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Found 2,701 results

  1. A Abyssinian Hard (Wheat triticum durum) Alcohol (Spirits - Specific Types) Atta Flour B Barley Grass (can contain seeds) Barley Hordeum vulgare Barley Malt Beer (most contain barley or wheat) Bleached Flour Bran Bread Flour Brewer's Yeast Brown Flour Bulgur (Bulgar Wheat/Nuts) Bulgur Wheat C Cereal Binding Chilton Club Wheat (Triticum aestivum subspecies compactum) Common Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Cookie Crumbs Cookie Dough Cookie Dough Pieces Couscous Criped Rice D Dinkle (Spelt) Disodium Wheatgermamido Peg-2 Sulfosuccinate Durum wheat (Triticum durum) E Edible Coatings Edible Films Edible Starch Einkorn (Triticum monococcum) Emmer (Triticum dicoccon) Enriched Bleached Flour Enriched Bleached Wheat Flour Enriched Flour F Farik Farina Farina Graham Farro Filler Flour (normally this is wheat) Freekeh Frikeh Fu (dried wheat gluten) G Germ Graham Flour Granary Flour Groats (barley, wheat) H Hard Wheat Heeng Hing Hordeum Vulgare Extract Hydroxypropyltrimonium Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein K Kamut (Pasta wheat) Kecap Manis (Soy Sauce) Ketjap Manis (Soy Sauce) Kluski Pasta M Maida (Indian wheat flour) Malt Malted Barley Flour Malted Milk Malt Extract Malt Syrup Malt Flavoring Malt Vinegar Macha Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Matza Matzah Matzo Matzo Semolina Meripro 711 Mir N Nishasta O Oriental Wheat (Triticum turanicum) Orzo Pasta P Pasta Pearl Barley Persian Wheat (Triticum carthlicum) Perungayam Poulard Wheat (Triticum turgidum) Polish Wheat (Triticum polonicum) R Rice Malt (if barley or Koji are used) Roux Rusk Rye S Seitan Semolina Semolina Triticum Shot Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Small Spelt Spirits (Specific Types) Spelt (Triticum spelta) Sprouted Wheat or Barley Stearyldimoniumhydroxypropyl Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein Strong Flour Suet in Packets T Tabbouleh Tabouli Teriyaki Sauce Timopheevi Wheat (Triticum timopheevii) Triticale X triticosecale Triticum Vulgare (Wheat) Flour Lipids Triticum Vulgare (Wheat) Germ Extract Triticum Vulgare (Wheat) Germ Oil U Udon (wheat noodles) Unbleached Flour V Vavilovi Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Vital Wheat Gluten W Wheat, Abyssinian Hard triticum durum Wheat Amino Acids Wheat Bran Extract Wheat, Bulgur Wheat Durum Triticum Wheat Germ Extract Wheat Germ Glycerides Wheat Germ Oil Wheat Germamidopropyldimonium Hydroxypropyl Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein Wheat Grass (can contain seeds) Wheat Nuts Wheat Protein Wheat Starch Wheat Triticum aestivum Wheat Triticum Monococcum Wheat (Triticum Vulgare) Bran Extract Whole-Meal Flour Wild Einkorn (Triticum boeotictim) Wild Emmer (Triticum dicoccoides) The following items may or may not contain gluten depending on where and how they are made, and it is sometimes necessary to check with the manufacturer to find out: Amp-Isostearoyl Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein2 Artificial Color2 Baking Powder2 Clarifying Agents2 Coloring2 Dry Roasted Nuts2 Emulsifiers2 Enzymes2 Fat Replacer2 Gravy Cubes2 Ground Spices2 Hydrolyzed Wheat Gluten2 Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein2 Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein Pg-Propyl Silanetriol2 Hydrolyzed Wheat Starch2 Hydrogenated Starch Hydrolysate2 Hydroxypropylated Starch2 Miso2 Natural Juices2 Non-dairy Creamer2 Pregelatinized Starch2 Protein Hydrolysates2 Seafood Analogs2 Seasonings2 Sirimi2 Soba Noodles2 Soy Sauce2 Soy Sauce Solids2 Sphingolipids2 Stabilizers2 Starch1, 2 Stock Cubes2 Suet2 Tocopherols2 Vegetable Broth2 Vegetable Gum2 Vegetable Protein2 Vegetable Starch2 Vitamins2 1) If this ingredient is made in North America it is likely to be gluten-free. 2) Can utilize a gluten-containing grain or by-product in the manufacturing process, or as an ingredient.
  2. Celiac.com 02/20/2015 - Here is Celiac.com's most up-to-date list of gluten-free beers and alcoholic beverages. The gluten status of the products listed below is accurate at the present time. However, as product formulations can change without notice, it is best to verify gluten-free product status by checking the ingredients yourself, or by contacting the manufacturer. Unless gluten is added after distillation, all distilled alcohols are gluten-free. However, US labeling laws prohibit beverages that use cereal grains at any point in the manufacturing process from advertising themselves as 'gluten-free.' Many people with celiac disease choose to avoid distilled beverages that use cereal grains in the manufacturing process, while many others drink them with no adverse effects. So, when you do see a 'gluten-free' label on a distilled beverage, it means that no gluten ingredients have been used at any point in the production process. A List of Naturally Gluten-free Beers Anheuser-Busch Redbridge Bard's Gold Bard's Tale Beer Brasserie Dupont Forêt Libre Brasseurs Sans Gluten Glutenberg Blanche Brunehaut Bio Ambrée Brunehaut Blonde Bio Brunehaut Blanche Burning Brothers Brewing Coors Peak Dogfish Head Craft Brewed Ales: Tweason'ale Drummond Gluten Free Epic Brewing Company: Glutenator Ghostfish Brewery Glutenberg American Pale Ale Glutenberg Blonde Glutenberg Belgian Double Glutenberg India Pale Ale Glutenberg Rousse Green's Discovery Amber Ale Green's Endeavour Green's Enterprise Dry-Hopped Lager Green's India Pale Ale Green's Quest Tripel Blonde Ale Ground Breaker Corsa Rose Gold Ale Ground Breaker IPA No. 5 Ground Breaker Dark Ale Holidaily Brewing Company Ipswich Ale Brewery: Celia Saison Joseph James Brewing Fox Tail Lakefront New Grist Ginger Style Ale Lakefront New Grist Pilsner Style Minhas Lazy Mutt Gluten Free Mongozo Premium Pilsener New Planet Belgian Style Ale New Planet Blonde Ale New Planet Pale Ale New Planet Raspberry Ale New Planet Seclusion IPA New Planet Tread Lightly Session Ale Nickel Brook Gluten Free Nouvelle France La Messagère Nouvelle-France Messagère Aux Fruits Nouvelle-France Messagère Red Ale Schnitzer Bräu Hirse Lemon Schnitzer Bräu Hirse Premium Sprecher Brewing Company's Shakparo Ale Steadfast Beer gluten-free Blonde and Pale Ales Steadfast Beer Company's Oatmeal Cream Stout To Øl Reparationsbajer Gluten Free Whistler Forager A List of Gluten-Removed Beers Alley Kat Scona Gold Kölsch Brunehaut Bio Tripel Estrella Damm Daura Estrella Damm Daura Marzen Lammsbräu Glutenfrei Lager Beer Mikkeller American Dream Gluten Free Mikkeller Green Gold Gluten Free Mikkeller I Wish Gluten Free IPA Mikkeller Peter, Pale And Mary Gluten Free New Belgium Glutiny brand Golden and Pale Ales Short's