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Found 2,366 results

  1. Celiac.com 03/23/2019 - Want a killer gluten-free dessert that’s easy to make, perfect for spring, and practically guaranteed turn some heads and draw rave reviews? Try these butterscotch pots de creme. If you’re unfamiliar, butterscotch pots de creme is a French dessert that’s a delightful marriage of creme, butter, sugar, egg yolks, and a bit of vanilla bean. Simple, right? Simple, but deceptively, deviously delicious. And delightfully gluten-free. Enjoy! Ingredients: 3½ cups heavy cream 1 teaspoon vanilla extract, or one real vanilla bean, if you like 3 tablespoons Scotch whiskey 4 tablespoons salted butter 1¼ cup dark brown sugar (regular brown sugar in a pinch)* 9 egg yolks, beaten pinch of salt Directions: Heat oven to 350 degrees. Place the cream in a heavy-bottomed pot over medium heat. Add vanilla. If using the bean, then split the vanilla bean, scrape the seeds into the cream and drop in the pod, as well. Bring the cream and vanilla to a simmer. Remove the vanilla pod and discard. In a separate pan, melt the butter with the sugar, whiskey, and a pinch of salt. Heat the mixture until it begins to bubble. Slowly whisk the heated cream mixture to the butter and sugar mixture. Beat the egg yolks well. Slowly whisk a bit of the hot cream-butter mixture into the yolks to help warm them up. Then slowly whisk the warmed yolks into the hot cream-butter mixture, until well mixed and thick. Pour mixture into six 6-ounce ramekins. Place ramekins in a baking pan with high sides. Add hot water to the baking pan until halfway up the sides of the ramekins. Cover pan with foil and bake for 30 to 35 minutes, or until the mixture sets. Allow to cool, and serve at room temperature. Tops with whipped cream, chocolate shavings, fresh berries and a dash of sea salt, as desired. *If you want to get fancy, you can use dark Muscovado sugar, which is available at specialty shops.
  2. Celiac.com 03/21/2019 - Calls are mounting in India to eliminate the term "low-gluten" from food labels, and to push for “zero gluten” labels for foods that are gluten-free. The Heart Care Foundation of India (HCFI) is calling for the term "low-gluten" to be eliminated from food labels, and for gluten-free foods to be labelled as "zero gluten," with the idea that the public perceives foods labeled "gluten-free" to include some gluten. Moreover, HFCI is calling for gluten-free food options on all airlines and trains, and in all parties, marriages and restaurants for people who need to avoid gluten for medical reasons. They are also calling for gluten-free options for non-celiac wheat sensitive persons, which includes up to ten percent of the population. HFCI is calling on medical associations to pass resolutions supporting these changes forthwith. The HCFI is also pushing honey water wine, with under 3% alcohol, as a harm reduction alternative to beer. Earlier in 2016, FSSAI had notified the Food Safety and Standards (Food Products Standards and Food Additives) Second Amendment Regulations, 2016, relating to standards for gluten food and low-gluten food. Read more at FBRNews
  3. Celiac.com 03/16/2019 - It's spring, and that means it's time for leafy greens! Kale is on the menu in this rich, hearty and delicious Italian-style bean soup that's a perfect way to get more fiber into your diet. I use Hurst HamBeens 15 bean soup mix, but you can conceivably make this without it. Regarding the spice packet, a note in the FAQ section of the Hurst website says: "All of our seasonings are completely gluten-free. All of our dry beans are naturally gluten free as well. We do occasionally package barley in our facility." Ingredients: 2 cups (1/2 bag) Hurst HamBeens 15 Bean Soup (spice packet is gluten-free) 2 cups chicken stock 1 cup water 1 can stewed tomatoes, with juice (14.5 ounce) 1 tablespoon bacon grease or olive oil 1 medium onion, chopped 3 cloves garlic, minced 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder 1/2 teaspoon cumin powder 1/2 teaspoon onion powder 1/2 teaspoon turmeric 1 bay leaf 2-3 cups fresh kale, loosely chopped Ham hock 2 cups gluten-free macaroni, prepared al dente Instructions: Soak beans overnight in water. Prepare macaroni al dente, according to instructions. Drain, add a bit of olive oil to the pasta and stir to prevent sticking, and set aside. In a large stock pot, sauté onions in bacon grease until clear. Add garlic and sauté until fragrant. Add spice packet and other spices and stir. Add chicken stock and water. Add beans and bay leaf. Bring pot to a boil, and then reduce to a simmer a few hours, until beans are tender. Be sure to taste all the bean sizes to be sure they are uniformly cooked through and tender. Add kale in the last 15-20 minutes of cooking. When beans are all tender, serve over gluten-free macaroni, or over rice.
  4. Celiac.com 03/19/2019 - For anyone with food allergies, finding safe, reliable allergen-free food is not just important, it’s critical. That’s especially true when eating out. According to Food Allergy Research & Education, researchers estimate that up to 15 million Americans have food allergies, including nearly six million children and teens. On average, food allergies send an American to the emergency room every three minutes. Now, a tiny company in Nashville, Tennessee is creating a certification process in an effort to promote celiac disease awareness and to provide a list of safe local restaurants for people who can’t eat gluten, or who have other food sensitivities. Allergy-Friendly.org was founded in 2018 by a local Nashville resident living with celiac disease. The company works to provide food-sensitive diners with safe restaurant options, and to ensure that restaurants understand and can meet the challenges of providing patrons with allergen-free meals. They also help to train employees on the preparation of allergy-safe meals for various food allergies. With the recent addition of BurgerUp Cool Springs, Allergy-Friendly.org has certified three restaurants in the Nashville area. The other two are Sunflower Cafe and Mangia Nashville. Though the company currently has no medical professionals associated with the certification process, it is in the process of forming a board, which will include medical professionals. The company plans to expand beyond Nashville. Find out more at Allergy-Friendly.org
  5. Celiac.com 06/29/2018 - Warning! If you crave the taste of "real" bread, this gluten free bread may be addictive. No rice flour here. This totally satisfying, wholesome, nutritious, hearty gluten free bread exudes the robust taste and firm, springy texture of rye bread. It really, really tastes like REAL bread, no exaggeration. The bread is absolutely delicious toasted or untoasted, keeps fresh for over 2 weeks in the refrigerator, and does not tear, sink in the center, dry out or crumble. This incredible 4 inch tall loaf can even be sliced nearly paper thin and still hold together. It is vegan, free of soy, corn, wheat, gluten, nuts, dairy, or eggs. Add caraway seeds and you'll want to break out the mustard, pickles, and coleslaw. It makes the perfect deli bread. Want pizza? Toasted slices of this bread make great pizza crusts for quick and easy gluten free mini pizzas. Even those not on a gluten free diet will find this bread utterly irresistible. A Quest Begins This outstanding GF bread is the result of a years long quest for the perfect GF bread recipe. It began with the classic GF bread recipe of rice flour, tapioca starch, corn or potato starch, powdered dry milk, eggs, oil, sugar, salt, xanthan gum, yeast and water. It later evolved to include bean flours. These early GF bread recipes, mostly starch and "empty" calories, simply tasted horrible and left a bitter aftertaste. Rice flour, bean flours and corn starch were quickly eliminated. After scientific studies concluded oats were gluten free and safe (except for possible wheat contamination), oat flour became a central ingredient. Starches were limited to no more than one third of the flour mix. Mashed banana, apple sauce, pumpkin puree, and yogurt were added to increase bread height and volume. Oat flour was blended with flour from other seeds and grains, including sorghum, millet, amaranth, quinoa, and buckwheat. A blend of oat and sorghum flour, tapioca and potato starch, mashed banana and low fat vanilla yogurt became standard GF bread recipe ingredients. Einkorn Einkorn an ancient form of wheat, was separately investigated. At that time, einkorn was considered potentially safe for celiacs. Samples of einkorn were obtained from Prime Grains [1] in Saskatchewan, Canada. Einkorn flour was found to have most of same height, volume, and sinking in the center problems as with any other gluten free flour blend in creating a GF bread. Einkorn bread, however, does not require the addition of starches. An oat/einkorn bread recipe similar to an oat/sorghum recipe minus the starches was created, but it became necessary to end the einkorn investigation when new research on einkorn came out showing that einkorn does contain gluten epitopes potentially harmful to celiacs. However, gluten content in einkorn is very