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Found 2,701 results

  1. I have an immensely difficult time finding gluten-free, vegan, sugar-free, yeast-free bread products, so the ingredient list for this recipe couldn't be more ideal for a celiac. The only ingredients: teff, salt, and water. Injera is the bread staple of Ethiopia and is eaten by most households everyday. Injera is traditionally made solely with teff grain, although some modern recipes call for yeast or all-purpose flour as well. The high iron content of teff makes it a perfect choice for a bread substitute. This recipe is very easy however, injera requires advanced planning and will not work for a last minute meal, as it can take up to three days for the teff to ferment before cooking is possible. Traditional Ethiopian Teff Injera (Gluten-Free) Servings: 20 Ingredients: 3 cups ground teff 4 cup distilled water Himalayan salt to taste Olive oil for the skillet Note: This is a large batch, as I like to have left-overs. Also, the fermentation process takes a while, so it's nice to have some injera for later. For a smaller batch, cut the ingredients in half. Mix ground teff with the water and let stand in a bowl covered with a dish towel at room temperature until it bubbles and has turned sour. The fermentation process will take approximately 1-3 days. The fermenting mixture should be the consistency of a very thin pancake batter. Stir in the salt, a little at a time, until you can barely detect its taste. Lightly oil a skillet 8 inches minimum but you can also use a larger one. Heat over medium heat. Pour in enough batter to cover the bottom of the skillet; About 1/4 cup will make a thin pancake covering the surface of an 8 inch skillet if you spread the batter around immediately by turning and rotating the skillet in the air; This is the classic French method for very thin crepes; Injera is not supposed to be paper thin so you should use a bit more batter than you would for crepes, but less than you would for a flapjack pancakes. Cook briefly, until holes form in the injera and the edges lift from the pan; Do not let it brown, and don't flip it over as it is only supposed to be cooked on one side. Remove and let cool. Place plastic wrap or foil between successive pieces so they don't stick together. To serve, lay one injera on a plate and ladle your chosen dishes on top. Serve additional injera on the side. Guests can be encouraged to eat their meal without utensils, instead using the injera to scoop up their food. Important: Please use caution when eating with your hands. To avoid contamination make sure your hands are very clean with gluten-free soap before eating.
  2. Hello, everybody! It's my first post here on the forum. I'm 25 year old and I leave in Bulgaria, Europe. I've been gluten free for the last 5 years. Initially when I started my gluten-free journey I didn't have ataxia symptoms but I wasn't very careful then and I often got glutened. Then the ataxia showed up gradually. Now I have slight unsteadiness almost all of the time and when I get accidentally glutened my symptoms get worse. I wanted to share my experience and hear about your experience too so that I get a better understanding if it's really ataxia or it's something else. Here are some of my questions: How quickly does the ataxia symptoms return after you get glutened (mine come in a matter of minutes, if not seconds - and I am curious if that's even possible or my mind is playing tricks with me)? Is the ataxia the first symptom to show after a reaction (even before the abdominal cramps, etc.)? Or they are the last to show up for you (or they don't show up at all because you've healed, etc.)? After going gluten free did the ataxia completely resolved or it's still there but just less noticeable? ...And I can probably ask you a lot more things but that's a good start Any comments are welcome and appreciated because I've been fighting this battle on my own for years now – no one in my country is even aware of things like non-celiac gluten intolerance, gluten ataxia, etc. I should also point out that for the last 3 years I've been eating only WHOLE, REAL foods and nothing else. I am really careful about cross-contamination. So I feel like I am doing my absolute best to avoid all gluten but the unsteady feeling and lack of balance is still there. It's not like I am falling or anything, but it's very disturbing and sometimes scary – and most importantly it stops me from fulfilling my full potential and going after my dreams.
  3. Oops well I blew it big time. I failed to carefully read a supplement label. I saw that the company selling it said that it was gluten/soy free, but the ingredient list clearly showed that it wasn't. I took it for 200 days. I and my health care triangle couldn't figure out why I was swelling/ and gaining weight big time. The problems didn't stop there, we noted increased liver enzymes, and 3 months later sluggish kidney function. With treatment, the liver enzymes had gone down to normal levels. I kept taking the wrong supplement over last fall and winter. I felt more and more over-whelmed and unable to carry out my usual work. Finally recently, I went to order another several bottles of the supplement and discovered the ingredient list. I ran for my bottle in the freezer, oh sure, there it was. I quit taking the supplement right away. Then, it seemed like my real trouble began. My lymph system went wild, my thighs got enormous with ripples. I was cold and achy. This couldn't be from just one little bitty supplement? It was. A few months later, we tested my thyroid and found that it was working very hard. I wonder if anyone that has dealt with thyroid could answer this: Do we know the mechanism that brings a thyroid down. Is it always antibodies? We tested TPO which was negative, but didn't check the other kind of antibodies that I know of now. I am recovering so I am not sure if I should check the thyroid again and check the both antibodies or not. I can try a round of thyroid medicine to see if it helps, but would rather avoid it...well, unless I absolutely need it.
  4. Looking for a benadryl I can take thats soy and gluten free, about to take some antibiotics, like to have something to ease the side effects if I have any allergic reactions to it.
