of foods, assessing detection sensitivity, reproducibility, and cross-reactivity. Nima presented a 99.0% true positive rate, with a 95% confidence interval of 97.8%–100%.” Gluten Free Watchdog says that: “Based on third party testing data, the Nima Sensor fails to detect gluten at the 20 ppm level over 20 percent of the time. It isn’t until a sample contains a level of gluten at the 40 ppm level, that a gluten found result is received close to 100% of the time.” Gluten Free Watchdog suggests that this is a problem, because: “At a level of gluten in a sample from less than 2 ppm up to a level of gluten between 30 ppm and 40 ppm, the result displayed on the Nima Sensor may be either smiley face or gluten found. If a sample is tested with a Nima Sensor and the result is a smiley face, there is no practical way for a consumer to know if the level of gluten in the sample is less than or more than 20 ppm. If a sample is tested with a Nima Sensor and the result is gluten found, there is no practical way for a consumer to know if the level of gluten in the sample is less than or more than 20 ppm. As a result, the data point received from the Nima Sensor for gluten presents major interpretation problems.” Gluten Free Watchdog charges that Nima uses “NOT the scientifically validated Ridascreen Gliadin R5 ELISA Mendez Method from R-Biopharm used by Gluten Free Watchdog.” The fact is that R5 Elisa remains the industry standard for most testing applications. Gluten Free Watchdog closes its warning with a word from their independent expert: According to Adrian Rogers, Senior Research Scientist at Romer Labs, “It could be argued that the device is not fit for purpose as the company states that there is a clear differentiation between safe and unsafe products based on a 20 ppm level which the validation data does not corroborate.” It’s worth noting that for all his accomplishments, Rogers is neither a doctor, nor a PhD. Rogers' LinkdIn page lists his education as: Bsc (Hons), Microbiology, University of Wales, Aberystwyth. A Bachelor of Science degree may not necessarily make an expert in this subject, yet he is presented as one. Rogers also seems to have a potential conflict of interest that was omitted in Thompson’s press release. Directly from Rogers’ LinkdIn site: “Romer Labs®, Inc. developed an immunochromatographic lateral flow assay for the qualitative detection of gluten in raw ingredients, processed foods, finished food products, and environmental surfaces, using the G12 antibody developed by Belén Morón. The G12 antibody targets a 33-mer peptide which is resistant to enzymatic digestion and heat denaturation, as well as being the fragment of the gliadin protein to which celiac disease sufferers react, making it a reliable analytical marker.” The company Rogers works for, Romer Labs, makes its own gluten testing kits. It seems a bit disingenuous for Gluten Free Watchdog to use a spokesperson from a potentially competing company to try to counteract a peer-reviewed scientific publication for a device which is made by a potential competitor. Nima’s Scientific Advisory Board includes some of the most highly respected celiac disease researchers and scientists in the world. They include: Peter HR Green, MD Phyllis and Ivan Seidenberg Professor of Medicine. Director, Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University; Jody Puglisi, PhD Stanford University Professor of Structural Biology; Lucille Beseler, MS, RDN, LDN, CDE, FAND Family Nutrition Center of South Florida; Benjamin Lebwohl, MD, MS Director of Clinical Research Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University; John Garber, MD Gastroenterology, Mass General; and Thanai Pongdee, MD Consultant, Division of Allergic Diseases, Mayo Clinic. Nima says that Gluten Free Watchdog’s view of their recently published validation is incomplete and misleading. Nima wrote: “All the studies show Nima is highly sensitive across a range of both low and high levels of gluten." "The Nima third party data accurately reported gluten found at 20 ppm and above between 93.3% for food as prepared (a food item that is spiked with an intended quantity of gluten) and 97.2% for food as quantified by an ELISA lab kit (used to determine the exact ppm of gluten in the food)." "The Nima peer reviewed study published in the Food Chemistry Journal reported gluten found at 20 ppm and above at 96.9% accuracy." The statement that: “'Nima will fail to detect gluten at 20 ppm 20% of the time' is almost entirely driven by 1 specific food out of 13 tested. That sample, when quantified, was actually below 20 ppm." "In real life, people get glutened at many different ppm levels, not just 20 ppm. Nima has been shown to detect gluten at levels below, at and above 20 ppm across a variety of foods in a number of studies.” Reading the peer reviewed data provided by Nima, and reading Gluten Free Watchdog’s complaints, it becomes clear that Gluten Free Watchdog’s complaints sound serious and authoritative, but ring a bit hollow. Consider the Following Analogy Imagine a gluten-sniffing dog that performed as well as Nima in scientific trials; same performance, same exact data. You can give this dog a sniff, or a small bite of food, and he can signal you if the food’s got gluten in it with 97% accuracy at 20ppm or below. Nearly 100% accuracy at 40ppm or above (as stated by Gluten Free Watchdog). People would think that the dog was not only cute and fluffy, but wonderfully helpful and everyone would love it, and everyone with celiac disease would want one. And it would be a great big gushing warm and fuzzy feel-good story. Pretty much no one would be arguing that the dog was potentially dangerous, or somehow unfit for people with celiac disease. Such dogs would also be far more expensive to own and maintain than the Nima device. Apparently such dogs can cost upwards of $16,000, not including the cost of food, vet bills, etc. So, what’s the accuracy rate of a gluten-sniffing dog, anyway? From Mercola.com: Willow, a German shorthaired pointer, is another gluten-sniffing dog, in this case living in Michigan. Her owner, Dawn Scheu, says she can detect gluten with 95 percent to 98 percent accuracy. She worked with a trainer (the same one who trained Zeus) to teach her own dog to detect gluten, with excellent results. Gluten-sniffing dogs may detect gluten in amounts as small as .0025 parts per million with 95 percent to 98 percent accuracy. So, will Gluten Free Watchdog be warning against gluten-sniffing dogs anytime soon? Somehow, because Nima is a mechanical device made by a company, it's not so warm and fuzzy, not so feel-good. Maybe Nima needs to shape their device like a cute little doggy, or a Pez candy dispenser? But the data remains, as does the fact, whatever its drawbacks, anything that detects gluten like Nima does, as well as it does, is potentially very helpful for celiac disease in numerous situations. And it is extremely unlikely to do them any harm. Nima seems very much committed to transparency, scientific excellence, and continual product improvement. These are noble goals and generally a win for people with celiac disease. Think of it, just ten years ago, a portable gluten-sensor with the kind of accuracy Nima is reliably achieving would have been the stuff of fantasy. Yet here it is. More accurate than any gluten-sniffing dog, and for a couple hundred bucks. People with celiac disease are living in a very different world than just a few years ago. Nima did not have to publish its data, but it chose to do so, and in a reputable, peer-reviewed scientific journal. Nima conducted its research using solid scientific standards, and reported those results publicly. They explained their methodology and results, they acknowledged product limitations and expressed a commitment to improvement. How is this remotely controversial? The celiac disease community is fortunate to have companies committed to investing time and money into products and devices that help to improve the lives of people with celiac disease. We feel strongly that the perfect should not be the enemy of the good. Devices like the Nima gluten sensor can be helpful for numerous people with celiac disease. Disclosure: Nima is a paid advertiser on Celiac.com. Celiac.com's advertisers do not influence our editorial content. Read Nima’s full report on test data at: Food Chemistry.com Read Gluten Free Watchdog’s Statement on the Nima device at: Glutenfreewatchdog.org Read Nima’s Reply to Gluten Free Watchdog at: Nimasensor.com