low. The investigation produced no ill effects from consuming einkorn. Those with gluten sensitivity rather than celiac disease may well tolerate einkorn with no problems. Flaxseed Along with the Prime Grains einkorn samples sent from Saskatchewan, samples of golden and brown flaxseed were also sent. Using a coffee grinder to grind the flaxseed, the ground flaxseed was steeped in near-boiling water and used as egg replacer in GF bread recipes. The steeping releases mucilage from the outer coating of flaxseed to create a thick, slimy emulsion. Flaxseed mucilage seems to have a synergy with beta glucan in oats, a soluble fiber, forming a hydrocolloid combination that increases bread volume. When the Prime Grains flaxseed ran out, flaxseed was locally purchased. It was immediately noticed locally purchased flaxseed produced a much thinner emulsion than did the Prime Grains flaxseed. The local flaxseed had a much lower mucilage content. GF bread made with the local flaxseed had less volume and height and more sinking in the center than the Prime Grains flaxseed. Were it not for the flaxseed samples sent with the einkorn, the great variation in mucilage content in different varieties of flaxseed grown in different localities would have been missed. Little information is available on the mucilage content of flaxseed grown in North America. One study was found [2,3,4]. Prime Grains flaxseed is currently distributed through Farmer Direct Co-op [5] in Regina, Saskatchewan. High mucilage Farmer Direct Co-op flaxseed has been available from Whole Foods in the bulk foods section. Amazon's recent Whole Foods purchase may change that as bulk bin labels no longer state "Farmer Direct", only that it originates from Canada. However, the issue of high mucilage versus low mucilage flaxseed may be moot. The reason is buckwheat. Buckwheat, like flaxseed, also releases mucilage. It turns out buckwheat mucilage also increases bread height and volume, and, when used together with flaxseed, high mucilage flaxseed has no more effect on bread height and volume than lower mucilage flaxseed. More on buckwheat later. Deep Loaf Pans GF breads containing eggs and mostly starch can achieve high height and volume without collapsing using an ordinary loaf pan. But to achieve a full 4 inch loaf height using flaxseed as egg replacer and a low starch content requires a loaf pan with high sides. The deepest loaf pans available are 4 inch deep pullman loaf pans. Ideally a pan deeper than 4 inches is desired because GF breads tend to rise above the loaf pan and then fall during baking. Additionally, during baking, the loaf shrinks and pulls away from the pan side walls, more at the top than the bottom, resulting in a loaf narrowing toward the top rather than straight sides. Ideally the the sides of the loaf pan should taper so the bottom is narrower than the top. This cancels out the narrowing of the loaf at the top creating a finished loaf with straight sides. A small batch of 4-1/2 inch depth by 4-1/4 inch width by 8-1/2 inch and 13 inch length tapered heavy duty 16 gauge solid aluminum loaf pans were custom made by a USA baking pan manufacturer for this author to sell online. These long-life, heavy duty pans were ideal, but, unfortunately, high cost and price made for underwhelming online sales. The website was shut down years ago. However, a cheaper 13 inch long by 4 inch width by 4 inch depth aluminum-coated, folded thin steel pullman loaf pan should be adequate for the recipe which later follows. The cover is not needed. The following pans are suggested: USA Pan 13x4x4 Large Pullman Loaf Pan & Cover 1160PM-1 [6] or Chicago Metallic 44615 Pullman pan,single 13x4x4 [7]. Xanthan Gum and Konjac Glucomannan In the early development of oat and einkorn bread recipes, xanthan gum caused some problems. The use of xanthan gum alone often produced strange odd loaf shapes with concave sides. In one case an extra added teaspoon of xanthan gum caused the loaf to balloon well above the 4-1/2 inch deep loaf pan. When done, the sides of the loaf were sucked inwards and a cross section of loaf had the appearance of a giant mushroom. Konjac glucomannan powder [8] was then investigated. Konjac glucomannan is a natural, odorless soluble fiber that is found in the konjac plant and is the most viscous hydrocolloid available. Konjac used by itself produces a very firm loaf and restricts the bread height and volume. Xanthan gum produces a softer, more elastic bread. Konjac used together with xanthan gum have a synergy which allows the firmness of bread to be adjusted depending on their ratio and amounts. Konjac also "tames" xanthan gum so that the loaf has straight sides instead of turning into a mushroom. For a long time, 1-1/2 teaspoons each of konjac powder and xanthan gum, a one to one ratio, was used in the standard GF bread recipe. But this ratio and amount always resulted in at least some sinking in the center of the loaf. Recalling that additional xanthan gum creates a "mushroom" effect which results in a rounded top, the ratio was changed to 3 teaspoons of xanthan gum and 1 teaspoon konjac powder. This worked, resulting in a loaf with a slightly rounded or flat top, no longer sinking in the center. Psyllium husk was never tried as it generally decreases bread volume and height, not the desired effect [9]. Attempts That Did Not Work For years a standard GF bread recipe consisting of oat flour, sorghum flour, tapioca starch, potato starch, flaxseed, banana, low fat vanilla yogurt, molasses, sugar, canola margarine, cinnamon, ginger, salt, yeast, xanthan gum, konjac powder, apple cider vinegar, and water became standard daily fare. This recipe provided an acceptable GF bread, but was by no means perfect. It tended to crumble, required delicate handling, sank in the center, and had less volume and height than desired. It was not vegan or dairy free, and its taste could stand improvement. Deciding it was time for a change, numerous attempts to fix these short-comings were made. The attempts that failed included using citrus pectin, sugar beet fiber, gum arabic, and aquafaba (liquid from cooked chickpeas). High methoxyl citrus pectin did succeed in increasing height and volume and reducing crumbling, but its strong, bitter taste made it totally unacceptable. Choosing the Best GF Starches - Arrowroot and Potato Starch: Yes - Tapioca: No After the previous failures, investigations focused on how choice of starch affects GF bread volume. One especially interesting published research paper looked at GF breads made using a single starch in place of flour [10]. The study compared breads made with wheat, potato, tapioca, corn, and rice starch. Only wheat and potato starch produced any real bread structure. Corn starch had some bread structure. Tapioca and rice starch produced structures too far gone to be fully analyzed in the study. Tapioca starch produced a shapeless blob. Rice starch produced a crust circling a large empty center. The study revealed that potato starch would be the best GF starch for achieving greater volume and preventing sinking in the center. Unfortunately, the study did not look at arrowroot starch which later was found to be superior to tapioca starch. The standard oat/sorghum GF bread recipe used equal amounts of potato and tapioca starch. Two baking tests with these starches were performed using the standard GF bread recipe. One test used 3 parts potato to 1 part tapioca starch and the other test used 1 part potato to 3 parts tapioca starch. The test favoring potato starch produced a higher volume and height bread with reduced center sinking, as expected. The test favoring tapioca starch resulted in a drop in volume and height with increased center sinking. Potato starch has a bland, supposedly neutral taste. In the test favoring potato starch the "bland" taste dominated the entire taste of the bread covering up the taste of all other ingredients including molasses, spices, and banana, oats and sorghum, a totally unacceptable result. In the test favoring tapioca starch, a slight off taste was noted, but, worse, when toasted, the tapioca caused increased burning of the crust resulting in a bitter crust taste. It was concluded one should not make excessive use of potato starch and that tapioca starch may not be the best choice for a starch. This led to arrowroot starch as the next subject for investigation. Arrowroot and tapioca starches appear to be very similar. They definitely are not. Two baking tests were performed with arrowroot and potato starch. One test used 3 parts arrowroot to 1 part potato starch and the other test used equal parts of arrowroot and potato starch. In the test favoring arrowroot starch, the bread did not sink in the center or lose as much volume as when tapioca starch was favored. When toasted, the crust did not burn as with tapioca starch or produce any bitterness. Arrowroot starch also had no off taste as with tapioca starch. In the test with equal parts arrowroot and potato starch, there was a slight improvement in volume and less center sinking than with tapioca and potato starch at equal parts. The conclusion was that arrowroot starch is a superior choice over tapioca