  5. Celiac.com 10/11/2012 - Would you be surprised to learn that a number of naturally brewed soy sauces are technically gluten-free? I was. I was recently doing some research for a catered even and needed to make a decision about what kind of soy sauce to use in the food preparation. Since the Korean food being served required a great deal of soy sauce for marinating purposes, the hosts were concerned that gluten-free tamari might end up costing too much. However, the event included a number of folks who eat gluten-free, and the hosts did want to provide food that everyone could eat. So, what to do? The restaurant making the food uses Kikkoman. Is Kikkoman safe to serve to people with celiac disease and gluten-intolerance? In an effort to answer that question, I did a bit of research. I was a bit surprised when my research led me to an interesting article on the naturally fermented soy sauce made by Kikkoman and Lima Foods, which are two major manufacturers of soy sauce. There are two ways to manufacture soy sauce. The first uses natural fermentation. The second uses chemical hydrolysis. Both methods will break down the complex proteins including gluten into smaller components such as amino acids and polypeptides. However, the soy sauces tested for the article were produced using natural fermentation. That's because chemically produced (or artificial) soy sauce is may contain toxic and carcinogenic components produced by hydrochloric acid hydrolysis. The article said that the soy sauces made by these companies actually met Codex Alimentarius standards for gluten-free foods, and that tests show their gluten content to be well under the 20ppm required for gluten-free products. The people who produced the article sent samples out to a major laboratory in the Netherlands for gluten analysis, and the results were surprising. Gluten content in both samples was well under the acceptable detection limit of 5ppm (see report). According to a new European laws, any product labeled gluten-free must contain less than 20 ppm gluten. The FDA has proposed the same 20 ppm level for their rule, which they look set to implement very soon. That means that the naturally fermented soy sauces that were tested meet gluten-free standards, and will likely not trigger adverse reaction in gluten sensitive individuals, especially considering the small daily quantities of soy sauce consumed. Anyone who does not trust this can, of course, choose soy sauces that do not contain any wheat to start with. Tamari soy sauces are typically produced without wheat, but some brands do not follow this tradition and are not wheat-free, so: Buyer beware. As for the catered event, after talking with the gluten-free guests, the hosts decided to go with traditional Kikkoman. They have not received any reports of illness or adverse reactions, even in the several people with high gluten-sensitivity. I'm sure there are plenty of gluten-free eaters who have plenty to say about soy sauce. What's your take on the test results? Source: Soya.be LAB RESULTS
  6. Celiac.com 04/17/2018 - Could the holy grail of gluten-free food lie in special strains of wheat that lack “bad glutens” that trigger the celiac disease, but include the “good glutens” that make bread and other products chewy, spongey and delicious? Such products would include all of the good things about wheat, but none of the bad things that might trigger celiac disease. A team of researchers in Spain is creating strains of wheat that lack the “bad glutens” that trigger the autoimmune disorder celiac disease. The team, based at the Institute for Sustainable Agriculture in Cordoba, Spain, is making use of the new and highly effective CRISPR gene editing to eliminate the majority of the gliadins in wheat. Gliadins are the gluten proteins that trigger the majority of symptoms for people with celiac disease. As part of their efforts, the team has conducted a small study on 20 people with “gluten sensitivity.” That study showed that test subjects can tolerate bread made with this special wheat, says team member Francisco Barro. However, the team has yet to publish the results. Clearly, more comprehensive testing would be needed to determine if such a product is safely tolerated by people with celiac disease. Still, with these efforts, along with efforts to develop vaccines, enzymes, and other treatments making steady progress, we are living in exciting times for people with celiac disease. It is entirely conceivable that in the not-so-distant future we will see safe, viable treatments for celiac disease that do not require a strict gluten-free diet. Read more at Digitaltrends.com , and at Newscientist.com
  7. Celiac.com 11/24/2014 - Following a strict gluten-free diet is the only way to treat celiac disease. However, researchers have been lacking clear agreement on how and when to assess gluten-free dietary adherence in celiac patients or how to determine its effectiveness on villous atrophy. To address this reality, a team of researches conducted a prospective study to determine patient adherence to a gluten-free diet, and its effect on histological recovery after 1-year of gluten-free diet. The research team included G. Galli, G. Esposito, E. Lahner, E. Pilozzi, V. D. Corleto, E. Di Giulio, M. A. Aloe Spiriti, and B. Annibale. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Digestive and Liver Disease, the Department of Haematology, the Department of Pathology, and the Department of Digestive Endoscopy at Sant'Andrea Hospital Sapienza University Rome in Rome, Italy, and with the Centro Ricerche S. Pietro, Ospedale S. Pietro in Rome, Italy. Between 2009 and 2012, the researchers enrolled 65 consecutive newly-diagnosed adult patients (median age 38 years, 18–70) with biopsy-proven atrophic celiac disease. The researchers assessed patients after one year of gluten-free diet, using duodenal histology, serological assays, symptom reports and a dietary interview based on a validated questionnaire. They defined complete histological recovery as the absence of villous atrophy and ≤30/100 intraepithelial lymphocytes. The team found that 81.5% of patients showed adequate gluten-free diet adherence (ADA), whereas 18.5% had inadequate adherence (IADA). Overall, 66% of ADA patients achieved complete histological recovery, but no IADA patients recovered (P < 0.00001). Interestingly, ADA patients who achieved complete histological recovery showed about the same antibody seroconversion and symptoms as those who achieved partial histological recovery with P = 0.309 and P = 0.197, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that, for ADA patients with incomplete histological recovery, Marsh 3C was still a risk factor (OR 8.74, 95% CI: 1.87–40.83). This study shows that 66% of adult celiac patients who successfully follow a gluten-free diet can make a complete histological recovery after 1-year. However, patients with severe histological damage at diagnosis who successfully follow a gluten-free diet remain at risk for incomplete histological recovery 1 year later. Lastly, patients who do not follow a gluten-free diet have no hope of making a full histological recovery. For clinicians and doctors, this data should serve as a guideline for determining gluten-free diet adherence in celiac patients, and determining the level of patient recovery. For celiac patients, the data should serve to demonstrate the importance of following a strict gluten-free diet. Source: Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics 2014; 40(6):639-647.
  8. Celiac.com 10/10/2014 - If you’ve ever had the pleasure of eating El Salvadoran, Nicaraguan, southern Mexican food, then you might be familiar with fried plantains. Plantains are like big bananas. When fried, they are soft, sweet and delicious. They can be eaten as a meal, or as a desert. They can even be served for breakfast with rice, beans and corn tortillas. They are often served with Mexican style sour cream, or ‘crema.’ Fresh plantains are common in the local restaurants, and ubiquitous in the local Mexican and Central American markets around San Francisco. Ingredients: ½-1 cup oil for frying 4-6 plantains (make sure they are very mature, not green—brown and soft is best) Directions: Heat oil in a large, deep skillet over medium high heat. Peel the plantains and cut them in half. Slice the halves lengthwise into thin pieces. Fry the pieces until browned and tender. Drain excess oil on paper towels. Serve as a side dish to a main meal, with refried beans and Mexican style sour cream.
