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Found 2,701 results

  1. Celiac.com 03/09/2017 - It's cheaper, more nutritious, and properly delicious. Will gluten-free flour made from cockroaches change the way bread is made? There's a great article over at Munchies. It's about two scientists from the Federal University of Rio Grande in Brazil, who have developed flour made from ground cockroaches that contains 40 percent more protein than normal wheat flour. Oh, and it happens to be gluten-free. Excited yet? Grossed out? As part of their research, food engineering students Andressa Lucas and Lauren Menegon discovered a new way of producing cheaper, more nutritious food with the cockroach flour, since it contains a large amount of essential amino acids and some lipids and fatty acids as well—the keys for a balanced and healthy human diet. These cockroaches are not the ones we find running or flying in city sewers or drains. They are a particular species, Nauphoeta cinerea, to be precise, and procured from a specialized breeder, where they are hygienically produced and fed on fruits and vegetables to meet all hygiene requirements required by ANVISA, the Brazilian health surveillance agency. So, these are certified clean cockroaches, okay? And not only is the flour itself gluten-free, it's extremely high protein. Lucas and Menegon found that a bread containing just 10% cockroach flour presented a protein increase of 49.16 percent, when compared to bread made only with wheat flour. Also, at that ratio, the cockroach flour bread loaves keep the same flavor as their non-insect counterparts. So, given the high protein, and the desirable elastic qualities, it seems a natural for someone to test out some gluten-free breads that use cockroach flour. We promise you updates on these and other gluten-free stories. Meantime? Tell us what you think. It obviously sounds gross, but what if cockraoch flour makes good gluten-free bread? Are you in or out?
  2. Celiac.com 02/26/2018 - People with celiac disease and gluten-sensitivities react adversely to gluten proteins in wheat, barley and rye. The gold standard for assessing gluten levels in foods is a test called the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, aka ELISA. Now, ELISA is, by most measures, a good test. However, it does have some drawbacks. ELISA tests do vary by manufacturer, and can provide inconsistent results, including false negatives, which can be harmful for people with celiac disease or gluten-sensitivity. Also, for optimal detection, each type of gluten requires a different ELISA. So, barley, wheat and rye all require separate tests. Researchers Kevin D. Dorfman, Scott P. White and C. Daniel Frisbie claim they have developed a gluten detector that can rapidly detect and quantify different sources of gluten with a single test. Their team says that their gluten assay device is based on floating gate transistor technology, and relies on tiny micro-channels for a sample to move through. Gluten in a sample will bind to one of three capture agents, which can be antibodies or a DNA-based aptamer, that specifically latch onto gluten proteins from certain sources. This binding causes a shift in the voltage read-out of the transistor which acts as a chemical fingerprint that identifies the gluten as being from barley, wheat, or rye. As with ELISA, the device could detect gluten below 20 parts per million, which is the maximum threshold allowed by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for a "gluten-free" label. Because it has fewer processing steps, and uses automated sampling, the new sensor typically produces results 45 minutes faster due than ELISA tests. The new test is still in development, and not set to replace ELISA anytime soon. But progress in the gluten-free world is rapid these days, so changes to commercial gluten detection systems are likely on the near future. Source: American Chemical Society
  3. Celiac.com 03/05/2018 - While people with non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) have neither celiac disease nor wheat allergy (WA), they often do have intestinal and extra-intestinal symptoms that are related to gluten consumption. Using a double-blind placebo-controlled (DBPC) gluten challenge with crossover, a team of researchers recently set out to conduct the first assessment of NCGS rates in children with chronic, gluten-associated gastrointestinal symptoms. The research team included R Francavilla MD, PhD, F Cristofori MD, L Verzillo MD, A Gentile MD, S Castellaneta MD, C Polloni MD, V Giorgio MD, E Verduci MD, PhD, E D'Angelo MD, S Dellatte MD & F Indrio MD. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Pediatrics, San Paolo Hospital, Bari Italy; the Department of Pediatrics, Santa Maria del Carmine Hospital, Rovereto TN, Italy; the Department of Pediatrics, Catholic University, Rome, Italy; the Department of Pediatrics, University of Milan, S. Paolo Hospital, Milan, Italy; the Department of Pediatrics, Santa Maria Incoronata dell’Olmo Hospital; Cava dei Tirreni SA, Italy; the Tandoi Group Factory, Corato, Italy; and the Interdisciplinary Department of Medicine-Pediatric Section, University of Bari, Bari, Italy. Their team looked at 1,114 children with chronic gastrointestinal symptoms, but no celiac disease and WA. For children showing a positive connection between symptoms and gluten ingestion, the team offered a four-stage diagnostic challenge that included: run-in, open gluten-free diet (GFD) and DBPC crossover gluten challenge. Patients randomly received gluten (10 g/daily) and placebo (rice starch) for 2 weeks each, separated by a washout week. The gluten challenge was considered positive when accompanied by a minimum 30% decrease of global visual analogue scale between gluten and placebo. Out of 1,114 children, 96.7% showed no correlation with gluten ingestion. Thirty-six children were eligible for the diagnostic challenge. After the run-in and open GFD, 28 patients underwent gluten challenge. Eleven of these children tested positive (39.2%). This is the first such study to demonstrate the need for a DBPC for diagnosing NCGS in children, since the diagnosis is ruled out in more than sixty-percent of cases. Source: The American Journal of Gastroenterology. doi:10.1038/ajg.2017.483