starch. Arrowroot may cost more than tapioca starch, but arrowroot starch now replaces tapioca starch as the preferred choice for a perfect GF bread recipe. Arrowroot starch can be found online in bulk at reasonable prices. Buckwheat - The Key to Volume, Height, Amazing Taste and a Bread That Does Not Sink or Crumble Still seeking the key to increasing bread volume and height, the world wide web was scoured for ideas. Intrigued by the impressive volume and height of GF breads made with buckwheat and rice flours by Strange Grains Gluten Free Bakery [11] in Perth, Australia, the question was asked, "Could buckwheat be the key?" Buckwheat had previously been rejected from consideration in the course of earlier oat bread recipe development due to a strong, unpleasant bitter taste. It turns out however, toasted buckwheat groats (kasha) were unknowingly used in that earlier trial years ago, a very bad and unfortunate choice. The world wide web provides many learning opportunities, one being that buckwheat flour does not have to taste awful. Buckwheat flour can be ground from three different forms of buckwheat, each having a completely different taste. The three forms are: 1) whole unhulled buckwheat; 2) raw dehulled buckwheat or buckwheat groats; 3) toasted buckwheat groats or kasha. The familiar earthy slightly bitter taste comes from the buckwheat hulls. In fact, some whole buckwheat flour contains added ground hulls for a stronger earthy flavor. The hulls create a greyish colored flour. Buckwheat groats are dehulled buckwheat seeds. Dehulling removes the source of the familiar earthy flavor. Flour from raw buckwheat groats has a creamy white color and a very mild sourdough rye flavor acceptable to just about everybody except for those who really miss having that earthy buckwheat hull flavor. Kasha or toasted buckwheat groats, on the other hand, has an extremely strong taste and odor that is popular in some cultures, but absolutely repulsive to most people. Kasha has a taste slightly suggestive of rye on the plus side but an odor strongly reminiscent of rotting food waste on the minus side. Kasha can easily be made by stirring raw buckwheat groats in a pan on medium heat for about 5 minutes until evenly brown and "fragrant". If the "fragrance" drives you out of your house into a freezing snowstorm, then you probably won't like kasha. Actually, after about a week of storage in a plastic bag in the refrigerator, the odor of rotting waste in bread made with kasha flour dissipates leaving the desirable sourdough rye flavor. Buckwheat flour can easily be made by grinding groats or whole buckwheat in a coffee grinder. Raw buckwheat groat flour is not readily available, especially gluten free certified flour, so a coffee grinder is needed. Gluten free whole buckwheat and raw buckwheat groats are readily available. Bob's Red Mill whole buckwheat flour is NOT certified gluten free (its groats are) but Anthony's Goods has certified gluten free whole buckwheat flour. Whole Foods has raw buckwheat groats in the bulk section at a very reasonable price. Bulk raw buckwheat groats are available online at reasonable prices. To test if buckwheat was the key to a perfect GF bread, a blend of one cup each of buckwheat, oat, and sorghum flours together with 2/3 cup each of potato and arrowroot starches went into the bread dough for the baking test. The buckwheat flour made the dough much more workable and elastic. Into to oven it went. The result? Success! Buckwheat indeed proved to be the missing key. The bread volume and height increased, reaching just over 4 inches tall. The use of 3 teaspoons xanthan gum and 1 teaspoon konjac powder contributed to a loaf with a slightly rounded top and absolutely no sinking in the center. The bread did not crumble. The rye-like taste was amazing. Why did buckwheat work? Buckwheat, like flaxseed, contains mucilage, and that slimy fiber likely gives buckwheat flour its high viscosity and unique baking properties [12]. Making GF Bread Dairy Free The final challenge was making the GF bread recipe vegan and dairy free. Low fat vanilla yogurt had been used to increase bread volume and protein. A substitute was needed. The latest trend in protein supplements is yellow pea isolate [13,14]. Yellow pea's protein amino acid profile compares favorably to that of dairy whey although it is not a totally complete protein. One study determined yellow pea protein added to GF bread had the highest level of sensory perception consumer acceptance compared to other proteins added to GF bread [15]. Yellow pea protein has also been used as the basis for a dairy free milk made by Ripple Foods [16]. Yellow pea protein is available from a number sources including Anthony's Goods, Bob's Red Mill, and Bulk Food Supplements. For the new GF bread vegan recipe, 2/3 cup of low fat vanilla yogurt was replaced with 1/4 cup yellow pea protein isolate powder plus 5 oz water. Yellow pea is a legume. If you have allergies to soy or peanuts (also legumes) use with caution, though yellow pea is considered to be much less likely to be an allergen. The yellow pea protein powder can be omitted with little effect on the overall GF bread recipe. Just replace it with another heaping tablespoon each of buckwheat, oat and, sorghum flours to maintain bread volume. Another vegan consideration is choice of oil. Canola oil, olive oil, coconut oil or a vegan buttery flavored spread like Smart Choice Original or Earth Balance Soy Free can be used. Smart Choice Original and Earth Balance Soy Free use yellow pea protein in place of dairy whey and sunflower lecithin in place of soy lecithin. Molasses or Maple Syrup? Molasses is used in the standard GF bread recipe to achieve a satisfying robust rye flavor. For an alternative subtle, delicate, sweet maple taste, grade A very dark and strong flavor maple syrup can be used in place of the molasses and granulated sugar. Pure maple syrup is a very pricey ingredient. The subtle change in taste using maple syrup may not really be worth the syrup's high cost, but the option is included in the recipe below, nonetheless. Maple syrup is sold in four grades: grade A golden color and delicate taste; grade A amber color and rich flavor; grade A dark color and robust flavor; and grade A very dark and strong flavor. Only use grade A very dark and strong flavor maple syrup for baking. The maple flavor of lighter shades of maple syrup is too weak to be tasted when used in most baked goods. The money spent using lighter shades of pricey maple syrup will only be wasted. Grade A very dark and strong flavor maple syrup is mostly used for cooking and not available in most grocery stores. It is readily available online and direct from maple syrup farms. Shipping from the east coast to the west coast may cost more than the maple syrup itself. Try to find an online deal with free shipping. RECIPES Oat-Sorghum-Buckwheat-Banana-Flaxseed GF Bread This recipe produces a 56 ounce (1.588 kg) gluten free bread loaf yielding 28 slices 7/16 inch (11.11 mm) thick. Preparation time is about 2 hours 15 minutes. Baking time is 1 hour 40 minutes. Kitchen Essentials: Coffee grinder (preferably burr-type) Electric mixer (preferably a stand mixer) Mixing bowl Pullman loaf pan, 13 inch x 4 inch x 4 inch (33.02 cm x 10.16 cm x 10.16 cm) Lidded 2 quart/liter (or larger) plastic food container Quart/liter glass or plastic measuring cups (2) 5 ounce (150 ml) glass measuring cup Potato/banana masher, ricer or food processor Hard rubber bowl scraper, specifically Rubbermaid FG1901000000 Scraper 9-1/2 inch 1 inch pastry brush A good set of stainless steel measuring cups and spoons 10 inch x 14 inch (25.4 cm x 35.56 cm) plastic food storage bags with twist ties Cooling rack Dry Ingredients: 1 cup (240 ml) oat flour 1 cup (240 ml) sorghum flour 1 cup (240 ml) buckwheat flour milled from raw dehulled buckwheat groats 2/3 cup (160 ml) potato starch 2/3 cup (160 ml) arrowroot starch ~3/4 cup (180 ml) (approx.) milled flaxseed freshly ground from 1/2 cup (120 ml) whole flaxseed 1/4 cup (60 ml) yellow pea protein isolate powder (* can be replaced with 1 heaping tablespoon (20 ml) each of oat, sorghum and buckwheat flour) 2 tablespoons (30 ml) granulated sugar (* omit granulated sugar if using maple syrup in place of molasses) 2 tablespoons (30 ml) caraway seed (* optional for deli rye flavor) 1-1/2 (7.5 ml) teaspoons salt 1-1/2 (7.5 ml) teaspoons ground cinnamon 1-1/2 (7.5 ml) teaspoons ground ginger 1 teaspoon (5 ml) baking soda 3 teaspoons (15 ml) xanthan gum 1 teaspoon (5 ml) konjac glucomannan powder 4 teaspoons (20 ml) fast acting yeast Wet Ingredients: 2 cups (480 ml) cold water to mix with milled flaxseed Additional water to mix with mashed banana and molasses (or maple syrup) to achieve 2 cups total mixture ~1 cup (240 ml) (approx.) mashed ripe banana (2 medium to large bananas) 4-1/2 tablespoons (67.5 ml) molasses, unsulphured, mild (or full flavor) to one's taste (* Alternately, omit molasses and use 3/4 cup (180 ml) maple syrup, grade A very dark and strong flavor) 2 + 1 tablespoons (30 + 15 ml) canola, olive or melted coconut oil or melted vegan buttery flavored spread Additional oil or vegan spread to grease loaf pan 1 teaspoon (5 ml) apple cider vinegar (as an antimicrobial, anti-mold agent) Directions: 1. Grind enough raw dehulled buckwheat groats in a coffee grinder to make 1+ cups (260 ml) buckwheat flour. 