  9. Celiac.com 10/10/2016 - Good news for anyone on a gluten-free diet who misses their beloved Lucky Charms breakfast cereal. Lucky Charms joins a number of General Mills' other brands with gluten-free versions, including Chex and Cheerios. In this case, the company turned an old brand into a gluten-free product. Like Cheerios, Lucky Charms are made from oats, which are gluten-free, except that most major commercial oat supplies have minor, but problematic, amounts of other grains. To solve that, General Mills has created a process that sorts "out the small amount of wheat, rye and barley in our supply of whole oats that are inadvertently introduced at the farms where the oats are grown, or during transportation of the whole oats to our mill," according to the company. General Mills has applied for patents on their unique sorting process that ensures General Mills’ gluten-free cereals meet the FDA's strict guideline for gluten free, said Emily Thomas, senior marketing manager for Lucky Charms in a press release. One advantage of General Mills sorting process is that it allows the company to formulate gluten-free options without altering their recipes, or changing their flavor. One thing consumers can count on, says Thomas, is that “…the recipe won't change. It will maintain the same great, magically delicious taste that Lucky Charms fans love." Read more: Investopedia
  10. TL;DR Mom is a celiac. Father, Brother are lactose intolerant. Sister has IBS problems as well. I believe I have gluten allergy, even though every doctor test is negative. But I do have geno-type for celiac. Marijuana has become my only solution to stop the pain and get hours of relief. No other medicine works. but pot lets me go to work, without crapping my pants and getting paid to s$#&. Anyone else in my particular situation or does everyone else feel it differently? Hello, My name is Ryan and I am a twenty-four male, 300lbs, 6ft 4in. Ive been haunted by stomach/head aches for almost my whole life. Gaining depression in middle school, which downward spiraled by the time I was 20-21. Ive been diagnosed with Chronic Lyme Disease which is, I guess, controversial among physicians on whether or not it is actually a real thing. My Dr. gave me that diagnosis at 16, after going to him with Lyme for the 8th time. My mom figured out she was a celiac when I was 20 years old, so I then started on a gluten-free diet and felt good, but didnt realize that it was actually helping me. I went back on gluten to have the testing done, but it came back negative. So I said okay, I'm not allergic to gluten it must be my imagination or something else and went on my way. Had two more doctors tell me I probably wasnt Gluten intolerant. I then started to get serious urinary issues, and started to go to urologists. They couldnt find anything wrong, so I went to a GI and they told me nothing was wrong, after doing all the testing over the years, they said I wasnt allergic to Lactose or Gluten, however my most recent GI said I have a Geno-type for it. MFer*** I know its already here. It doesnt take but an hour and I am in gut wrenching pain and cant get off the toilet for sometimes hrs, with breaks in between (4 times on) and the pain and discomfort lasts for hrs. The doctor has put me on every kind of medicine and nothing works. He said well you dont have anything we test for, so I'm just going to say you have IBS. Which still makes sense, because there is times, I know I havent touched gluten ( I dont think, I'm not a very good label checker) or cheese and I'm still in the BR. I am currently on 50MG Amytriptaline (spelling) for the depression, urinary issue and intestinal inflammation(whether its there or not, the gastro put me on it, and it keeps the other two things at bay, so I cant go off it. However, it doesnt do too much for the stomach problem. The only solution I have found is Marijuana, which I have only recently started (1yr), but man does it make a difference. Now I can have a full time job, but I have to smoke to go to work. Which isnt my most favorite thing to do , but Ive gotten used to it and it helps me tremendously. So its become my catch all illness defeater. However, it only puts my intestines on hold(how long depending on how much pot, but usually a small amount keeps my stomach at bay for about 6-8 hrs. I can suffer the last hr at work, but at least I'm not in the bathroom for my whole shift. Which is great, its an amazing feeling to be at work without something plaguing you. I still dabble in gluten, like 1 slice of pizza, here and there (bc im supposed to be not gluten intolerant) but the devil strikes every time. Im sure Ive missed some stuff, but would like some feedback on the route I should take, get some insight, my wife said I should go to a holistic doctor, which has amazing reviews near us, but its 500 dollars cash to get the evalution and its not covered by insurance. She thinks I'm allergic to soy, which I guess is in both lactose and gluten?? But ive never been tested for that. I want some light to follow. Thanks Is it typical to feel an attack so fast? It happens between 15 minutes to 2 hrs, giving the span, but usually an hour. Does everyone react the same way to gluten? - I dont get diarrhea or constipation, I get a little of both, its loosely packed and hard to pass with excruciating pain. Other times ( I think this is the IBS part), it'll just come out of no where, but its not super painful, but I cannot hold it at all. Could all of my problems be Gluten/Lactose...or just part of it/none of it? Has anyone else gotten a negative test, but still said hell with it, Gluten Free? Are there any good, well organized mega threads for stuff to not touch if you're allergic to gluten, especially lesser known things (to avoid oops moments)
  11. I am new to this forum - I also belong to the Microscopic Colitis Forum, which is an amazing wealth of information. My story, I am a 56 yr old female. In 2016 I had papillary thyroid cancer so my thyroid has been removed and I am on 137 mcg of levothyroxine. Ive been on anti depressant medications for probably 20 years. In 2016, because of extreme depression and anxiety I switched medications and was given the highest dose using Effexor at 300mg a day. In 2015 I had a colonoscopy and was told that I have lymphocytic colitis. My symptoms are chronic constipation not the usual text book diarrhea. Anyway, additional symptoms, which was debilitating for me was whenever I ate gluten, drank alcohol, etc my stomach would be distended so bad that I would look 4 months pregnant. It got so bad recently that I decided to have a lab test done to find out which foods I was sensitive to. Below is my lab report....not pretty. I've been on a strict or though I thought gluten free, dairy free, nut free diet by combining the Paleo and gluten free diets. I have also been suffering from swollen glands in my neck, head, face and ears, with hives. It has gotten so bad that I've been searching the internet for forums like yours. I am taking Benedryl at night and claritin in the morning, but sometimes I feel like these aren't working because I wake up and still have th hives and itching. I've also incorporated the Autoimmune Anti-inflammatory Diet, I'm still