  4. Hi Everyone, I am sure that this question has been asked multiple times but I am new to this forum as well as the Celiac world. I haven't been feeling like myself health-wise for a couple years now, with my stomach always being bloated, crampy, irritated, and just plain old not feeling well. I am a 20 year old nursing student so I had not had the time to focus on what the issue may be but I finally decided that I wanted to figure it out. I love pasta, but every time I ate it my stomach would expand to the size of a 5 month old pregnant woman and become rock solid I got tested for gluten sensitivity and the test came back as having high allergen gluten IgG levels. It says that the normal amount is less than 2.0 mcg/mL and my results read 6.4 mcg/mL. The doctor at my school said the only way to determine if this is Celiac is to get a biopsy and see a GI doctor. It's not easy for me to do that as I am a busy student, out of state. I was wondering if anyone knew if this was a good indication of Celiac or non-celiac gluten sensitivity. I know it is hard to determine from that one test but I'm looking for all the help I can get. Thank you! - Naomi Moore
  5. Hello! I am on week 3 of being gluten free and dairy free. I noticed I had a bit more energy. But other than that I haven't noticed any change in my keratosis pilaris, my main reason for changing my diet. For those of you who saw a change in your skin after going gluten-free, how long did it take? Also- I've heard of other foods that can cause KP, but trying a diet that would eliminate all of those possible sensitivities and reintroducing them sounds tough. I'd have to forego gluten, dairy, nightshades, sugar, eggs, legumes, grains, corn, nuts, and high glycemic fruits. That's great and all, but what would I have left to eat? Broccoli and dirt??
  6. I kept a gluten-free diet for a long time, but I think there were a lot of so-called "hidden" gluten (in chocolates, coffee, sauces). Then I kept an ideal diet for a 7 days. After that I passed tests for antibodies IgA and IgG for gluten, they were negative. Does this mean that there was no hidden gluten in my previous diet? Or antibodies had been already left my body in that 7 days?
  7. Celiac.com 02/24/2018 - Forget about Valentine's Day. Well, not literally, you should definitely do something nice for your Valentine; but let's put that aside for a moment. Just about any day can be right for a romantic dinner if you plan ahead and keep it simple. One suggestion: fondue. Few dishes can so effortlessly anchor a simple, romantic dinner as traditional Swiss fondue. Yes, you could make your own fondue, but I prefer to make it easy by dropping by my local Trader Joe's. Made in Switzerland, Trader Joe's Fondue is a blend of Swiss Emmental and Gruyère cheeses, white wine, kirsch, a dry cherry brandy, and a selection of savory spices. Trader Joe's also make a French version called Isigny Ste Mère Fondue Normande, which is made with soft cheeses Camembert, Livarot, and Pont L'Eveque cheeses and apple brandy. Want my recipe for the easiest, most romantic gluten-free dinner I know? Lightly steam some broccoli, asparagus, carrots, zucchini, potatoes until tender, but firm. Cut them into bite-sized chunks and arrange on a plate. Also add cut apples, pears, some toasted gluten-free bread, and some good ham or sausage. Grab a box of Trader Joe's Fondue, and prepare as directed. If you don't have a fondue pot, you can still heat the fondue in the microwave and serve it a ramekin or other ceramic dish. The ceramic will hold the heat well, and help keep the fondue fit for dipping. Spread out on a blanket near the fireplace, and if you don't have a fireplace, turn on one of those fireplace videos on YouTube. Pour a glass of your favorite wine, dig in, and enjoy your lingering, romantic dinner. If you don't have a Trader Joe's nearby, or feeling DIY? Fret not. Here's a great recipe recipe for an easy gluten-free beer and cheddar fondue. Gluten-Free Beer and Cheddar Fondue Ingredients: 12 ounces light gluten-free beer ½ teaspoon Dijon mustard 1 clove garlic ¼ teaspoon Gluten-free Louisiana-style hot sauce 4 cups shredded sharp Cheddar cheese 2 tablespoons cornstarch or potato starch Cooked sausage or ham, cut to bite-size New potatoes, steamed and cut to size Gluten-free Bread, toasted and cut into cubes Apples cut into bite-size squares Pear cut into bite-size squares broccoli cauliflower asparagus carrots zucchini Directions: Heat beer, Dijon mustard, garlic, and hot sauce in 4-quart saucepan on low; whisk in Cheddar cheese tossed with cornstarch until melted and smooth. Pour into a warm ramekin or other ceramic dish. Lightly steam some broccoli, cauliflower, asparagus, carrots, zucchini, potatoes until tender, but firm. Cut into bite-sized chunks and arrange on a plate. Add cut apples, pears, toasted gluten-free bread, and good ham or sausage. To serve, spear fruit, veggies or meat with a fork and dip in cheese. Eat and repeat.
