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Found 2,292 results

  1. Celiac.com 12/14/2018 - As the popularity of gluten- and allergen-free foods have exploded, so has the list of manufacturers rushing new products to market. Several studies have shown that numerous restaurant and commercial foods labeled as ‘gluten-free’ contain unacceptable gluten levels. Meanwhile, other news has revealed that many supermarket products labeled gluten-free in fact contain unacceptable levels of wheat. Now, news in from the UK says that manufacturers were forced to recall sixty-eight products linked to potentially lethal allergies or food intolerances due to being improper labeling. There have been several cases of accidental exposure to allergens causing death. Partly as a result, a renewed diligence among grocers and manufacturers has led to a number of product recalls. Recalled products include yogurt, salad dressing, supermarket croissants, biscuits and cottage pies. The figures suggest that companies may have supply, formulation, and/or manufacturing issues that leave them out of touch with the ingredients in their products. Recent major product recalls in the UK include: Sainsbury's in-store bakery All Butter Croissant recalled over undeclared almonds. Quorn’s recall packs of Gluten Free Burgers due to undeclared gluten. M&S’s recall of Gluten Free Scotch Eggs due to undeclared gluten. Mary Berry's Salad Dressing’s recall due to undeclared egg. Tesco’s recall of Hearty Food Company Cottage Pie and Hearty Food Company Sausage and Mash due to undeclared milk. Tim Lang, professor of food policy at City, University of London, said: "The recent deaths ought to be a wake-up call. Labeling is not working and confidence is falling. This is not a good state of affairs." The Food & Drink Federation (FDF), which speaks for manufacturers, said that, under UK regulations, “If a pre-packed food or drink product contains any of the 14 food allergens it must be declared and emphasized within the ingredients list.” The FDF advises that "In the unlikely event that once a product has shipped, a business discovers that this labeling has not been done correctly, it is their responsibility to inform the Food Standards Agency and immediately recall the product." The British Retail Consortium, which speaks for the major chains, said: "Supermarkets are fully aware of how crucial allergen labeling is. That's why in the small number of cases where an ingredient is not correctly labeled, retailers withdraw the product and notify the FSA." With numerous studies, products recalls, and news stories calling attention to the problem of gluten contamination in gluten-free food, look for retailers and manufacturers to take a more aggressive role in policing their labels, if only to escape the action of regulators and litigators.
  2. 12/13/2018 - Is wine gluten-free? Wine Spectator recently weighed in on gluten and wine. The article is worth a read, and there’s a link at the bottom of this page. Meantime, here’s a quick rundown of the basics of wine and gluten. Wine is generally regarded as gluten-free and safe for people with celiac disease and other gluten-related sensitivities. That said, there are a couple of ways that wine could come to contain gluten; but they are mostly due to old and discontinued wine making practices. First, in the old days, barrel makers used to seal barrels with with wheat paste, which contains gluten. Wine aged in these barrels could contain trace amounts of gluten. However, these days, nearly every winery in the world now uses non-gluten-based wax products to seal their barrels. Even if barrels commonly contained wheat paste, a 2012 test run by Tricia Thompson, founder of GlutenFreeWatchdog.org, found that gluten levels of two different wines finished in wheat paste–sealed barrels contained under 5ppm gluten—thus meeting the FDA gluten-free standard. So, that method of possible contact with gluten is unlikely to be a problem for most people with celiac disease or a medical gluten-sensitivity. Another way wine could be exposed to gluten is if wheat gluten is used for a process called ‘fining.’ However, these days, the use of wheat gluten in fining is practically nonexistent. And even if wheat gluten were used for fining, it is unlikely to be an issue. A 2011 study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry found that wines fined with gluten contained either extremely low, or undetectable, levels of gluten. Furthermore, "even if any traces of gluten would accidentally enter a wine—let's say the winemaker falls into a tank holding a whole-wheat sandwich—as a protein, gluten would react with [wine's] phenolics," said Dr. Christian Butzke, a professor of enology at Purdue University. So, the vast majority of wines are gluten-free and likely safe for with celiac disease or a medical gluten-sensitivity. One thing for consumers to watch for is any wine or wine product that contains added colors or flavors, or that is made from barley malt, such as bottled wine coolers," says Marilyn Geller, CEO of the nonprofit Celiac Disease Foundation. Bottom line: Check the label. If the product is a straight red or white or rosé wine, then it is almost certainly gluten-free. Watch out for coolers or wine with added ingredients. Read labels. If you still have questions, do not hesitate to contact the winery directly. Read more at: WINESPECTATOR.COM