Brewing Space Rock Stone Delicious IPA Sufferfest Brewing Company Pale Ale and Lager Widmer Omission Lager Widmer Omission IPA Widmer Omission Pale Ale Wold Top Against The Grain Wold Top Marmalade Porter Wold Top Scarborough Fair IPA Gluten-Free Hard Cider Most ciders are fermented from apples or other fruits. Most are safe, however, some add barley for enzymes and flavor. Read labels! Gluten-free hard cider brands include: Ace Pear Cider Angry Orchard Blue Mountain Cider Company Blackthorn Cider Bulmer's Hard Cider Crispin Cider (including Fox Barrel products) Gaymer Cider Company Harpoon Craft Cider J.K. Scrumpy's Organic Hard Cider Lazy Jack's Cider Magner's Cider Newton's Folly Hard Cider Original Sin Hard Cider Spire Mountain Draft Cider Strongbow Cider Stella Artois Apple and Pear Hard Cidre Woodchuck Woodpecker Cider Gluten-Free Wine All wines, including brandy, champagne, cognac, port wine, sherry, and vermouth are safe for celiacs. Gluten-Free Wine Coolers The majority of wine coolers are made from barley products. Gluten-free versions include: Bartle & Jaymes - all EXCEPT malt beverages Boones - all EXCEPT their malt beverages Other Gluten-Free Alcoholic Brews, Wines and Spirits Include Brandy Campari Champagne Cognac—made from grapes Cointreau Grappa Midori Prosecco Khalua Coffee Liquer Kirschwasser (cherry liqueur) Old Deadly Cider Sambuca Vermouth Gluten-Free Distilled Alcohols Unless gluten is added after distillation, all distilled alcohols are free of gluten. However, US labeling laws prohibit beverages that use cereal grains at any point in the manufacturing process from advertising themselves as 'gluten-free.' So, when you do see a 'gluten-free' label on a distilled beverage, it means that no gluten ingredients have been used at any point in the production process. Gluten-Free Gin Most gins are made with gluten-containing cereal grains. The final distilled product does not contain gluten, but cannot be advertised or labeled as gluten-free. Many people with celiac disease choose to avoid these beverages, while many others drink them with no adverse effects. Gluten-free gin brands include: Cold River Gin—distilled from potatoes Brands of standard gin include: Aviation American Gin Beefeater Bombay Bombay Sapphire Boodles British Gin Booth's Gin Gordon's Leopolds Gin New Amsterdam Gin Seagram's Tanqueray Gluten-Free Rum Distilled from sugar cane, most rums are gluten-free and safe for celiacs. Beware of pre-made drink mixes, such as those intended for piña coladas — many of these contain gluten ingredients as flavoring. Gluten-free rum brands include: Appleton Estate Jamaica Rum Bacardi—only Gold, Superior, 151, and flavored Bayou Rum Bundaberg Rum Captain Morgan Rum Cruzan Rum Malibu Rum Mount Gay Rum Meyer's Rum Gluten-Free Sake Fermented with rice and Koji enzymes. The Koji enzymes are grown on Miso, which is usually made with barley. The two-product separation from barley, and the manufacturing process should make it safe for celiacs. Gluten-Free Tequila Made from the agave cactus, all tequilas are gluten-free and safe for celiacs. Gluten-free tequila brands include: 1519 Tequila 1800 Tequila Cabo Wabo Cazadores Chimayo Don Julio El Jimador Herradura Hornitos Jose Cuervo Patron Sauza Gluten-Free Vodka Vodkas distilled from potatoes, gluten-free grains or other gluten-free ingredients contain no gluten ingredients and can be labeled as gluten-free. Gluten-free vodka brands include: Corn Vodka—Deep Eddy, Nikolai, Rain, Tito's, UV Grape Vodka—Bombora, Cooranbong Potato Vodka—Boyd & Blair, Cirrus, Chase, Chopin, Cold River Vodka, Cracovia, Grand Teton, Karlsson's, Luksusowa, Monopolowa, Schramm Organic, Zodiac Rice Vodka—Kissui Sugar Cane—Downunder, DOT AU Vodkas distilled from cereal grains include: Many vodkas made with gluten-containing cereal grains. The final product does not contain gluten, but cannot be advertised or labeled as gluten-free. Many people with celiac disease choose to avoid these beverages, while many others drink them with no adverse effects. Barley Vodka—Finlandia Grain Vodka—Absolwent, Blavod, Bowman's, Fleischmann's, Orloff, Polonaise, SKYY, Smirnoff, Stolichnaya, Wheat Vodka—Absolut, Bong Spirit, Danzka, Grey Goose, Hangar One, Ketel One, P.i.n.k Vodka Rye Vodka—Belvedere, BiaÅ‚a Dama, Platinka, Sobieski, Starka, Wisent, Wyborowa, Xellent Swiss, Å»ubrówka Gluten-Free Whiskey Nearly all whiskeys are made with gluten-containing cereal grains. The final product does not contain gluten, but cannot be advertised or labeled as gluten-free. Many people with celiac disease choose to avoid whiskey, while many others drink it with no adverse effects. Gluten-free whiskey brands include: Queen Jennie Whiskey, by Old Sugar Distillery is made entirely from sorghum Whiskeys distilled from cereal grains include: Bourbon—Benjamin Prichard's, Booker's, Buffalo Trace, Jim Beam, Early Times, Ezra Brooks, Jefferson's Bourbon, Knob Creek, Makers Mark, Old Crow, Old Forester, Old Grand-Dad Canadian Whiskey—Alberta Premium, Black Velvet, Canadian Club, Crown Royal, Tenesse Whiskey—Jack Daniels, George Dickel. Irish Whiskey—Bushmills, Jameson, Kilbeggan, Redbreast, Tullamore Dew Japanese Blended Whiskey—Hibiki, Kakubin, Nikka, Japanese Single Malt Whiskey—Hakushu, Yamazaki, Yoichi Rye Whiskey—Alberta Premium, Bulleitt Scotch Whiskey Blends—Ballentine's, Bell's, Black Grouse, Chivas Regal, Cutty Sark, Dewar's, Famous Grouse, Johnnie Walker, Teacher's, Whitehorse Scotch Whiskey Single Malts—Bowmore, Glenfiddich, Glen Grant, The Glenlivet, Glenmorangie, Highland Park, Knockando, Lagavulin, Laphroaig, Macallan, Monkey Shoulder, Singleton, Talisker Taiwanese Whiskey—Kavalan Classic Gluten-Free Drink Mixes Club Extra Dry Martini (corn & grape) Club Vodka Martini (corn & grape) Coco Casa and Coco Lopez Brands: Cream of Coconut Jose Cuervo Brand: Margarita Mix and All Jose Cuervo Blenders Master of Mixes Brand: Tom Collins, Whiskey Sour, Strawberry Daiquiri, Sweet & Sour Mixer, and Margarita Mix Mr. & Mrs. T—Except Bloody Mary Mix TGI Friday's Brand: On The Rocks, Long Island Ice Tea, Margarita, Mudslide, Pina Colada, and Strawberry Daiquiri. TGI Friday's Club Cocktails including: Gin Martini, Manhattan, Screwdriver, Vodka Martini, and Whiskey Sour mix. Other Gluten-free Beverages Mixes & Cooking Alcohol Club Tom Collins—made with corn Diamond Jims Bloody Mary Mystery Holland House - all EXCEPT Teriyaki Marinade and Smooth & Spicy Bloody Mary Mixes Mead—made from honey Mistico: Jose Cuervo Mistico—agave and cane Ouzo - made from grapes and anise Spice Islands - Cooking Wines - Burgundy, Sherry and White Also Godiva products contain gluten as do Smirnoff FMB's, Twisted V, and Smirnoff Ice.