  8. Hii all... i have many symptoms started 5 months ago !... at the beginning start feeling dizziness then fatigue, pain all over the body (muscle pain), Muscle twitching, Skin rash, can not gain weight, low appetite ,headaches,low concentration, brain fog, weakness in arms and legs, low energy, Constipation/ diarrhea. i had many investigations: Brain CT, Blood Tests, Neurological examinations, Brain MRI, ---> all are NORMAL - Except Vitamin D deficiency which is now corrected. and Low Lithium <0.1 (Normal value 0.6-2.5)/ then i started taking Multivitamins, Magnesium supplements and Vitamin D, ashwagandah, and after 3 months i started to feel better, some good days some bad days! but generally i feel much better. (No dizziness ,much less twitching, no tinnitus, No brain fog) still have some weakness and i started thinking about Celiac disease or gluten intolerance,,,, i had Blood Test for Celiac disease and Biopsy,,,, Blood test for celiac came Negative,,,, but the biopsy shows irregular, reduced Villi, and Increased Number of Lymphocytes. (1st and 2nd part of duodenum). since 1 week i am eating Gluten-free. i feel much much better in the first 4 days ! but now since 2 days started again to have some weakness with little headache. with that results, can it be only Gluten intolerance? and how long i need to feel better?! or to clear Gluten from the body?
  9. Celiac.com 07/11/2017 - A UK man has filed a lawsuit against a local bar and grill after becoming sick on a gyro salad that servers led him to believe was gluten-free. The Webster Groves resident, Phillip "Gus" Wagner alleges that servers at Michael's Bar & Grill in Manchester, provided inaccurate information about the dish, and that he suffered an adverse reaction to the gluten in the dish that left him with "severe and permanent injuries." His lawyer, Christine Anderson of Faerber and Anderson, specifies that Mr. Wagner was injured in one or more of the following respects to wit: injuries to the cardiovascular system, gastrointestinal tract, internal organs, respiratory system and body as a whole; that he sustained an aggravation of a pre-existing condition; that said injuries are permanent and permanently disabling; that he has experienced pain and suffering in the past and is reasonably certain to experience pain and suffering in the future; that he has expended money for necessary medical care, treatment and services in the past and is reasonably certain to expend money for necessary medical care, treatment and services in the future resulting from said occurrence; that he has lost the ordinary gains of his employment and will lose further such sums in the future; that he has sustained loss of a normal life. For their part, the restaurant says that the lawsuit is their first indication of any kind of a problem. Michale's general manager, Katina Malliotakis, says they had no indication that any customer had any kind of problem, until someone called and demanded to know their insurance company, and adding that that someone had told Wagner the gyro salad was gluten-free. Malliotakis says that Michale's special gluten-free menu does not include the gyro salad, and that her servers are all aware of that fact. "Nobody remembers a customer asking about the gyro salad,” she says. If someone did ask for a gluten-free salad, any server would have pointed them toward another salad on the menu that is gluten-free."We have plenty of gluten-free options if people ask for that," she says. What do you think? Mistaken restaurant? Mistaken patron? Much ado about nothing? Source: riverfronttimes.com
  10. Celiac.com 02/10/2018 - People with celiac disease must avoid all forms of gluten from wheat, rye, or barley. So, what about Kamut? Is Kamut safe for people with celiac disease or gluten-sensitivity? Like Spelt, Kamut is simply another form of wheat that is sometimes wrongly thought to be gluten-free. Kamut is simply a trademark for a specific kind of wheat, Khorasan wheat, grown under specific conditions. Khorasan wheat is triticum turanicum. It is wheat, and it contains gluten, which people with celiac disease should not eat. So, in short, Kamut is NOT safe for people with celiac disease or any sensitivity to gluten. Because Kamut is still a type of wheat that contains gluten it is not safe for people with celiac diseases and appears on Celiac.com's UNSAFE food list of non-gluten-free foods.