reacting. I am at my wits end. The only thing I've been eating since this lab report which has been 2 months is ground turkey and well cooked vegetables using olive oil or coconut oil, salt pepper and dried basil. Someone on the MC forum said that pre-packaged ground turkey organic is most likely injected with rosemary extract which is soy based, and of course I'm not supposed to have anything soy. I have A LOT to learn, but boy this is hard and frustrating. Any advice out there would be greatly appreciated. Thank you in advance:) EnteroLab www.enterolab.com Specialized Laboratory Analysis for Optimum Intestinal and Overall Health Kenneth D. Fine, M.D. Medical Director 13661 Jupiter Road, Suite 307 Dallas, Texas 75238 Laboratory Report Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score 930 Units (Normal Range is less than 300 Units) Fecal Anti-gliadin IgA 171 Units (Normal Range is less than 10 Units) Fecal Anti-casein (cow’s milk) IgA 27 Units (Normal Range is less than 10 Units) Fecal Anti-ovalbumin (chicken egg) IgA 15 Units (Normal Range is less than 10 Units) Fecal Anti-soy IgA 27 Units (Normal Range is less than 10 Units) Mean Value # Antigenic Foods 19 Units (Normal Range is less than 10 Units) Mean Value 11 Antigenic Foods 19 Units (Normal Range is less than 10 Units) While all of the foods tested can be immune-stimulating, the hierarchy of reactions detected were as follows: Food to which there was no significant immunological reactivity: Food to which there was some immunological reactivity (1+): Food to which there was moderate immunological reactivity (2+): Food to which there was significant and/or the most immunological reactivity (3+): None Corn Rice Chicken Pork Beef Almond Cashew Walnut White potato Oat Tuna None Within each class of foods to which you displayed multiple reactions, the hierarchy of those reactions detected were as follows: Grains: Grain toward which you displayed the most immunologic reactivity: Oat Grain toward which you displayed intermediate immunologic reactivity: Corn Grain toward which you displayed the least immunologic reactivity: Rice Meats: Meat toward which you displayed the most immunologic reactivity: Tuna Meat toward which you were next most immunologically reactive: Chicken Meat toward which you displayed intermediate immunologic reactivity: Pork Meat toward which you displayed the least immunologic reactivity: Beef Nuts: Nut toward which you displayed the most immunologic reactivity: Almond Nut toward which you displayed intermediate immunologic reactivity: Cashew Nut toward which you displayed the least immunologic reactivity: Walnut Nightshades: You displayed immunologic reactivity to white potato, the member of the nightshade family usually consumed most often and in greatest quantities. While this does not necessarily mean you would react to all other nightshade foods (tomatoes, peppers, eggplant), it is possible. In the realm of elimination diets for immunologic disorders, nightshades are usually eliminated as the entire food class (i.e., all four previously mentioned foods in this class). This is especially important to the clinical setting of arthritis. TEST INTERPRETATION(S) Interpretation of Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score: A fecal fat score greater than or equal to 300 Units indicates that an abnormally high amount of dietary fat has passed undigested and/or unabsorbed into the stool. Malabsorption of dietary fat almost always is associated with malabsorption of all other nutrients as well (protein, carbohydrates, vitamins, etc.). When associated with gluten sensitivity, elevated fecal fat usually is due to gluten-induced small intestinal functional damage and subsequent malabsorption; this does not require there be villous atrophy present. However, deficient production of enzymes by the pancreas can also be associated with celiac disease or non-celiac gluten sensitivity with autoimmune attack on the pancreas, causing maldigestion and malabsorption of dietary fat and other nutrients. Some other causes of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency include chronic pancreatitis from any cause (alcoholism being the most common), pancreatic resection, pancreatic cancer, or common bile duct obstruction. Pancreatic insufficiency as the primary cause of fat malabsorption usually causes significant elevations of fecal fat values, usually into the moderate (600-1000 Units) or severe (>1000 Units) ranges. To distinguish between small intestinal malabsorption and pancreatic maldigestion, a fecal pancreatic elastase test is necessary, which is now available from our laboratory. Other possible causes of elevated fecal fat (steatorrhea) include - another inflammatory bowel disease (such as Crohn’s disease which can be associated with gluten sensitivity); deficiency in the production or secretion of bile salts; overgrowth of bacteria in the small intestine; diarrhea from any cause which can, in turn, cause dietary fat to rush through the intestine unabsorbed; consuming very large amounts of dietary fat; eating unabsorbable synthetic dietary fat substitutes; or taking “fat blockers;” and resection of the small intestine causing “short bowel syndrome” (if you have had an intestinal resection). Any elevated fecal fat value should be rechecked in one year after treatment to ensure that it does not persist, because chronic fat malabsorption is associated with osteoporosis and other nutritional deficiency syndromes. Interpretation of Fecal Anti-gliadin IgA: The level of intestinal anti-gliadin IgA antibody was elevated, indicative of active dietary gluten sensitivity. For optimal health; resolution or improvement of gluten-induced syndromes (mainly falling into six categories abbreviated as NAAAGS – neuropsychiatric, autoimmune, asthma, abdominal, glandular deficiencies/hyperactivity or skin diseases); resolution of symptoms known to be associated with gluten sensitivity (such as abdominal symptoms - pain, cramping, bloating, gas, diarrhea and/or constipation, chronic headaches, chronic sinus congestion, depression, arthritis, chronic skin problems/rashes, fibromyalgia, and/or chronic fatigue); and prevention of small intestinal damage and malnutrition, osteoporosis, and damage to other tissues (like nerves, brain, joints, muscles, thyroid, pancreas, other glands, skin, liver, spleen, among others), it is recommended that you follow a strict and permanent gluten free diet. As gluten sensitivity is a genetic syndrome, you may want to have your relatives screened as well. For additional information on result interpretation, as well as educational information on the subject of gluten sensitivity, please see the "FAQ Result Interpretation," "FAQ Gluten/Food Sensitivity," and "Research & Education" links on our EnteroLab.com website. Interpretation of Fecal Anti-casein (cow’s milk) IgA: Levels of fecal IgA antibody to food antigens greater than or equal to 10 Units are indicative of an immune reaction, and hence immunologic “sensitivity” to that food. It is recommended that for any elevated fecal antibody level to a highly antigenic food such as milk, that it be removed from your diet. Interpretation of Fecal Anti-ovalbumin (chicken egg) IgA: Levels of fecal IgA antibody