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  1. ChildLife Essentials® provides a complete line of nutritional supplements designed specifically for infants and children. ChildLife Essentials® are made from the highest quality natural ingredients. Their products are all Gluten Free, Alcohol, Casein, and Dye, Free, No artificial, Sweeteners, Colorings or ingredients. No detectable levels of Mercury, Aluminum, Heavy Metals, Dioxins, PCB’s, Pesticides, Environmental Toxins and they are all GMO FREE. All have been 3rd party tested. Dr. Murray Clarke, the leading Holistic Pediatrician in the U.S., is the founder, and formulator of the CHILDLIFE ESSENTIALS complete line of Children’s nutritional supplements. Dr. Clarke has specialized in pediatrics in his homeopathic and nutritional clinic for the past twenty years. The ChildLife Essentials® line is literally the product of this experience. The sixteen products we offer are those, which have proven to be the most important, and the most effective in supporting healthy development and promoting natural immune strength in infants and children. Dr. Clarke is known for his work, and attention to children with challenging situations, which include: Autism, Allergies, Gluten Sensitivities, Environmental Allergies, ADHD, ADD, to name a few. The great taste of the products makes taking nutritional supplements an easy part of a child’s daily routine. These products are sold in natural stores, health food stores, pharmacies and online throughout America. Internationally, they are distributed throughout Asia, Europe Australia, and New Zealand in the South Pacific. We are very proud of this product line and are deeply committed to promoting improved nutrition for children as a foundation for good health and well-being. Some of the products recommended are: Multi Vitamin & Minerals Vitamin C Cod Liver Oil- Probiotics with Colostrum Aller-Care Liquid Calcium with Magnesium For Immune Support: First Defense, Echinacea, Formula 3 Cough Syrup Probiotics with Colostrum For more info visit: Visit Our Site.
  2. Celiac.com 05/30/2018 - One of the key aspects of non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) is that patients are diagnosed partly by the absence of celiac disease. That is, patients with NCGS, whatever their symptoms, do not have celiac disease. But could those patients still have some kind of gut damage, or permeability issues? Do people with non-celiac gluten sensitivity have distinct duodenal histological features? Researchers are seeking a better understanding of this still undefined condition. Some researchers have suggested that histology may play a key role in NCGS, but there is still no consensus. A recent review by Bardella et al. revealed that histology is not always reported in NCGS studies, and exclusion of celiac disease is generally done by showing negative serology and/or genetic typing. In June 2015, researchers published what is now called the Salerno Experts’ criteria, which proposes a double (or single)-blind, placebo-controlled, (DBPC), crossover gluten challenge as the gold standard to NCGS diagnosis In order to investigate histological findings of people with suspicion of NCGS, we retrospectively evaluated duodenal biopsies of a cohort of patients undergoing clinical diagnostic algorithm for NCGS as proposed by the Salerno consensus. The research team included B Zanini, V Villanacci, M Marullo, M Cadei, F Lanzarotto, A Bozzola, and C Ricci. They are variously affiliated with the Gastroenterology Unit, Department of Clinical and Experimental Sciences, University of Brescia, Viale Europa 11, 25123, Brescia, Italy; and with the Institute of Pathology Spedali Civili, Piazzale Spedali Civili 1, 25123, Brescia, Italy. Their team’s main goal was to underline that the peculiar IEL distribution and the increased eosinophil count may represent a valid warning that help to identify patients with NCGS, given the absence of serological markers for NCGS. The team also performed a CD3 immunohistochemical evaluation of T lymphocytes confirming that the IEL numbers were normal, but their distribution is peculiar, as noted by the clusters of T lymphocytes in the superficial epithelium and linear disposition of T lymphocytes in the deeper part of the mucosa above the muscularis mucosae. They also note that their failure to fully match study subjects with placebo challenge is a limitation of this study, but stress the current uncertainty of the actual clinical diagnostic algorithm as supported by recent reviews of the literature. The team’s observations led them to note that histology may play a similar role in NCGS diagnosis as it does in celiac diagnosis. Researchers do know that, unlike with celiac disease, there is an absence of damage or change to intestinal mucosa in patients with NCGS, especially an absence of villous atrophy. In addition, the morphological exclusion of celiac disease is a crucial assessment, because some patients classified as NCGS show increased duodenal IEL count (> 25 IELs/100 enterocytes), corresponding to Marsh I, or grade A lesions of celiac histological classification. To properly diagnose NCGS, the team says it’s very important to confirm these features, to rule out any type of organic malabsorption diseases, and to definitively rule out celiac disease, via a negative celiac disease serology. Taken as a whole, the team’s results provide evidence that both intraepithelial lymphocytes and eosinophils play a role in the physiopathology behind NCGS. They are calling for more studies to confirm their findings and to determine whether the results they observed were specific to NCGS. Source: Virchows Arch. 2018 Apr 4. doi: 10.1007/s00428-018-2346-9
  3. Celiac.com 06/04/2018 - Rates of contamination in commercial food advertised as gluten-free are improving, but nearly one in ten still show unacceptable levels of gluten. As part of a government mandated food sampling program, the city of Melbourne, Australia recently conducted a survey of 127 food businesses advertising gluten-free options. For the tests, government officers conduct unannounced site visits and take a sample of at least one food item declared to be gluten-free. Ridascreen Gliadin R5 ELISA analysis showed that 14 of 158 samples (9%) contained detectable gluten in excess of the official Food Standards Australia New Zealand (FSANZ) definition of gluten-free. Nine of the 14 samples (6% overall) registered gluten above 20 parts per million, which exceeds the official threshold for foods labeled gluten-free in Europe and the United States. At one business, food labeled gluten-free registered above 80 ppm, even though they were asked directly for a gluten-free sample. These findings confirm the lack of understanding reported by many people with celiac disease. The good news is that rates of gluten non-compliance has improved over earlier audits, from 20% of samples in 2014 to 15% of samples in 2015. The survey team notes that one-third of the businesses in this study had previously been audited) and education seems to be paying off. In one burger chain alone, four of five venues which were non-compliant in 2014, were fully compliant in 2015 and 2016. The survey results showed that businesses that provided gluten-free training for staff showed 75% better odds of compliance. The overall good news here is that gluten-free compliance in commercial food businesses has improved steadily since the first surveys in 2014. One in ten odds of getting gluten contamination from food labeled gluten-free is still to high, but even though there is room for improvement more and more businesses are providing gluten-free training for their staff, and those that do are reaping benefits. Look for this trend to continue as more businesses offer training, gluten-free and celiac disease awareness increases, and more consumers demand safe gluten-free foods. Read more at: The Medical Journal of Australia