  11. Celiac.com 12/10/2000 - As reported in Ann Whelans September/October issue of Gluten-Free Living, the American Dietetic Association (ADA) has released the 6th edition of its Manual of Clinical Dietetics, which offers revised guidelines for the treatment of celiac disease. This manual is currently used by hospitals and doctors all over North America, and represents the most up-to-date source of information with regard to the dietary treatment of various illnesses. The new standards set in this publication conform more closely with current international standards. Included on their safe list are items that have been on Celiac.coms safe list for over five years, including: amaranth, buckwheat, distilled vinegar (no matter what its source), distilled alcoholic beverages (including rum, gin, whiskey and vodka), millet, quinoa and teff. A team of American and Canadian dietitians wrote the new gluten-free guidelines, including: Shelley Case, RD, Mavis Molloy, RD, Marion Zarkadas, M.Sc.RD (all from Canada and all members of the Professional Advisory Board of the Canadian Celiac Association), and Cynthia Kupper, CRD, CDE (Executive Director of the Gluten Intolerance Group and celiac). Additional findings of this team regarding buckwheat and quinoa contradict what has been accepted as common knowledge for years by some US support groups, mainly that these two grains are more likely to be contaminated by wheat than other grains. In fact, according to the team, buckwheat and quinoa are far less likely to be contaminated than most other grains. At the most basic level the new guidelines mean that celiacs do not need to avoid foods containing unidentified vinegar or distilled alcohol, this alone will allow much more freedom when shopping or eating out. Further, celiacs who drink alcohol will have much more freedom and a far greater choice when they want to have a drink. Additionally, celiacs will be able to more easily maintain a well-rounded and nutritious diet because they will have access to a far greater number of highly nutritious and safe grains. The ADAs 6th edition of the Manual of Clinical Dietetics represents the first time that Canadian and United States dietary guidelines have come together to create a united North American gluten-free standard, and will hopefully lead to the adoption of a single standard by all US support groups so that hundreds of thousands of celiacs will not have to unnecessarily exclude more foods than necessary. These new guidelines go a long way towards an international standard, which should be the ultimate goal for all celiacs and celiac organizations in the world.
  12. Hi, Im a bit confused about my symptoms so hoping for some insight. I have been suffering from a range of symptoms, which all started just after I had my second child (who is nearly 3 now). I have constipation on and off, mucoua in stool, undigested food in stool, insomnia which sometimes is very severe...I cannot sleep for days, migraines, sinus pain, vertigo, burning feeling in ears, sore joints, pain in knees and lower back pain. I also suffer from wind when I am constipated. I dont really feel bloated and my stomach doesnt swell or anything. I didnt connect it to anything I was eating until recently. I assumed it was stress related. However I have noticed that when I eat grains, they come out undigested and I almost alseays have constipation about 2 or 3 days later. I ate the grain feekah a few days ago...and now am constipated again...with fully recognisable grains. Sorry for tmi! I am wondering if the fact the grains are undigested...is this a reliable way of determining that it is the culprit food and that is causing problems? Is it possible just to have an intolerence to grains but be ok with other wheat sources such as bread etc? I am also wondering if wheat allergy and/or gluten intolerence or celiac disease, can just develop out of the blue? I havent had any problems before until the past 2-3 years. Also, can it be triggered by stress/ pregnancy/giving birth? My doctors arent the best tbh...so I havent really gone back as I get fobbed off. Im going to try eliminating foods from diet to try to see what helps. Any advise etc greatly appreciated. Karolina
  13. Celiac.com 03/24/2017 - Does it meet the FDA standard for a gluten-free product? Is it safe for people with celiac disease? Starbucks' new Gluten-Free Breakfast Sandwich looks yummy. But, why does Starbucks' website feature a disclaimer saying the company cannot guarantee the absence of allergens, including wheat? The sandwich itself is pretty standard fare, consisting of two slices of cherrywood-smoked Canadian bacon, an egg patty and reduced-fat white cheddar on a gluten-free roll. The company website uses boldface type to tout the "gluten-free"-ness of the new offering, noting that the sandwich uses a "gluten-free roll," is "prepared in a certified gluten-free environment," and sealed "in its own oven-safe parchment bag to avoid any cross-contamination." Sounds good, so far, perhaps even safe for celiacs. But then there's this little disclaimer at the bottom of the page saying that Starbucks "cannot guarantee that any of our products are free from allergens (including dairy, eggs, soy, tree nuts, wheat and others) as we use shared equipment to store, prepare and serve them." Wheat? This product may contain wheat? Wheat contains gluten. Things that contain wheat are not gluten-free, and usually cannot be labeled as such. So, what's the deal? Is the sandwich gluten-free or not? Is this a bit like when Pizza Hut offered a gluten-free pizza crust, but wouldn't guarantee a gluten-free pizza? How much wiggle room is built into Starbucks' disclaimer? The questions are basic ones. Is the product gluten-free? Is it safe for people with celiac disease, or not? If it is, then Starbucks has been unclear in declaring the suitability of their product for people with celiac disease. If not, then Starbucks has been equally unclear in declaring the unsuitability of their product for people with celiac disease. Also, if the company can't guarantee a gluten-free product, and won't recommend it for people with celiac disease, then who is this product for? The Starbucks