  3. Celiac.com 08/15/2018 - Grain-free food has been linked to heart disease in dogs. A canine cardiovascular disease that has historically been seen in just a few breeds is becoming more common in other breeds, and one possible culprit is grain-free dog food. The disease in question is called canine dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), and often results in congestive heart failure. DCM is historically common in large dogs such as Great Danes, Newfoundlands, Irish Wolfhounds, Saint Bernards and Doberman Pinschers, though it is also affects some Cocker Spaniels. Numerous cases of DCM have been reported in smaller dogs, whose primary source of nutrition was food containing peas, lentils, other legume seeds or potatoes as main ingredients. These reported atypical DCM cases included Golden and Labrador Retrievers, a Whippet, a Shih Tzu, a Bulldog and Miniature Schnauzers, as well as mixed breeds. As a result, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Center for Veterinary Medicine, along with a group of veterinary diagnostic laboratories, is investigating the possible link between DCM and pet foods containing seeds or potatoes as main ingredients. The good news is that in cases where the dog suffers no genetic component, and the disease is caught early, simple veterinary treatment and dietary change may improve heart function. According to Nutritional Outlook, an industry publication for makers of dietary supplements and healthy foods and beverages, there is a growing market for “free from” foods for dogs, especially gluten-free and grain-free formulations. In 2017, about one in five dog foods launched was gluten-free. So, do dogs really need to eat grain-free or gluten-free food? Probably not, according to PetMD, which notes that many pet owners are simply projecting their own food biases when choosing dog food. Genetically, dogs are well adapted to easily digest grains and other carbohydrates. Also, beef and dairy remain the most common allergens for dogs, so even dogs with allergies are unlikely to need to need grain-free food. So, the take away here seems to be that most dogs don’t need grain-free or gluten-free food, and that it might actually be bad for the dog, not good, as the owner might imagine. Stay tuned for more on the FDA’s investigation and any findings they make. Read more at Bizjournals.com
  4. Celiac.com 08/14/2018 - Occasionally, Celiac.com learns of an amusing gluten-free story after the fact. Such is the case of the “Gluten-Free Fireworks.” We recently learned about a funny little event that happened leading up to Fourth of July celebrations in the town of Springdale in Northwest Arkansas. It seems that a sign advertising "Gluten Free Fireworks" popped up near a fireworks stand on interstate 49 in Springdale. In case you missed the recent dose of Fourth of July humor, in an effort to attract customers and provide a bit of holiday levity, Pinnacle Fireworks put up a sign advertising "gluten-free fireworks.” The small company is owned by Adam Keeley and his father. "A lot of the people that come in want to crack a joke right along with you," Keeley said. "Every now and then, you will get someone that comes in and says so fireworks are supposed to be gluten-free right? Have I been buying fireworks that have gluten? So then I say no, no they are gluten-free. It's just a little fun." Keeley said that their stand saw a steady flow of customers in the week leading up to the Fourth. In addition to selling “gluten-free” fireworks, each fireworks package sold by Pinnacle features a QR code. The code can be scanned with a smartphone. The link leads to a video showing what the fireworks look like. We at Celiac.com hope you and your family had a safe, enjoyable, and, yes, gluten-free Fourth of July. Stay tuned for more on gluten-free fireworks and other zany, tongue-in-cheek stories. Read more at kark.com
  5. Celiac.com 08/20/2018 - Following a gluten-free diet is critical for people with celiac disease. However, the factors that influence gluten-free diet success for people with celiac disease are not well understood on a population-wide scale. A team of researchers recently set out to assess the factors that influence gluten‐free diet adherence in patients with celiac disease. The research team included E. P. Halmos, M. Deng, S. R. Knowles, K. Sainsbury, B. Mullan, and J. A. Tye‐Din. The team asked celiac patients to complete an online survey that included the validated Celiac Dietary Adherence Test, along with questions on demographics, details of diagnosis and management and assessment of diet knowledge, quality of life and psychological distress. The team then reviewed the survey data for predictors of adherence and quality of life. There were a total of 7,393 survey responses, with 5,310 people completing the Celiac Dietary Adherence Test, and 3,230 of whom were following a gluten‐free diet. Multivariate regression showed that predictors of gluten-free dietary adherence included older age, being male, symptoms severity after gluten consumption, above average gluten-free food knowledge, and lower risk of psychological distress. People with celiac disease who followed a gluten-free diet also reported better quality of life. Respondents who reported having poor food knowledge were more likely to wrongly identify gluten‐free foods, though they could still recognize gluten‐containing foods. This indicates that poor overall food knowledge may lead people with celiac disease to over‐restrict their diet. Poor understanding of gluten‐free diet and stressful psychological well-being were the main modifiable risk factors for failure to follow a gluten‐free diet in patients with celiac disease. From these responses, the team concluded that access to a dietitian and mental health care professional, in cases of psychological stress, is likely necessary to improve gluten-free dietary observation, and thus to improve overall patient health and well-being. Read more at: Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeuticsdoi.org/10.1111/apt.14791 The researchers in this study are variously affiliated with the Department of Gastroenterology, The Royal Melbourne Hospital in Parkville, Victoria, Australia, the Department of Gastroenterology, Central Clinical School, Monash University in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, the Cartovera Pty. Ltd. in Adelaide, SA, Australia, the Department of Psychological Sciences, Faculty of Health, Arts and Design, Swinburne University of Technology in Hawthorn, Victoria, Australia, the Department of Mental Health, St Vincent's Hospital in Fitzroy, Victoria, Australia, the Department of Psychiatry, University of Melbourne in Parkville, Victoria, Australia, Institute of Health and Society, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Newcastle University in Newcastle Upon Tyne, UK, the Health Psychology & Behavioural Medicine Research Group, School of Psychology, Curtin University in Bentley, WA, Australia, the Immunology Division, The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research in Parkville, Victoria, Australia, and the Department of Medical Biology, University of Melbourne in Parkville, Victoria, Australia.
  6. Celiac.com 08/16/2018 - What is the significance of vitamin D serum levels in adult celiac patients? A pair of researchers recently set out to assess the value and significance of 25(OH) and 1,25(OH) vitamin D serum levels in adult celiac patients through a comprehensive review of medical literature. Researchers included F Zingone and C Ciacci are affiliated with the Gastroenterology Unit, Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology, University of Padua, Padua, Italy; and the Celiac Center, AOU San Giovanni di Dio e Ruggi di Aragona, University of Salerno, Department of Medicine and Surgery, Salerno, Italy. Within the wide spectrum of symptoms and alteration of systems that characterizes celiac disease, several studies indicate a low-level of vitamin D, therefore recent guidelines suggest its evaluation at the time of diagnosis. This review examines the data from existing studies in which vitamin D has been assessed in celiac patients. Our review indicates that most of the studies on vitamin D in adult celiac disease report a 25 (OH) vitamin D deficiency at diagnosis that disappears when the patient goes on a gluten-free diet, independently of any supplementation. Instead, the researchers found that levels of calcitriol, the active 1,25 (OH) form of vitamin D, fell within the normal range at the time of celiac diagnosis. Basically, their study strongly suggests that people with celiac disease can recover normal vitamin D levels through a gluten-free diet, without requiring any supplementation. Source: Dig Liver Dis. 2018 Aug;50(8):757-760. doi: 10.1016/j.dld.2018.04.005. Epub 2018 Apr 13.
  7. Hey, I was wondering if any of you knew - when you eat gluten when you have Celiac, do you take in the calories from the food? Before I was diagnosed, I was extremely malnourished because my body wasn't absorbing vitamins, but does the body absorb the calories? If so, how is so much weight loss possible?