  4. This article appeared in the Autumn 2006 edition of Celiac.coms Scott-Free Newsletter. Celiac.com 12/11/2006 - Yes, thats what I think. Gluten-sensitivity is a disease of your brain and nerves. The gluten puzzle I have come to this conclusion after studying the effects of gluten on my patients for over a decade. I am a pediatric gastroenterologist and allergist. I run a busy clinic for children and their parents. I have been increasingly concerned by the large numbers of my patients who are affected by gluten. I was perplexed by their wide-ranging symptoms. The puzzle was to explain how gluten could cause so much ill health to so many people in so many different ways, including celiac disease. Faulty brain control Eureka! The solution came when deep in discussion with my friend and colleague, Ron Harper, Professor of Neurobiology, UCLA. We were both struggling with the concept of multiple symptoms that needed to be explained. The answer appeared absurdly simple: disturbed "brain control". It suddenly seemed obvious—gluten could disturb the neural pathways of the body. Gluten was gradually damaging the brain and the nerves of susceptible people. It was the brain that was the common pathway for the manifestations of all of the gluten symptoms. So I set out to research what the world medical literature had to say. Is gluten a neurotoxin? I felt excited. I reviewed my patients in this new light—I began looking for a brain-grain connection. I began to see gluten as a neurotoxin—this could provide a universal model of gluten-sensitivity. This toxicity might act through inflammatory mechanisms or cross-reactivity with neurons. I began accumulating the evidence for my proposal that gluten-sensitivity is a brain and nerve disease. "Full Of It!" The concept of "Full of it" developed from the stories from my patients. I wrote my hypothesis down in a book now called Full of it! It refers to our diets being full of gluten; to the world being full of gluten-sensitive people; to the medical practitioners who are so skeptical of adverse reactions to gluten; to the enthusiasm of people who are feeling vibrant again on a gluten-free diet; and to those who are brimming with hope that the problem of gluten has now been recognized. Food allergy skeptics As a junior doctor I decided to formally research the food allergy phenomenon. I was awarded a research post and carried out the first comprehensive food allergy studies in New Zealand. I triumphantly demonstrated that food allergy was both a real entity and that it was common. But, to my disappointment, my colleagues were reluctant to believe me or my data. They professed a "disbelief" in food allergy. This surprised me as I had the research data. My next step was to conduct four more years of investigation of food allergy in Australia (at the Royal Childrens Hospital, Melbourne). This was a bigger and more elaborate study. My Doctoral Thesis (1982) based on this work is called: Food hypersensitivity in children: diagnostic approaches to milk and egg hypersensitivity. Since then I have continued my investigations into food allergy—but still today (25 years later) medical skepticism abounds. This "disbelief" is held despite the vast body of research describing food allergy. There seems to be an underlying unwillingness for doctors to consider food allergy as a possibility. Unfortunately, this also applies to gluten reactions. The shocking truth The shocking truth about gluten is that gluten foods are causing tremendous damage—but currently this is going mostly unrecognized. Unfortunately, gluten grains have become our staple diet. The quantity of gluten in our food supply has been steadily increasing. Yet worse, official Health Policies endorse gluten grains as the foundation of our food pyramid. Medics turn a blind eye Gluten is sapping the energy and wellbeing of countless millions. To date, the medical profession has turned a blind eye to glutens wider problems whilst focusing all of their attention on the narrow problem of celiac disease. A typical story I received emails like this every day: "Dr Ford, I have emailed you a number of times regarding our two children. I thought I should let you know that since going gluten free for the last three months, at last our son and daughter have put on some weight. If I had kept them on a normal gluten diet (which they recommended at the hospital) we would be still be having the headaches and sore tummies as well as the bad moods which our son would have. People just thought he was a naughty child, but now he is so different - we can talk to him without getting into any fights. I congratulate you for all your efforts on bringing gluten intolerance to the media and medical profession. More children and their families may find long awaited help. We have had to put up with this for seven years! At long last there is light at the end of the tunnel. Kind regards, Sue and Garry." Can gluten damage your brain? I believe that gluten was actually causing these two children to be sick. That is the explanation for their "naughty" behavior, their moods and their headaches. I postulate that gluten can damage your brain. I have come to this conclusion by the abundant circumstantial evidence from my observations of my patients who are gluten-sensitive. I have pondered the next questions: "Why do they have such an array of symptoms from gluten?" "Why do they recover so quickly when gluten is removed?" And "Why do they deteriorate so rapidly when only tiny amounts of gluten are eaten?" The concept of a brain/nerve disease can explain everything. The brain/nerve hypothesis "The symptoms from gluten occur through its action on the nervous system". I propose that gluten-sensitivity is a brain condition. Each and every organ in your body has some form of brain/nerve control. I propose that gluten can injure the delicate nervous networks that control your guts functions. A malfunction will subsequently lead to all of the gut symptoms that have so well been described. In addition, gluten can also directly affect brain function, which leads to the primary neurological symptoms that are so commonly seen with gluten-sensitivity. What is new? There are a number of new ideas that I put forward. These are based on circumstantial evidence. They produce a unifying theory of the symptoms that are attributed to gluten toxicity. A brain disease I consider that gluten-sensitivity is mostly a neurological problem. A major contribution to this debate is the realization that the brain has a central role in the expression of the symptoms that have, until now, been attributed to the local toxicity of gluten in the gut. A nerve disease I propose that gluten-sensitivity is a nerve disease. There is a gigantic network of nerves that controls every function that your gut is programmed to do. There are as many nerve cells in your gut as there are in your head! (about 25 billion nerve cells). I call it your tummy brain (or gut brain). Your tummy brain can be directly damaged by gluten reactions. This is the cause of so many sore tummies and bowel troubles. A wide spectrum of neurological manifestations For decades, there have been reports of unexplained brain and nerve symptoms which are associated with celiac disease. Although these associations have been described, there has been no universal mechanism proposed. However, if gluten is seen as a neurotoxin, then the explanation has been found. A very common disease Reactions to gluten have recently been documented to be extremely common. About one-in-ten people (as ascertained by blood donor studies) have high levels of gluten antibodies in their blood. My clinical studies have arrived at this same high number of gluten-sensitive people. Others have data to show that it is even more prevalent. Am I full if it? You might ask, "Is he full of it?" Yes, I am full of excitement and hope for the future. So many people can now be helped, if only this information can be widely distributed. I am full of ideas and full of enthusiasm. I hope that you are full of hope for your healthy and vibrant future. Tariq's story: "Dear Rodney, Thank you for your care and support of my family in regard to our allergies, gluten sensitivity and celiac disease that exists within that framework. My son Tariq, who is nearly 12 years old, has been a patient of yours over a number of years for his multiple food allergies. Tariq also suffers from dyslexia. Over the last several years Tariq has been becoming increasingly tired, lacking in energy and motivation, struggling with school work and constantly scratching due to his eczema and rashes covering all of his body. During this time, even though he has attended soccer training up to four times a week he somehow gained a lot of weight. Tariq was constantly grumpy and had low mood levels. Two months ago you diagnosed Tariq with gluten-sensitivity (his tTG 4; IgG-gliadin 86; IgA-gliadin 9). Tariq was extremely reluctant to go on a gluten free diet. But as the rest of the family had gone gluten-free—so he was forced also to become gluten-free. The changes that a gluten-free diet has evoked in Tariq have been astounding. His energy levels have increased, his skin has vastly