to food antigens greater than or equal to 10 Units are indicative of an immune reaction, and hence immunologic “sensitivity” to that food. It is recommended that for any elevated fecal antibody level to a highly antigenic food such as egg, that it be removed from your diet. Interpretation of Fecal Anti-soy IgA: Levels of fecal IgA antibody to food antigens greater than or equal to 10 Units are indicative of an immune reaction, and hence immunologic “sensitivity” to that food. It is recommended that for any elevated fecal antibody level to a highly antigenic food such as soy, that it be removed from your diet. Interpretation of Mean Value # Antigenic Foods: Not yet categorized Interpretation of Mean Value 11 Antigenic Foods: With respect to the mean value of the 11 foods tested, overall, there was only a modest amount of immunological reactivity detected to these antigenic foods in terms of fecal IgA production. Many foods besides gluten, milk, egg, and soy are antigenic in their own right; the main classes of which include other grains, meats, nuts, and nightshades (potatoes being the primary food eaten from this latter class). Minimizing exposure to antigenic foods is an important component of an anti-inflammatory lifestyle to optimize immune system health. This is especially important for those with chronic abdominal symptoms and/or chronic immune/autoimmune syndromes, or for those who want to prevent them. For immunologic food sensitivity testing, the actual numeric value (in Units) for any given food or for the overall average of a group of foods is important mainly for determining: 1) if the immune reaction is present or absent, and 2) the immune reaction in relative terms to different foods tested in a given individual at a given point in time. It is not a score, per se, to be interpreted as a measure of clinical or immunological severity for that individual or between individuals. This is because the amount of IgA antibody made by a given person is particular for the immune function of that person. Furthermore, sometimes a person can display what can be viewed as immunological and nutritional “exhaustion,” whereby a more significant and symptomatic immunologic food sensitivity is accompanied by a lower positive measured anti-food antibody value (rather than a higher positive). In such an instance, following clinical improvement and improved nutritional status (while the suspect antigenic foods are withdrawn), values can actually be higher for a time before finally falling into the negative range after several years. Thus, the overall average food sensitivity antibody value for this panel is an assessment of your overall humoral immunologic food reactivity, which can help determine if dietary elimination trials may help you. If the mean value is less than 10 Units, the humoral immune reactions can be considered clinically insignificant (negative); if greater than or equal to 10 Units, they can be considered clinically significant (positive). Rather than reporting the absolute value of a positive result for each individual food, since it cannot be considered as an assessment of severity, the results are reported in semi-quantitative terms between the foods tested (1+, 2+, or 3+). This provides you with the knowledge of which foods are stimulating the most immune response which, in turn, is indeed the most practically applied information to dietary elimination trials. Dietary Recommendation Based on Test Results to Individual Foods: This test panel was designed to guide your choices when building a new more healthful, less antigenic dietary plan. The results are delivered in such a way that you are not left with “nothing to eat,” but instead they should guide you in avoiding the foods to which the highest or most immunologic reaction was detected (and hence, are most stimulating to your immune system). We discourage dietary changes that involve removing too many foods at once. This can lead you to feel too hungry too often, especially if adequate healthful replacement foods are not readily available. Dietary elimination (beyond gluten-free, dairy-free, and soy-free) is best approached over a period of weeks to months and sometimes years, removing one or two additional foods at a time, rather than removing many foods at once. If you reacted to more than one of the grains, meats, or nuts, we recommend that you first eliminate from your diet the one food from that class you reacted to most strongly, while keeping in your diet the ones you reacted to less strongly. When you want to try and eliminate additional foods, do so in the order of the strength of reaction from highest, intermediate, to least. In the case of potato, you may want to eliminate it if you reacted positively to it. If you have an autoimmune or chronic inflammatory syndrome, or just want to pursue an optimally healthy diet and lifestyle, avoiding all grains, meats, and nightshades can optimize an anti-inflammatory diet (despite a negative result on food testing). As nuts and seeds are a very healthful source of vegetarian protein and heart-protective oils and minerals, rather than avoiding all nuts and seeds, you can render nuts and seeds less antigenic, more digestible, and more easily tolerated by choosing the few that you seem to best tolerate overall, soaking a one-day supply in a glass jar filled with clean water for 4-8 hours (or for ease, overnight), and pouring off the water and rinsing before eating. The resultant soaked nuts or seeds can be eaten as is (alone or with fresh or dried fruit), blended into nut butters (by adding some water), or added to “smoothies.”
  12. Celiac.com 04/20/2017 - More people than ever are following a gluten-free diet, but does the diet carry health risks that could cause harm in the long run? That's a very possible scenario, according to a report published in the journal Epidemiology. The report presents strong data to suggest that numerous gluten-free food staples contain high levels of toxic metals, which means that many gluten-free eaters could face higher risks for cancer and other chronic illnesses. Moreover, the US studies both reveal that people who follow a gluten-free diet have twice as much arsenic in their urine as those who eat a non-gluten-free diet. They also have 70 per cent more mercury in their blood, along with high levels of other toxic metals, such as lead and cadmium. Clearly the report invites further study to determine if these potentially negative effects are merely statistical, or if they are actually represented in corresponding numbers of gluten-free dieters. So, look for more study to see if people eating gluten-free are actually having higher rates of cancer and other toxic metal-related disorders. Meantime, you may be able to mitigate negative effects of a gluten-free diet by choosing products with lower levels of toxic metals. California-grown rice, for example seems to have lower levels compared to Chinese rice. If you follow a gluten-free diet for medical reasons, keep an eye out for symptoms related to toxic metal exposure, and consult a doctor if you think you are experiencing such symptoms. Read more at: Celiac.com. Does a Gluten-free Diet Mean Higher Arsenic and Mercury Levels? Read more at The Daily Mail.