  8. Celiac.com 08/12/2018 - Receiving a celiac disease diagnosis or being told you need to be on a gluten-free diet can be an overwhelming experience, and it is certainly not for the faint of heart. Most people get frustrated with the transition, and many don't know where to begin. While eating gluten-free can improve your health, I must emphasize that it is not recommended to attempt a gluten-free diet without a doctors supervision, as there are many potential health risks involved with making drastic changes to your diet, which can be avoided with assistance of a qualified doctor and/or nutritionist. If you suspect gluten-intolerance to be the culprit for your health problems, get examined by a doctor and get tested for celiac disease before initiating a gluten-free diet. It is very important to continually consume gluten while you are undergoing testing for celiac disease because many of the tests require you to be consuming gluten to get accurate results. Prescription: A Gluten-Free Diet Now that you have your diagnosis and need to eliminate gluten, you can make the transition to a gluten-free diet with confidence. The following information is a guideline of what you will need to know to get started. I must emphasize that this is only a guideline, and you will need to do your own research and consult with your doctor for more detailed information on a gluten-free diet. It is also a great idea to get involved in local support groups. Support groups will have members that understand what you are going through and they can help direct you to beneficial resources: Celiac Disease Support Groups, Organizations & Contacts Create New Habits To begin, if you are accustomed to doing things your own way, you will have to throw out many of your old habits. To avoid gluten poisoning you must keep all gluten away from your mouth. You will need to evaluate everything you ingest very carefully. Gluten can come in a variety of unexpected ways, including a kiss from a loved one, and any gluten that comes into contact with your mouth is a potential source of contamination. Cross-contamination can occur when a meal is prepared on cooking equipment shared with gluten-containing foods. It can also come from touching anything that has come into contact with gluten. It is therefore important to gluten-proof your house and to keep everything you eat separate from gluten and gluten residue. If you eat at restaurants, it is important to only eat at places that you know are safe. To help you avoid accidental gluten ingestion, please follow your instincts and use the following guidelines and avoid potential health hazards. Please remember that these are only guidelines--if you still have questions, please consult with a medical professional. What does "Gluten-Free" Actually Mean? Since gluten is found in wheat, rye and barley, it is obvious that you will need to avoid these grains. Less obvious however, are the myriad of products that contain gluten as a hidden ingredient. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently regulated the use of "gluten-free" on a food label, and there was already an FDA regulation that requires manufacturers to declare wheat if it is used as an ingredient in a product. Products that don't use "gluten-free" on their label unfortunately don't have to disclose ingredients that are made from barley or rye, which requires you to learn to read and understand ingredient labels. Many additives, natural or artificial, can contain gluten. Sometimes companies label products as "gluten-free" or the ingredients are naturally gluten-free, but the product may have be contaminated if it was manufactured on shared equipment. You will have to decide if you want to include such products in your diet. It is also important to remember, for reasons just mentioned, that “wheat-free” does not mean “gluten-free.” Batch Testing: According to current FDA proposals, products testing at less than 20 parts per million (PPM) for gluten will likely be allowed to be labeled "gluten-free," and, according to them, are considered safe for people with gluten-intolerance or celiac disease. There are several organizations that offer gluten-free certification for companies who follow their guidelines and batch test their products. Check out the link below for more information on gluten-free certification and labeling. Gluten-Free Food Certification Program by the Gluten Intolerance Group Gluten-Free Shopping Shopping will likely take much longer for you than it used to. Don't rush. It is important to read all ingredients carefully. If you are in a hurry, you run the risk of overlooking a key ingredient that might contain gluten. I find it helpful to plan my meals in advance. There is nothing worse than coming home from work hungry and realizing that you have nothing to eat (and it isn't like you can go to the first drive-thru you find). So planning my meals on the weekend and doing my shopping in advance, cuts my stress level down considerably and keeps me from going hungry. Check your products against your gluten-free guidebooks, and contact the manufacturer if you are unsure about something. The following links will help you take the guess work out of shopping for gluten-free products: Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) As mentioned, there are also many products that are naturally gluten-free that are not labeled "gluten-free," and there are some very helpful books that can help you find these foods when you are shopping. A Gluten-Free Kitchen A gluten-free kitchen is very important. If you can have an entirely gluten-free kitchen, that is ideal, but it may not be an option for many households. Therefore it is especially important to keep your house clean and free of gluten contaminates. It is also important to dedicate special kitchen supplies for gluten-free cooking. I bought a new cutting board that is dedicated only to gluten-free cooking. You may also want to have separate kitchen utensils such as sponges, toasters (a dedicated gluten-free toaster is highly recommended), sifters, bread machines, etc. This is especially important if you use utensils that are made of wood, plastic, or other porous materials that could harbor gluten and possibly contaminate your gluten-free food. If possible use an electric dishwasher to clean your dishes. If everyone in your household is going gluten-free it is important to clean out and empty all of the gluten products from your kitchen. If you share a kitchen with gluten eating family members, it is a good idea to store their food products separately from your gluten-free products, and to clean off all surfaces before you prepare your gluten-free food. Dedicating gluten-free cupboards and refrigerator shelves is a great way to start. Here are some important links that will help you cook gluten-free meals with ease: Gluten-Free Cooking Gluten-Free Recipes Kitchen Checklist - Possible Sources of Contamination: Bread-machine Toaster Sponges & cleaning pads All kitchen supplies & utensils Colanders Cutting boards Door handles Soaps For more information on maintaining a safe kitchen environment, click the link below: What You Need If You Can't Have A Gluten-Free Kitchen Dining Out Gluten-Free Dining out presents a challenge for most people on a gluten-free diet. Depending on your level of sensitivities, you may have difficulty eating out at all. Even if the restaurant offers a gluten-free menu, it is always important to find out what safety precautions the restaurant uses to avoid cross-contamination, and to make sure all the ingredients in your food are gluten-free. This may require you to modify your order, and also may mean talking with the chef about their kitchen practices. You may also benefit from utilizing a guide to safe restaurants. Here is an additional article that may be helpful to your situation: Take Charge of Your Meal When Eating Out A Gluten-Free Bathroom Believe it or not, your bathroom is another place where you might be getting sick from gluten contamination, and not even know it. There are many products in your bathroom to watch out for as many body products contain wheat and/or hidden gluten ingredients. Most celiacs can use body products without a negative reaction, though some people experience rashes and other unsavory reactions from gluten body products. However, if you are using face or body products that contain gluten, it is very important not to ingest them. I find it difficult to avoid getting shampoo or makeup near my mouth, so I don't take any chances. I use gluten-free soap, shampoo, conditioner, face-cleaner, toner, make-up, toothpaste; basically nothing goes onto my body that contains gluten. Using gluten-free body products allows me the freedom to worry less about accidental contamination, and gives me more time to enjoy my life. Many gluten-free body products are not labeled gluten-free, so it is important to read ingredient labels carefully and check with the manufacturer if necessary. Bathroom Checklist: Toothpaste Shampoo/conditioner Make-up Lip-stick, lip-liner, lip-gloss, cosmetics, etc. Lotion Sunscreen Gluten-Free Medications (Prescriptions and Supplements) Most people with celiac disease or gluten-intolerance also suffer from malabsorption and sometimes malnutrition. Your doctor may prescribe pain, anti-inflammatory, digestive or other medications or supplements to help assist with your recovery. It is very important to note that some medications and supplements can contain gluten. Do not assume that just because your doctor knows you have celiac disease or gluten intolerance that the medications or supplements they may prescribe for you are gluten-free. Be your own advocate and read the ingredients and contact your pharmacist and/or the manufacturer and find out if your prescriptions, vitamins and supplements are gluten-free. Gluten-Free Medications List Additional Concerns Children with Celiac Disease Raising children with celiac disease or gluten-intolerance is no easy feat. Your kids will have to deal with immense peer pressure and there will be a great deal of temptation for them to eat gluten-containing foods. Talk to the staff at their school and help them to understand your child's special needs. The more support you have, the better off your child will be. There are many support groups that advocate for children with celiac disease, and it is important to get involved and learn everything you can to help support your child. Raising our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K) Support Group Pets Your pets present another source of potential contamination, especially if you have pets like mine that love to smother you with unexpected kisses, sometimes on the mouth. What your pet eats can affect you too. Handling your pet's food, cleaning your pet's