website features lots of talk about the "gluten-free," aspects of the product, and the serving process, but there is no language stating that the sandwich, as served is "under 20ppm" gluten, which is the FDA standard for advertising package goods as "gluten-free." There is no claim that the product is safe for people with celiac disease. The Starbucks Gluten-free Breakfast Sandwich sounds very much like something that many people in the celiac disease community might welcome…IF it's actually gluten-free. Let's hope it is. Let's hope this was just a mix-up by Starbucks, perhaps the result of an over-zealous legal department. Otherwise, it would seem that, without more clarity, people with celiac disease could be confused or mislead by the claims, and maybe influenced by the ubiquitousness of Starbucks and their promotional campaign into trying something that might harm them. Celiac.com is reaching out to Starbucks for comment. We look forward to sharing their reply. Until it becomes clear that this product is actually gluten-free, and suitable for everyone, Celiac.com urges celiac sufferers to use caution, and to follow the story here for more updates. Source: Starbucks.com
  14. Celiac.com 10/30/2014 - I have always been a fan of Steve Rice and his Authentic Foods line of gluten-free products. Recently I had the opportunity to try out his new Steve's Gluten-Free Bread Flour Blend, and I must say that I'm very excited about this amazing new flour blend, and the many possibilities that if offers. When Steve told me that he had been working for 20 years to perfect this mix, I knew that I was in for something very special, and my experiences with it were amazing. In the past I have tried many products billed as all purpose gluten-free flour mixes, but none are quite like this one. The directions are straightforward, and I only needed my own yeast packet, sugar, egg, butter and oil to make the mix. I new something magical was happening at the point where you first begin to mix everything together...see below: I know that Steve recommends using a mixer, but I don't have one. However, after mixing and kneading it for only a few minutes by hand it came together with the look and feel of a real gluten bread dough...it was very easy to work with, and in a very short time it looked like this: I used the dough to make the outstanding pizza below, which had a spongy, delicate crust. When making it I found that I could easily pick up the dough and work with it to form the gluten-free pizza crust. My wife used the remaining dough to make a cake, which came out light and fluffy, and it held together extremely well: Be sure to give this great new product a try. I'm sure that you too will be blown away by how great it is, and how many things you will be able to make with it using Steve's many recipes offered on his Web site.
  15. Celiac.com 04/12/2011 - Paul Seelig was found guilty today of 23 counts of obtaining property by false pretense after a two-week trial in Durham, NC. The jury found that he illegally represented baked goods as gluten-free, but they actually contained gluten. Mr. Seelig received an 11 year prison sentence for his crimes, which included the sickening of more than two dozen customers, one of whom had a premature delivery that was possibly caused by her involuntary gluten consumption. Seelig's company, Great Specialty Products, purchased regular gluten-containing items from companies in New Jersey such as Costco, and then repackaged them in his home kitchen and sold them as "gluten-free" at the NC State Fair, various street fairs and via home delivery. Seelig claimed that his baked items were homemade in his company's 150,000-square-foot commercial kitchen, and that his company raised its own grains on its 400-acre farm. High gluten levels were detected by both customers and investigators in Seelig's supposedly gluten-free bread, even though he claimed that he tested his bread weekly for gluten and found none. Mr. Seelig could not produce any of his test results at trial. Source: http://www.newsobserver.com/2011/04/12/1123724/bread-seller-lied-jurors-find.html
  16. Dr. Vikki Petersen D.C, C.C.N

    Can IBS be Reversed?

    Celiac.com 02/23/2017 - IBS, also known as Irritable Bowel Syndrome, is a miserable condition. If you've ever had food poisoning or experienced Montezuma's revenge from travel, you have a good idea of how someone who suffers from IBS may feel. But while your food poisoning passed in a couple of days, imagine what it would be like to live like that each and every day. You have loose bowel movements anywhere from 4 to 20 times per day. And often they are so urgent that making it to the bathroom is not always possible. You don't need to think about that scenario for long to realize why patients with IBS often choose not to venture far from home. They can literally become ‘house bound' by this condition. The chronic diarrhea often switches to constipation for several days before the diarrhea resumes, but they rarely have ‘normal bowel function'. Imagine if you were diagnosed with this condition. You would want to know the treatment and, hopefully, the cure. Most doctors will tell you that there is no cure. They'll also start talking to you about your stress levels. Do you think it's more common for the stress to precede IBS or to be a result of it? Do you think it's at all stressful to never know when you'll next need to ‘dash' to the restroom? Do you think it's at all stressful to constantly have to contemplate what it would be like if you DIDN'T successfully make it to the restroom? Yes, in my experience I do find that in the vast majority of cases the stress is secondary to the condition, not primary. That's my experience, but I also haven't met a case of IBS that I haven't cured – providing the patients were compliant, of course. If you look online, this is what ‘WebMD' has to say about the condition: "Although there currently is no cure for IBS, careful attention to diet and stress management should help keep your symptoms under control and perhaps even prevent them from coming back." "In many people who have IBS, eating may trigger symptoms. But for most people, there is not a particular type