2. Grind 1/2 cup (120 ml) whole flaxseed in a coffee grinder. 3. Place 2 cups (480 ml) COLD water in a quart/liter measuring cup and stir in the ground flaxseed with a fork. 4. Heat water and flaxseed mixture in a microwave oven until near boiling. Let steep for 10 to 20 minutes. 5. Combine all dry ingredients EXCEPT flaxseed into a lidded 2 quart/liter (or larger) plastic food container. 6. Thoroughly shake and blend dry ingredients together in the food container holding lid down securely. 7. Mash, rice, or puree 2 medium to large bananas into a separate quart/liter measuring cup. 8. Using 5 ounce (150 ml) glass measuring cup, warm 4-1/2 tablespoons (67.5 ml) molasses in microwave oven to thin and add to mashed bananas, or, in place of molasses, add 3/4 cup (180 ml) maple syrup to mashed bananas 9. Add enough water to the bananas and molasses (or maple syrup) and stir together so that the liquid mixture measures 2 cups (480 ml). 10. Warm up the banana molasses (or maple syrup) mixture in a microwave oven for 2-3 minutes. 11. Melt 2 tablespoons (30 ml) of coconut oil or vegan spread in a microwave oven in a small bowl, if these oils used. 12. Stir banana molasses (or maple syrup) mixture and steeped flaxseed into a mixing bowl. 13. Add 2 tablespoons (30 ml) oil plus 1 teaspoon (5 ml) apple cider vinegar to the mixing bowl. 14. Grease a 13 inch x 4 inch x 4 inch pullman loaf pan. Use a pastry brush for applying liquid oil. 15. Using an electric mixer with a dough hook, blend liquids for 1-2 minutes at a high medium speed. 16. Stop mixer and add dry ingredients to the bowl. Start mixing at low speed for 15 seconds, then increase to a low medium speed and mix for 16 minutes to a smooth, thick, moist (not wet), elastic dough consistency. 17. Preheat oven to 300-325° F (150-160° C). 18. Using a hard rubber bowl scraper, transfer dough from mixing bowl to the greased pullman loaf pan. 19. Plunge the hard rubber bowl scraper up and down in the dough to level and even out the dough. 20. Melt remaining 1 tablespoon (15 ml) coconut oil or vegan spread in the microwave in a small bowl, if oils used. 21. Use a pastry brush to spread 1 tablespoon (15 ml) oil on top of the dough. Smooth and round the top of the dough with the pastry brush. 22. Allow the dough to rise to just above the top of the pullman loaf pan. 23. Place the pullman loaf pan (uncovered) in the preheated oven and bake for 1 hour 40 minutes maintaining an oven temperature slightly above 300° F (150° C) to avoid burning the crust. 24. When done, remove loaf pan from oven and allow the loaf to cool in pan for only about 10 minutes to avoid the crust becoming soggy from trapped pan moisture. 25. Remove loaf from pan, tapping pan bottom corner edges on counter to loosen loaf. Transfer loaf to cooling rack. 26. Allow bread to cool to room temperature before slicing the loaf into 2 halves with a sharp, smooth edged (not serrated) slicing knife. 27. Store each loaf half in 10 inch x 14 inch plastic food storage bags with twist ties and place in the refrigerator. 28. If you can wait, keep it in the refrigerator overnight before consuming. The bread taste and texture actually improve overnight as it firms up in the fridge. When firm, the bread can easily be sliced nearly paper thin without falling apart. The bread will keep fresh in the fridge for well over 2 weeks and seems to improve in taste as it ages. Quick and Easy Gluten Free Mini Pizzas Making mini pizzas using bread slices for crusts is nothing new. But finding a GF bread suitable for a pizza crust is somewhat elusive. Just finding a GF bread with tall enough slices is a challenge. The Oat-Sorghum-Buckwheat-Banana-Flaxseed GF Bread presented above works great! Its full size slices, taste, and texture make for a wonderful mini crust upon which to build an easy, tempting GF mini pizza. The recipe is simple. Key to this recipe is the use of a cooling rack on top of a metal baking sheet. The cooling rack raises the pizza crust above the surface of the baking sheet allowing hot oven air to circulate under the crust. This keeps the crust dry and crispy, preventing the crust from getting soggy due to moisture trapped between the crust and baking sheet. Directions for one 2-slice pizza serving: Prepare or slice any toppings you desire. Preheat the oven to 450° F (232° C). Toast 2 slices of Oat-Sorghum-Buckwheat-Banana-Flaxseed GF Bread to a golden brown. Place toast on top of a cooling rack sitting on top of a metal baking sheet. Spread a generous tablespoon of your favorite pizza sauce, canned or homemade, on each slice. Spread a layer of shredded mozzarella cheese on top of the sauce, about 1/3 cup (80 ml) per slice. Spread any other cheeses, such as diced or shredded sharp cheddar, on top of the mozzarella. Add your toppings and a touch more mozzarella. Slide the mini pizzas, cooling rack, and baking sheet together into the hot oven. Bake for 9 minutes until cheese melts and bubbles. Slide the baking sheet and rack out from the oven and transfer pizzas to a plate using a metal spatula. Serve. About Gluten Free Toasters Toasting gluten free bread in a typical kitchen 2 or 4-slice toaster cannot be completed in one toasting cycle. To achieve a golden brown toast requires 2 or even 3 toaster cycles. Typical toasters provide toasting times of no more than 2-1/2 minutes maximum per cycle. A few more expensive toasters can toast up to 3 minutes. It is common for GF breads to require a single cycle toasting time of more than 5 minutes to toast golden brown. It takes 5 minutes 15 seconds starting in a cold 1000 watt kitchen toaster to toast slices of Oat-Sorghum-Buckwheat-Banana-Flaxseed GF Bread to a golden brown in a single cycle. A toaster-oven can provide a longer single cycle toasting time, but may require 10 minutes or longer to toast GF bread golden brown. A toaster-oven is less efficient for toasting bread than a 2 or 4-slice toaster because it must heat up a much larger volume than a 2 or 4-slice toaster which has heating elements up against the bread. A few manufacturers have provided toasters with a "Gluten Free" button to extend the maximum single cycle toasting time. These include Crux 2 and 4-Slice Toasters [17] available exclusively at Macy's, Bella Pro Series and Ultimate Elite 2 and 4 Slice Toasters [18,19], and the Williams Sonoma Open Kitchen 2-Slice Stainless Steel Toaster [20]. There are several problems with these toasters. First, the maximum toasting times on the "Gluten Free" setting are still not long enough. Maximum toasting times provided by Bella for its Ultimate Elite Toaster are 3 minutes 50 seconds for the "Gluten Free" setting and 4 minutes 20 seconds for the "Gluten Free" + "Frozen" setting. Second, a gluten-free toaster for celiacs, by necessity, must be used exclusively for GF breads to avoid wheat contamination. A gluten free toaster does not need a "Gluten Free" button. A gluten free toaster simply requires a 6 minute maximum toasting time to adequately toast gluten free breads. One should not have to remember to push a "Gluten Free" button every time they toast bread. Is it so hard for manufacturers to offer a toaster with a 6 minute timer? For those with some basic electronic technical skills, there is a relatively easy solution to having a toaster with a sufficiently long 6 minute maximum toasting time for GF bread. The electronic toaster controller board in a toaster can be modified to extend the maximum toasting time by simply replacing a resistor and/or a capacitor on the board. First one needs to find a toaster in which the controller board can easily be accessed. It turns out the Nesco T1000 toaster [21] is well-suited to the task. As toasters go, almost all are made in China and tend to have a high percentage of manufacturing defects per customer product reviews. The Nesco T1000 is a nice looking, sturdy toaster with nice features. With the right screwdriver to remove the "tamper proof" screws, the controller board is easy to get to and easy to modify. The only flaw in the Nesco T1000 is that the toasting time is shorter in a hot Nesco T1000 toaster than the toasting time in a cold Nesco T1000 toaster at the same browning setting, resulting in inconsistent browning. If toasting always begins in a cold toaster, browning is always consistent, and the browning setting need never be touched to achieve the same results every time. Below, instructions on modifying the Nesco T1000 are provided. A modified Nesco T1000 toaster has been perfectly toasting GF bread daily for over 4 years without a single problem. These notes are of a technical nature. Modifying the Nesco T1000 toaster will void the warranty. Any modifications you perform are done so at your own risk. If you are not familiar with electronic components or a soldering iron, do not attempt the modification. Find a friend or someone with the technical skills if you wish to have a modified Nesco T1000 toaster. Nesco T1000 Toaster Tech Notes - How to Increase the Toasting Cycle Time Summary: The browning control circuit of the Nesco T1000 toaster is designed around the AO201D toaster controller chip, an 8-pin DIP integrated circuit. Toaster cycle timing is achieved by adjusting the frequency of a timer oscillator on board the AO201D via an external RC circuit. The frequency is inversely proportional to RC. Increasing R (resistance) and/or C (capacitance) decreases frequency and increases the toasting cycle time. R in the Nesco toaster is a summation of a 250k potentiometer (variable resistor) in parallel with a 390k resistor (R6) in series with a 68k thermistor (NTC) in parallel with a 180k resistor (R5). C is a .033µf capacitor (C3). The Defrost button increases the toasting cycle time by switching in an additional .0047µf capacitor (C4) in parallel with C3. The thermistor decreases the resistance as the toaster ambient temperature rises and is supposed to help stabilize the oscillator frequency which is affected by heat. Ideally, temperature compensation provided by the thermistor and the AO201D should keep the oscillator frequency stable and browning shade the same from batch to batch as the toaster ambient temperature rises. Unfortunately, in the Nesco toaster, the oscillator frequency becomes unstable and increases as the toaster heats up, significantly reducing the toaster cycle time when the toaster is hot compared to the cycle time of a cold toaster. Hence, to maintain the same browning shade of a cold toaster, the browning control must be turned up higher when toasting in a hot toaster. The modifications below will increase the original factory maximum toasting cycle time of about 2.5 minutes to about 5.5 minutes when the toaster is cold. The Defrost button adds up to 30 seconds or so additional time. (Note: There is no datasheet available online for the AO201D chip. A datasheet in chinese is available for a similar MCU CMS12530 chip [22] with some diagrams and tables labelled in english. The Pericom PT8A2514A toaster controller chip [23] is also of interest with an english datasheet and a timer that can be adjusted from 30 sec to 10 min.) Tools Required: TA23 triangle head screwdriver (Silverhill Tools ATKTR4 Triangle Head 5 Size Screwdriver Set) #1 Phillips head screwdriver Mini needle nose pliers Mini wire cutter 25 watt taper point soldering iron Desolder bulb, wick, or tool 60/40 Tin/Lead rosin core solder Parts Required: .02µf 25v to 100v ceramic or polyester film capacitor 68k 1/4-watt resistor (blue-gray-orange) Disassembly: Lay some newspaper or a towel on the work surface. Have a container handy to keep the small screws and parts from getting lost. Remove the crumb tray (which makes 2 tabs on the plastic base that slip under the shell lip more visible). Lay the toaster upside down on the work surface. Using the TA23 screwdriver, remove the tiny black screw from the bottom of the chrome pop-up lever knob. Insert a tool slightly larger than the TA23 screwdriver into the screw hole (the TA27 driver if you have it) and push the black plastic insert out of the chrome portion of the pop-up lever knob to free the knob from the metal lever. Slip the knob off the metal pop-up lever. Remove the 4 triangle head screws which attach the black plastic base to the metal shell. Separate and lift the metal shell off the plastic base noting the 2 tabs that were under the crumb tray and the 4 metal tabs at the ends of the toaster slots that insert into small slots on top of the inner metal cage. Disconnect the 4-wire cable small white nylon connector connected to the browning control circuit board attached to the toaster shell. Completely separate the base and inner cage from the outer metal shell and set aside the base. Using the #1 Phillips screwdriver, remove the 2 broad head screws securing the insulation board to the browning control circuit board attached to the outer metal shell. Remove the 4 Phillips screws securing the browning control circuit board. Turn the browning control to an extreme so that you can easily realign it on reassembly. Lift up and slip the browning control circuit board from out behind the browning control knob and push buttons (the knob and buttons remain in place and do not have to be removed). Modifications: Desolder and remove the 390k resistor (orange-white-yellow) labelled R6 (no replacement needed). Desolder and remove the 180k resistor (brown-gray-yellow) labelled R5. Replace R5 with a 68k 1/4-watt resistor (blue-gray-orange). Locate capacitor C3 (.033µf) which is numbered 2A333J. Turn the circuit board over and on the back side solder a .02µf 25v to 100v ceramic or polyester film capacitor across the two C3 capacitor connections keeping the .02µf capacitor flat against the circuit board and trimming off excess leads. Reassembly: Before reassembling, take a look at the pop-up lever spring mechanism and make sure the small metal plate beneath the lever properly aligns with the electromagnet arms when lowered. If skewed, twist the the metal plate until it is properly aligned (the plate in my toaster was skewed at the factory which caused a glitch preventing the pop-up lever from latching when first testing the toaster out of the box). Reverse the steps used in disassembly. Be sure to reconnect the 4-wire connecter, use the 2 broad head screws for the insulator board, and carefully align and insert the 4 outer metal shell tabs into the inner metal cage slots. Make sure you properly align the small notch in the black plastic insert with metal pop-up lever notch before pressing it back into the chrome portion of the pop-up knob. Do not over-tighten the triangle head screws, especially the tiny black screw in the pop-up knob (tighten just enough to bottom-out the screw heads). Testing: Make sure all functions still work (you don't need bread in the toaster to test). Get a watch and time the toasting cycles at "1" and "6" settings both in hot and cold conditions (give the toaster plenty of time to cool to the touch for cold testing). At "1" you should get about 32 sec hot and 1 min 23 sec cold. At "6" you should get about 4 min 25 sec hot and 5 min 35 sec cold. Pressing the "Defrost" button will add additional time. SOURCES Prime Grains Inc. http://www.primegrains.com/about-us.htm Variation of Mucilage Content in the Flaxseed Coat; Diederichsen A, Raney JP, Duguid SD; Saskatchewan Flax Grower Oct 2003 Vol 5 No 1 https://saskflax.com/quadrant/media/Pdfs/Newsletters/flaxfall03.pdf Variation of mucilage in flax seed and its relationship with other seed characters; Diederichsen A, Raney JP, Duguid SD; Crop Science Feb 2005 Vol 46 No 1, p 365-371 https://dl.sciencesocieties.org/publications/cs/abstracts/46/1/365 Selection for increased seed mucilage content in yellow mustard; J Philip Raney and Gerhard FW Rakow; (Describes method used for determining mucilage content in seed); The Regional Institute, Online Publications http://www.regional.org.au/au/gcirc/4/79.htm Farmer Direct Co-op http://www.farmerdirect.coop/ USA Pan 13x4x4 Large Pullman Loaf Pan & Cover 1160PM-1 https://www.usapan.com/13-x-4-x-4-large-pullman-loaf-pan-and-cover-1160pm Chicago Metallic 44615 Pullman pan,single 13x4x4 https://www.bundybakingsolutions.com/product/44615/ Konjac Glucomannan Powder http://www.konjacfoods.com/product/1.htm The Gluten-Free-Bread Baking-with-Psyllium-Husks-Powder Test by Annalise Roberts http://mygluten-freetable.com/2014/04/the-gluten-free-bread-baking-with-psyllium-husks-powder-test/ Fundamental Study on the Impact of Gluten-Free Starches on the Quality of Gluten-Free Model Breads; Horstmann SW, Belz MC, Heitmann M, Zannini E, Arendt EK; Foods. 2016 Apr 21;5(2) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5302342/pdf/foods-05-00030.pdf Strange Grains Gluten Free Bakery https://www.strangegrainsbakery.com.au/gluten-free-bread-perth Technological Properties of Pea and Buckwheat Flours and Their Blends; Ilze Beitane, Gita Krumina-Zemture, Martins Sabovics; Latvia University of Agriculture Research for Rural Development 2015, Annual 21st International Scientific Conference Proceedings Vol 1, p 137-42 http://llufb.llu.lv/conference/Research-for-Rural-Development/2015/LatviaResearchRuralDevel21st_volume1-137-142.pdf Northern Pulse Grower Association Pea Flour Brochure http://www.northernpulse.com/uploads\resources\661\pulse-flour-brochure.pdf USA Dry Pea & Lentil Council Brochures https://www.usapulses.org/brochures Non-gluten proteins as structure forming agents in gluten free bread; Ziobro R, Juszczak L, Witczak M, Korus J; J Food Sci Technol. 2016 Jan;53(1):571-80 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4711467/pdf/13197_2015_Article_2043.pdf Ripple Foods Pea Milk https://www.ripplefoods.com/ Crux Toasters http://www.cruxkitchen.com/crux_toaster_2slice.php Bella Pro-Series Toasters https://bellahousewares.com/products-bella/?taxonomy=productscategories&term=pro-series Bella Ultimate-Elite Toasters https://bellahousewares.com/products-bella/ultimate-elite-collection-2-slice-digital-toaster/ Williams Sonoma Open Kitchen Toaster https://www.williams-sonoma.com/products/willaims-sonoma-open-kitchen-2-slice-stainless-steel-toaster/ Nesco T1000 2-Slice Toaster http://www.nesco.com/products/Small-Appliances/Toasters/TWO-SLICE-TOASTER-THUNDER-GREY/ MCU CMS12530 toaster controller chip (in chinese) http://mcu.com.cn/uploads/file/2015/20150819163253_26043.pdf Pericom PT8A2514A toaster controller chip https://www.diodes.com/assets/Datasheets/PT8A2514A.pdf