dishes and having young celiac children in a house where they may eat dog or cat food are all legitimate concerns. I decided to switch my pets to gluten-free pet food. Most pet food is not labeled gluten-free, so it is important to read ingredients carefully. I found grain-free, all natural pet food to be a great alternative to gluten-containing pet foods, that way I don't have to worry about accidental contamination or getting kisses from my pets--and it's healthier for them too! It is also important to check all other pet products that you come into contact with for hidden gluten ingredients, like shampoos and soaps. It is of course always important to talk to your veterinarian before making any dietary changes for your pet. Other Food Sensitivities Most people who begin a gluten-free diet experience almost immediate relief from their symptoms. However, many people experience gluten-like reactions to other foods, and often suspect that their food was contaminated by gluten. As it turns out, many people who experience such reactions may in fact have additional food sensitivities. Some of the most common food sensitivities include, dairy/casein, soy, corn, sugar, nuts, shell-fish and processed or fatty foods. While many people report that they are able to add these foods back into their diet after they have established a gluten-free diet for many months, and after their intestines have had time to heal, it is up to you and your doctor or nutritionist to determine which foods may be causing you trouble. The 'elimination diet' is often recommended for determining what additional food sensitivities you may have. Ask your doctor if the elimination diet is right for you. Food Diary It is important to keep a food diary, especially when first initiating a gluten-free diet. Making notes of the foods you eat and the reactions you have to the foods you eat, and how you feel that day, can give you more insight as to which foods are hurting you and which foods your body can easily digest. Final Thoughts Be Picky Having a gluten intolerance means taking pride in your body, but not being too proud to say, "no, thank you." Don't worry about appearing too picky to others, you simply can't take care of yourself and worry what others think of you at the same time. You have the right to eat what you want; if something doesn't look, smell or taste right to you, or if you just don't feel right about eating something, don't eat it! It is better to come across as too finicky, than to spend the night in the bathroom or worse yet, the emergency room. Everyone has a different level of gluten sensitivity and you will have to find out through trial and error what works best for you. Be Prepared As a former Boy-Scout, my high-school teacher used to always say, "Be prepared". I cannot emphasize enough the importance of this statement. It is important to be prepared and think ahead. Keep gluten-free snacks on hand at all times, because you never know when you are going to get hungry somewhere that doesn't offer gluten-free food. Keep shelf-stable snacks in your car, office, purse, and anywhere you spend time. It is better to have gluten-free snacks on hand, then to get hungry and make a bad decision to eat something you might later regret. Gluten-Free Quick-Check: Read all labels carefully Call the manufacturer whenever necessary Avoid cross-contamination at all times Keep your hands clean Check personal-care products for hidden gluten Check all vitamins, supplements and RX prescriptions for hidden gluten Make sure your pets are gluten-free Maintain a food diary Get involved-join a support group Rule of thumb-if you think it's possibly contaminated, don't take any chances. It's better to go hungry than to suffer later. Above all, trust your body Additional Resources: Gluten-Free Forum Celiac Disease Support Groups Gluten-Free Newsletters & Magazines
  9. Celiac.com 08/09/2018 - Whatever one might say about crawfish, shrimp and crustaceans in general, Americans don’t typically eat bugs. Can a former Ralph Lauren marketing executive turn the world on to flour made from crickets? Over the last few years, Americans have been presented with a buffet of alternative proteins and meals. Robyn Shapiro’s company, Seek, has created all-purpose, gluten-free, and Paleo blended flours, which can be used cup for cup in any recipe calling for flour. The company, which makes pure cricket powder for smoothies, ice creams, and other liquid-based foods, is now selling cinnamon-almond crunch cricket protein and snack bites. To get the public interested in its cricket protein and cricket flour products, Shapiro has collaborated with famous chefs to create recipes for The Cricket Cookbook. The book’s cast includes La Newyorkina chef Fany Gerson, a Mexico City native known for her cricket sundaes; noted Sioux chef and cookbook author Sean Sherman; and former Noma pastry chef Ghetto Gastro member, Malcolm Livingston, among others. Other companies have sought to promote the benefits of insect protein, including Chapul, which makes cricket protein bars and powders, and Exo, which makes dairy- and gluten-free cricket protein bars in flavors like cocoa nut and banana bread. These companies, along with others in the business tend to aim their products at Paleo dieters by promising more protein and no dairy. Seek’s chef-focused approach makes it unique. By pairing with noted chefs who already use bugs and bug protein in their cooking, Shapiro is looking to make the public more comfortable and confident in using bugs to cook and bake. So far, the response has been slow, but steady. Seek has already raised nearly $13,000 from 28 backers, well on its way toward its $25,000 goal. Seek’s cricket flours and other products will initially only be available via Kickstarter. If that goes well, the products will be sold on Seek’s website. Early backers will get a discount and a chance for a signed copy of the book. Seek hopes to debut their products nationwide starting in the fall. Could gluten-free cricket flour and the new cookbook be the next big gluten-free Christmas gift? Stay tuned for more on this and other gluten-free stories. Source: grubstreet.com
  10. Celiac.com 08/08/2018 - A number of studies have cataloged the numerous challenges faced by adolescents with celiac disease attempting to comply with a gluten-free diet. A team of researchers recently set out to reevaluate gluten-free dietary compliance and the current clinical condition of 123 now teenage celiac patients, who were diagnosed in the first three years of life and were followed up for at least 10 years to determine whether a less strict approach to a gluten-free diet can actually increase gluten-free dietary compliance. The research team included M Mayer, L Greco, R Troncone, S Auricchio, and M N Marsh. They are variously affiliated with the University Department of Medicine, Hope Hospital, Salford, Manchester, UK. The team used computerized image analysis to assess mucosal structure and lymphocytes in small intestinal biopsy specimens obtained from 36 subjects. Of these adolescents with celiac disease, 65% were adhering to a strict gluten free diet, 11.4% followed a gluten-free diet with occasional gluten intake, while nearly 25% ate a gluten containing diet. Patients on a gluten containing diet had more frequent clinical gluten-related symptoms, while patients on a semi-strict diet did not. Occasional intake of small amounts (0-06-2 g/day) of gluten did not produce increased concentrations of anti-gliadin antibodies, but did result in a substantially greater crypt epithelial volume and expanded crypt intraepithelial lymphocyte numbers. So, could a semi-strict gluten-free diet benefit celiac teenagers who eat a gluten containing diet? These numbers suggest that a semi-strict gluten-free diet may be better than no gluten-free diet at all. Of course, the best choice would always be a 100% gluten-free diet. Source: Gut
  11. Celiac.com 08/07/2018 - A new drug designed to reduce symptoms of accidental gluten ingestion in celiac disease sufferers has yielded some encouraging data. The drug in question is a monoclonal antibody designed to reduce adverse reactions in celiacs who are accidentally exposed to gluten. The results, presented at Digestive Disease Week, held in Washington DC from 2–5 June 2018, suggest that monoclonal antibodies could provide protection for people with celiac disease. Celiac patients on a gluten-free diet who randomly received six injections of a monoclonal antibody, called AMG 714, over a ten-week period, enjoyed a substantial reduction in intestinal inflammation. Over a ten week study period, celiac patients on a gluten-free diet received six randomly assigned injections of either a placebo, or of AMG 714 at a dose of either 150mg or 300mg. Patients then underwent a dietary gluten challenge from week through until week twelve. As tested, the drug did not reduce damage to intestinal villi for either treatment group, which was the trial’s primary goal, but it did significantly reduce celiac-related inflammation and symptoms in response to gluten consumption. Patients receiving the highest dose of AMG 714 had no clinically active disease at week twelve of the study, and also had a significant improvement in self-reported outcomes, compared with the placebo group. No matter how diligently people with celiac disease follow a gluten-free diet, they can still suffer accidental gluten exposure ingestion. Treatments like AMG 714 could become important adjunct to gluten-free diet in for people with celiac disease, including non-responsive celiac disease. Read more in Pharmaceutical-journal.com
  12. Scott Adams

    White Bread (Gluten-Free)

    This recipe has been modified from Bette Hagemans Butter Basted White Bread (More From the Gluten-Free Gourmet, page 38). Here it is: Combine 2 cups white rice flour, ½ cup potato starch flour, ½ cup tapioca flour, 2 ½ teaspoon xanthan gum, 2/3 cup dairy milk powder, 1 ½ teaspoon salt, 2 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon sugar and 2 ¼ teaspoon saf-instant yeast granules thoroughly. In a separate bowl, combine 4 tablespoons melted butter, 1 cup warm water, 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar. Slowly add to dry mixture, then add 3 room temperature eggs, one at a time (the mix should feel a little warm). Beat on high for 2 minutes. Cover with plastic wrap and a towel, and rise until doubled (time varies). After the first rise, beat the dough again for 3 minutes on high. Fill a large loaf pan 2/3 full (can use extra dough in muffin tins) Let rise until slightly over top of pan; bake at 350 for 30-45 minutes, covering with alum foil after the first 10 minutes. Delicious, and freezes pretty well. This recipe comes to us from Marne L. Platt in New Jersey.