  12. Celiac.com 09/18/2018 - With a number of major tennis stars singing the praises of a gluten-free diet, including top players like Novak Djokovic, Swiss great Roger Federer weighed in on the topic. The 20-time Grand Slam winner says that he’s never tried the gluten-free diet, and that he doesn’t not “even know what that all means…I eat healthy, and I think that's what people should do, too, if they have the options. It's sure important the right diet for an athlete.” Djokovic, the 2018 US Open winner has been gluten-free since 2011, and calls the diet his biggest key to his success. For Federer, diet is helpful, but not the whole story. “[Diet] can help you, you know. I mean, I think every athlete should be in good shape. I don't think we should have any fat athletes, to be honest. We do too much sports and we should be too professional to let that happen to ourselves. If it happens, well, we should wake up. You don't have the right entourage. They're not telling you that you're a bit fat. Players try different things, and whatever works for them. I do my thing. It's been very easy and natural and healthy, and it's worked.” So, while Novak Djokovic, and a number of other athletes, have gone gluten-free and continue to tout the benefits, look for Federer to remain faithful to his generally nutritious non-gluten-free diet. Read more at: TennisWorldUSA.org
  13. Celiac.com 09/12/2018 - Many people with celiac disease develop peripheral neuropathy, also known as gluten neuropathy. A team of researchers recently set out to determine rates of neuropathic pain in patients with seemingly idiopathic peripheral neuropathy and gluten sensitivity, and to make note of any contributing factors. They included patients with positive antigliadin, endomysial, and/or transglutaminase antibodies, with or without enteropathy. The research team included P Zis, PG Sarrigiannis, DG Rao, and M Hadjivassiliou. They are affiliated with the Academic Department of Neurosciences, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Glossop Rd, Sheffield, South Yorkshire, UK. They invited all consecutive patients with gluten neuropathy attending a specialist gluten/neurology clinic to participate in the study. They used the DN4 questionnaire and the visual analog scale to assess pain levels. They used the Overall Neuropathy Limitations Scale to assess the severity of neuropathy, along with the Mental Health Index (MHI-5) to assess patients' general mental health status. A total of 33 out of 60 patients with gluten neuropathy showed neuropathic pain. The team found no significant differences between the painful, and the non-painful groups in terms of age, gender, neuropathy severity and neuropathy type. Over half of patients with painless gluten neuropathy followed a strict gluten-free diet, compared with just 21.2% of those with painful neuropathy. Patients with painful gluten neuropathy also showed significantly worse MHI-5 scores. After adjusting for age, gender and MHI-5 scores, multivariate analysis showed that, strict gluten-free diet lowered the odds of peripheral neuropathic pain by nearly 90%. Most patients with gluten neuropathy commonly have neuropathic pain, which is associated with poorer mental health status. A strict gluten-free diet might substantially reduce rates of peripheral neuropathic pain in patients with gluten neuropathy. Read more at: J Neurol. 2018 Jul 21. doi: 10.1007/s00415-018-8978-5.PMID: 30032386
  14. Celiac.com 09/17/2018 - Her name is Hawkeye, she’s a black lab, and her mission is to detect gluten for a young man named Toby, who gets terribly sick if he eats food that contains gluten. Hawkeye is up to 98% accurate at detecting gluten with just a few sniffs. Hawkeye was also expensive, costing a princely $16,000, not including food, and vet bills. That may sound expensive, but, says Toby’s mom, Amy "when you think about it trainers are often training only one to two dogs at a time and our trainer, she only trained one dog at a time and it took a year.” In Toby’s case, the community rallied to raise the money to buy Hawkeye, who is a registered service dog, and so can accompany Toby nearly everywhere. Everyone loves Hawkeye and her role in Toby’s life. Amy calls Hawkeye a “life-giver, and says that Amy continued “she's breathed life and confidence into Toby that we haven't seen in a really long time." She adds that the family has “really seen just growth and development in him because he's not getting sick as often and he's now able to learn more. So he can now say his alphabet, learn his numbers and colors, things that just a year ago he wasn't doing." Gluten-sniffing dogs are rare, but their numbers are growing. The Mercola.com website says that Willow, a gluten-sniffing German shorthaired pointer in Michigan, can detect gluten with 95 percent to 98 percent accuracy. The website Nimasensor.com notes that “[g]luten-sniffing dogs may detect gluten in amounts as small as .0025 parts per million with 95 percent to 98 percent accuracy.” Love the idea of a gluten sniffing dog, but maybe daunted by the price, logistics or commitment? There are portable gluten sensors currently on the market, with greater accuracy than Hawkeye, for a few hundred dollars. Disclosure: Nima Labs is a paid advertiser for Celiac.com
  15. In my house, fall and winter cooking means lots of stews, soups and casseroles. Beef stew is one of my true favorites, and one that I can almost never order at a restaurant, because it almost always contains wheat, either as a thickener, or to dredge the meat for browning. Beef stew is a dish that goes well by itself, or which can be served over rice or gluten-free noodles for a heartier meal. Here is a recipe that will deliver a delicious gluten-free stew that will keep your hungry eaters coming back for more. Ingredients: 2 pounds stew beef 2 tablespoons vegetable oil 2 cups water 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce 1 gluten-free beef bouillon cube (I often use Celifibr's Vegetarian) 5 tablespoons Just Like Lipton's Gluten-Free Soup Mix (Recipe below) 3 whole cloves garlic, peeled 2 bay leaves 1 large onion, sliced 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon sugar 1 teaspoon pepper ½ teaspoon paprika ¼ teaspoon ground allspice 4-5 large carrots, sliced 3-4 potatoes, cubed 3 celery stalks, chopped 2 tablespoons cornstarch Directions: Heat oil in a large stew pot. Stir in meat and cook lightly until meat browns. Add water, Worcestershire sauce, garlic, bay leaves, onion, salt, sugar, pepper, paprika, soup mix, bouillon cube, and allspice. Cover and simmer on low heat for 1½ hours. Remove bay leaves and garlic cloves. Add potatoes, carrots and celery. Cover and cook another 30 to 40 minutes. To thicken gravy, get a large bowl, and mix ¼ cup water and the cornstarch until smooth. Slowly whisk in 2 cups of liquid from the stew pot. Slowly stir mixture into the stew pot. Stir and cook until it reaches desired thickness. Gluten-free Dry Onion Soup Mix Ingredients: 1½ cups dried minced onion ¼ cup beef bouillon powder (gluten-free) 2½ tablespoons onion powder ½ teaspoon crushed celery seed ½ teaspoon sugar Directions: Combine all ingredients and store in an airtight container. About 5 tablespoons equals a single 1¼-ounce package of Lipton's mix.