of food that triggers symptoms." "Increasing the amount of fiber in your diet can help control constipation. High-fiber foods include fresh fruits (raspberries, pears, apples), fresh vegetables (peas, brussels sprouts), wheat bran, and whole-grain breads and cereals. Beans such as kidney, pinto, and garbanzo are also high-fiber foods, but they should probably be avoided if gas is one of your symptoms." "You can take steps to reduce the possibility that certain foods will cause symptoms, such as avoiding or limiting gas-producing foods (including beans and cabbage), sugarless chewing gum and candy, caffeine, and alcohol." Okay. So according to them you should eat wheat bran, but you should avoid beans and cabbage. To say I disagree would be an understatement. I personally have not met a single person with IBS who wasn't gluten intolerant and I have never found anyone with this ailment who couldn't eat some beans and cabbage. Gas is a result of poorly digested food. The cause isn't typically the ‘gassy' food, but rather a food intolerance that is creating stress on the small intestine, resulting in a compromised ability to produce enzymes and properly digest food. Gassiness is an easy symptom to cure, but avoiding beans and cabbage is not typically the answer. Let's look at some recent research that shines some light on this topic: Just last month Gastroenterology published an article entitled ‘A Controlled Trial of Gluten-Free Diet in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome-Diarrhea: Effects on Bowel Frequency and Intestinal Function'. This study was performed by a team of doctors at the Mayo Clinic. Their goal was to discover whether IBS patients with diarrhea as their predominant symptom could benefit from a gluten-free diet. They performed genetic testing for celiac genes on 45 IBS patients who fit their criteria. Twenty-two patients were put in the gluten containing diet group, while twenty-three were put into the gluten-free group. In each group, 50% had the celiac genes and 50% of the group did not. Bowel function (number of bowel movements) and permeability, as well as the production of inflammatory chemicals were measured. Those on the gluten containing diet had more bowel movements per day, with the greater number seen in those positive for the celiac gene. So too was intestinal permeability (leaky gut) more prevalent in those consuming gluten and positive for the celiac gene. While effects of gluten were certainly stronger in those with the celiac gene, even those without the gene were affected when compared to the gluten-free group. The authors' conclusion was that gluten alters bowel barrier function in IBS patients with predominant diarrhea, particularly among those who carry the celiac gene. They concluded with this statement: "These findings reveal a reversible mechanism for the disorder." Did those who reacted to gluten suffer from gluten sensitivity? Is that why they still reacted negatively to gluten despite not carrying the gene for celiac? It would be interesting to find out. In my clinical experience, it is often the case that a patient suffers from IBS but does not have celiac disease. We find them to be gluten sensitive. The treatment of avoiding gluten is still the same, but these patients do not carry the celiac gene. It seems that while a gluten-free diet isn't the answer for 100% of IBS patients, it is definitely a component in enough people suffering from IBS that it would be a shame to not test for it. Do you agree? It seems to be a better course than recommending eating gluten and avoiding beans, while stating there is no cure. I'm sorry if my comments seem caustic, but it is upsetting to see such advice given that, in my opinion, does next to nothing to improve the lives of those who are suffering. If you have IBS or know of someone who does, do consider getting testing for celiac disease and gluten sensitivity. Remember that these tests aren't perfect. Even if you test negative, it would do no harm to try a 30 day gluten elimination diet. Let me know how it goes and please contact me should you have any questions. Our destination clinic treats patients from across the country and internationally, so you don't need to live locally to receive help. You can call us for a free health analysis at 408-733-0400. Reference: Gastroenterology. 2013 Jan 25. pii: S0016-5085(13)00135-2. doi: 10.1053/j.gastro.2013.01.049. A Controlled Trial of Gluten-Free Diet in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome-Diarrhea: Effects on Bowel Frequency and Intestinal Function. Vazquez-Roque MI, Camilleri M, Smyrk T, Murray JA, Marietta E, O'Neill J, Carlson P, Lamsam J, Janzow D, Eckert D, Burton D, Zinsmeister AR.
  17. Celiac.com 01/27/2018 - If you've ever had a good version of this crowd-pleasing dish at a restaurant, you likely wondered if it could be made at home. It can, indeed, and you can do it gluten-free with no extra trouble at all. This version is tasty and easy to make. Enjoy it over rice. Ingredients: 2 pounds boneless, skinless chicken breast halves, cut into bite-size chunks 1 tablespoon vegetable oil 3 cloves garlic, minced ½ medium onion, diced ½ cup gluten-free soy sauce or tamari ¼ cup ketchup 2 teaspoons sesame oil ½ cup honey 2 tablespoons cornstarch 3 tablespoons water 2 scallions, white and light-green parts, chopped, for garnish ⅓ cup Toasted sesame seeds ½-1 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes, as desired Kosher salt Freshly ground black pepper Potato starch for dredging Directions: Season the chicken lightly with salt and pepper, and dredge in potato starch. Add vegetable oil to a medium skillet, and sauté onion until translucent. Add the garlic, and chicken and stir, cooking, until the chicken browns slightly and the onion softens. Add the soy sauce, ketchup and crushed red pepper flakes, and stir to mix. Add the sesame oil and honey, stirring to incorporate. Dissolve the cornstarch in water in a small bowl, then add to the pot, a little at a time, stirring as you go, until it thickens as desired. Stir in most of the sesame seeds. Divide among individual plates; sprinkle with the scallions and remaining sesame seeds. Serve over rice.