  13. Celiac.com 08/02/2018 - For those who’ve been craving a juicy gluten-free social media story, crave no longer. None other than Kylie Jenner, younger sister to Kim and Kourtney Kardashian, has stepped up to oblige by labeling one of the shades of her eye shadow collection “Gluten Free.” It’s true, you can Google it. In case you, like me, have been out of the Kardashian loop lately, Kylie has most recently hitched her star to the growing makeup empire of sister Kourtney, after working with Kim and Khloe on their makeup lines. It seems that Kylie decided that one of the colors in their eye shadow palette was just begging to be called “Gluten Free.” Cue the reaction. Meanwhile, on Twitter some celiac folk thought it was hilarious, others less than funny. @paytoncalder tweeted: The fact that Kylie Jenner actually named a shade "gluten free" makes me cringe so hard. @business_poodle tweeted: Kylie Jenner is rly selling an eyeshadow called “gluten-free” and I’m working minimum wage????? For her own part, Kourtney explained on her app (who knew?) how she came to, embrace a gluten-free diet: “I have noticed a great positive change in behavior with my children when we stick to a gluten-free and dairy-free diet. I don’t think everyone needs to eat this way but we had muscle testing done, which showed we all have sensitivities to corn, gluten and dairy.” Between welcoming daughter Stormi Webster in February, Kylie and doing things like attending Coachella, Kylie has been busy as she looks to burnish her own makeup credentials. So, is Kylie’s eye shadow actually gluten-free? Let’s hope so, otherwise we’ll be back with more about this delicious, if un-nutritious story. Meantime, for more on this zany story de jour, Google it, or check your Twitter.
  14. Celiac.com 07/03/2015 - For people with celiac disease or gluten intolerance, accidentally eating gluten can have numerous undesirable consequences. Symptoms of gluten-exposure among people with celiac disease can vary, but main problems and complaints include: upset stomach, stomach pain, inflammation, diarrhea, gas, bloating, indigestion, heart burn, skin rash or breakouts, and nerve and arthritis pain, among others. If you're one of these people, then you likely work pretty hard to make sure everything you eat is gluten-free. But what can you do if you accidentally eat gluten? Officially, beyond simply waiting it out, there is no clinically accepted treatment for people with celiac disease or gluten sensitivity who accidentally eat gluten. However, there are things that many people claim will reduce the suffering and promote healing when this happens. Here are the best home remedies for accidental gluten ingestion, as submitted by readers to our gluten-free forum. The main goal is to reduce or eliminate the worst immediate symptoms, including pain, inflammation, diarrhea, gas and or bloating, etc. The secondary goal is to rebuild gut health. So what works? Or, what do people say works for them? The remedies listed below are not ranked in any particular order of importance or efficacy. Fasting—Recent studies indicate that fasting for a couple of days can help to reset the immune system, which might be beneficial for those suffering from an adverse gluten reaction. Be sure to check with a doctor before fasting, just to be safe. Digestive Enzymes-- For many people, digestive enzymes seem to help the bloating. Many people claim that such enzymes help provide relief, especially against small amounts of gluten. Two such products are Eater's Digest by Traditional Medicinals, and Gluten Defense digestive enzymes. Green tea or peppermint tea. Many people have reported that green tea is also helpful. Peppermint tea is said to promote muscle relaxation, and can help for gassy stomach issues. Strong gluten-free peppermints will work in a pinch. Imodium seems to help some people control associated diarrhea. If you have diarrhea, be sure to drink water with electrolytes to help replace lost fluids. Pepto-Bismol—Some people take Pepto-Bismol to help relieve stomach upset. Marshmallow root can help to sooth stomach and gas pain. Antihistamines—Some people claim to find relief with antihistamines, such as Benedryl, Clatratin, or Zyrtec. Often these are used in combination with other remedies Probiotics—Many people find probiotics to be helpful, especially as part of a general gut maintenance program. Probiotics are generally more helpful in advance of accidental gluten exposure, but many people take them after exposure. Either way, it certainly can't hurt. Broth—Many people with celiac disease, gut and/or nutritional issues turn to broth for help in building gut health and proper nutrition. Good old fashioned beef, chicken or fish broth can be a beneficial part of a healthy gut regimen. Broth also has many health properties beyond gut healing. Tummy Rescue Smoothie: This recipe was developed by a celiac.com reader in response to his own "gluten emergency.” The healing properties of each ingredient are also listed. Puree in blender until smooth, and slightly thickened. It is most soothing when consumed while still warm from the hot tea. Tummy Rescue Smoothie: 1 cup hot freshly brewed nettle leaf tea (anti-histamine, anti-spasmodic) ¼ cup Santa-Cruz pear juice (flavoring/sweetener - pears are the least allergenic of fruits) ¼-½ teaspoon whole fennel seed (reduces gas & bloating) 2 Tablespoons slippery elm powder (healing & soothing to mucous membranes and the gut) 1 Tablespoon flax seed oil (soothing, anti-inflammatory) ¼ - ½ cup rice milk (hypoallergenic, use to thin to desired consistency) This smoothie is best consumed in small sips over an hour or so. Magnesium also helps with pain and relaxes muscle spasms, so taking a little extra magnesium may be of benefit. For severe symptoms, drink the smoothie while reclining in bed, with a warm castor oil pack over the abdomen, covered by a heating pad set on low. Do not leave the pack in place for more than an hour. Longer-term strategies include rebuilding intestinal health with an anti-inflammatory diet, taking supplements like L-Glutamine, coconut oil, fat-soluble vitamins A, E, D, and K, Calcium, Magnesium, B-Vitamins, Essential Fatty Acids (EFA's), and probiotics, including acidophilus for about a week to get intestinal flora back in order. This list is not intended to be authoritative or comprehensive. Nor is it intended as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice. As with any health remedy, do your research and make the choices that are right for you. If you have any thoughts or insights on how best to treat accidental gluten ingestion for people with celiac disease or gluten intolerance, please share them in our comments section below.
  15. Celiac.com 07/09/2018 - In a seemingly innocuous case of gluten-contamination, an Australian woman was hospitalized with serious health issues after mistakenly eating a waffle she thought was gluten-free. The incident began when Williams and her husband Scott dined at a local Perth restaurant where they had eaten before. This time, though, after eating a meal of chicken and what she took to be gluten-free waffles, she became ill. The mistake caused her to lose consciousness several times, and resulted in mild kidney failure. Diagnosed as celiac at 12 months of age, the 27-year old Williams is a CrossFit fanatic, a fact she believes helped her to survive. “If I was already sick or if I was an elderly person and I had this sort of reaction, I could have died,” Ms Williams said. Williams wants to help spread the word that, for some people, celiac disease is a serious and potentially life-threatening medical condition. The owner of the restaurant seems to be taking the incident seriously, and has said she would be investigating what went wrong that day. “I’m trying to find out what happened because we’ve never had an issue with this,” she said, and that she “would never want to hurt anyone at all.” While the Perth restaurant’s menu did carry a disclaimer that gluten-free items may contain traces of gluten. The owner said the gluten-free options were not recommended for people who are “coeliac or really gluten intolerant.” The restaurant has offered Ms Williams a $40 refund with a confidentiality clause, which she intends to decline so she can speak out and educate others about the risks of dining out. Coeliac Australia’s Cathy Di Bella said restaurants can’t use a “may contain traces of” disclaimer to offset a claim that food is gluten-free. Any restaurant that advertises gluten-free food should take necessary measures to ensure that their gluten-free items are if fact free of gluten. This is an important point, as this incident comes amid recent news reports that indicate nearly one out of ten meals sold as gluten-free at cafes and restaurants across Melbourne were contaminated with gluten. For Ms Williams’ part, she said she has “lost faith in going out for dinner and it’s going to take me a long time to be able to go out and do that without fear of this happening.” Do you or a loved one have a gluten-free horror story to tell? Share it in our comments below. Read more at: Thewest.com.au
  16. Hello! I am a 59-year-old, newly diagnosed with allergies (I also suspect that i have some form of celiac or gluten intolerance). I haven't done the food allergy tests or challenges yet - but from what i've read, i may have OAS when it comes to certain foods, but i'm not sure. I'm not sure I would do a celiac test at this point, because that would require me eating mostly gluten - i've been eating mostly gluten-free - i don't know what else to do and i need some tips - HELP!