  13. Celiac.com 04/02/2018 - Exactly how hard is it for people with celiac disease to faithfully follow a gluten-free diet? Anyone who’s ever tried to completely avoid gluten for any length of time likely has a story to tell about accidental gluten consumption, and the consequences that follow. It’s not at all uncommon for gluten-free celiacs to be exposed to low levels of gluten that can trigger symptoms and cause persistent intestinal histologic damage. To gain an understanding of gluten consumption across a wide population of celiac patients, a team of researchers recently set out to determine how much gluten people eat when they are trying to follow a gluten-free diet. The team included Jack A Syage, Ciarán P Kelly, Matthew A Dickason, Angel Cebolla Ramirez, Francisco Leon, Remedios Dominguez, and Jennifer A Sealey-Voyksner. They are variously affiliated with ImmunogenX in Newport Beach, CA, the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center at Harvard Medical School in Boston MA, and with Biomedal in Seville, Spain. The team began by analyzing data from previous clinical studies. That meta-analysis focused on data from a clinical study of gluten in stool and urine in celiac patients, a second study on non-celiac populations; and an analysis of data from trials for the investigational therapeutic latiglutenase. As part of the stool and urine studies the team included controlled gluten challenges. They then applied a calibration factor that allowed normal ingestion of gluten to be computed from the urine and stool measurements. They determined gluten consumption by estimating how much gluten was eliminated from patients’ diets due to a trial effect that resulted in improved histology, even in the placebo group. Using the stool test, the team estimated the average inadvertent exposure to gluten by celiac disease individuals on a GFD to be about 150–400 mg/d, while they estimated the median exposure to be about 100–150 mg/d. Using the urine test, those numbers showed an average exposure of about 300–400 mg/d, with a median of about 150 mg/d. Meanwhile, data analyses showed that celiac patients with moderate to severe symptoms showed that patients ingested substantially more than 200 mg/d of gluten. The data indicate that many gluten-free celiacs regularly consume enough gluten to trigger symptoms and perpetuate gut damage. Source: The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Volume 107, Issue 2, 1 February 2018
  14. Hello, I don't know if my topic fits better here, but I didn't know where to categorize it. In 2011 I've been diagnosed with celiac disease and since then I've been on a very strict diet, finally starting to feel better in 2014. In the meanwhile, I also had a laparoscopic surgery for 3rd stage endometriosis, and last year I was diagnosed with IBS, lactose intolerance, as well as insulin resistance and systemic candidiasis. Since last month I'm also on therapy for IBD (the doctors are suspecting microscopic colitis, but colonoscopies confirmed atypical inflammation only). Therapy for Candida (Diflucan) didn't help, and I've been recommended to adapt my diet. I was wondering if anyone has experience in dealing with other diets, in particular for Candida? Most of the gluten-free products are starchy, so what do you actually eat? Foods usually recommended for this, like leafy vegetables as well as spices, are impossible for me to eat - actually, I feel sometimes like most of the foods make me feel even worse and I keep losing weight. I hope someone can share their experience, thank you!
  15. There's been some confusion as to whether Lipton's Onion Soup mix contains gluten. Officially, Lipton's lists the ingredients as: Onions (deyhydrated), salt, cornstarch, onion powder, sugar, corn syrup, hydrolyzed soy protein, caramel color, partially hydrogenated soybean oil, monosodium glutamate, yeast extract, natural flavors (wheat), disodium inosinate, disodium guanylate. Also, some folks point out that the kosher version lists yeast extract from barley as an ingredient. Others point out, as does the website for Unilver, which makes Lipton products, that Lipton Onion Soup mix is "made in a facility that also processes milk, eggs, soy, wheat, sesame and sulfites." To be on the safe side, I usually make my own mix and store it for later use. Here's a great recipe for a tasty gluten-free onion soup mix that tastes very much like Lipton's, and works great as a substitute in other recipes. It goes great in meatloaf, stew, and works well to make dip. Ingredients: 1½ cups dried minced onion ¼ cup beef bouillon powder (gluten-free) 2½ tablespoons onion powder ½ teaspoon crushed celery seed ½ teaspoon sugar Directions: Combine all ingredients and store in an airtight container. About 5 tablespoons equals a single 1¼-ounce package of Lipton's mix.
  16. Scott Adams

    Corn Bread (Gluten-Free)

    This recipe comes to us from Janet Wolkenstein 1 ¼ cups yellow corn meal ½ cup white rice flour ¼ cup tapioca flour ¼ cup sugar 2 teaspoons baking powder ½ teaspoon salt 1 cup skim milk ¼ cup vegetable oil 1 egg, beaten Combine dry ingredients in a bowl and stir together until evenly mixed. Stir in milk, oil, and egg and mix just until dry ingredients are moistened. Pour batter into a greased 8 or 9 inch pan (or can use muffin tins if desired). Bake at 400 for 20-25 minutes or until light golden brown and wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean. Makes about 8-9 servings. You can substitute 1/3 cup dry milk and 1 cup water for the skim milk, or a gluten-free non-dairy milk substitute if needed.
  17. The California Cider Company was founded in Graton, California in 1993. The ACE brands are ACE APPLE, ACE PERRY, ACE APPLE HONEY, ACE BERRY, ACE JOKER, ACE PUMPKIN, ACE PINEAPPLE, ACE BLACKJACK 21 and SPACE. The ciders range from the dry JOKER to the sweeter ACE BERRY and the champagne-like BLACKJACK 21 made with all local Sonoma apples. SPACE is a bloody orange mimosa at 6.9%abv. ACE Ciders are available in 46 states, go to acecider.com for more details. All our styles are all natural, all fruit and gluten-free and vegan. The ciders are unpasteurized but cold filtered 4 times so that they are fresh and clean to the taste. They are a lower calorie , lower alcohol alternative to wine and beer and very refreshing. The California Cider Company is the largest, independent, family owned cidery in the US, with we believe the best range of ciders for all tastes. Visit our site for more info: acecider.com.
  18. I'm new here, so I'm not sure if I'm even posting this in the right forum, but here goes. It's been about 3 months and I am at my wit's end. Forgive me for being dramatic, but I don't wanna suffer alone anymore. My gluten intolerance emerged when I hit puberty, but it was never serious: just bloating, constipation, fatigue. However, along the years, I noticed some strange symptoms come about. The weirdest being a "globus" sensation, as if something was caught in my throat. After attempting to cough it up to no avail, I decided to ignore it, assuming it was simply mucus. Once again, I continued to eat gluten, not realizing the damage it was causing. Then slowly over the course of a couple more years, I noticed that food would take awhile to go down. I didn't think much of it, just that I had to drink a lot more water than usual. Fast forward to the present time, and now I can hardly swallow my own saliva. I went to the doctor, who said I had nothing more than a mere chest cold. So I took the medicine, and only got worse. I don't know how it happened, but I stumbled upon a forum post, about a woman whose dysphagia was linked to celiac disease. It all makes sense now. After a month of starvation, my swallowing returned to (somewhat) normal, and as you can imagine, I stuffed every food imaginable down my throat: pizza, bread, ramen, my favorite foods basically. And now I'm back to step one, and I've never felt more miserable. I've avoided gluten like the plague ever since, yet I still cannot swallow. I really hope that someone out there can relate to the toll that this is taking on my mental health. I've never been suicidal, but it just seems like each day, a new symptom arises for no utter reason, and I think that being dead would be so much easier. As of now, I haven't eaten gluten in weeks, yet I have the sensation of a walnut stuck in my throat, and I am scared to death to eat a morsel of mashed potato. I've been waking up every morning choking on my saliva. No one is taking me seriously. My mom just tells me to eat less dairy and gluten. But my throat literally feels like it's the size of a straw. That's not all either. Don't even get me started on the brain fog, the random rashes, my bones aching for no reason, falling asleep while eating, the list goes on. I've managed to eat some soup now, although it takes me an hour to eat half a cup. This, along with the stress of college is beating me to a pulp right now. I hate to complain so much, but I really just want someone to tell me that they know what I'm going through, because no one in my life can relate to me right now, or even have any sympathy. Please, tell me I'm not alone.