improved, he has lost a lot of his excess weight (even though his appetite has increased) and he has shown improvement in his dyslexia. Tariq is not as grumpy as he was and his mood levels have improved. Tariq is now vigilant about gluten and can see the differences it has made to his life and the quality of it. Also, the other soccer parents have noticed a vast improvement in Tariqs energy levels and speed. His teacher has also noticed a big difference. Thanks again. Regards, Rosemary" Are you affected? The shocking truth is that gluten can damage your brain and that so many people are being encouraged to eat gluten-foods that might be steadily eroding their health and energy. If you have any lingering doubt about your own health, then I suggest that you check out the possibility of gluten-sensitivity. If you have any comments or questions we would love to hear from you. Dr Rodney Ford is a Pediatric Gastroenterologist, Allergist and Nutrition Consultant. He has been Associate Professor of Pediatrics at the Christchurch School of Medicine, University of Otago. He runs a busy Childrens Gastroenterology and Allergy Clinic in Christchurch, New Zealand. He has written over a hundred scientific papers including book chapters and books. www.doctorgluten.com This includes a series of five books on gluten: why it can make you ill and how to go gluten-free. Are You Gluten-Sensitive? Your Questions Answered Going Gluten-Free: How to Get Started The Gluten-Free lunch book The book for the Sick, Tired and Grumpy (Gluten-Free kids) Full of it! The shocking truth about gluten (The brain-grain connection - ISBN 978-0-473-10407-8)
  5. Celiac.com 10/17/2012 - This article originally appeared in the Winter 2012 edition of Celiac.com's Journal of Gluten-Sensitivity. It’s estimated that of the 3 million Americans with celiac disease, an autoimmune disease triggered by exposure to gluten-a protein component of wheat, barley, and rye-only 3% have been diagnosed. The good news for celiac patients who have been diagnosed is that the treatment for their condition is simple and doesn’t require the ingestion of drugs--a gluten-free diet. Unfortunately, celiac patients must deal with several challenges in maintaining a diet free of gluten, specifically the expenses involved. Compared with “regular” gluten-containing foods, gluten-free alternatives are more expensive. In fact, a study has indicated that gluten-free foods cost more than double their gluten-containing counterparts. In a study by the Dalhousie Medical School at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, prices were compared between food products labeled as “gluten-free” with comparable gluten-containing food products at two large-sized chain grocery stores. Unit prices of the food items in dollars per 100 grams were calculated for this purpose. According to the study, all the 56 gluten-free products were more expensive than their corresponding products. The average unit price for gluten-free products was found to be $1.71, compared with $0.61 for the gluten-containing products. This means that gluten-free products were 242% more expensive than gluten-containing items. Fortunately, celiac patients can receive tax deductions for certain expenses related with their gluten-free diet. To receive these benefits, celiacs must provide a doctor’s note confirming their celiac diagnosis and save their receipts for all their gluten-free foods and other products they purchase. The difference between the prices of gluten-free items compared to those of regular items is tax-deductible. Products that don’t have a gluten-containing counterpart, such as xanthan gum and sorghum flour, are totally tax-deductible. Shipping costs for online orders of gluten-free items are also tax-deductible. In order to file your claim, you should fill out a 1049 schedule A for medical deductions. For more information, contact a qualified accountant. There are other ways to avoid spending loads of money on gluten-free foods. For instance, stay away from gluten-free processed and “junk” foods such as snack foods and desserts made with refined carbohydrates and sugar and lacking nutrients. Not only will you save money, but you’ll safeguard your health. I recommend making meals comprised of nutritious, naturally gluten-free whole foods at home such as fruits, vegetables, dairy products, poultry, fish, meats, nuts and seeds, and eggs. These foods are packed with vital nutrients and don’t carry any additional costs. Make sure that no gluten has been added to such foods and they are safe from cross-contamination. Another way to save money is to make your own gluten-free mixes yourself, such as the ones I recommend on my gluten-free website. Instead of buying expensive commercial gluten-free baking mixes, you can create your own gluten-free flour mixes for a variety of foods such as pancakes, pizza, rolls, and muffins and store them conveniently in your refrigerator or freezer. I also recommend purchasing gluten-free ingredients in bulk online, as many websites offer great deals. These are just a few of the ways to save money on the gluten-free diet. It is unfortunate that gluten-free foods are more expensive than “regular” food items, especially to such an extraordinary degree, however savvy gluten-free dieters can through tax deductions and smart shopping choices cut down on their expenses. Perhaps in the future we will see a decrease in gluten-free food pricing, but one thing is for sure-we should consider ourselves lucky that we have found an answer to our health problems. Even if the gluten-free diet is expensive, at least it’s the road to greater health and quality of life.
  6. Celiac.com 10/21/2014 - Insects offer one of the most concentrated and efficient forms of protein on the planet, and they are a common food in many parts of the world. So, could high-protein flour made out of crickets change the future of gluten-free foods? A San Francisco Bay Area company is looking to make that possibility a reality. The company, Bitty Foods, is making flour from slow-roasted crickets that are then milled and combined with tapioca and cassava to make a high-protein flour that is gluten-free. According to the Bitty Foods website, a single cup of cricket flour contains a whopping 28 grams of protein. So can Bitty Foods persuade gluten-free consumers to try their high protein gluten-free flour? Only time will tell. In the mean time, stay tuned for more cricket flour developments. What do you think? Would you give it a try? If it worked well for baking, would you use it?
  7. I miss biscuits more thananything. Before going gluten-free, I loved to eat biscuits andgravy, strawberry shortcake (on homemade biscuits) and warm biscuitswith honey! There is nothing that compares with the satisfaction ofeating a warm homemade biscuit. Which is why the following recipe isso exciting. This is a recipe that can be manipulated to cater tospecific dietary restrictions-even mine! There are dairy-free,soy-free and egg-free options included. It might take a couple triesfinding the right combination for you, so spend a day making somedelicious gluten-free home-style biscuits. Home-style Drop Biscuits(Gluten-Free) Servings: 16 largebiscuits Ingredients: 1 ½ cup brown rice flour 2 cup corn starch orpotato starch or tapioca starch ½ cup soy flour orsorghum flour 2 teaspoons baking powder 1 ¾ teaspoons salt 1½ teaspoons teaspoons baking soda 2 teaspoons xanthan gum 1 stick of butter or gluten-free butter substitute(chilled in the freezer) 1 ¼ cup soy milk 1 ¼ cup water 1 tablespoon cider vinegar 1 egg, beaten (or the equivalent amount ofyour favorite egg replacement) To Make: *Note: 1. If you’re not vegan or dairy free, feelfree to use 1 c. buttermilk in place of the soy milk and vinegar. Ifyou’re allergic to soy, try using your usual milk substitute andkeep the vinegar in the recipe. Also reduce the liquid if necessary, you don't want the batter to be too runny. Preheat your oven to 350F degrees. In a large mixing bowl thoroughly combine the flour (a fork works well for this), bakingpowder, salt, baking soda, and xanthan gum. For an easiertime working with the butter, grate the butter into the flour usingthe small holed side of a box grater. Mix the butter into the flourso that there are no large balls of grated butter. Add the soy milk, water, vinegar and beaten egg to the flourand stir until the dry and liquid ingredients are combined. Using a large spoon, drop the dough onto agreased pan to make 16 biscuits. Cook at 350F degrees for 15 minutesor until golden brown.