  18. Celiac diagnosed in 1992. Ate Domino's gluten free pizza (1 small slice every evening for 2 weeks) Experiencing severe bone pain similar to pre-diagnosis. Wondering how long it will last. Anyone else have this following gluten exposure? DebLee
  19. Did you ever wonder if your gluten-free diet is really 100% gluten-free? Did you know that you're supposed to be getting regular checkups with your doctor to verify that? The Gluten Detective's stool and urine at-home test kits are designed to verify that your diet is gluten-free, at least during the three or more days prior to running a test. Both the stool and urine tests do the same thing, and both kits make each type of test very easy to carry out. The kits come complete with everything you need, including gloves, collection instruments, extraction solution, dilution solution, test strip, etc. There are many reasons to regularly use these kits. For example, if you eat out regularly at restaurants or at friends' houses you could use them to verify that your food has been safe. Alternatively if you got sick after a meal you could also use a test kit to see if gluten was indeed the culprit, instead of not knowing for sure what made you feel sick. Perhaps you need to ditch that favorite restaurant? Ultimately these kits are designed to help you make better choices with your gluten-free diet, and learn how to stay safe. They are an inexpensive way to regularly monitor your gluten-free dietary compliance. For more info visit their site.
  20. Celiac.com 12/10/2014 - Creamy tomato soup is a comfort food classic that goes great with a gluten-free grilled cheese sandwich. Alas, some canned versions contain wheat flour. This gluten-free tomato soup recipe delivers a rich, creamy tomato soup that will warm your body and make your stomach sing with joy. Perfect for a cold day. Ingredients: 1 (28-ounce) can whole peeled tomatoes in their juices (I use San Marzano) 2 cups chicken broth 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 tablespoon unsalted butter 1 medium sweet onion, chopped 2 bay leaves ½ teaspoon chopped fresh thyme ½ cup basil, cut to thin ribbons ½ cup heavy cream Directions: Heat oil and butter in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Once butter foams, add onion and a big pinch of salt and fresh ground pepper. Cook, stirring occasionally, until onion is completely soft and just beginning to brown, about 12-15 minutes. Add broth, tomatoes and juices to the saucepan and stir to crush up tomatoes. Add bay leaves and heat until bubbly. When soup bubbles, season with a little salt and pepper, add thyme and basil, and simmer gently until tomatoes begin to break apart, about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. Remove from heat, discard bay leaves, and allow soup to cool slightly. Carefully purée soup in a blender until smooth. Be careful. If you don't have an immersion blender, you may have to do this in batches. I always cover the top with a towel, just to be safe. Return soup to the stove over low heat and stir in cream. Taste and adjust seasoning as desired. Serve with salad, or vegetables, and your favorite gluten-free grilled cheese sandwich for a delicious meal.
  21. Does anyone know if the mix for Cheeseburger macaroni hamburger helper is gluten free? I'm having a hard time figuring out which ingredients are in the pasta and which ingredients are in the mix! I'd like to substitute with gluten free noodles and just use the mix. Thanks!