  19. Celiac.com 09/24/2010 - A team of researchers recently found that people with celiac disease, even those following a gluten-free diet, also commonly suffer from sleep disorders that are related to depression, anxiety and fatigue. Since anxiety and depression both occur at higher rates in people with celiac disease than in the general population, the researchers were curious to see how celiac disease might affect quality of sleep. The research team included F. Zingone, M. Siniscalchi, P. Capone, R. Tortora, P. Andreozzi, E. Capone, and C. Ciacci. They are affiliated with the Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine at Federico II University of Naples in Italy. In addition to finding that sleep disorders commonly affect people with celiac disease, regardless of gluten-free status, they also found that sleep disorders are less common in celiacs who score higher on quality of life scales, while those with low quality of life scores suffer at higher rates. For their study, the team evaluated people celiac disease at diagnosis, celiacs on a gluten-free diet at follow-up, and a group of healthy control subjects. All patients completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), SF36, Zung and Fatigue scales and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). Their results showed that people with celiac disease at diagnosis and those following a gluten-free diet showed higher PSQI scores than did healthy volunteers (P < 0.001). PSQI scores were no lower for those following a gluten-free diet than for the others with celiac disease (P = 0.245). People with celiacs disease at diagnosis and those on a gluten-free diet scored similarly on the other tests, but differed sharply from the healthy control subjects. Patients who had higher individual scores for overall physical and mental fitness (r = −0.327, P = 0.002, and r = −0.455, P < 0.001, respectively) had higher overall PSQI scores. Factors influencing sleep quality were depression (r = 0.633, P < 0.001), fatigue (r = 0.377, P < 0.001), state anxiety (r = 0.484, P < 0.001) and trait anxiety (r = 0.467, P < 0.001). So, if you or someone you love has celiac disease, be prepared to address sleep issues, and maybe consider doing everything possible to ensure a good night's rest. Source: Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics. DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2036.2010.04432.x
  20. I have been doing a lot of research and trial/error on finding the right products and food. It’s been 1 year since my diagnosis and it hasn’t been easy but definitely found my way. Anyway...the main reason I’m making this post is because I need to find a way to make companies aware of making gluten free products. I see too many of them are using shared equipment and it’s frustating!!!!! Thats like....giving something that is peanut free to a child but made in a facility where peanuts are all over the place. Why would they emphasize gluten free when it is not. I really wanna push companies to providing a separate room or building to manufacture their products. If they have the money, why not spend it knowing consumers such as myself would purchase it especially if it is gluten free?! Any ideas?
  21. Hi, my boyfriend has Celiac's, and therefore we have separate toasters (his for gluten-free bread, mine for gluten bread). The other day, I made a slight mistake: I put one slice of gluten bread in his toaster. I didn't toast it (realized the mistake right away and took the slice out, so there shouldn't be incrusted crumbs everywhere inside), but it did definitely go in the bread slot. Is there a way to clean the toaster so that he can keep using it, or should we just get a new one? I am sort of hoping that by using the toaster on gluten-free bread several times, maybe whatever gluten is on the toaster will "stick to" the gluten-free bread, and that the toaster will then be usable again; or something of the kind. Thanks!
  22. Jules Shepard

    Gluten-Free Matzo (Matzah)

    Matzo is the oldest and most well-known (edible) symbol of the exodus of the Jews from Egyptian slavery. According to the Bible, Aaron and Moses warned of 10 plagues sent to cause Pharaoh to free the Jews. When the final plague killed all the first-born sons of Egypt but passed over the Jewish houses, Pharaoh finally released the Jews from their bondage in Egypt. However, they were forced to leave in such great haste that their bread dough did not have time to rise, leaving them with what we now know as "matzo" (matzah, matza, matzoth, matzot), or unleavened bread. While matzo was the humble food of slaves, it also recalls a great moment of freedom. During Passover, special foods like matzo are eaten to symbolize both the bitterness of slavery and the sweetness of freedom. Gluten-free participants in Passover rites have typically not been so free to share in this great tradition, however. Matzo is manufactured for Passover using wheat flour; thus, we must think outside the proverbial cracker box to explore our safe and tasty options. Like any other wheat flour recipe we might long to enjoy again, devising a gluten-free solution is as simple as: modify, substitute and perfect using gluten-free ingredients. You will be pleasantly surprised not only at the crunchy lightness of this recipe, but also at its simplicity! Since matzo must be made and baked within 18 minutes to prevent any leavening in the dough, you have no time to dawdle with a intricate details. This 5 ingredient recipe takes only 20 minutes from start to finish! Like many of the recipes coming out in my third book (to be released this summer of 2010!), this recipe is not only gluten-free, but also dairy-free, soy-free, egg-free and vegan. Enjoy! Ingredients: 1 cup Jules Gluten Free All Purpose Flour (kosher) ½ cup almond flour 4 Tbs. extra virgin olive oil 3 Tbs. water ½ tsp. sea salt or kosher salt Directions: Preheat oven to 450 F (static) 425 F (convection, preferred). Whisk together Jules Gluten Free All Purpose Flour and almond flour then add in the liquid slowly while stirring with a fork or pastry cutter. If the dough is too dry, add additional water by the ½ teaspoonful in order to get dough wet enough to form a ball but not be sticky. Form a ball with the dough and pat out onto a clean surface or pastry mat dusted with Jules Gluten Free All Purpose Flour. Pat with your fingers to flatten the dough and roll to the thickness of matzo, then prick with a fork. Sprinkle with additional coarse kosher salt, if desired. Bake for 10 minutes on a parchment-lined baking sheet, or just until slightly browned. Serves: 4.