  8. Celiac.com 07/27/2010 - Many businesses contact us here at Celiac.com, wanting to know how to start a gluten-free business. There are many important things to consider before you open your gluten-free business to celiac and gluten intolerant customers. The following information is intended to help those looking to comply with celiac standards of gluten-free food. Start-Up: To begin, it is important to take take inventory of celiac contamination requirements. Will your gluten-free business also sell gluten-containing foods? If so, cross contamination will be an issue. If your company will be solely a gluten-free accommodating business, it will make your challenges fewer, but there are other important factors to consider such as contamination, suppliers and certifications. Before you begin your journey into providing gluten-free products, it is important to think like a celiac. Contamination & Cross-Contamination: Cross-contamination occurs when a gluten-free product comes into contact with other gluten based products. Cross contamination can occur in a variety of ways, but it usually begins where food is prepared and packaged, such as with the supplier or the manufacturer. However, cross-contamination can occur from other sources as well. If you plan to sell gluten containing pizza and gluten-free pizza, for example, then you will have an entirely new set of concerns. If you make the pizza dough in-house, there is a very good chance that gluten flour will permeate in the air for hours after using, coating your surfaces and creating a health hazard for the gluten-free folks. And if you bake the gluten and non-gluten pizza's in the same oven, then you will also need to take that into consideration, as that is also a source of cross-contamination and can render your gluten-free pizza inedible for sensitive celiacs. If your gluten-free food is stored in the same place as the gluten-containing food, you may have also a health hazard on your hands. Basically, it's a good rule of thumb to follow the celiac guidelines set for keeping a gluten-free kitchen. There are many considerations to take into account when supplying gluten-free food and while keeping a pristine business will be your best friend, sometimes even that isn't enough. Suppliers: Suppliers are a very important factor when starting a gluten-free business. It is important to research the product sources before using an ingredient source. If an ingredient source is contaminated by gluten, then your products could also be contaminated by gluten. So if you are looking to buy gluten-free rice flour for example, the reliability of your rice flour to be gluten-free will depend greatly on your supplier. It is important to carefully research the product supplier before using them. There is nothing worse than buying large quantities of food labeled “gluten-free” that actually contain gluten. Remember, it is up to a product's manufacturer to guarantee that their products are gluten-free. They must research their ingredient suppliers, and follow-up with them periodically, as sources and ingredients can change at anytime without notice. Gluten-Free Certification: If you plan to operate a gluten-free business then getting your products certified gluten-free is the best way to go. Not all gluten-free certifications are created equal. There are various gluten-free labels ranging from legitimate to not so legitimate, so it is important to research the most reliable, and best gluten-free label for your products. Getting your product 'gluten-free' certified will put your consumers at ease and increase your sales. It will also put you at ease knowing that you are providing the best gluten-free product you possibly can.
  9. This recipes comes to us from Melissa Boucher. 4 ½ cup gluten-free flour 1 ¾ cup sugar 7 teaspoons baking powder 2 teaspoons salt ½ teaspoon nutmeg ½ teaspoon cinnamon 3 eggs 2 teaspoons gluten-free vanilla 2 cup milk or water 1 cup oil Mix dry ingredients together. At medium speed beat eggs and vanilla. Add rest of wet ingredients. Add dry mixture. Makes about 2 dz. donuts. These freeze well and can be put in the microwave--80% power for 20-30 seconds.
  10. Celiac.com 11/23/2015 - A new study looks at the impacts of introducing gluten to infants and the development of celiac disease. A research team recently set out to assess the evidence regarding the effect of time of gluten introduction and breastfeeding on the risk of developing celiac disease. The research team included MI Pinto-Sánchez, EF Verdu, E Liu, P Bercik, PH Green, JA Murray, S Guandalini, and P Moayyedi. Their team conducted a comprehensive review of studies from the following electronic databases: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); MEDLINE (Ovid); EMBASE (Ovid); and System for Information on Grey Literature in Europe (SIGLE). Two independent authors collected the data. Their analysis included randomized controlled trials and observational studies that assessed proper timing for introducing gluten to the infant diet, appropriate quantity of gluten consumption at weaning, and the effect of breastfeeding on celiac disease risk. Out of a total of 1982 studies they identified, 15 matched their criteria for data extraction. The team performed a meta-analysis on 2 randomized controlled trials, 10 cohort studies, and 1 case-control study. That analysis showed a 25% increase in celiac disease risk with gluten-introduction after 6 months, compared to the recommended 4 to 6 months (risk ratio [RR], 1.25; 95% CI, 1.08-1.45). There was no difference between breastfeeding vs no breastfeeding on celiac disease risk (OR, 0.55; 95% CI, 0.28-1.10), with substantial heterogeneity (I2 = 92%) among studies. There is currently no evidence to support that early introduction of gluten to the infant diet increases the risk of celiac disease. However, introduction of gluten after six months of age might promote an increased risk of celiac disease. More studies are needed that control for potential confounders and that evaluate environmental factors in low-risk families. Source: J Pediatr. 2015 Oct 20. pii: S0022-3476(15)01045-8. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2015.09.032.
  11. I haven't browsed here in a while so there may be other threads about this but thought I would share a recent event. I have been using "assist/defense" pills for years. I never have been brave enough to truly "test" them to see if they really would keep me from getting sick if ate glutens. I am VERY sensitive and travel alot so I have to trust that things I'm eating have been made with TLC. When my local store quit carrying the Gluten Defense that I've taken before every meal when I'm not in control of the food preparation, I tried Me+My Gluten Assist from Wal-Mart (scary in itself). I know my local Wendy's has some CC issues on their fries due to the oil overflowing between nugget and fry vats. I was really craving their fries and sent through their drive thru. I came home, took 1 Gluten Assist and began eating. Within about 15 minutes I could tell I had CC fries as my gut started to turn inside out. The package from the pills says to take one before consuming.... an additional pill may be taken if needed. We always laughed about that as if needed meant in my case that it was too late. Well, I took a second one and within 15-20 minutes my gut had settled and balanced itself out and I did not have the massive reaction that I get when I eat glutens. Having been dx'd in 2005 I've been at this a long time and do realize that I could be harming my villa even if I'm not "getting sick" but considering the FDA allows companies to label things as gluten-free if they have less than the 20ppm, I feel that the minimal CC from the fry vats can't be doing too much damage for the occasional splurge like this night. I say all this to let you know that there is some validity to the "assist" pills that can help avoid a horrid reaction from the occasional CC. I can no longer find it at Wal-Mart but CVS has been carrying it near me. It was about $12 for 30 pills. I feel it's worth the $.40 per meal to have that little bit of help when I'm not in control of my food.
  12. Can I be cross contaminationed by purchasing resale items that have come in contact with gluten? Can I properly sanitize a bedding set without destroying the color/fabric? If so, how? I purchased a bedding set through a virtual yard sale, and my husband brought this question up. I've never thought of it in my 6 years as a diagnosed celiac. I couldn't find information about cleansing cloth (fully) from gluten, and I'd like to feel safe before picking the set up. Any info or direction would be greatly appreciated.