  6. Celiac.com 03/08/2019 - How many times have you gone out to dinner and tried to find a gluten-free meal that wouldn't make you sick? How many times have you eaten that gluten-free meal, only to think, "gee, I wouldn't feed this to my dog?" This leads to the question, do restaurants that serve gluten-free menu items taste test their offerings? If not, why not? Why do they think that people with gluten-intolerance or celiac disease want to eat cardboard? These and other questions continue to baffle me. There are a few things that restaurants could do better. The gluten-free wave is sweeping the nation. Restaurants need to learn how to swim, or be swept away with the tide. These are some of my pet peeves when it comes to dining out gluten-free. Running out of gluten free items, such as hamburger rolls or bread It is really easy to buy really good packaged gluten-free hamburger buns or bread. How many times have you been told that the only gluten-free offering is a lettuce wrap? Really? If I want to eat salad, I will order salad! Offering inedible gluten-free items Have you ever had a really awful gluten-free muffin in a restaurant, or for that matter, on a cruise ship? I am sure that if the kitchen staff tried these stale pieces of sawdust, they would not want to eat them. Why do they think someone with celiac disease or gluten-intolerance would? Trying and Failing to do it themselves (especially with dessert) Believe me, I really do appreciate the effort a chef makes to give me a gluten-free dessert other than sorbet or a fruit plate. I had a wonderful experience on a cruise a few years ago. The chef attempted to make me a gluten and dairy free cake (I am also dairy intolerant). It was really great. Unfortunately, they waited until the last night of the cruise, and I could only eat one piece of it. But I have to admit, by that time I was really tired of eating fruit plates. It's not that difficult to buy a ready made gluten-free cake, cookie or muffin mix and give us some options. Removing the "offending" gluten-free items until there's nothing left How many times have you ordered a wonderful sounding dish, only to receive a pale, gluten-free comparison? Believe me, before I go out to eat, I study the allergen menu really closely and try to find something that will not be entirely ruined if it is made gluten-free. I am not always successful. Sometimes the chef goes overboard in the interest of caution, and removes everything that could "possibly" contain anything remotely containing gluten. What I get is a tasteless shadow of the original dish, and resounding disappointment. I don't order certain items, like crab cakes, because even though gluten-free breadcrumbs actually exist, it wouldn't occur to the chef to try to use them. Improperly trained staff I am sure you have all seen the eye-roll and the deer in the headlights look of waitstaff who panic, or sneer at the mere mention that you are gluten-free. Nor do they have a clue about menu items that might contain gluten. It might be obvious to those of us who live this life everyday, but the waitstaff and kitchen staff don't seem to know. It is imperative that waitstaff and kitchen staff know what contains gluten, and what does not. I can't even count how many times I have gotten sick because I was told something was "fine". Cross-contamination with gluten-containing foods If you think your restaurant has a dedicated area to handle your gluten-free meal, you might be sadly mistaken. Using the same fryer, using the same pasta water, using the same utensils; these are just some of the things that are going on in the kitchen. It is far easier for a busy kitchen staff to take shortcuts than to properly prepare a gluten-free meal. I have also noticed that the attention to detail goes up with the price-tag of the meal in question. You are likely to get more attention in a fine-dining restaurant than in a small mom and pop owned one. Of course, there are exceptions to this rule. You are also more likely to get "glutened" on a busy night, as opposed to a slow one. In Conclusion I know in my heart that as the numbers of gluten-intolerant diners grows, so will the improvement of our collective dining experience. My love for dining out has waned since I became gluten-intolerant. I find I can make better food at home. I know this is not an option for everyone. But why should gluten-free be a tradeoff?
  7. If you like Vegemite, you’re likely Australian, or some sort of culinary oddball. Until now, you very likely did not have celiac disease. That’s because Vegemite was simply not gluten-free. Those days are over. In what is sure to be great news for Australians with celiac disease, and culinary oddballs everywhere, that only-in-Australia favorite is finally going gluten-free, and due on store shelves in a flash. A tweet from the company reads: “Happy little Vegemites rejoice! Australia’s favourite spread is now available in Gluten Free! 🙌 The same great taste you love, now gluten free, FODMAP friendly and @CoeliacAust approved. ✅ Coming soon to a store near you! #TastesLikeAustralia #Vegemite #GlutenFreeVegemite” The company confirmed that the product is the result of two years of product development. Nearly one in four Australians currently avoids gluten in their diets, so the company behind the Australia’s culinary delight said it felt an obligation to develop the gluten-free version afters thousands of requests from fans. The company promises Gluten-Free Vegemite will have the same great taste Vegemite fans crave. Go ahead, do your victory dance.
  8. Celiac.com 02/25/2019 - Even when following a gluten-free diet, many people with celiac disease occasionally ingest small amounts of gluten in food. However, researchers don’t have much good data on how that plays out in real life. Testing patient stool and urine is an excellent way to measure the frequency of gluten exposure in celiac patients who are on a gluten-free diet. To get a better picture, a team of researchers recently set out to explore the pattern of fecal and urinary excretion of gluten immunogenic peptide (GIP) during a 4-week period in celiac patients on a long-term gluten-free diet. The research team included Juan P Stefanolo; Martín Tálamo; Samanta Dodds; Emilia Sugai; Paz Temprano; Ana Costa, Ana; María Laura Moreno; María Inés Pinto Sanchez; Edgardo Smecuol; Horacio Vázquez; Andrea F Gonzalez; Sonia I Niveloni; Elena F Verdu; Eduardo Mauriño; and Julio C Bai. They are variously affiliated with the Dr. C. Bonorino Udaondo Gastroenterology Hospital, Buenos Aires, Argentina, Argentina.; the Farncombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute, McMaster University Health Sciences Centre, Hamilton, ON, Canada; and with the Research Institutes at the Universidad del Salvador, Buenos Aires, Argentina. For their descriptive and prospective study, the team enrolled consecutive adult celiac patients who had been following a gluten-free diet for more than two years. All participants filled out a celiac symptom index (CSI) questionnaire to document related symptoms. Patients collected stool and urine samples for 4 weeks. The team designed the collection protocol to measure gluten excretion during week-days and week-ends. For GIP detection, the team used ELISA test for stool (iVYLISA GIP-S ®, Biomedal S.L. Spain) and point-of-care tests (GlutenDetect ®; Biomedal S.L., Spain) for urine. The team found that, regardless of symptoms, celiac patients on a long-term gluten-free diet frequently ingested gluten, especially on weekends. The steady increase in GIP over the month-long study indicate that people may be less vigilant about eating gluten-free, especially on weekends. This study indicates that many people with celiac disease are lowering their vigilance, and accidentally or deliberately eating gluten, whether or not they have symptoms. These results drive home the importance of constant vigilance for people with celiac disease. Source: Digestive Disease Week 2019
  9. Celiac.com 03/09/2019 - Spring is a great time for root vegetables, and Brussels sprouts are a regular favorite. A little red wine vinegar helps these Brussels sprouts turn a corner. Pecans and Parmesan do the rest. Enjoy! Ingredients: 1 cup pecans, broken 1 pound Brussels sprouts, cleaned and cut in half 2-3 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil, plus extra 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar ½ cup grated Parmesan Kosher salt and pepper to taste Directions: Heat oven to 350˚F. Toast the pecans on a sheet tray for about 5-6 minutes. Set aside. Increase oven temperature to 450˚F. Toss Brussels sprouts in a bowl with olive oil, and season with salt and pepper. Spread on sheet tray and roast about 20 minutes until fork-tender and some outer leaves caramelize and char. Let sprouts cool, and then toss with pecans. Drizzle with red wine vinegar and olive oil, and season with salt and pepper. Sprinkle with Parmesan cheese and serve.