  16. Celiac.com 09/11/2018 - Gluten sensitivity is the most common sign of celiac disease. Clinical celiac diagnosis usually involves a positive blood test followed by biopsy confirmation of a typical enteropathy. The body’s immune response to celiac disease involves both adaptive and innate immunity, and is marked by anti-gliadin (AGA) and anti-transglutaminase 2 antibodies (tTGA), lymphocytic infiltration in the intestinal epithelial membrane, and expression of multiple cytokines. Researchers know that long pentraxin 3 (PTX3), an acute-phase inflammatory molecule, plays an important role in innate immunity. A pair of researchers recently set out to assess the relationship between Pentraxin 3 and biopsy status in celiac patients. Roberto Assandri and Alessandro Montanelli of the Department of Clinical Pathology, Clinical Chemistry Laboratory ASST Ospedale Maggiore di Crema, Italy, and the Clinical Chemistry Laboratory, Spedali Civili di Brescia, Italy, set out to explore a possible relationship between PTX3 and celiac disease. They used Marsh Histological grade following Marsh criteria classification to dividing 108 celiac disease patients into three groups: Group 1: Marsh 0, patients with a known history of celiac disease under gluten free diet, complete remission; Group 2: Marsh 1 and Marsh 2; Group 3: Marsh 3. As a control group, they used 30 healthy age-matched individuals with no known history of celiac disease or gastrointestinal symptoms. They used sandwich ELISA on an automated platform to measure PTX3 serum levels. They found that PTX3 serum levels were substantially higher in group 3 and group 2 compared with the healthy control group. They found no statistically significant differences between group 1 and the healthy control group. They noted a strong linear correlation between PTX3 serum levels and AGA levels in group 2, and group 3, but no such correlations between PTX3 serum levels and tTGA levels. Blood tests showed that PTX3 correlated with major gastrointestinal damage in celiac patients. PTX3 is a part of the innate immune system’s humoral branch. Data from this study show that PTX3 serum levels are high in active disease patients with pathological levels of AGA. They also show that patients with normal AGA IgA levels had PTX3 serum levels compared to healthy control subjects. The team proposes that PTX3 can modulate the innate response to gliadin in celiac disease, and may also regulate the adaptive immune response. Read more at: Gastroenterology and Hepatology
  17. Celiac.com 09/10/2018 - Anyone diagnosed with celiac disease needs to eat a gluten-free diet if they hope to see their condition improve, and not lead to worse outcomes. So, how much gluten exposure do celiacs get on a gluten-free diet? William F. Balistreri, MD, Director Emeritus, Pediatric Liver Care Center; Medical Director Emeritus, Liver Transplantation at Cincinnati Children's Hospital in Cincinnati, Ohio presented data at this year's Digestive Disease Week that focused on the challenges celiac patients face in trying to follow a gluten-free diet. Gluten-free standards and labels help improve awareness, but even so, eating gluten-free can be a challenge. Anyone with celiac disease can tell you that the chances of accidental gluten contamination are many, and that consent vigilance is required. Even ”gluten-free foods" are not always free from variable amounts of gluten, whether by imprecise food production, processing, packaging, or preparation. Accidental gluten exposure can also come via non-foods, such as lipstick, shampoo, toothpaste and the like. Regular, low-level gluten exposure can cause many celiac patients to have mucosal inflammation despite maintaining a gluten-free diet. Product by product, gluten levels are generally well-known, but not much is known about how much gluten exposure levels in people with celiac disease who are following a gluten-free diet. Such information could be quite helpful in designing disease management and patient follow-up strategies. Gluten immunogenic peptide (GIP) analysis provides direct and quantitative measurement of gluten exposure, has proven useful in diagnosis and clinical management of non-responsive or refractory celiac patients. To figure out the amounts of gluten ingested by highly motivated, educated celiac patients following a gluten-free diet, the research team measured levels of GIPs in food, urine, and stool. They noted the connections between gluten exposure and persistent villous atrophy or related conditions. The study also analyzed food samples from restaurant “doggie bags" saved by the study subjects. The team detected gluten in at least one food sample from nearly 90% of patients consuming a gluten-free diet. That indicates that nearly nine out of ten people with celiac disease, who are trying hard to follow a gluten-free diet, as being exposed to gluten when they eat out. Overall, approximately 33% of food samples tested positive for GIPs above 20 ppm, and the estimated GIPs ingested ranged from 0.23 mg to > 40 mg per exposure. This new information confirms what many people with celiac disease have long suspected. Namely, that avoiding gluten is really hard to do, even for who are highly aware of gluten-related celiac disease issues, and who work hard to avoid gluten. Read more at: Medscape.com
  18. Celiac.com 10/02/2008 - Whole grains are good sources of B-Vitamins and minerals such as calcium, iron, magnesium, and selenium, but one of their most important nutritional benefits is the fiber they bring to our diets. Whole grains such as wheat, brown rice, and oats include both soluble and insoluble fiber. Soluble fiber is easy to remember – it is water soluble, and as such can be assimilated into the body, where it plays an important role in blood sugar regulation and cholesterol balance. Soluble fiber also helps provide a sense of fullness or satiety. Insoluble fiber is - you guessed it - insoluble in water, and is not assimilated into the body, but passes through the digestive tract and is eliminated. That does not mean insoluble fiber has a less important nutritional role to play. Insoluble fiber is very important in keeping our digestive and elimination systems regular. Fiber aids the transit of toxic substances out of the body, and in doing so, helps to reduce the incidence of colon and rectal cancers. In eliminating gluten grains from your diet, have you wondered what you are missing nutritionally? Are you able to get adequate replacements for the nutrients in wheat, barley, rye, and oats, from the other nutritional components of your diet? The answer is a qualified yes. We know this on several levels. For tens of thousands of years, entire cultures have thrived without growing or consuming any of the gluten grains. We also know, from looking at what nutrients gluten grains provide, that there are more than adequate sources of these nutrients in alternative grains, and from vegetable sources. Fiber is something we do need to be aware of, though. Studies have shown that standard gluten-free diets are low in fiber, especially when baking with the “white” alternative products like white or sweet rice flour, tapioca starch, and potato starch. We can remedy this by eating alternative grains in whole, unprocessed states, and by including nuts, seeds, and other sources of fiber such as dried coconut and legumes in our diets. Wheat is an excellent source of Vitamin E, so those on gluten-free diets might want to supplement with a good brand of Vitamin E. Some commercial gluten-free flour blends seek to duplicate white flour, and are made primarily of white rice flour, tapioca starch, and potato starch (see the nutrition comparisons on the next page). These products are nearly devoid of nutrition and contain almost no fiber. Using these types of products result in baked goods that are the nutritional equivalent of wonder-bread. If you didn’t eat wonder-bread before going gluten-free, why should you attempt to duplicate it now? When making your flour blends, coming up with new recipes, and altering traditional wheat-flour recipes, try to include alternative grain products (and sometimes nut flours) that contain substantial amounts of fiber, protein, calcium, and iron, all nutrients found in whole grains, but in much smaller amounts in highly processed grains. Quinoa, sorghum, teff, amaranth, brown rice and millet flour are all good products to try. See the chart attached to this article (the link to it is in the "Attachments" section below) for the nutrient content of the many gluten-free alternative grains, starches, and nut flours. The highest levels of nutrients in each category are noted, and you can see what nutritional powerhouses grains like teff, quinoa, sorghum, and amaranth are compared to white rice flour, tapioca starch, and potato starch.
  19. Hello I made this account tonight because I am need of help by those with more experience than me. Basically since June I've been feeling horrible every morning throughout the entire day. My main symptoms were extreme nausea (no vomiting), stomach pain, constipation, and diarrhea. I was in and out of the doctors doing blood work and taking medicines for other things like ibs and gastritis until we started to think about a month and a half later that it could be celiac or a gluten insensitivity. My typical day was wake up around 9 am, feel nauseous, eat little while drinking water, and feel okay enough to fall asleep around 3 pm for a few hours and wake up feeling better with almost no nausea at all. After seeing a Gastroenterologist and having extensive blood work done, everything came back looking normal (beginning of august). We kept up with gluten free diet while taking protonix and eventually things started to turn around. I was waking up less nauseous and it would only last a few hours or a couple compared to all day. It ended up getting better to the point where i woke up later than 8 or 9 am with finally no nausea or hunger pains and i would be able to eat a fair amount throughout the day and not have any symptoms besides occasional bloating. Something happened last thursday where I woke up with nausea and it lasted a couple hours. It has been the same thing since then and even today was one of my worst days with eating little and nausea being present after eating any meal no matter how small. I never use to get nausea at night and for the past two days i have had it for a couple hours before bed. I canceled my endoscopy that was scheduled for the 27th this monday about a week prior to that date because i had felt so much better but now i regret it. We think ive been glutened but i keep a food journal and i havent been eating anything different than before i had made great progress. Does anyone else have this problem? Does this sound like ive been glutened? Something feels different and although i havent been officially diagnosed celiacs I just dont understand why id be feeling this way after making such great progress. This all comes when im starting up school and an internship and is very inconvenient and depressing. I have my own utensils and cookware that I use and I am extra paranoid and safe about making sure my areas in the kitchen are gluten free and clean. Does anyone have any tips or knowledge about this? Should I call up my doctor again? The nausea was so bad this summer i couldnt work and couldnt do anything besides pace around the house while sipping water with the air conditioner running. Im really hoping i can go back to feeling the way i felt just a week ago so that i can start up my internship and make it to school everyday. I appreciate any and all feedback!