  17. Like barbecue, greens can be a touchy subject. Sweet? Tart? Savory? Ham? Bacon? Some people prefer mustard greens, others prefer collards. I'm one of those who prefer a mix of the two. Maybe that's equally sacrilegious, I don't know. But, in the interest of harmony, here's an easy recipe for an easy, delicious mix of mustard and collard greens. Ingredients: l pound of bacon 6 cups mustard greens 6 cups collard greens 1 cup chicken broth 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 tablespoon distilled white vinegar 1 teaspoon of sugar ½ teaspoon pepper few dashes of red pepper hot sauce, such as Crystal or Trappey's salt and pepper to taste Directions: Rinse greens several times to remove all grit. Remove and discard thickest parts of stems. Chop greens coarsely. Brown bacon in a cast iron pot. Once bacon is brown, place on paper towels to drain. In the same pot, heat 2-3 teaspoons of bacon grease and olive oil to medium-high. Add the greens, chicken broth, sugar, pepper, hot sauce and vinegar. Put a tight fitting lid on the pot. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to low, and simmer 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. Serve immediately. Season individually with salt and pepper, hot sauce, or more sugar or vinegar, to taste.
  18. Celiac.com 06/30/2018 - It seems there’s a bit of a gluten-free and halal food controversy going on across the pond. For those who don’t know, ‘Halal’ is the Muslim equivalent of what Jewish folks call ‘Kosher.’ Basically, it means food prepared to certain standards and blessed for consumption. The Aureus School in Didcot, Oxfordshire, England is being decried by angry parents as “like a dictatorship” after the school banned packed lunches and began serving pupils gluten-free options, including halal meat, water and salad. The ruckus began when the school recently banned students from bringing lunches and snacks from home, and began a program to make sure that “all students have access to a daily nutritious home-cooked family meal.” This is fine in principal, say angry parents, but in practice has become “draconian.” One father, who asked not to be named, said that he and his wife were “thinking of taking [their daughter] out of the school, adding that the situation was “getting silly and more like a dictatorship. Their views are quite extreme.” The dad said that "It's about choice. It's supposed to be an inclusive school but they are only catering for one particular religion.” He added that he had tried unsuccessfully to get the policies changed since September. So, whereas in days past, lunch might mean whatever mom saw fit to pack, these days at Aureus School lunch means the choice of a hot halal meat meal, hot gluten-free vegetarian meal, a jacket potato, a salad, a pasta pot or a baguette. The school insists that only water be drunk on site because “hydrated brains learn better”. The school states that their Halal kitchen policy is simply a move to “celebrate the diversity of our country’s culture,” in addition to providing nutritious food for the children. What do you think? A gluten-free and Halal lunch bridge too far, or a good meal for the kids?
  19. Celiac.com 06/20/2018 - Currently, the only way to manage celiac disease is to eliminate gluten from the diet. That could be set to change as clinical trials begin in Australia for a new vaccine that aims to switch off the immune response to gluten. The trials are set to begin at Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre. The vaccine is designed to allow people with celiac disease to consume gluten with no adverse effects. A successful vaccine could be the beginning of the end for the gluten-free diet as the only currently viable treatment for celiac disease. That could be a massive breakthrough for people with celiac disease. USC’s Clinical Trials Centre Director Lucas Litewka said trial participants would receive an injection of the vaccine twice a week for seven weeks. The trials will be conducted alongside gastroenterologist Dr. James Daveson, who called the vaccine “a very exciting potential new therapy that has been undergoing clinical trials for several years now.” Dr. Daveson said the investigational vaccine might potentially restore gluten tolerance to people with celiac disease.The trial is open to adults between the ages of 18 and 70 who have clinically diagnosed celiac disease, and have followed a strict gluten-free diet for at least 12 months. Anyone interested in participating can go to www.joinourtrials.com. Read more at the website for Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre. Source: FoodProcessing.com.au
  20. Celiac.com 01/12/2017 - Good gluten-free news for burger fans, especially those with celiac disease. Popular burger franchise Shake Shack has announced that they will be offering gluten-free buns in all locations, except stadiums and ballparks, for just $1 extra. The company made the announcement via Twitter. We got gluten-free buns, hun! You can now snag your burger with a gluten-free bun at all Shacks 'cept stadiums & ballparks. pic.twitter.com/5ZtrCAlmJi — SHAKE SHACK (@shakeshack) December 19, 2016 The buns are made by BellyRite Foods Inc., and taste similar to their Martin's potato rolls currently served on all Shake Shack burgers. So, if you're gluten-free and craving Shake Shack, you can jump in line with everyone else. This is just another example of popular restaurants trying to make their food available for gluten-free eaters. Been to Shake Shack? Tried a gluten-free bun? Let us know how it went.
  21. Jefferson Adams

    What Exactly is Gluten, Anyway?