  13. Celiac.com 05/25/2018 - People with celiac disease need to follow a lifelong gluten-free diet. However, once their guts have healed, they can still be sensitive to gluten. Sometimes even more sensitive than they were before they went gluten-free. Accidental ingestion of gluten can trigger symptoms in celiac patients, such as pain in the gut and diarrhea, and can also cause intestinal damage. A new drug being developed by a company called Amgen eases the effects of people with celiac disease on a gluten-free diet. Researchers working on the drug have announced that their proof-of-concept study shows AMG 714, an anti-IL-15 monoclonal antibody, potentially protects celiac patients from inadvertent gluten exposure by blocking interleukin 15, an important mediator of celiac disease, and leads to fewer symptoms following gluten exposure. The drug is intended for people with celiac disease who are following a gluten-free diet, and is designed to protect against modest gluten contamination, not to permit consumption of large amounts of gluten, like bread or pasta. AMG 714 is not designed for celiac patients to eat gluten at will, but for small, incidental contamination. Francisco Leon, MD, PhD, study director and consultant for Amgen, says that their team is looking at AMG 714 “for its potential to protect against modest contamination, not deliberately eating large amounts of gluten, like bread or pasta.” Amgen hopes that AMG 714 will help celiac patients on a gluten-free diet to experience fewer or less sever gluten-triggered events. Findings of the team’s first phase 2 study of a biologic immune modulator in celiac disease will be presented at the upcoming Digestive Disease Week 2018. Read more at ScienceDaily.com
  14. Hi, I went to see my dermatologist today to get a biopsy of what she suspects to be DH on my elbows. She freaked me out because she said that if the test is positive my diet will be very restricted since I am a Vegetarian. She advised me to get a nutritionist. My question is should I also ask my PCP for a referral to a gastroenterologist as well, if I indeed do have Celiac? Thanks in advance.
  15. I was diagnosed with celiac disease about 2.5 years ago and was living alone at the time. I went gluten-free and lived in a completely gluten free house. I was asympotomatic when diagnosed but noticed improved health, energy, skin, mood, etc. after going gluten free and as time has gone on, it has been worth it to stick to the diet. But I still battle with frustration and anger in social situations where I cannot join others in eating some of my former favorite foods (pizza, bagels, Chinese, etc.). For the most part, I just avoided scenarios like that and was happier for doing so. Now, about a month ago, I moved in with my elderly father to take care of him as my mother has had to go into a nursing home. He loves his bagels and bread and is very messy, making my new living quarters covered in crumbs. I have expressed to him the importance of keeping gluten products contained to avoid cross-contamination but it seems no matter how I explain it to him, he doesn’t understand the importance and thinks I’m over-reacting. He says he doesn’t let the knife touch the bread when he’s putting peanut butter on it, or cream cheese on a bagel, so double dipping isn’t ruining anything. I have bought separate containers of these products now, all labeled gluten-free so he doesn’t contaminate them but I’m not sure I trust he is reading my labels. I have put his bread in a tray and provided another tray that I instructed him to only prepare foods on the contained area, but since I’ve been here, not a day has gone by that I haven’t seen crumbs on every surface. Although my celiac disease was asymptomatic when diagnosed, after years of living gluten-free, I can now notice the negative effects living in a gluten house. My skin has been awful, I’ve been getting headaches (including one migraine that lasted 3 days!), I’m always tired, the brain fog has made it hard to concentrate on anything, and I’ve been so depressed I can literally burst into tears at any moment for no damn reason. When I talk about feeling bad, my family says I’m being dramatic and I’m probably only depressed because my mother is in the nursing home. While yes, my mothers health is upsetting, she’s been declining for years and I’m definitely saddened by it, but this feeling of depression now does not feel tied to that. Or anything really. I don’t feel sad about anything in particular, except feeling misunderstood by my family, if anything. Sorry for the long rant, but I’m feeling hopeless. Does anyone have any advice on how to educate the elderly on this? Or how to help sensitize a family to one person’s needs? Is it possible to teach an old dog new tricks? I don’t want to take away my fathers bread, but I will also not be able to take care of him if I’m stuck in bed with migraines and depression. How can I find balance here??
  16. The following gluten-free carrot cake recipe is truly a traditional cake. Full of some of the most common allergens like, dairy, eggs and nuts. I tend to experiment with new recipes by replacing ingredients I can't tolerate, with ingredients I can. For example, many recipes allow you to substitute eggs with applesauce. The nuts can be left out-for those allergic to nuts, and the cream cheese can be substituted for dairy-free cream cheese. When substituting however, ratios will be different and it is a good idea to know what ratio of applesauce (for example) equals 4 eggs. Ratio quantities will also greatly depend on your taste buds, but if this recipe is okay for your diet, dig in and enjoy! Cake Ingredients: 1 cup pecans - toasted and finely chopped 2 ½ cups carrots - finely grated 2 cups gluten-free all purpose flour 1 tsp. baking soda 1 ½ tsp. baking powder 2/3 tsp. salt - finely ground 1 ½ tsp. cinnamon 4 large eggs - room temp 1 ½ cups granulated sugar 1 cup vegetable or canola oil 2 tsp. vanilla Cream Cheese Frosting Ingredients: 1/4 cup unsalted butter - room temperature 8 ounces cream cheese - room temp 2 cups powdered sugar 1 tsp. vanilla 1 lemon - finely grated lemon zest only To Make: Start by toasting the pecans in the oven at 350 degree F for 6-8 minutes. Remove from the oven, allow to cool and chop finely. Next, finely shred 2 ½ cups of carrots. Finally, combine the gluten-free flour, baking soda, baking powder, salt, and cinnamon in a bowl, set aside. Beat the 4 eggs on medium speed for about 1 minute, reduce the speed and slowly pour in the granulated sugar. Once the sugar and eggs are combined (about 3-4 minutes) slowly pour in the oil and vanilla. Next, add the flour mixture and beat just until combined. Finally, use a spatula to fold in the carrots and toasted pecans. Divide the batter between two well greased 9 inch round cake pans. Bake at 350 F for 25-30 minutes. Cool in the pan for 10 minutes before inverting onto a cooling rack. Baking Directions: Divide batter between 2 well greased 9 inch round cake pans. Bake at 350 degrees F for25-30 minutes. Allow to cool in the pan for 10 minutes before inverting onto a cooling rack. * Note: This cake can also be made into a single layer 9x13 cake, simply increase baking time to 30-40 minutes. While the cake is cooling, beat together the butter and cream cheese. Next, add the powdered sugar, vanilla, and lemon zest. Beat until thoroughly combined. Place one layer of cake on a platter, spread an even layer of frosting on top of the cake. Add the second layer of cake. Use the remaining frosting to cover the top and sides of the cake. *Idea: Use remaining or extra pecans to decorate the outside of the cake.