  20. Celiac.com 11/03/2015 - Many people today are dealing with the need to be gluten-free, whether from allergies, intolerance or celiac disease. Being gluten-free can be the difference between being healthy and having chronic, potentially debilitating, symptoms. However, sometimes being gluten-free is not enough. The challenge with a gluten-free diet is that many of the most popular gluten-free flours are actually high in oxalate! Oxalate is a toxin that occurs naturally in most plant foods, but at very different levels, some relatively safe, and some not. Oxalate can even kill at high enough doses. The scientific challenges in the oxalate field, as well as oxalate's potential relationship to celiac sprue, were discussed in the feature article by Susan Costen Owens which appeared in the Spring issue of this journal. In this follow up article, you'll find the practical advice on how you can reduce the level of oxalate in your gluten-free diet. A great example of a popular high oxalate gluten-free flour is almond flour. Almonds are one of the very highest oxalate foods, with about 300 mg of oxalate for one half cup of whole nuts. Given that you will actually have more nuts in a half cup of flour than you will in a half cup of whole nuts, you could have 400 or more milligrams of oxalate in that single half cup of flour. So, your daily morning muffin made with almond flour could be 200-250 mg of oxalate. This means that you may not feel as good on your gluten-free diet as you might expect because your digestive tract can be suffering with ongoing inflammation from a new source – oxalate. Now 250 mg of oxalate might not seem so bad – unless you consider that a low oxalate diet is defined as 40-60 mg of oxalate per day! That makes your morning muffin the equivalent of 4-5 days worth of oxalate, for someone who is eating a typical low-oxalate eating plan. If you've been eating a lot of nut flours, you might be wondering what you can substitute instead? The one nut flour that is low oxalate is coconut flour. This can be a great option, if you like the density of nut flours, and want a flour with higher nutrition. All other nut flours are high; most seed flours are high too. Nuts themselves are some of the highest oxalate foods in nature. Baked products made with nut flours will be particularly high in oxalate – and if you add chocolate, you compound the problem. Unfortunately, this is more bad news for lovers of chocolate baked goods. Chocolate is another extremely high oxalate ingredient: cocoa has more than 35 mg of oxalate per tablespoon and the substitute carob, is no better! Given that many baked goods could easily have 1-2 tablespoons of chocolate or carob per serving, you can see how your oxalate intake could really add up. Of course, this doesn't include the fact that many baked goods – like brownies – will combine both cocoa and nuts, for a double hit of oxalate. The same problem arises with many of our common gluten-free baking flours and spices. They can often add an overload of oxalate to each serving, with the potential for problems later as oxalate accumulates in the body. So, how can you avoid gluten, and not introduce more of a known toxin into your body? The trick is knowing enough about oxalate to avoid it effectively. The first thing to learn is how to get flavor in your food without the oxalate. Oils and extracts are typically much lower in oxalate than the whole herb or spice, and yet retain the flavor for baking and cooking purposes. The process by which oils are pressed and extracts are made appears to leave the oxalate behind. This rule of thumb gives us a way to get the taste we want, and avoid oxalate. For instance, to get a chocolate taste without too much cocoa, you can carefully craft a recipe that balances the use of cocoa with chocolate extract, chocolate flavoring and even a bit of coffee. Using food grade cocoa butter, which has zero oxalate, in place of butter or oil, is another way to boost that chocolate flavor. If you use the lowest oxalate flours as well, you leave some room for a bit more cocoa because you are not adding a lot of oxalate in the flour. By doing this, you can get the flavor you want while avoiding the oxalate. Another example of baking smart is an almond flavored cookie. You can actually make a cookie with almond oil as well as almond extract for extra taste – while almonds themselves are extremely high, both the oil and the extract have almost no oxalate at all! This concept of using oils and extracts is particularly important if you like the sweet taste of cinnamon. Cinnamon is a very high oxalate spice with over 38 mg of oxalate for just one teaspoon! Choose instead cinnamon oil or cinnamon extract. Cinnamon oil is available from various outlets that sell culinary oils. You can get cinnamon extract in the supplement section of your grocery or health food store – generally, it is sold in capsules. When cooking with it, you simply open the capsules and put the powdered extract into your dish. Substitute about the equivalent amount of dry extract for ground cinnamon. The second thing to learn is how to pick low oxalate flours. While many of the gluten-free flours are high in oxalate, the process of picking appropriate flours may not be as hard as it first appears. Oxalate is often present in the "bran" of a grain. As a result, most whole grain flours are actually high in oxalate. This seems strange to us because we are told to get more fiber and eat whole grain. But the truth is that not all whole grains are good for us and we can get our fiber in other ways not so tied to oxalate. Interestingly, most starches are low oxalate (even if they come from high oxalate whole foods), in the same way that oils are low oxalate. This means that starches are our friends when we want to cook! Most starches (including potato, corn, green bean and sweet potato) are low in oxalate, and can be used as part of the flour combination in a baked good to get a lighter, fluffier result. Again, the explanation is similar to the explanation regarding oils and extracts: when we remove the starch from even a high oxalate food, we appear to leave the majority of the oxalate behind. But be careful to get starches and not flours when you are dealing with high oxalate whole foods – items like potato flour or sweet potato flour are extremely high in oxalate, and should be avoided. Only the starches are safe on a low-oxalate eating plan. You can consume some medium oxalate foods, and still remain low oxalate overall. This expands the possible flours that you can use. Good options include white masa (which is a corn flour), green pea, lupin, sorghum, and sweet rice flours. While buckwheat and quinoa are also common in gluten-free foods, these grains are very high in oxalate. You should ideally avoid them. So what do you do if you are used to baking with nut flours? If you want high nutrition flours that are much lower in oxalate than nut flours, look to legume flours. Consider black-eyed pea flour (also called cowpea bean flour), garbanzo bean flour, or yellow pea flour. All of these legume flours are low in oxalate. However, because legume flours can be heavy, combine them with low oxalate starches, like corn, rice, green bean, potato or sweet potato starch to get the right texture in your baked goods. When we combine the lowest oxalate flours with others that are medium (and sometimes small amounts of higher oxalate flours), we can get the right kind of flavor and texture, yet remain low in oxalate per serving. A great example is a flour mix that contains a variety of flours. One easy combination of flours is ½ cup of sweet rice flour (medium oxalate), with ½ cup of coconut flour (medium oxalate), ½ cup of potato starch (low oxalate) and ½ cup of cornstarch (low oxalate). This particular flour combination can be used in crepes, and results in a crepe that has the same kind of stretch that you have with gluten flours, because of the properties of the various flours used in the combination. While some of us will be experimental and will like the idea of playing with flours and starches to develop our own recipes, others will not. If you are looking for a good quality gluten-free flour mix that you can use at home, consider Orgran. Another great option for baking (as well as pancakes) is gluten-free Bisquick. So far we've presumed that you are baking or making your own gluten-free items. But what if you are buying packaged gluten-free foods? When looking at baked goods, look for starches in the first five ingredients. So, you should see low oxalate flours early in the ingredients, because these will be the largest components of your baked good. Avoid items with buckwheat flour, hemp, quinoa, sesame seeds, and teff in general. All of these ingredients are so high in oxalate, that even small amounts would be a problem. While tapioca starch and white rice flour are high in oxalate, in smaller amounts, they should be fine. If you are considering reducing oxalate in your diet, the best way to do that is slowly! When you reduce oxalate too quickly, you can experience stressful symptoms as the oxalate that is stored in your body leaves too quickly. The process of oxalate moving out of your tissues and into your blood, seeking then a site of secretion, is called "dumping" by our project since it is a very common experience. This can be the culprit behind digestive symptoms, fatigue, brain fog, rashes and other symptoms. Ideally, you would slowly phase high oxalate foods out of your diet. So rather than completely abandoning your