    Celiac.com 07/04/2018 - For the vast majority of people, gluten is nothing to worry about. However, for people with celiac disease, gluten triggers an immune reaction that can be uncomfortable and lead to damage of the intestinal lining, and, left untreated, other conditions, including certain types of deadly cancers. Actually, the real offender is a protein in gluten called gliadin. It's the gliadin that triggers the immune reaction in people with celiac disease. For our purposes today, I will talk about gluten, even though it's really gliadin that's the culprit. Still, avoiding gliadin means avoiding gluten, so let's just keep it simple, if a bit unscientific, for now. There are some people who are sensitive to gluten, but who don’t have celiac disease, a condition know as Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity (NCGS). When people with NCGS eat gluten, they often experience symptoms similar to those with celiac disease, yet they lack the same antibodies to gluten, as well as the intestinal damage seen in celiac disease. People with celiac disease and gluten sensitivity need to follow a gluten-free diet that excludes all products containing wheat, barley and rye ingredients. These people can still enjoy a healthy diet filled with fruits, vegetables, meats, poultry, fish, beans, legumes and most dairy products. Many delicious foods are naturally gluten-free, and safe for people with celiac disease. That said, gluten is found in a wide variety of foods, even those you wouldn’t expect, such as soy sauce and even some french fries. Foods containing wheat, barley or rye contain gluten, but the protein can also be hidden in many foods as an additive, especially processed foods. Gluten can also sometimes be found in certain medications, personal hygiene products and more. For people with celiac disease, even tiny amounts of gluten can cause damage to the small intestine and prevent nutrients from being absorbed into the bloodstream. The safest bet is to purchase naturally gluten-free grains, flours and starches labeled gluten-free and, when possible, certified gluten-free by a third party. For a more complete list, see Celiac.com’s gluten-free Safe Foods List and the non-gluten free Unsafe Foods List. What Foods and Products Contain Gluten? Gluten is found in any products with ingredients derived from wheat, barley and rye. This includes: 1) Wheat products (Triticum), including: All species of wheat contain gluten, including durum, semolina, spelt, kamut, einkorn, faro and triticale, which is a hybrid of wheat and rye. 2) Barley Products (Hordeum vulgare) 3) Rye Products (Secale) 4) Any bakery item, beer, breads, candy (not all), cereal, flour, pastas, non-dairy milk (not all), sauces (not all), soups (not all), or other product made with wheat, rye, barley, including the following ingredients: Abyssinian Hard (Wheat triticum durum) Alcohol (Spirits - Specific Types) Atta Flour Barley Grass (can contain seeds) Barley Hordeum vulgare Barley Malt Beer (most contain barley or wheat) Bleached Flour Bran Bread Flour Brewer's Yeast Brown Flour Bulgur (Bulgar Wheat/Nuts) Bulgur Wheat Cereal Binding Chilton Club Wheat (Triticum aestivum subspecies compactum) Common Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Cookie Crumbs Cookie Dough Cookie Dough Pieces Couscous Criped Rice Dinkle (Spelt) Disodium Wheatgermamido Peg-2 Sulfosuccinate Durum wheat (Triticum durum) Edible Coatings Edible Films Edible Starch Einkorn (Triticum monococcum) Emmer (Triticum dicoccon) Enriched Bleached Flour Enriched Bleached Wheat Flour Enriched Flour Farik Farina Farina Graham Farro Filler Flour (normally this is wheat) Freekeh Frikeh Fu (dried wheat gluten) Germ Graham Flour Granary Flour Groats (barley, wheat) Hard Wheat Heeng Hing Hordeum Vulgare Extract Hydroxypropyltrimonium Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein Kamut (Pasta wheat) Kecap Manis (Soy Sauce) Ketjap Manis (Soy Sauce) Kluski Pasta Maida (Indian wheat flour) Malt Malted Barley Flour Malted Milk Malt Extract Malt Syrup Malt Flavoring Malt Vinegar Macha Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Matza Matzah Matzo Matzo Semolina Meripro 711 Mir Nishasta Oriental Wheat (Triticum turanicum) Orzo Pasta Pasta Pearl Barley Persian Wheat (Triticum carthlicum) Perungayam Poulard Wheat (Triticum turgidum) Polish Wheat (Triticum polonicum) Rice Malt (if barley or Koji are used) Roux Rusk Rye Seitan Semolina Semolina Triticum Shot Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Small Spelt Spirits (Specific Types) Spelt (Triticum spelta) Sprouted Wheat or Barley Stearyldimoniumhydroxypropyl Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein Strong Flour Suet in Packets Tabbouleh Tabouli Teriyaki Sauce Timopheevi Wheat (Triticum timopheevii) Triticale X triticosecale Triticum Vulgare (Wheat) Flour Lipids Triticum Vulgare (Wheat) Germ Extract Triticum Vulgare (Wheat) Germ Oil Udon (wheat noodles) Unbleached Flour Vavilovi Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Vital Wheat Gluten Wheat, Abyssinian Hard triticum durum Wheat Amino Acids Wheat Bran Extract Wheat, Bulgur Wheat Durum Triticum Wheat Germ Extract Wheat Germ Glycerides Wheat Germ Oil Wheat Germamidopropyldimonium Hydroxypropyl Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein Wheat Grass (can contain seeds) Wheat Nuts Wheat Protein Wheat Triticum aestivum Wheat Triticum Monococcum Wheat (Triticum Vulgare) Bran Extract Whole-Meal Flour Wild Einkorn (Triticum boeotictim) Wild Emmer (Triticum dicoccoides)
  22. Long read......Hi, I’m seeking some guidance here because I’m suspicious that I have at least a gluten intolerance because of constipation, bloating, tiredness, and hives. Here’s some background: I’m 18 years old. When I was 16, I started suffering from chronic hives that seemed to have no cause. We changed soaps, detergents, medicines, avoided allergens, etc, but I only got worse. I had extensive blood work which turned out normal in every area and eventually was sent to a counselor and put on Prozac (unrelated) for anxiety. After awhile, I just assumed the hives were caused by stress. I’ve had hives nearly every day since. 3-4 months ago, I had horrible sore throats that resembled strep. I developed horrible exhaustion to the point where I nearly fell asleep in class and took naps every day, which I never could do, and went to bed at 9:30-10. The strep tests came back negative twice, and eventually I was tested for mono which also came back negative. Soon after, I developed random bouts of canker sores all over my tongue, lips, and cheeks. Once one went away, another would develop. Now, I get them all over my tonsils as well, and I have pimple-like bumps in the back of my throat. I went gluten free for a week and the hives went away completely. I saw my doctor after this and explained the sores, hives, and exhaustion, and she shrugged all of it off, saying I needed to “eat better” because it would fix all of it. She would not test me for any conditions (celiac, hypothyroidism, Hashimoto’s, deficiencies, etc) and said I shouldn’t go into college self diagnosing myself with something I don’t have. I’ve reintroduced gluten and for two weeks I was fine, but lately I’ve been sleeping up to 12 hours at night and then taking 4-5 hour naps during the day. All I do anymore is sleep and I feel like it’s actuallyruining my life, on top of the horrible mouth sores!! How can I be tested? Do you have any ideas what the problem might be?
  23. have Hashimotos hypothyroidism. was whole foods vegan for 5 years. in January I went to get blood panel ( because I couldnt digest properly and was having depression come back and weakness) and ldl was high and omegas low, decided to start eating meat again. for the last 6 months I've been struggling with hemorrhoids and possibly anal fissures. went gluten free once again (prior to all of this I had started eating gluten again for about 3 months) and mostly AIP and hemorrhoid has improved but not gone and still bleeds. if I eat certain things my stomach from below my belly button feels swollen, I thought possibly sibo but last weekend I ate pizza (not gluten free) and ever since then my stomach has felt super swollen . is this possibly just a gluten issue? It's not gas but literally feels like my intestines are swollen, and it lasts for days after eating gluten or other foods that I suspect had gluten contamination. The swelling typically only happens the next day or several hours later that night and lasts 3-5 days.
  24. Celiac.com 06/26/2018 - Gliadin is an alcohol-soluble wheat protein that is toxic for people with celiac disease. Gliadin toxicity is not lowered by digestion with gastro-pancreatic enzymes. It’s been documented that an innate immunity to gliadin plays a key role in the development of celiac disease. This is mainly due to an immune response that induces epithelial stress and reprograms intraepithelial lymphocytes into natural killer (NK)-like cells, leading to enterocyte apoptosis and an increase in epithelium permeability. A team of researchers recently set out to elaborate on the role played by innate immunity to gliadin in the development of celiac disease by assessing the in vitro effects of enzymatic digested gliadin on the functionality of the process of autophagy, or natural cell destruction. The research team included Federico Manai, Alberto Azzalin, Fabio Gabriele, Carolina Martinelli, Martina Morandi, Marco Biggiogera, Mauro Bozzola, and Sergio Comincini. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Biology and Biotechnology, and with the Pediatrics and Adolescentology Unit in the Department of Internal Medicine and Therapeutics at University of Pavia, Fondazione IRCCS, Pavia, Italy. They reported recently that the administration of enzymatically digested gliadin (PT-gliadin) in in Caco-2 cells significantly reduced the expression of the autophagy-related marker LC3-II. Moreover, analysis by electron and fluorescent microscope suggests a compromised functionality of the autophagosome apparatus. The team established the rescue of the dysregulated autophagy process, along with a reduction of PT-gliadin toxicity, by using a starvation induction protocol, and by 3-methyladenine administration. Rapamycin, a well-known autophagy inducer, did not trigger significant improvement in the clearance of extra- and intra-cellular fluorescent PT-gliadin amounts. These results show the potential role of the autophagy process in the degradation and reduction of extra-cellular gliadin peptides, and provides new molecular targets for counteracting adverse gliadin reactions in celiac patients. Source: Int J Mol Sci. 2018 Feb; 19(2): 635. doi:  10.3390/ijms19020635
  25. I was helping my husband fill a bunch of Zuru Bunch O' Balloons and was unaware that they contain a clear gel that helps retain the water inside them. As the balloons were filling, this gel was leaking out and getting on my skin. I have no other known skin allergies besides related to my gluten intolerance. Itches like crazy. This product is not marked as containing wheat or gluten, because it isn't meant for internal use, but may cause external reactions.
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