  17. Celiac.com 05/15/2018 - There is a good amount of anecdotal evidence that people with non-celiac gluten sensitivity can tolerate sourdough bread, but there is no good science to support such claims. To determine if sourdough bread help conquer wheat sensitivity, the Alberta Wheat Commission (AWC) is funding a team of researchers to see if the sourdough fermentation process can reduce or eliminate wheat components that trigger wheat sensitivity. The project will study the way the sourdough bread fermentation process breaks down proteins and carbohydrates in wheat flour. Chair of the AWC Research Committee, Terry Young, said new research suggests that wheat protein may not be the cause of gluten sensitivity in people without celiac disease. Longer fermentation, aka sourdough fermentation, is more common in Europe. Young says that reports indicate that “incidents of non-celiac sensitivity…are actually lower in Europe." He adds the current research will focus on the fermentation, but the future may include the development of wheat varieties for gluten sensitive individuals. The research will be led by food microbiologist at the University of Alberta, Dr. Michael Gänzle, who said the use of sourdough bread in industrial baking reduces ingredient costs and can improve the quality of bread as well. Dr. Gänzle wants to assess anecdotal claims that people with non-celiac wheat or gluten intolerance can tolerate sourdough bread. His team wants to “determine whether fermentation reduces or eliminates individual wheat components that are known or suspected to cause adverse effects.” The team readily admits that their project will not create products that are safe for people with celiac disease. They may, however, create products that are useful for people without celiac disease, but who are gluten sensitivity. The AWC is collaboratively funding the project with the Saskatchewan Wheat Development Commission, and the Minnesota Wheat Research Promotion Council, which will contribute $57,250, and $20,000, respectively. The research team will issue a report of its findings after the project is completed in 2021. Studies like this are important to shed light on the differences between celiac and non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Stay tuned for more developments in this exciting area of research. Source: highriveronline.com
  18. Celiac.com 02/08/2017 - "What if the kid you bullied at school, grew up, and turned out to be the only surgeon who could save your life?" --Lynette Mather If you ask any high school senior what in their life has changed the most since kindergarten, statistics show that many would answer moving from one school to another. However, the more drastic of changes are seen such as illnesses diagnosed during these critical school ages. In 2009 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, and that diagnosis has impacted my life in both positive and negative ways for my past, present, and future time at Indiana Area High School and beyond. Personally I have had to deal with bullying because of my disabilities. Bullying by definition is the use of force or coercion to abuse or intimidate others. I along with 20% of my peers nationwide in grades 9-12 (The Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System) experience bullying in many different forms. Bullying can be teasing, hitting, leaving someone out, whispering behind backs, online harassment, shoving, remarks about race, sexuality, and disabilities. Before my diagnosis I was considered "normal" but as a result of my illness and "strange" dietary needs therefore I have been bullied. However, looking back on my experience I am happy to have dealt with the resistance because it has made me a better, more confident individual. I, like three million fellow Americans nationwide (National Celiac Disease), must deal with the stress of having celiac disease. I was diagnosed in 2009 after having lost my eyesight to a migraine. Celiac Disease is an often under-diagnosed autoimmune disease wherein the person cannot eat wheat, rye, barley, or oats, otherwise known as gluten, because their antibodies will attack their own system leading to other serious health issues such as cancer. Celiac Disease is spread through genes; my entire family, including my father, mother, and sister, has this disease. However, even with the growing awareness of celiac disease, there is also a growing skepticism. "Critics" of my disease claim that the gluten free diet is a fad. Many celebrities have tried to lose weight and failed to stay on this difficult diet. Restaurant chains are coming out with new gluten free menus every day to raise prices and profits, though they refuse to educate their servers about what someone with a gluten "allergy" cannot eat. While some people are sympathetic and know the outstanding facts about celiac disease, most of the population stays in the dark about this ailment. This causes frustration for people with celiac disease, like me, to have to deal with the resulting brick wall of resistance. In my small community it is very rare for someone to have such a disease that the public knows little about. This can cause doubt and disbelief, especially at a high school where everyone is just trying to "fit in". When I was diagnosed in 2009, I had just started ninth grade and I had also started playing two high school sports, softball and tennis. For the softball team it was a well-known fact that after every away game the softball boosters would buy each girl a twelve inch sub from a local deli to eat on the way home. Whenever my parents and I contacted the booster president to explain the situation with my disability and that I simply would like to have a salad, we were met with backlash. I did not understand at the time why a parent would refuse to supply another child with food after a physical activity when everyone else was getting a meal. This quickly made me an outcast on the softball team as the "strange girl with the made up disease", causing me to feel stressed and awful about myself over something that I could not control. I would have loved to have been able to "fit in" and eat the subs like my teammates rather than being different, especially after growing up able to eat gluten! It was a hard transition to make. I went from being able to eat the subs, donuts, pizza, and any other fast-food product to a strict dietary regime. After my long process through the education system, I finally got the meal I had a right to have. Unfortunately, the boosters' actions, forced us to go through the school system to "prove" I had a legitimate excuse not to eat the subs. I was distanced from other members of the team and, in subsequent years, had to deal with backlash from my teammates. They do not understand that it is not a personal choice to avoid gluten. I have a disability. I simply cannot eat it. Instead, they go back to the first year when I was eating the same foods they ate, and I get blamed for wanting to be "special" and get the more expensive food. I know that I am not alone in my struggle and that people with celiac disease around the world deal with what I deal with everyday - just like others who are bullied for being different. The after effects from my being bullied have shown themselves even in everyday situations. I have learned a great deal about myself and respect for other individuals' differences. I believe that if I had not been bullied I would not have the self-confidence, integrity, sense of right and wrong, or leadership skills that I have now. It has allowed me to go above and beyond in tough situations, knowing that I can overcome them. I know that even though the times are tough with my disability, and that while others may never understand mine, I can certainly understand and respect theirs. I respect and do not judge others simply based on what they can or cannot eat. I also know that just because someone does not "look" ill on the outside does not mean they are not dealing with something awful on the inside. This allows me to make friends easily and to understand others more effectively. Being bullied has also allowed me to learn new leadership skills that I use in my volunteer work. I am confident in myself that I can go forward into the world of higher education and succeed because of the values I now hold dear. The most drastic change I have encountered in my high school career is the diagnosis of celiac disease in 2009. This diagnosis has impacted my life in both positive and negative ways, in the past, present, and future at Indiana Area High School and beyond. I have had to deal with bullying because of my disabilities. Bullying, by definition. is the use of force or coercion to abuse or intimidate others. I along with 20% of my peers nationwide in grades 9-12 (The Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System) experience bullying in many different forms. After dealing with the effects of my being bullied, I know that it has made me a better person. I can travel the world and make lasting relationships based on acknowledging and respecting differences in every person I encounter.
  19. I went gluten-free over nine years ago. I was always thin - 5'9" and roughly a size eight. After years of chronic pain and mood issues and insomnia a doc caught the celiac. Soon after quitting gluten all symptoms subsided but I quickly gained A LOT of weight. It's been many years, many docs and MANY different diets. I can't lose the weight. I've tried every variation of diets and it doesn't budge. I exercise regularly and eat a fraction of what others eat. I'm so tired of people telling me "calorie in calorie out." It's BS! I've seen tons of docs, most of which don't believe my diet log. I did crossfit for five years. The more paleo I ate and the harder I exercised the more with I gained. Doc told me I blew my adrenals so I stopped and stuck to walking for eight months. I recently took up yoga and I'm gaining again. I like to about about 90% paleo, organic with minimal red meat. I also don't eat soy and I never drink coffee. My thyroid tests are normal and I've tried all the thyroid meds and they don't do anything. I'm about 40 lbs over weight and SOOOOO tired of it. I'm covered in a very fatty layer and look full of cellulite. I do supplements, cleanses, you name it. If I eat fruit, it's low glycemic. I only eat minimal nuts to avoid calories. It just doesn't add up. I'm pretty sure, whatever anyone suggests, I've tried it. I've seen the best docs in the area and they are baffled. I have high insulin but I'm not prediabetc. I have gorgeous blood work - It appears I'm very healthy. I've monitored my blood glucose and... normal. My A1C is 4.6! I have a team of naturopaths and no one can figure it out! Anyone else have this problem!?!? I'm fat as hell and I shouldn't be. If anyone wants to tell me I don't eat enough... I tried that route too (more food, more frequently to boost metabolism - nothing). IDEAS!?!?!?!?!?!?