morning muffin made with almond flour, you would slowly reduce your portion by ¼ of a muffin per week, until you were no longer eating an almond flour muffin after 4 weeks. During those 4 weeks, you slowly introduce your new morning muffin, ¼ at a time, which is now made with coconut flour. You would also want to remove only one food at a time in this way – so that oxalate is very slowly phased out, and you can also use up some of the high oxalate foods that you have in your home. It's not only easier on your body to do this change slowly, but it's also easier on your pocket book! Oxalate is not just an issue with grains and flours – it can also be an issue with other foods. So while this article has focused more on the specific issues with gluten-free baking and cooking, there are other high oxalate foods that you need to be aware of if you want to reduce oxalate in your overall diet. You may have heard or seen information that points at leafy greens as high oxalate foods. While such common staples as spinach, beets and Swiss chard are extremely high in oxalate, you can enjoy other greens in a healthy diet. Consider other leafy greens like arugula, turnip greens, mustard greens or certain varieties of kale, like dino / lacinto or purple, to get leafy veggies in your diet. Most lettuces are low in oxalate and high in nutrition, including romaine and leaf lettuce. Eating low oxalate does not have to mean removing whole food groups from your diet, nor losing all your high nutrition options! Many of the common fruits are lower in oxalate and can be incorporated in your diet – including berries. Many people have mistakenly heard that all berries are high oxalate. Testing done by Dr. Michael Liebman of the University of Wyoming shows this is not true! According to test results from his lab, both blueberries and strawberries are low oxalate, and raspberries are medium oxalate. So while you might want to avoid blackberries (which are very high in oxalate), you can safely eat other healthy berries. However, other fruit can be extremely high in oxalate. Citrus can be tricky because it's important to know not just which fruit you are eating, but which parts. Many citrus juices, like grapefruit, orange, lemon and lime, are low oxalate per serving, so you can still get the taste of these items when cooking with the juice. But don't eat a lot of grapefruit – the whole fruit is high oxalate. Similarly, if you use citrus zest for extra flavor, you'll find that it's a problem: the oxalate levels are too high. Sometimes you need to know the variety of a food, or need to watch your serving size. Pears are a great example. Some varieties of pears have tested low; others have tested high. When choosing pears, go for Bartlett (also called Williams pear). Many exotic and tropical fruits are high, including kiwi, figs, papaya, gauva, and pomegranate. Some are so high that they could be dangerous to consume in a single serving! Star fruit has this dubious distinction: it is so high that people have had seizures and even died from eating star fruit when their kidneys were in trouble. It is important to recognize that many of the foods that we think of as being the healthiest may also contain a lot of oxalate. Vegans can be particularly susceptible to eating a very high oxalate diet, as they may be getting their protein primarily from high oxalate legumes, including soybeans. If you want to include legumes in your diet for the fiber and nutritional benefits, focus on the low and medium oxalate legumes. That list includes red, green, brown and yellow lentils, green peas, red kidney beans, tofu, garbanzo beans, yellow and green split peas, lima beans and black-eyed peas. Note that tofu is okay – but whole soybeans are not. This is one of the most challenging aspects of the diet. Some foods are okay in the right form, or with the proper processing. So much as extracts, oils and starches are lower in oxalate than the whole foods they come from, some processed forms of foods are lower than the whole, unprocessed food. So you can eat tofu – but don't eat edamame. A last point that can help you to reduce oxalate in your diet is to consider how a food is cooked. When a food is boiled, you may actually reduce the amount of oxalate in the food. Oxalate can be soluble, and so it will leach into the cooking water, and can then be thrown away. There is no other cooking method that can reliably reduce oxalate, other than cooking or soaking in water. However, this flies in the face of current nutritional advice, which focuses on eating as many foods as possible raw. While you don't have to boil everything you eat – there are a number of very low oxalate veggies and fruits that can be eaten and enjoyed raw – boiling can be a valuable strategy to reduce this known toxin, and leave you with a more nutritious end result. If you have more questions about oxalate and your diet, please see the website www.lowoxalate.info. There is also an associated support group, which is currently at Yahoo, called Trying_Low_Oxalates. In addition, we have a Facebook group with the same name. On Facebook, we also have two additional recipe groups, one of which is focused specifically on vegan eating. These support groups can help you to make lower oxalate choices part of your diet and can also help you gain a perspective on how oxalate may have been affecting other issues in your health. Lower Oxalate Flours, Starches and Products Potato starch Cornstarch Green Bean starch Sweet Potato starch Flax meal / seed White masa corn flour Green pea flour Lupin flour White rice flour Sweet rice flour Coconut flour Black-eyed pea (cowpea) flour Garbanzo bean (chickpea) flour Water chestnut flour Yellow pea flour Low Oxalate per serving General Mills Corn Chex (1/2 cup) General Mills Rice Chex (1/2 cup) Arrowhead Mills gluten-free Popcorn (1 cup) Eden Kuzu Pasta (1/2 cup) Thai Kitchen Rice Noodles (1/2 cup) Annie's Homegrown Macaroni and Cheese, gluten-free (1/2 cup) Tinkyada White Rice Spaghetti (1/2 cup) Lotus Foods Bhutan Red Rice (1/2 cup cooked) Higher Oxalate Gluten-free Products Medium oxalate per serving Udi's White Sandwich Bread (1 slice) Nabisco Cream of Rice (1/4 cup dry) Envirokids Gorilla Munch (1 cup) Orville Redenbacher's Popcorn (1 cup) Mission Yellow Corn Tortillas (1) Tinkyada Brown Rice Spaghetti (1/2 cup cooked) Tolerant Foods Red Lentil Rotini (1/2 cup cooked) Lundberg Brown Jasmine Rice, boiled (1/2 cup) Extremely High Oxalate foods Beans (Anasazi, Black/Turtle, Cannellini, Great Northern, Navy, Pink, Pinto, Red, Soy, White) Cactus/Nopal Carob Cocoa Powder/dark and milk chocolate Fruits (Apricot, Blackberries, Figs, Guava, Kiwi, Pomegranate, Rhubarb, Star Fruit/Carambola) Grains (Amaranth, Buckwheat, Quinoa, Teff) Nuts (Almonds, Cashew, Brazil, Hazelnut/filberts, Macadamia, Peanuts/Spanish Peanuts, Pine) Seeds (Caraway, Chia, Hemp, Poppy, Sesame) Herbs/Spices (Allspice, Cinnamon, Clove, Cumin, Curry Powder, Ginger, Onion Powder, Turmeric) Potatoes (Russet, Burbank, Idaho, Fingerling) Vegetables (Artichoke, Beets, Eggplant, Hearts of Palm, Jerusalem Artichokes, Okra, Plantain, Swiss chard, Spinach, Sweet Potato/Yam) Guide to Lower Oxalate Substitutions (chart on substitutions is used by permission from: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Low-Ox-Coach/551330634959001/) High Oxalate Ingredient(s) What it's used for Lower Oxalate Substitution Spinach Greens in a stir fry Cooks down for sauces / dips ARUGULA. Similar flavour and consistency. Substitute one for one. Beets Greens in a stir fry Sweet root veggie Used for detox For stir-fries, try other greens, like turnip or kohl rabi. You can also use red cabbage for a red veggie (if you need something red). Try boiled carrots or parsnip for dishes that need a root veggie. If you want a gentle detox, try lemon juice in water to start your day. Swiss Chard Greens in a stir fry Steamed Boiled Dino / Lacinto Kale. Lowest ox when boiled. Can also try mustard greens or dandelion greens. Almonds Snack Baking Gluten free crusts For snacks, try pumpkin seeds. For baking, either go to coconut flour (rather than almond flour) or use a lower ox nut and smaller quantities. For bread, try pumpkin seed butter or sunflower seed butter. Pecans or walnuts are the lowest ox nuts. Almond or peanut butter Spread for bread Sunflower seed butter, macadamia nut butter, pumpkin seed butter, golden pea butter (golden pea is the lowest oxalate) Sesame seeds Used for both flavour and as the whole seed While sesame seeds are high, the oil is zero oxalate! So, try using either plain or toasted sesame seed oil to flavour dishes. Most dried beans, including red beans, adzuki beans, black beans, etc Chili Savory dishes Dips Try subbing lower ox legumes like black-eyes peas, red lentils, green and yellow split peas, garbanzo beans and lima beans. Brown rice Side dish Casseroles Stir-fries Sub with either brown rice that is soaked, drained and cooked like pasta (in lots of water), or use white rice. Uncle Ben's is one of the lowest rices. Chocolate / Cocoa Desserts of all kinds! Try lesser amounts of chocolate, or a combination of cocoa and chocolate flavoured stevia. Also, can sub white chocolate in many applications, like white chocolate chips for cookies. In a recipe, sub food grade cocoa butter in place of other specified oils / butter. Tomato sauce Sauces Casseroles Pastas Instead of 100% tomato sauce, sub with 1-2 tablespoons of tomato paste, ½ cup pumpkin or butternut squash puree and water to thin as required. Add appropriate spices for the dish. Black tea