  23. Celiac.com 09/27/2016 - Healthy comfort food is hard to find in the supermarket—especially when you want it tasty, cheap and appealing to everyone. Rice pudding is the ultimate comfort food because it is found on almost every continent wherever rice is available (none was found on Antartica during my month there). Rice cream or pudding has many names- Arroz con leche in Spanish, Risalamande in Scandinavia, Pulut hitam in Malaysia, Riz bi halecb in Lebannon. But when you make your own from this simple recipe, alternative milk choices need to be carefully selected. Cow's milk is one of the big 8 allergens with increasing numbers of people avoiding the highly processed homogenized, pasteurized milk in the dairy case. I remember the days when milk spoiled in a week. Today, you know it is highly processed when the expiration date on the carton is 4 weeks from the day you purchase it. Individuals with celiac disease may also have an intolerance to the proteins in cow's milk so other sources need to be considered to avoid gastrointestinal inflammation. Soy milk is not a better choice because over 90% of the soybeans grown in the U.S. are genetically modified to withstand Roundup pesticide exposure. There is adequate research to indicate GMO soy products should be avoided. Don't be fooled by a major brand that has carefully selected wording on their carton to the contrary. There is insufficient non-GMO soybeans grown in the U.S. to produce all the soy milk products available in every supermarket across the nation. Besides, males should tread lightly in their consumption of phytoestrogen products like soy. Besides, a recent study done at Northwestern University in Chicago has indicated that soy oils are harmful to the lungs and cause increased asthma. This may be the tip of the iceburg of how dangerous GMO soy foods may be to overall health. Other choices for making rice pudding would certainly be better. The worst choice for making a healthy rice pudding is almond milk. USDA and the California Almond Board have allowed the false advertising and mislabeling of almonds as "raw". Pasteurized almonds sold as raw almonds or made into almond milk can be toxic. In 2007 it became mandatory to pasteurize almonds because of numerous salmonella foodborne illnesses. The treatment process approved by FDA (Food and Drug Administration) is propylene oxide (PPO). Even the EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) cautions about the neurological effects of PPO that have been observed in animals. Research also indicates PPO has caused tumors in animals and is a probable human carcinogen. Consumption of almonds and almond milk can be a health risk. The best choice of milk for a healthy rice pudding is coconut milk. It provides a creamy texture and delicate flavor. Don't worry about the saturated fat content in coconut. It is not a factor in coronary hart disease until the oil is hydrogenated into non-dairy products and toppings. Yes, supermarkets can be dangerous places but wise consumers can eat healthy by making simple home prepared meals and desserts. You can bring home that extra rice from the Asian restaurant and make it into rice pudding, or chose your favorite rice - jasmine is mine- and make a delightful rice pudding. Gluten-Free Rice Pudding Ingredients: 2 cups milk 3/4 cup uncooked rice (1 1/2 c cooked) 1 tablespoon honey Pinch of salt 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract or 2 inch piece vanilla bean Sprinkle with grated nutmeg Pomegranate seeds or raisins, optional Directions: Cook milk, rice, honey and salt (+ vanilla bean, if using) in saucepan over medium heat about 30 minutes until rice is soft, stirring frequently. Lower heat to simmer. Cover for 10-15 minutes until rice kernels soften and take up milk. Stir in vanilla extract. Divide into serving dishes. Sprinkle with nutmeg and top with pomegranate seeds or raisins. Makes 4 servings. Calories per serving (varies with milk choice) 88-112 Protein : 3-4 g Carbohydrates : 19 g Fat: 2-5 g Note: For special occasions, soak raisins in rum and serve on top with sprinkle of cinnamon sugar.
  24. Hi, I am 16 years old and have been gluten free for about 4 months now however I was just officially diagnosed with celiac a month ago. I was completely gluten free for the first week however now I cannot seem to cope with the idea of not eating gluten. And yes I know how damaging it is to my body and it makes me so sick for so long however, I can't seem to stop eating it. I keep putting on a ton of weight and my stomach is so bloated it looks as if Im pregnant (which let me make very clear, I am not). I just don't know what to do. I have suffered from an eating disorder before my diagnosis and am worried that I am going to develop it again. My gluten eating binges usually end with me so sick I can't move or focus and me crying in a bathroom. My entire house is gluten free because my parents are so so supportive of me. I just really need help because as I am typing this I just ate a panini and a croissant. I really need help I can't keep living like this and I thought that someone on here would be able to offer me some much needed advice. Please Please Please help me. ps... I should also mention that I suffer from many other food sensitivities, mainly dairy, soy and coconut.
  25. Celiac.com 02/20/2015 - Most all gins and whiskeys, and many vodkas, are distilled from grain. While many people with celiac disease and gluten-intolerance can drink them with no adverse effects, many others cannot. These brands of gin, whiskey and vodka are made with gluten-free ingredients, and safe for people with celiac disease and wheat sensitivity. So anyone with celiac disease who has been missing their gin or whiskey can now happily indulge. Cheers! GLUTEN-FREE GIN Cold River Gin is distilled from potatoes. The company’s website says that, like their world-famous vodkas, their gluten-free gin is made with whole Maine potatoes and the pure water of Maine's Cold River. Cold River uses a recipe that “dates back to the early days of British gin,” and contains their own “secret blend of seven traditional botanicals that are steeped for the perfect amount of time to infuse the essential flavors.” GLUTEN-FREE WHISKEY Queen Jennie Whiskey, by Old Sugar Distillery is made entirely from sorghumThe idea of a whiskey made from gluten-free grains is sure to excite anyone with celiac disease who longs for a wee dram. The company’s web page says that Queen Jennie is made with 100% Wisconsin Sorghum, and is “Less sour than a bourbon and less harsh than a rye.” GLUTEN-FREE VODKA Corn Vodka—Deep Eddy, Nikolai, Rain, Tito’s, UV Potato Vodka—Boyd & Blair, Cirrus, Chase, Chopin, Cold River Vodka, Cracovia, Grand Teton, Karlsson’s, Luksusowa, Monopolowa, Schramm Organic, Zodiac Monopolowa is one of my favorites, and is usually available at Trader Joe’s. Cold River gluten-free vodka is triple-distilled in a copper pot still, from Maine potatoes and water from Maine's Cold River. Tito’s award winning vodka is six times distilled from corn in an old-fashioned pot still, just like fine single malt scotches and high-end French cognacs. Tito’s is certified Gluten-free.
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