  10. Celiac.com 02/16/2019 - Despite having the word 'wheat' in its name, pure buckwheat is gluten-free and safe for people with celiac disease. These light, fluffy, delicious buckwheat pancakes are a celebration of really good gluten-free cooking. They are sure to disappear at breakfast and leave lots of happy eaters in their wake. Ingredients: ¾ cup buckwheat flour ¾ cup almond flour (in a pinch, use all-purpose gluten-free flour, or just use all buckwheat flour) 3 tablespoons sugar ½ teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon baking soda 3 tablespoons butter, melted 1 egg 1-2 cups buttermilk* ½ cup pecans, chopped, optional 1 tablespoon maple syrup, more to serve the pancakes Instructions: In a large bowl, whisk together flours, sugar, salt, baking soda. Pour the melted butter over the dry ingredients and start stirring. Beat the egg with a fork and stir it into half of the buttermilk. Add the buttermilk/egg mixture to the dry ingredients. Slowly add in the rest of the buttermilk,* maple syrup and vanilla, and mix until the batter is desired thickness. Try to err on the thick side, and thin with buttermilk as needed. *Note: If you don’t have any buttermilk on hand, you can make 1 cup of buttermilk substitute by adding 1 tablespoon of lemon juice or white vinegar to 1 cup of whole milk. You’ll need up to 2 cups for these pancakes. Make batter to desired thickness. Ladle about ¼ cup batter at a time onto an oiled, medium-hot griddle. Cook about 1-2 minutes until bubbles are well-formed around edges of pancakes, and bottom is desired brownness. Turn and cook other side, about 1-2 minutes until done. Serve with butter, and warm maple syrup. Note: Pecans make a delightful addition to these pancakes. Either add them to the batter, or serve them warm with finished pancakes.
  11. Celiac.com 02/23/2019 - Early in the 1990s, a food craze started called the wrap. Instead of using bread to make sandwiches, flat bread, tortillas, and even large lettuce leaves were used to hold sandwich fillings. It started simply enough with the burrito. Imagine, a cylinder-shaped sandwich you could hold in your hand… and then the craze blossomed to include almost every kind of filling imaginable. Whether you use corn tortillas, rice flour tortillas, teff and millet tortillas, or homemade tortillas, and whether you opt to slice the filled roll in half for lunch or cut it into thin slices for an appetizer, wraps are delicious. If you use soaked rice papers, wrap the completed sandwich in a damp paper towel then in wax paper to keep it moist until lunchtime. Wraps are also eye candy because you can see all the different layers and colors hiding inside. A wrap can be made with hot or cold fillings Three components are usually used to create the filling. First, there’s a spread (hummus, guacamole, salsa, refried beans, or cream cheese for example) which is topped with something extra (sautéed mushrooms and onions, bacon, cheese, shredded lettuce, julienned veggies) and a hearty filling (lunchmeat, tuna fish, grilled chicken, roast beef, etc.) Rolling the sandwich has become an art. Before you start, warm the wrap slightly so it will be softer and easier to roll. Start with a large 8 or 10 inch tortilla. Wrap it in a damp paper towel and warm it in the microwave for a few moments to soften. When spreading the filling, leave a 1-inch border around the edge so the filling doesn’t ooze out when you roll it. Once the wrap has been filled, begin rolling one side until the entire sandwich has been rolled. If you want to make sure the filling doesn’t slip out, after filling the tortilla, fold the bottom edge (about 2 inches) of the tortilla closest to you over the filling then fold in the sides; now roll the tortilla away from you to form a package. Don’t over-fill the wrap or it won’t roll. The best things about wraps (beside the fact that you can fill them with just about anything) are that they’re pretty, economical, and taste great. Fillings can be as plain or elaborate as you choose You can fill a wrap with peanut butter and bananas for a quick breakfast for the kids… or slather it with dilled mayonnaise before layering it with steamed salmon and capers. They’re perfect to serve at tailgate parties and they’re easy to pack in lunch bags. Wraps are so easy to assemble that kids can make their own. Set out a spread, one or two fillings, and let them create their own masterpieces. The great part about sending wraps in a lunch bag is that there’s no bread to get soggy. If the children are really small, slice the wrap into thin slices to create colorful pinwheels that will fit easily into their little hands. If you’re assembling your wrap to eat right now, brown the filled roll in a lightly oiled skillet over medium heat so it browns and crisps just a little; this adds another degree of flavor. If your creation is to be eaten later, wrap it in wax paper, twisting the ends of the paper. At lunchtime, either unwrap it and eat it as is or microwave it for 1-1/2 minutes to warm the filling. Taco wraps are the favorites of most people Spread the tortilla with refried beans. Add a layer of guacamole or thinly-sliced avocados. Next, layer a little cooked Spanish rice, taco-seasoned cooked ground beef or thin chicken slices, shredded lettuce, chopped tomato or salsa, and shredded cheddar cheese. A few dollops of sour cream may be warranted, too. Again, just put a very small amount of each item or you’ll have trouble wrapping the filled tortilla. Cold wraps can include a multitude of ingredients including roasted red peppers, thin pickle slices, tuna or chicken salad, cold salmon, slices of lunchmeat, shredded lettuce, sliced hardboiled eggs, sliced cheese or crumbled feta or blue cheese, thin tomato or cucumber slices, Dressings or spreads can be any creamy salad dressing, hummus, plain or flavored cream cheese, or even just mayonnaise or mustard. Hot wraps can be filled with julienned sautéed veggies, BBQ shredded pork, beef or chicken, shredded cheese, caramelized onions, or baked beans with slices of sausage. Make an Asian wrap with sautéed beef strips and veggies and some steamed or refried rice. Take your favorite food and convert it to a wrap. This includes BLT, hero sandwich, sloppy joes, chicken Caesar salad, cobb or chef’s salad, Asian stir-fry… almost anything can be wrapped in a tortilla. Wraps offer versatility for vegetarians Fill the wrap with grilled veggies and cheese, refried beans with sharp cheddar cheese and avocados, sautéed mushrooms with onions and zucchini slices, egg salad, artichoke hearts with feta cheese and thinly-sliced tomatoes, hummus with pepper cheese and roasted red peppers, or pesto with mozzarella cheese and tomato slices. And wraps aren’t just for lunches. Scramble eggs with chopped green pepper and onion for breakfast then spoon it onto a wrap – add some chopped ham or cooked sausage if you like. Spread a wrap with apricot jam then a layer of yogurt; top with a drizzle of honey, toasted almonds, and a little cereal (gluten-free Chex cereal). Make a Tex-Mex breakfast by drizzling hot or medium/hot salsa over scrambled eggs then sprinkle with sharp cheddar cheese before rolling. Let’s not forget dessert. For dessert, spread a tortilla with softened cream cheese and canned pie filling then roll. Or use peanut butter for the spread and top with raisins and chopped apple. If you really want to be decadent, fill the wrap with sliced bananas, mini chocolate chips and miniature marshmallows then warm it in the microwave and top it off with a scoop of ice cream. Antipasto Lettuce Wraps by Connie Sarros This recipe is from the book Gluten-free Cooking for Dummies Belgium endive leaves were created to hold stuff. They’re naturally boat-shaped and beg for a filling. You can eat these wraps right away, but they’re even better if you cover and refrigerate the filling for a few hours to allow the flavors to blend. Total preparation time is 6 minutes. Ingredients: 2 tablespoons olive oil 2 tablespoons cider vinegar ¼ teaspoon garlic powder 1/8 teaspoon pepper ¾ teaspoon dried oregano 1 small onion, minced ¼ green pepper, chopped 3 roasted red peppers, sliced thin 6.5-ounce can tuna fish, drained 2 ounces pizza pepperoni slices, halved 6-ounce jar marinated artichokes, drained and cut in half 8 Belgium endive leaves Directions: In a medium bowl, whisk together the oil, vinegar, garlic powder, pepper, and oregano. Add the onion, green pepper, red peppers, tuna fish, pepperoni, and artichokes and stir to blend. Spoon the mixture into 8 endive leaves to form a boat sandwich. Yield: 4 servings.
  12. Celiac.com 07/21/2018 - These easy-to-make tortilla wraps make a great addition to your lunchtime menu. Simply grab your favorite gluten-free tortillas, a bit of cream cheese, some charred fresh sweet corn, creamy avocado and ripe summer tomato. Add a bit of sliced roast beef and some mayonnaise and hot sauce, and you’re in business. And it's all ready in about half an hour. If you cook the corn the night before, they can be ready in just a few minutes. Ingredients: 12 ounces thinly sliced cooked beef, sliced 6 burrito-sized gluten-free tortillas 1 ripe medium avocado, diced 1 large tomato, diced ½ medium red onion, thinly sliced ¼ cup mayonnaise 2 ears sweet corn, husks and silk removed 1 teaspoon olive oil ¾ cup soft cream cheese spread 1-2 teaspoons gluten-free hot sauce of choice Sprouted pea greens, as desired fresh salsa, as desired Directions: Heat grill to medium-hot. Brush corn with olive oil. In a small dish, blend mayonnaise and hot sauce. Adjust mixture, and add fresh salsa, as desired. Grill corn for 8 to 12 minutes, turning as it browns and lowering heat as needed until corn is tender and charred in some places. Cool slightly; cut kernels from cobs. Spread 2 tablespoons cream cheese on one side of each tortilla to within ½-inch of edge; arrange beef slices to cover. Spread beef with mayonnaise hot sauce mixture as desired. Place a bit of grilled corn kernels, avocado, tomato and red onion in a 3-inch strip along one edge of each tortilla. Fold ends and roll into a burrito shape, and serve. I like to add sweet, crunchy pea greens for some extra crunch and nutrition. Note: If you like, you can heat tortillas in advance. You can even put a little butter on them, and lightly brown them in the pan first, as shown in the picture.