Beverages Decaf green tea, many herbal teas or coffee Nutmeg Spice Mace Black pepper Spice White pepper Sweet potatoes Dishes of all kinds Butternut squash or other suitable squash with the right texture and flavour. Onion, carrot and celery to use to start soup One of the most common combinations to start soup or stir fry Garlic, shallot and red pepper is a favourite. You can also use garlic, shallot and green cabbage. Lemon or orange rind Dishes of all kinds Lemon or orange juice, with a thickener. In some cases, lemon or orange extract. Cinnamon Dishes of all kinds Cinnamon extract (purchased in a dry capsule supplement at the health food store. Break open capsules and put contents in your dish). Regular potatoes Boiled, or used in dishes Baked You can boil new, red-skinned, white-fleshed potatoes and then add to dishes. You can also sub cauliflower or radishes, 1 to 1. (Radishes are great cooked!) To sub for a baked potato or for a dish that uses potato raw, try rutabaga or turnip (which can be scalloped or turned into a baked fry.) Regular pasta Usually for main dishes or side dishes Zucchini "noodles", or cornstarch noodles, or other tested and low ox pasta like Shiritaki noodles (which are also low carb and zero calories). You can get cornstarch "angel hair" pasta or Shiritaki noodles at Asian food markets. Oatmeal Breakfast Baking Sub with ½ oatmeal and ½ flax meal for cooked cereal with the same texture but lower oxalate. Turmeric Baking Flavor Sub with curcumin extract. This can be purchased as a health supplement in capsules. Capsules can be opened and the contents added to food and beverages. Ground ginger Baking Flavor Sub with fresh ginger or ginger root extract. From the author: If you have ever been diagnosed with an autoimmune disease and have been trying to lower oxalate, will you participate in the development of this science by filling out a survey? We would also like to find out whether reducing oxalate has affected your autoimmune condition. The link to our survey is here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/CMN5KK7
  21. Celiac.com 07/10/2006 - Increased consumption of gluten, according to Dr. Michael Marsh, raises the risk of celiac disease symptoms1. Although these symptoms may not indicate celiac disease, they reflect some biological realities. Grain-based foods simply do not offer the nutrients necessary to human health and they damage the human body. USDA and Canada Food Guides notwithstanding, if people eat grain-laden diets, they may develop symptoms of celiac disease (but in most cases, without the diagnostic intestinal lesion). The connection between eating disorders and celiac disease is well known and well documented2,3,4,5. Thus, the dynamics at work in celiac disease may offer insight into the broader realm of obesity, especially among those who are eating the recommended, daily quantities of grain-derived foods, while attempting to keep their weight down by eating low-fat foods. The primary, defining characteristic of celiac disease is gluten induced damage to the villi in the intestinal lining. Since malabsorption of vitamins and minerals are well known in the context of celiac disease, it should not be surprising that some celiac patients also demonstrate pica (Pica is an ailment characterized by eating dirt, paint, wood, and other non-food substances). Other celiac patients eat excessive quantities of food, coupled with a concurrent failure to gain weight. Yet another, perhaps larger, group of celiac patients refuse to eat (One may wonder if the latter find that eating makes them feel sick so they avoid it). Perhaps the most neglected group is that large portion of untreated celiac patients who are obese. Dr. Dickey found that obesity is more common than being underweight among those with untreated celiac disease6. When I ran a Medline search under the terms "obesity" and "celiac disease" 75 citations appeared. A repeated theme in the abstracts and titles was that celiac disease is usually overlooked among obese patients. While obesity in celiac disease may be common, diagnosis appears to be uncommon. Given the facts, I certainly believe that some of the North American epidemic of obesity can be explained by undiagnosed celiac disease. However, that is only a small part of the obesity puzzle, and I suspect that celiac disease may offer a pattern for understanding much of the obesity that is sweeping this continent. One example, a woman diagnosed by Dr. Joe Murray when he was at the University of Iowa, weighed 388 pounds at diagnosis7. Dr. Murray explained her situation as an over-compensation for her intestinal malabsorption. I want to suggest a two faceted, alternative explanation which may extend to a large and growing segment of the overweight and obese among the general population. As mentioned earlier, anyone consuming enough gluten will demonstrate some symptoms of celiac disease. If large scale gluten consumption damages the intestinal villi—but to a lesser degree than is usually required to diagnose celiac disease—fat absorption will be compromised. Deficiencies in essential fatty acids are a likely consequence. The natural response to such deficiencies is to crave food despite having absorbed sufficient calories. Even when caloric intake is huge, and excess calories must be stored as body fat, the need to eat continues to be driven by the bodys craving for essential fats. Due to gluten-induced interference with fat absorption, consumption of escalating quantities of food may be necessary for adequate essential fatty acid absorption. To further compound the problem, pancreatic glucagon production will be reduced, compromising the ability of the individual to burn these stored fats, while the cells continue to demand essential fats. Poor medical advice also contributes to the problem. The mantra of reduced fat continues to echo in the offices of health professionals despite a growing body of converse research findings. In February of this year, the results of a powerful, eight year study of almost 49,000 women showed little difference between the health of women consuming low fat diets when compared to those consuming normal diets8. Alarmingly, this low fat diet seems to have resulted in weight gain, a well recognized risk factor for a variety of diseases. For some of us, this result was predictable. The likely result of a low-fat diet is an increased intake of carbohydrates while food cravings are fuelled by a deficiency of essential fatty acids. If my sense of the underlying problem (caloric excess combined with essential fatty acid deficiency due to fat malabsorption at the microvilli) is accurate, then a low fat diet is exactly the wrong prescription. Many obese persons are condemned, by such poor medical advice, to a life of ever deepening depression, autoimmune diseases, and increasing obesity. At the end of the day, when these folks drop dead from heart attacks, strokes, or some similar disaster, the self-righteous bystanders will just know that the problem was a lack of willpower. I watched my mom steadily gain weight for 35 years. I watched her exercise more will power beyond the capacity of most folks. Still, she could not resist her compulsive eating. I have seen her take something from the freezer and chew on it while agreeing that she had just eaten a very large meal and should feel full. In December of 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease. According to the published experts in this area, my mom should also have been invited for testing. Yet, when asked for testing, her doctor refused her. Through persistence, and a pervasive faith in her son, mom finally (after months of negotiation) swayed her doctor to do the anti-gliadin antibody blood test. Despite the fact that she had been on a reduced gluten diet for the past year, her antibody levels were elevated. She never sought a biopsy diagnosis, and the EMA and tTG were not available here in Canada at that time. However, she has been gluten-free for the past seven years or so. She dropped a considerable amount of weight. Her weakness was never will power. She was battling an instinct so basic that few of us could have resisted. That, I think, is the story behind much of North American obesity. The widespread, excessive consumption of gluten at every meal, in addition to the low-fat religion that has been promulgated throughout the land, is resulting in intestinal damage and a widespread deficiency in essential fats is among North Americans. Ron Hoggan is an author, teacher and diagnosed celiac who lives in Canada. His book "Dangerous Grains" can be ordered at www.celiac.com. Rons Web page is: www.DangerousGrains.com References: Marsh, Michael N. Personal communication. 2002. Ferrara, et. al. "Celiac disease and anorexia nervosa" New York State Journal of Medicine 1966; 66(8): 1000-1005. Gent & Creamer "Faecal fats, appetite, and weight loss in the celiac syndrome" Lancet 1968; 1(551): 1063-1064. Wright, et. al. "Organic diseases mimicking atypical eating disorders" Clinical Pediatrics 1990; 29(6): 325-328. Grenet, et. al. "Anorexic forms of celiac syndromes" Annales de Pediatrie 1972; 19(6): 491-497. Dickey W, Bodkin S. Prospective study of body mass index in patients with coeliac disease. BMJ. 1998 Nov 7;317(7168):1290. Murray, J. Canadian Celiac Association National Conference. 1999. Howard BV, Van Horn L, Hsia J, et. al. Low-fat dietary pattern and risk of cardiovascular disease: the Womens Health Initiative Randomized Controlled Dietary Modification Trial. JAMA. 2006 Feb 8;295(6):655-66.