  20. Hello all, So, long story short, in 2011 I started getting really really sick, with no discernible cause. Violent vomiting daily, rapid weight gain (40 pounds in one month) unbelievable exhaustion, depression, social anxiety to the point of not being able to leave the house, hives, acne, rashes, brain fog, and my LEAST favorite, the all-over bruised body feeling you get when you have the flu (that horrible bone deep aching that makes it uncomfortable to move at all, and any clothing touching you hurts.) Oh, and monstrous swelling of my face and stomach. I wound up figuring out through elimination of certain things in my diet that what was doing it was gluten and dairy. So, over the years I've cut them out (at first, after I cut them out, I was still getting horrendously sick, just less often and it took me too long to realize CROSS CONTAMINATION WAS A THING) So fast forward to now, I'm able to function like a human again by being INCREDIBLY strict with my diet and making almost all of my food myself and NEVER taking any chances with anything that was "processed in the same facility with..." etc etc I've also recently started going back to school, which means I have to be EXTRA careful, or I won't be able to attend classes or study because my brain, and my body just don't function when I've been exposed. However, I've always been a do it yourself girl, so after having endoscopies and colonoscopies years ago, and having a doctor tell me I had "acid reflux" (way to diagnose the symptom, not the cause, ya jerk) and having no doctors know why I was getting so sick, and eventually figuring it out myself, I never was tested for Celiac's Disease. So obviously, I'm scarred for life, and terrified to death of gluten and I was wondering; does anyone know of some way that I could be tested for it WITHOUT exposing myself to it? Thank you so much in advance
  21. This recipe comes to us from Fiddle-Faddle in the Gluten-Free Forum. This is an adaptation of Robyn Ryberg's biscuits, found here on celiac.com. Ingredients: 1/3 cup shortening ½ cup potato starch ¾ cup cornstarch 1 ¾ teaspoon xanthan gum 1 tablespoon baking powder ¼ teaspoon baking soda 1 tablespoon sugar ¾ cup milk ½ teaspoon salt ½ cup shredded sharp cheddar cheese ¼ cup butter, softened (optional--makes a very fattening biscuit!) ********************************** Another ¼ cup butter, melted, mixed with ¼ - ½ teaspoon garlic powder Directions: Preheat oven to 375F. In medium bowl, blend all ingredients except for last two. Mix very well to remove any lumps. Dough will be quite soft and a bit sticky. Roll or pat our dough on a lightly floured (cornstarch) surface. Dough should be about ½ inch thick. Cut out biscuits with 2 ½ inch cookie cutters. An inverted glass will also do the job. Place biscuits on lightly-greased baking sheet. Bake for 12-15 minutes, until lightly browned. As soon as they come out of the oven, brush with melted butter/garlic combination. Makes 6-8 large biscuits.
  22. Celiac.com 08/22/2014 - It is often hard to tell if isolated case reports have anything to contribute to the larger understanding of celiac disease. However, some case reports are enough in themselves to cause reflection, whatever their contribution to the larger scientific understanding may be. For most people with celiac disease, symptoms disappear and healing begins with the adoption of a gluten-free diet. For one 9-year-old girl, however, the battle to beat her symptoms and feel better did not end with a gluten-free diet. The girl had initially complained of non-specific abdominal discomfort, and showed positive blood tests for celiac disease. Duodenal biopsies revealed Marsh 3B histopathology. So, she definitely had celiac disease with corresponding symptoms. Despite following a strict gluten-free diet, the girl continued to have symptoms and show positive blood tests for active disease. Gluten is a common additive in plastics. After some detective work, the team discovered that the child was being exposed to gluten from her orthodontic retainer that contained a plasticized methacrylate polymer. She discontinued its use and her symptoms disappeared and her celiac blood tests returned to normal. This case illustrates that, even for patients on the strictest gluten-free diet, exposure to non-dietary sources of gluten, such as those used to make plastics, dental equipment, and cosmetics, can trigger or exacerbate celiac disease symptoms. This case also emphasizes the importance of ferreting out and removing all possible sources of gluten, including non-dietary, when managing celiac disease. Source: Clin Pediatr (Phila). 2013 Nov;52(11):1034-7. doi: 10.1177/0009922813506254.
  23. Summary:History of gluten intolerance, symptoms have returned despite no change in diet after 5 years of the same gluten sensitivity, I now seemingly react to the smallest cross-contamination and am not getting symptom relief. Do I need to worry about refractory sprue? I posted this on the celiac sub-reddit about two weeks ago but now I thought I could get more input here. A little background. When I was 14 years old, I started having strange joint pains in my wrists, persistent neuropathies and tingling in my hands, and other strange symptoms. Pains were seemingly inflammation of the tendons, made worse by exercise, and the inflammation responded well to NSAIDs. Went to a ton of doctors, tested for RA, MS, and anything else under the sun, but everything came back negative. "We don't know." My digestive health wasn't too bad or too good: I got constipated and got diarrhea from time to time, but not too often. I didn't really experience severe abdominal pains on a consistent basis so I didn't think anything of my digestive symptoms. As a result, no one checked anything digestive. The inflammation went away with NSAIDS. The only lasting effect after was that I absolutely couldn't exercise without developing terrible tendonitis and Joint pain within a few days, which caused a lot of depression. The disease remained stable in nature for a while until when I turned 21 or so. The chronic tendinitis spread to my ankles in addition to my wrists. The inflammation began to happen without any exercise, just from me existing. I also began having some more severe digestive problems, loose stools, poorly-formed stools, stomach pains, and felt like I was in a fog all the time. I tested negative for everything rheumatological. During a late-night research session, I googled a bunch of my symptoms and found out that a lot of people with gluten intolerance experience these same symptoms. I immediately went gluten-free. Over the course of the next two weeks, my digestive health was completely restored, and my joint pains were decreased by about 80% after about 1-2 months. I had an enormous amount of energy. I felt like a new person. I went to the doctor and got tested for Celiac, but the antibody test came up negative. I was already on a gluten-free diet, so I know that probably meant little. I know that my symptoms are not reflective of traditional Celiac and I apologize for self-diagnosing (no positive test). All I know is that going gluten-free absolutely changed my life and restored my health. Over the past five years, I've had absolutely no baseline changes in my gluten sensitivity. I cook most of my food, and eat at places like Chipotle and occasionally eat at restaurants and make sure not to order anything with wheat, rye, or barley. I get "gluten-fee" pizza at pizza places knowing that it's cooked in the same ovens with bread and do fine. I avoid beer and am careful with my alcohol selection, but basically, I was always able to tolerate cross-contamination. On the one occasion when I did eat bread, I had diarrhea for a week or two and then was back to normal. I was still tremendously prone to repetitive strain injuries and inflammation, but not to the same degree I had been before and ONLY after exercise. I was living my life. ... Fast forward to about 2-3 months ago. I have been going through a very stressful period in my life, and I think the stress triggered something. Simultaneously, I have a "glutening:" for a period of a couple of weeks, on 3 or 4 occasions, I eat sushi with imitation crab meat and rice binder that has wheat in it. I start having the pains in my ankles again. X-rays have shown that my ankles are swollen, and I haven't done anything but stayed on my feet and walked. Start developing tendonitis in my wrists again. The loose stools and indigestion are back and I feel like my brain is in a fog. I only get a little bit of symptom improvement if I eat the food I cook for myself. . I now respond to foods I wasn't responding to before. Eating at the same cafeteria I was eating at 5 months ago without a problem now causes a reaction. I have seemingly become very sensitive to ANY cross-contamination whereas just half-a year ago I could tolerate it without a problem. This is after five years of absolutely no change in my baseline reactivity. What the hell is going on? I've HAD glutenings before years back, and they never caused my symptoms to return and persist as they have now! And they NEVER changed my baseline sensitivity to gluten. All of my rheumatological tests have come up negative. I finally spoke to gastroenterolist yesterday and he agreed that this could be Celiac's disease, but had no answer for me on whether my baseline sensitivity would improve. I'm not willing to gluten myself for 6 weeks to get a positive blood test. The symptoms are too much to bare and I am trying to finish graduate school. My question is... if I do have Celiac... Has it suddenly gotten worse? Is it normal to have a sudden worsening of this condition, after 5 years at steady-state? I feel like I'm losing my mind, and have no idea what to do. I'm in constant pain and it's miserable. Whatever this is, it has taken such a huge toll on my life now.