  22. Celiac.com 12/26/2017 - Because gluten is vital to the texture, structure and stretch of pasta, replicating pasta without gluten is especially difficult. It's even harder for fresh pastas, and harder still for filled pastas, like ravioli and tortellini. In the case of pasta, the trick is to get the pasta to stretch around the filling. In traditional fresh pastas, the stretch comes from gluten in the wheat flour. General Mills thinks it has found an answer in a cold extrusion process of pasta dough made with a special blend of flours and gums. The company's process allows the successful manufacture of a variety of free-from, fresh pastas including ravioli, tortellini and agnolotti; products that were previously hard to make without gluten. The company is looking to patent its new method for manufacturing gluten-free filled pastas, such as ravioli, without any breaking or tearing during production. For this patent, the company chose a blend of rice flour and cornstarch had been chosen for a bland flavor profile, and relies on 2-3% xanthan gum for structure and flexibility. The process works best by including at least 10% fresh egg by by mass. The process General Mills hopes to patent delivers an improved process for a commercially manufacturable gluten-free or reduced-gluten pasta. Other parts of the General Mills process include: cold extruding the mixture into sheets of around 1-1.2mm thickness at 34 C or less; adding the filling; and shaping the pasta around it prior to cooling and packing. Early trials showed 32 C was best for plain pasta and 25.7 C for filled pasta. In all cases, the extruder pressure had to be 75 Bar or more. General Mills said its invention would help address the increased demand for variety in fresh, gluten-free and reduced-gluten products. Source: foodnavigator-usa.com
  23. Celiac.com 01/10/2018 - If you're looking for a tasty variation on the usual winter stews of soups, try this delicious red chile sauce. It makes a great potluck dish and is sure to leave plenty of happy eaters on game day. Ingredients: 2 pounds boneless pork shoulder, trimmed and cut in half 2 quarts of chicken broth ¾ cup dried chiles de arbol 4 or 5 dried ancho chiles 3 15-ounce cans white hominy, drained and rinsed 6 cloves garlic (2 smashed, 4 minced) 2½ teaspoons ground cumin 2 tablespoons vegetable oil 1 large white onion, chopped 1 tablespoon dried Mexican oregano (regular will do in a pinch) 1 bay leaf Kosher salt Diced avocado, tortilla chips, lime wedges, chopped cabbage, diced onion, sliced radishes and/or fresh cilantro, for topping Directions: Break the stems off the chiles de arbol and ancho chiles and shake out as many seeds as possible. Put the chiles in a bowl and cover with boiling water; weigh down the chiles with a plate to keep them submerged and soak until soft, about 30 minutes. Transfer the chiles and 1½ cups of the soaking liquid to a blender. Add the smashed garlic and ½ teaspoon salt and blend until smooth. Strain through a fine sieve into a bowl, pushing the sauce through with a rubber spatula; discard the solids. Rub the pork all over with the cumin and ½ teaspoon salt; set aside. Heat the vegetable oil in a stock pot over medium heat. Add the onion and cook about 5 minutes, stirring occasionally, until soft. Add the chopped garlic and cook about 2 minutes, until fragrant. Increase the heat to medium high. Put the onion and garlic into a bowl and set aside for a few minutes. Add the pork to the pot and sear, turning as needed, until lightly browned on all sides, about 5 minutes. Stir in 2 cups water, the chicken broth, oregano, bay leaf, ½ teaspoon salt and ½ cup to ¾ cup of the chile sauce, to taste. Bring to a low boil, then reduce the heat to maintain a simmer. Partially cover and cook for about 3 hours, turning the pork a few times, until tender. Stir in the hominy and continue to simmer, uncovered, until the pork starts falling apart, about 1 more hour. Remove the bay leaf. Put the pork on a cutting board, chop, and return chopped pork to the pot. Add water or broth as needed if the pozole is too thick. Season to taste with salt. Serve with assorted toppings and the remaining chilihil sauce.
  24. Celiac.com 11/10/2017 - Gluten-free foods are more popular than ever, and the range of choices and the availability of gluten-free products continues to expand. One of the more significant changes in the last few years has been the entry of major players in a market once dominated by small companies. General Mills has taken their ubiquitous Cheerios line gluten-free, and is now one of the largest manufacturers of gluten-free food in the U.S. Udi's has grown from a once small company into a gluten-free bread giant. Major retailers like Amazon have taken a bite out of numerous smaller businesses. The gluten-free graveyard is piled high with the bones of once great companies that gave up the ghost. Here are some gluten-free companies that used to be popular, but are now out of business, went bankrupt, or no longer selling gluten-free products: Bimbo's Goodbye Gluten Blue Ribbon Bakery Bready Bye Bye Gluti / Gluten Out Cookies for Me Dads Pizza Crust Del's Gluten-Free Eats El Peto gluten-free Meals / Your Dinner Secret Gia's Gluten-Free Bakery Gluten Free A2Z Gluten Intolerance Essentials Glutenfreeapp.com Gluten-Free Artisan Bakery Gluten-Free Trading Company, LLC / Gluten-Free Warehouse GlutenFreeVitamins.com / Point Natural Gluten Less Dining The Lean on Me Baking Company Meals in a Minute Nostalgic Cookies S'Better Farms Sofella The Lean on Me Baking Company Toovaloo Gluten Free Versameal Zeer.com Do you remember any of these once proud gluten-free companies? If so, share your recollections in our comments section. And definitely let us know about any we missed.
  25. Hi everybody from Croatia! I need help with my test results. I have done some blood test, but not biopsy. I have Hashimoto, allergies, asthma, high blood pressure...I got 15 kilos when my thyroid starts to make problems. Also I had very low all vitamins (B12, D, A...) and poor ferritin and iron (not below the reference values). I had constipations etc. I am now in much better conditions, raised levels of vitamins, no constipation, more energy etc. I do my blood test before about 6 years whan I was eating gluten regular. Now I am gluten free for 2,5 years. What do you mean about my blood test? Do I really need to do biopsy to know exactly do I have celiac disease?? EMA (IIF) negative titer reference values < 1:20 tTg result 2 reference values <20 immunoglobulin A result 1,81 reference values 0,70 - 4,00 Genetics test in attachment. Thank you very much in advanced!
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