  22. Celiac.com 08/22/2018 - There’s been some data to support the idea that local pharmacists might have an important role to play in helping people with celiac disease to remain gluten-free by providing information about possible gluten in drugs, and even liaising with manufacturers for gluten information on the patient’s behalf, as needed. But how solid is your local pharmacist when it comes to celiac disease awareness? A team of researchers recently set out to evaluate pharmacists' knowledge of celiac disease, and to look for areas where further information may be beneficial. The research team included Carmela Avena-Woods, PharmD, BS Pharm; Robert A. Mangione, EdD; and Wenchen Kenneth Wu, PhD, MBA. They are all with St. John's University in Queens, New York. To gather data for their evaluation, their team sent a survey to community pharmacists who practice in a national chain pharmacy in one region of New Jersey and New York. A total of 418 pharmacists, just under 40%, responded to the survey. Sixty percent of the responses correctly noted that there are currently no federal regulations requiring manufacturers to designate medications as gluten-free. Still, forty percent got that wrong. Perhaps most alarmingly, of the pharmacists who claimed a basic or advanced understanding of celiac disease, only 27% correctly indicated that celiac disease is both an autoimmune and a chronic lifelong disease. Interestingly, twenty percent of pharmacists said they often suggested a change of diet to people with suspected celiac disease before a clinical diagnosis was made. This study suggests that community pharmacists have some understanding of celiac disease, but that additional celiac education is advisable if they are to play an integral role in helping people with celiac disease to maintain a gluten-free diet. Read more at: Am J Pharm Educ. 2018;82(2)
  23. Celiac.com 08/29/2018 - Up to one in twelve patients with gluten sensitivity develops neurological symptoms such as ataxia, dementia, seizures or peripheral neuropathy, though the reasons for this are still poorly understood. As a means of better understanding the immunological mechanisms behind this reality, a team of researchers recently reported the case of a 68‐year‐old male patient suffering from progressive ataxia and dementia associated with chronic diarrhea, and both elevated IgG and IgA antigliadin‐antibodies. The research team included Michel Mittelbronn, Jens Schittenhelm, Gellert Bakos, Rob A. De Vos, Manfred Wehrmann, Richard Meyermann, and Katrin Bürk. They are variously affiliated with the Institute of Brain Research at the University of Tübingen, and the Institute for Cell Biology, Department of Immunology at the University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany, the Neurological Institute/Edinger Institute, Goethe University Medical School, Frankfurt, the Department of Pathology, St. Georg Hospital, Leipzig, Germany, and with the Laboratory for Pathology, Enschede, the Netherlands. Autopsy indicated that frequent argyrophilic glial and neuronal inclusions within the basal nucleus of Meynert were the structural markers of the cognitive decline. The patient showed substantial neuronal loss in the cerebellar cortex and the inferior olives, along with infiltrating CD8+/perforin+/granzyme B+ cells, and reactive astrogliosis and microglial activation. In patients with gluten sensitivity and neurological disease, it is likely that CD8+ cytotoxic T and NK cells function as effector cells that trigger neuronal cell death, and thus might play some role in triggering cerebellar symptoms in gluten ataxia cases. The team concludes by noting that an absence of B‐ or plasma cells, along with multiple CD8+, granzyme B and perforin expressing cells in ataxia‐associated brain areas, indicates pronounced cytotoxic effects in neuro-pathogenesis of gluten sensitivity. This is one of the first reports to indicate that CD8+, perforin+, and granzyme B+ effector cells infiltrate the cerebellum and inferior olives in cases of gluten ataxia. Read more in: Neuropathology
  24. The Nima Sensor is the first and only portable sensor that tests food for gluten in just a few minutes. Perfect for dining out, school cafeterias, and travel, Nima is an extra precaution that helps you feel confident about your food. Trusted science Nima is pioneering this new technology and has been awarded funding from the National Institutes of Health. The antibody-based chemistry was developed by MIT scientists to enable use right at the dinner table. Learn more → Easy to use Nima is the fastest and easiest lab test you'll ever run. Put a little bit of food into a new Nima gluten test capsule. Insert capsule into the sensor and press start. In a few minutes, Nima will display the test result. If gluten is detected, a wheat symbol will appear. Otherwise, a smile will show up if the sample contains less than 20 parts per million (ppm) of gluten. Nima users can then share their results to the Nima app and with the gluten-free community. With a growing map of Nima-tested restaurants and packaged foods, anyone can browse a myriad of gluten-free options at their fingertips! Learn more → What People Are Saying "I cannot say enough about this product. It has given myself and my daughter (both celiac) the confidence to eat outside of our own kitchen. We began avoiding eating out after being glutened time and time again without knowing exactly the source of the gluten. Now that we have our beloved Nima, we can be completely sure whether or not we are safe to eat the product we have tested. Seriously, this product has given us freedom that we haven't felt for many years since being diagnosed as celiac. We quite literally do not leave home without it. It is absolutely worth every penny.” — Vickie E. "We have two kids recently diagnosed with Celiac Disease. Nima makes the difficult adjustment to a gluten free diet so much easier. Since getting Nima, we have been able to take family trips and eat out at restaurants again. It was surprising to see how many things that say “gluten free” have cross-contamination." — Mark G. Payment plans and FSA/HSA Reimbursement Since Nima is an important part of living a gluten-free lifestyle, Nima’s Gluten Sensor and Test Capsules are FSA/HSA reimbursable. You can also pay through PayPal, or through a payment plan offered on their website. To get your own Nima Starter Kit and stay up-to-date with the latest Nima news and events, visit their site.
  25. A Acacia Gum Acesulfame K Acesulfame Potassium Acetanisole Acetophenone Acorn Quercus Adipic Acid Adzuki Bean Acacia Gum Agar Agave Albumen Alcohol (Distilled Spirits - Specific Types) Alfalfa Algae Algin Alginic Acid Alginate Alkalized Cocoa Allicin Almond Nut Alpha-amylase Alpha-lactalbumin Aluminum Amaranth Ambergris Ammonium Hydroxide Ammonium Phosphate Ammonium Sulphate Amylose Amylopectin Annatto Annatto Color Apple Cider Vinegar Arabic Gum Arrowroot Artichokes Artificial Butter Flavor Artificial Flavoring Ascorbic Acid Aspartame (can cause IBS symptoms) Aspartic Acid Aspic Astragalus Gummifer Autolyzed Yeast Extract Avena Sativia (Oats3) Avena Sativia Extract (from Oats3) Avidin Azodicarbonamide B Baking Soda Balsamic Vinegar Beeswax Beans Bean, Adzuki Bean, Hyacinth Bean, Lentil Bean, Mung Bean Romano (Chickpea) Bean Tepary Benzoic acid Besan (Chickpea) Beta Glucan (from Oats) Betaine Beta Carotene BHA BHT Bicarbonate of Soda Biotin Blue Cheese Brown Sugar Buckwheat Butter (check additives) Butylated Hydroxyanisole Butyl Compounds C Calcium Acetate Calcium Carbonate Calcium Caseinate Calcium Chloride Calcium Disodium Calcium Hydroxide Calcium Lactate Calcium Pantothenate Calcium Phosphate Calcium Propionate Calcium Silicate Calcium Sorbate Calcium Stearoyl Lactylate Calcium Stearate