  24. Celiac.com 04/18/2018 - To the relief of many bewildered passengers and crew, no more comfort turkeys, geese, possums or other questionable pets will be flying on Delta or United without meeting the airlines' strict new requirements for service animals. If you’ve flown anywhere lately, you may have seen them. People flying with their designated “emotional support” animals. We’re not talking genuine service animals, like seeing eye dogs, or hearing ear dogs, or even the Belgian Malinois that alerts its owner when there is gluten in food that may trigger her celiac disease. Now, to be honest, some of those animals in question do perform a genuine service for those who need emotional support dogs, like veterans with PTSD. However, many of these animals are not service animals at all. Many of these animals perform no actual service to their owners, and are nothing more than thinly disguised pets. Many lack proper training, and some have caused serious problems for the airlines and for other passengers. Now the major airlines are taking note and introducing stringent requirements for service animals. Delta was the first to strike. As reported by the New York Times on January 19: “Effective March 1, Delta, the second largest US airline by passenger traffic, said it will require passengers seeking to fly with pets to present additional documents outlining the passenger’s need for the animal and proof of its training and vaccinations, 48 hours prior to the flight.… This comes in response to what the carrier said was a 150 percent increase in service and support animals — pets, often dogs, that accompany people with disabilities — carried onboard since 2015.… Delta said that it flies some 700 service animals a day. Among them, customers have attempted to fly with comfort turkeys, gliding possums, snakes, spiders, and other unusual pets.” Fresh from an unsavory incident with an “emotional support” peacock incident, United Airlines has followed Delta’s lead and set stricter rules for emotional support animals. United’s rules also took effect March 1, 2018. So, to the relief of many bewildered passengers and crew, no more comfort turkeys, geese, possums or other questionable pets will be flying on Delta or United without meeting the airlines' strict new requirements for service and emotional support animals. Source: cnbc.com
  25. Celiac.com 03/20/2015 - Mexican food and tacos are one of my most consistent gluten-free food options. If I'm on the road, or pressed for time, sometimes fast food chains are the only option. But not all Mexican fast food chains are created equal when it comes to gluten-free options. Some do a good job, others do not. So here is a list of Mexican fast food chains that do a good job with gluten-free food options. As always, your individual experience at any of these restaurants may vary, so observe, ask questions about any item you're not sure about, and gauge your comfort level accordingly. If you have feedback, or know of any other Mexican fast food chains that offer good gluten-free food options, be sure to tell us in the comments below. Best Mexican Fast Food Chains: #1: Chipotle Chipotle gets high marks for gluten-free options. Pretty much everything that is not served with a flour tortilla is gluten-free. So, at Chiptole, that means all soft and hard corn taco shells, all meats, beans, vegetables and sides are gluten-free. #2: El Pollo Loco El Pollo Loco is another chain where you can get a good, healthy meal without thinking too hard about gluten. El Pollo Loco gluten-free menu includes their flame grilled Mexican chicken, corn tortillas, pinto beans, refried beans, avocado salsa, Cotija Cheese, mixed vegetables, and flan. Basically, avoid any flour tortillas, and you can easily eat gluten-free at El Pollo Loco. #3: Jimboy's Tacos Jimboy's has long been a favorite of mine, because they prepare all their food fresh from scratch and offer a pretty robust gluten-free menu that includes Jimboy's original tacos, including bean, ground beef, chicken, steak, and carnitas, Tacoburgers, Taquitos in both ground beef, and chicken, Tostadas, including bean, ground beef, chicken, and steak, Ground Beef Kid's Taco, Ground Beef Pepper Poppers, and Jimboy's Guacamole & Sour Cream. #4: Baja Fresh Baja Fresh offers a pretty good range of options for gluten-free eaters. Gluten-free options include Baja Tacos made with corn tortillas, any “Bare style” burrito, and any Baja Ensalada with choice of steak, chicken, or grilled shrimp, as well as grilled vegetables, carnitas, rice, and both varieties of beans. All Baja Fresh dressings and salsas are gluten-free. #5: Qdoba Qdoba is another fast Mexican food chain that offers a solid eating experience for gluten-free diners. Qdoba's gluten-free menu options include all Chicken, Chorizo, Flat Iron Steak, Ground Sirloin, Pork, and Seasoned Shredded Beef. Also gluten-free are their Soft White Corn Tortilla, Cilantro Lime Rice, Black Beans, Tortilla Soup, all Salsas and Dressings, 3 Cheese Queso and Guacamole. #6 Taco Cabana I had the good fortune of trying Taco Cabana on a trip to Albuquerque a while back. I was not disappointed. Taco Cabana does gluten-free eaters right with a wide variety of gluten-free options, including their Black, Borracho, and Refried beans, their Barbacoa, Chicken Fajita Meat, Rotisserie Chicken, Shredded Chicken Taco Meat in their Crispy Tacos, Chorizo, Chalupas or Nachos Steak Fajita Meat, Ground Beef Taco Meat (Crispy Tacos, Chalupas or Nachos), and Street Tacos in both Chicken & Steak. As with most places on this list, diners can substitute corn tortillas for flour tortillas in all tacos, fajitas, & plates. Other gluten-free options include Guacamole, Hash Brown Potatoes, Pico de Gallo, Rice, and Salsas – Fuego, Roja, Verde, Ranch, and Sour Cream. #7: Mighty Taco Mighty Taco makes it easy on gluten-free eaters by offering any taco with a corns shell, and most anything else on their menu except flour tortillas. Mighty Taco's gluten-free menu includes: Mighty Taco with Seasoned Ground Beef or Chicken, Mighty Pack with Seasoned Ground Chicken, Refried Bean and Cheese, Meatless Mighty, Veggies and Cheese, Seasoned Ground Chicken, Seasoned Ground Beef, Fajita Chicken, Buffito Chicken, and the Taco Beef Salad, Mighty Chicken Salad, Chicken Fajita Salad, and the Chicken Buffito Salad.
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