  13. Celiac.com 02/27/2019 - To avoid the chronic inflammation, discomfort and damage associated with celiac disease, celiac patients need to follow a strict, lifelong gluten-free diet. That can be a challenge for teens and young adults, as shown by a number of earlier studies. Some studies have indicated that the challenge of following a gluten-free diet can cause stress and raise the risk for disordered eating behavior in some people. Teens and young adults with disordered eating behaviors face a greater risk of developing full-blown eating disorders. To better understand the issues involved, a team of researchers recently set out to assess the incidence and risk factors for disordered eating behaviors among individuals with celiac disease, and to examine a connection between a gluten-free diet and disordered eating behaviors. The Israeli research team included Itay Tokatly Latzer, Liat Lerner-Geva, Daniel Stein, Batia Weiss, and Orit Pinhas-Hamiel. For their Level V, cross-sectional descriptive study, the team submitted a personal and dietary survey that included questions on gender, age, weight, disease duration, along with two self-rating questionnaires that assessed disordered eating behaviors and adherence to a gluten-free diet: the Eating Attitudes Test-26 and the gluten-free diet questionnaire. They collected a total of 136 responses from celiac disease patients. They found in 7% of male and nearly 20% of female subjects. In general, patients who experienced disordered eating were overweight, older, and female. About one in three patients reported strict adherence to a gluten-free diet, independent of age, disease duration, age at diagnosis of celiac disease, or being overweight. According to this data, a significant number of adolescents with celiac disease experience disordered eating patterns, especially those who are overweight, older and female. Extra attention to this issue might help to disrupt these patterns and to prevent them from becoming worse in the future. Read more at Eating and Weight Disorders - Studies on Anorexia, Bulimia and Obesity
  14. Celiac.com 02/26/2019 - Researchers don't have much good information on gastrointestinal (GI) hormone response as it relates to appetite and glucose metabolism in celiac patients. To get some answers, a team of researchers recently set out to assess appetite sensation, glycaemia and hormone response induced by a complex meal in patients with celiac disease. The research team included Paola Vitaglione, Fabiana Zingone, Nicolina Virgilio, and Carolina Ciacci. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Agricultural Sciences, University of Naples “Federico II," in Portici, Italy; the Department of Surgery, Oncology, and Gastroenterology, University of Padua, in Padua, Italy; and the Department of Medicine, Surgery, and Dentistry, “Scuola Medica Salernitana” University of Salerno, in Fisciano, Italy. For their single day intervention study, the team enrolled twenty-two women with celiac disease, nine at celiac diagnosis (CeDD), thirteen celiacs following a gluten-free diet (CeDGF), and ten healthy subjects. For the study, each subject ate a gluten-free test meal, recorded their appetite sensations, and gave a blood specimen more than three hours after eating. The after meal data showed less hunger reduction in celiac patients, compared to gluten-free celiacs and healthy subjects. Reported fullness and satiety was about the same for all three groups. The diagnosed celiac group showed lower insulin and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) than the gluten-free celiac group the healthy control subjects. Both the diagnosed celiac group and the gluten-free celiac group showed a lower glucose response post-eating than healthy subjects. The results of this study suggest that people with celiac disease have glucose absorption problems, even after more than a year on a gluten-free diet. Increases in postprandial glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) may play a significant role in appetite cues and insulin response to a complex gluten-free meal. The takeaway here is that whether they are eating gluten-free or not, people with celiac disease show a lower glucose response after meals than healthy subjects. Moreover, celiacs who are not gluten-free show less hunger reduction after gluten-free meals than gluten-free celiacs and healthy subjects. Celiac disease definitely influences appetite and gastrointestinal hormone response to a gluten-free meal, but more and larger studies are needed to better understand the implications of these findings. Read more at: Nutrients, 2019 Jan; 11(1): 82. doi: 10.3390/nu11010082
  15. Celiac.com 02/04/2019 - With the rise in popularity of the gluten-free diet, and with more people being diagnosed with Celiac disease, more restaurants are offering gluten-free alternatives. While this is a great advancement, it’s important to note that not all gluten-free restaurant choices are created equal. Even if food is labelled “gluten-free,” the risk of cross-contamination could still be high, especially given the speed with which food is prepared. We see a lot of questions about gluten-free and gluten-safe fast food. One especially prominent question was “Is Burger King gluten-free?” The answer to that is that there is almost nothing gluten-free or gluten-safe at Burger King. There are far better options than Burger King in the otherwise bleak gluten-free landscape of American fast food. In fact, if you want reliable gluten-free and gluten-safe options, you’ll probably want to get beyond Burger King and McDonald’s. After a bit of research, these are the best, most reliable fast-food chains with gluten-free options we know about: Chipotle As long as you skip the four tortillas, Chipotle is a solid gluten-free choice. Chipotle’s burrito bowl allows you to choose from rice, meat, beans, and numerous gluten-free fixings. The tortilla chips salsa and guacamole are gluten-free. With numerous locations nationwide, Chipotle is a solid option for gluten-free diners looking for safe, reliable gluten-free fast food. Panera Bread You might not think it to look at the name, but Panera Bread offers a number of “gluten-friendly” options, mainly soups and salads, as long as you skip the croutons and the bread. Note that they changed their offerings from “gluten-free” to “gluten-friendly” due to the risk of cross-contamination, and their Web site indicates that their offering are not safe for celiacs. Panera’s gluten-friendly options include delicious options like the Greek Salad, Fuji Apple Salad, Modern Greek Salad with Quinoa, Strawberry Poppyseed Salad with Chicken, Baked Potato Soup, Black Bean Soup, Greek Yogurt with Mixed Berries, and many of their steel cut oatmeal dishes. For desert, Panera offers gluten-friendly triple chocolate cookie with walnuts and a coconut macaroon. If you decide to eat there make sure you’re very clear while placing your order that you need your meal to be gluten-free. Wendy’s Wendy’s burgers are gluten-free when made without the bun, and you can also get several of their salads without the chicken or the croutons. Wendy’s famous chili and their baked potatoes and toppings are also a safe bet. The Frosty is gluten-free, too. Wendy’s has more and better gluten-free options than most major burger chains, and information about cross-contamination on their website shows that they understand gluten-free cooking. In’N’Out Burger In’N’Out is a family run California burger chain with a die-hard fan base. In’N’Out offers burgers, fries, shakes and drinks. That’s it. They make their fries fresh from scratch and will make any burger “Protein-style,” that’s lettuce-wrapped without a bun. As burger chains go, In’N’Out is a reliable stop for many gluten-free Californians. Basically, their buns are the only gluten in the joint. Their open kitchen allows you to watch as they prepare your order. Five Guys Like In’N’Out, Five Guys is likely a bit safer than other burger chains, simply because it uses very few products that contain gluten. There are no breaded items it Five Guys, and Five Guys’ burgers, fries, and hot dogs, and nearly all toppings, are gluten-free, just make sure you skip the bun, the malt vinegar, and the fry sauce. Five Guys milkshakes are gluten-free, too, just watch out for the Oreo cookie pieces, the malted milk, and cherry milkshake mix-ins. Popeyes Louisiana Kitchen The only gluten-free options at Popeyes are side dishes. But, their gluten-free side options are not bad, and include their Cajun rice, red beans and rice, coleslaw, and corn on the cob. Subway Subway tested gluten-free buns and toyed with rolling out guaranteed gluten-free offerings, but then pulled back. Subway still offers gluten-free rolls at branches in Oregon and Washington state. Subway does offer salad version of many of their classic subs, like the spicy Italian Salad. Chili's Chili's isn’t a fast food chain, but a casual dining restaurant with popular take-out options. Chili’s does offer gluten-free patrons an allergen/vegetarian fact sheet and separate gluten-free menu. Chili's bone-in buffalo wings, bottomless tostada chips, and fresh guacamole are all gluten-free. Chili’s does warn diners that cross-contamination is possible, and advises that they consult a manager before ordering. Do you have a favorite gluten-free or gluten-safe fast food restaurant that we’ve missed? Share your thoughts below. Read more at Thrillist.com, and Thedailynutrition.com
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