Calcium Sulfate Calrose Camphor Cane Sugar Cane Vinegar Canola (Rapeseed) Canola Oil (Rapeseed Oil) Caprylic Acid Carageenan Chondrus Crispus Carbonated Water Carboxymethyl Cellulose Caramel Color Caramel Flavoring Carmine Carnauba Wax Carob Bean Carob Bean Gum Carob Flour Carrageenan Casein Cassava Manihot Esculenta Castor Oil Catalase Cellulose1 Cellulose Ether Cellulose Gum Cetyl Alcohol Cetyl Stearyl Alcohol Champagne Vinegar Channa (Chickpea) Chana Flour (Chickpea Flour) Cheeses - (most, but check ingredients) Chestnuts Chickpea Chlorella Chocolate Liquor Choline Chloride Chromium Citrate Chymosin Citric Acid Citrus Red No. 2 Cochineal Cocoa Cocoa Butter Coconut Coconut Vinegar Collagen Colloidal Silicon Dioxide Confectioner's Glaze Copernicia Cerifera Copper Sulphate Corn Corn Gluten Corn Masa Flour Corn Meal Corn Flour Corn Starch Corn Sugar Corn Sugar Vinegar Corn Syrup Corn Syrup Solids Corn Swetener Corn Vinegar Corn Zein Cortisone Cotton Seed Cotton Seed Oil Cowitch Cowpea Cream of Tartar Crospovidone Curds Cyanocobalamin Cysteine, L Dal (Lentils) D-Alpha-tocopherol Dasheen Flour (Taro) D Dates D-Calcium Pantothenate Delactosed Whey Demineralized Whey Desamidocollagen Dextran Dextrin Dextrimaltose Dextrose Diglycerides Dioctyl Sodium Dioctyl Sodium Solfosuccinate Dipotassium Phosphate Disodium Guanylate Disodium Inosinate Disodium Phosphate Distilled Alcohols Distilled Vinegar Distilled White Vinegar Dutch Processed Cocoa E EDTA (Ethylenediaminetetraacetic Acid) Eggs Egg Yolks Elastin Ester Gum Ethyl Alcohol Ethylenediaminetetraacetic Acid Ethyl Maltol Ethyl Vanillin Expeller Pressed Canola Oil F FD&C Blue No. 1 Dye FD&C Blue No. 1 Lake FD&C Blue No. 2 Dye FD&C Blue No. 2 Lake FD&C Green No. 3 Dye FD&C Green No. 3 Lake FD&C Red No. 3 Dye FD&C Red No. 40 Dye FD&C Red No. 40 Lake FD&C Yellow No. 5 Dye FD&C Yellow No. 6 Dye FD&C Yellow No. 6 Lake Ferric Orthophosphate Ferrous Gluconate Ferrous Fumerate Ferrous Lactate Ferrous Sulfate Fish (fresh) Flaked Rice Flax Folacin Folate Flavoring Flavoring Extracts Folic Acid-Folacin Food Starch Food Starch Modified Formaldehyde Fructose Fruit (including dried) Fruit Vinegar Fumaric Acid G Galactose Garbanzo Beans Gelatin Glucoamylase Gluconolactone Glucose Glucose Syrup Glutamate (free) Glutamic Acid Glutamine (amino acid) Glutinous Rice Glutinous Rice Flour Glycerides Glycerin Glycerol Monooleate Glycol Monosterate Glycol Glycolic acid Gram flour (chick peas) Grape Skin Extract Grits, Corn Guar Gum Gum Acacia Gum Arabic Gum Base Gum Tragacanth H Hemp Hemp Seeds Herbs Herb Vinegar Hexanedioic Acid High Fructose Corn Syrup Hominy Honey Hops Horseradish (Pure) HPP HVP Hyacinth Bean Hydrogen Peroxide Hydrolyzed Caseinate Hydrolyzed Meat Protein Hydrolyzed Plant Protein Hydrolyzed Protein Hydrolyzed Soy Protein Hydrolyzed Vegetable Protein Hydroxypropyl Cellulose Hydroxypropyl Methylcellulose Hypromellose I Illepe Iodine Inulin Invert Sugar Iron Ammonium Citrate Isinglass Isolated Soy Protein Isomalt J Job's Tears Jowar (Sorghum) K Karaya Gum Kasha (roasted buckwheat) Keratin K-Carmine Color K-Gelatin Koshihikari (rice) Kudzu Kudzu Root Starch L Lactalbumin Phosphate Lactase Lactic Acid Lactitol Lactose Lactulose Lanolin Lard L-cysteine Lecithin Lemon Grass Lentils Licorice Licorice Extract Lipase L-leucine L-lysine L-methionine Locust Bean Gum L-tryptophan M Magnesium Carbonate Magnesium Hydroxide Magnesium Oxide Maize Maize Waxy Malic Acid Maltitol Maltodextrin (except in pharmaceuticals) Maltol Maltose Manganese Sulfate Manioc Masa Masa Flour Masa Harina Meat (fresh) Medium Chain Triglycerides Menhaden Oil Methyl Cellulose2 Microcrystalline Cellulose Micro-particulated Egg White Protein Milk Milk Protein Isolate Millet Milo (Sorghum) Mineral Oil Mineral Salts Mixed Tocopherols Modified Food Starch Modified Starch Modified food Starch Molybdenum Amino Acid Chelate Monocalcium Phosphate Monoglycerides Mono and Diglycerides Monopotassium Phosphate Monosaccharides Monosodium Glutamate (MSG) Monostearates MSG Mung Bean Musk Mustard Flour Myristic Acid N Natural Flavoring Natural Flavors Natural Smoke Flavor Niacin-Niacinamide Neotame Niacin Niacinamide Nitrates Nitrous Oxide Non-fat Milk Nuts (except wheat, rye & barley) Nut, Acron Nut, Almond O Oats Oils and Fats Oleic Acid Oleoresin Olestra Oleyl Alcohol/Oil Orange B Oryzanol P Palmitic Acid Pantothenic Acid Papain Paprika Paraffin Patially Hydrogenated Cottonseed Oil Patially Hydrogenated Soybean Oil Peas Pea - Chick Pea - Cow Pea Flour Pea Starch Peanuts Peanut Flour Pectin Pectinase Peppermint Oil Peppers Pepsin Peru Balsam Petrolatum PGPR (Polyglycerol Polyricinoleate) Phenylalanine Phosphoric Acid Phosphoric Glycol Pigeon Peas Polenta Polydextrose Polyethylene Glycol Polyglycerol Polyglycerol Polyricinoleate (PGPR) Polysorbates Polysorbate 60 Polysorbate 80 Potassium Benzoate Potassium Caseinate Potassium Citrate Potassium Iodide Potassium Lactate Potassium Matabisulphite Potassium Sorbate Potatoes Potato Flour Potato Starch Povidone Prinus Pristane Propolis Propylene Glycol Propylene Glycol Monosterate Propyl Gallate Protease Psyllium Pyridoxine Hydrochloride Q Quinoa R Ragi Raisin Vinegar Rape Recaldent Reduced Iron Rennet Rennet Casein Resinous Glaze Reticulin Riboflavin Rice Rice (Enriched) Rice Flour Rice Starch Rice Syrup Rice Vinegar Ricinoleic Acid Romano Bean (chickpea) Rosematta Rosin Royal Jelly S Saccharin Saffron Sago Sago Palm Sago Flour Sago Starch Saifun (bean threads) Salt Seaweed Seeds (except wheat, rye & barley) Seed - Sesame Seed - Sunflower Shea Sherry Vinegar Silicon Dioxide Smoke Flavoring Soba (be sure its 100% buckwheat) Sodium Acid Pyrophosphate Sodium Acetate Sodium Alginate Sodium Ascorbate Sodium Benzoate Sodium Caseinate Sodium Citrate Sodium Erythrobate Sodium Hexametaphosphate Sodium Lactate Sodium Lauryl Sulfate Sodium Metabisulphite Sodium Nitrate Sodium Phosphate Sodium Polyphosphate Sodium Silaco Aluminate Sodium Stearoyl Lactylate Sodium Sulphite Sodium Stannate Sodium Tripolyphosphate Sorbic Acid Sorbitan Monostearate Sorbitol-Mannitol (can cause IBS symptoms) Sorghum Sorghum Flour Soy Soybean Soy Lecithin Soy Protein Soy Protein Isolate Spices (pure) Spirits (Specific Types) Spirit Vinegar Starch (the single word ingredient is, by law, cornstarch) Stearates Stearamide Stearamine Stearic Acid Stearyl Lactate Stevia Subflower Seed Succotash (corn and beans) Sucralose Sucrose Sulfosuccinate Sulfites Sulfur Dioxide Sweet Chestnut Flour T Tagatose Tallow Tapioca Tapioca Flour Tapioca Starch Tara Gum Taro Tarro Tarrow Root Tartaric Acid Tartrazine TBHQ is Tetra or Tributylhydroquinone Tea Tea-Tree Oil Teff Teff Flour Tepary Bean Textured Vegetable Protein Thiamin Hydrochloride Thiamine Mononitrate Thiamine Hydrochloride Titanium Dioxide Tofu (Soy Curd) Tolu Balsam Torula Yeast Tragacanth Tragacanth Gum Triacetin Tricalcium Phosphate Tri-Calcium Phosphate Trypsin Turmeric (Kurkuma) TVP Tyrosine U Urad/Urid Beans Urad/Urid Dal (peas) Vegetables Urad/Urid flour Urd V Vinegar (All except Malt) Vanilla Extract Vanilla Flavoring Vanillin Vinegars (Specific Types - Except Malt Vinegar) Vitamin A (retinol) Vitamin A Palmitate Vitamin B1 Vitamin B-12 Vitamin B2 Vitamin B6 Vitamin D Vitamin E Acetate W Waxy Maize Whey Whey Protein Concentrate Whey Protein Isolate White Vinegar Wines Wine Vinegars (& Balsamic) Wild Rice X Xanthan Gum Xylitol Y Yam Flour Yeast (except brewer's yeast) Yogurt (plain, unflavored) Z Zinc Oxide Zinc Sulfate 1) Cellulose is a carbohydrate polymer of D-glucose. It is the structural material of plants, such as wood in trees. It contains no gluten protein. 2) Methyl cellulose is a chemically modified form of cellulose that makes a good substitute for gluten in rice-based breads, etc.
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