  3. Celiac.com 12/12/2018 - In a step that health officials say could provide immediate relief to the estimated eight million Indians who suffer from celiac disease, the Indian government is assessing a plan to require drugmakers to declare any gluten ingredients on medical labels. India’s chief drug advisory body will discuss the issue at its meeting scheduled in early December, said people with knowledge of the plan. The Drug Technical Advisory Board’s decision to address the issue of gluten-free labels for drugs and medicine comes on the heels of an active recommendation by the department of physical medicine and rehabilitation at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS). In addition to clear gluten-warnings on all medical labels, experts at AIIMS have proposed changing the law to force drug makers to actively avoid gluten-containing ingredients in drugs or medicine. The proposal aligns with guidelines drafted by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2017. Those guidelines call for drug makers to properly label medications that contain gluten. The FDA also recommends that drug makers include a voluntary statement that indicates that the product contains no gluten, or any ingredient made from wheat, barley, or rye. Proper labeling of drugs and medicines is getting a great deal of attention from regulatory bodies over the last couple of years. Look for that trend to continue and for new guidelines to drive new labeling practices for medicines containing gluten ingredients. Overall, this is an extremely positive development for anyone with celiac disease or a medical gluten-sensitivity. Until such new guidelines make it to the pharmacy, be sure to check with your pharmacist about any drug or medicine you think might contain gluten. They are in a strong position to help, and can usually get answers to such questions. Lastly, stay tuned for more news on the official labeling decision by India's Drug Technical Advisory Board. Read more at: LIVEMINT.COM
  4. Celiac.com 12/10/2018 - More and more people are eating gluten-free for non-medical reasons. These days, people with celiac disease make up a small percentage of overall gluten-free food sales. However, the effects of eliminating or reducing wheat, barley and rye ingredients from the diets of in healthy adults have not been well studied. A team of researchers recently set out to assess the effects of a gluten-free diet in healthy adults. To make their assessment, the researchers conducted a randomized, controlled, cross-over trial of 60 middle-aged Danish adults with no known diseases. The trial included two 8-week assessments comparing a low-gluten diet of 2 grams of gluten per day, and a high-gluten diet of 18 grams of gluten per day, separated by a washout period of at least six weeks with habitual diet including 12 grams of gluten per day. Compared with a high-gluten diet, the data show that a low-gluten diet triggers slight changes in the intestinal microbiome, increases food and drink intake and postprandial hydrogen exhalation, and reduces self-reported bloating. The team’s data indicate that results of a low-gluten diet in non-celiac adults are likely triggered by qualitative changes in dietary fiber. Studies like this are important for understanding the effects of a gluten-free diet in both celiacs and non-celiacs alike. Better understanding of a gluten-free diet will help doctors, celiac patients, and healthy individuals to make better, more informed dietary decisions. Source: Nature Communications; volume 9, Article number: 4630 (2018) The research team included Lea B. S. Hansen, Henrik M. Roager, Nadja B. Søndertoft, Rikke J. Gøbel, Mette Kristensen, Mireia Vallès-Colomer, Sara Vieira-Silva, Sabine Ibrügger, Mads V. Lind, Rasmus B. Mærkedahl, Martin I. Bahl, Mia L. Madsen, Jesper Havelund, Gwen Falony, Inge Tetens, Trine Nielsen, Kristine H. Allin, Henrik L. Frandsen, Bolette Hartmann, Jens Juul Holst, Morten H. Sparholt, Jesper Holck, Andreas Blennow, Janne Marie Moll, Anne S. Meyer, Camilla Hoppe, Jørgen H. Poulsen, Vera Carvalho, Domenico Sagnelli, Marlene D. Dalgaard, Anders F. Christensen, Magnus Christian Lydolph, Alastair B. Ross, Silas Villas-Bôas, Susanne Brix, Thomas Sicheritz-Pontén, Karsten Buschard, Allan Linneberg, Jüri J. Rumessen, Claus T. Ekstrøm, Christian Ritz, Karsten Kristiansen, H. Bjørn Nielsen, Henrik Vestergaard, Nils J. Færgeman, Jeroen Raes, Hanne Frøkiær, Torben Hansen, Lotte Lauritzen, Ramneek Gupta, Tine Rask Licht and Oluf Pedersen. They are variously affiliated with the National Food Institute; the Department of Biotechnology and Biomedicine, Technical University of Denmark; the Department of Bio and Health Informatics; the Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering at the Technical University of Denmark in Lyngby, Denmark; the Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences; the Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports; the Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports; and the Department of Veterinary Disease Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen in Frederiksberg, Denmark; the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark; the Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Copenhagen University Hospital Hvidovre in Hvidovre, Denmark; the Department of Radiology, Bispebjerg Hospital in Copenhagen, Denmark; the Department of Autoimmunology & Biomarkers, Statens Serum Institut in Copenhagen, Denmark; the Department of Biology and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology in Gothenburg, Sweden; the School of Biological Sciences, The University of Auckland in Auckland, New Zealand; the Bartholin Institute, Rigshospitalet in Copenhagen, Denmark; the Research Centre for Prevention and Health, The Capital Region of Denmark in Frederiksberg, Denmark; the Research Unit and Department of Gastroenterology, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, the Capital Region of Denmark in Herlev, Denmark; with Clinical-Microbiomics A/S in Copenhagen, Denmark; the Department of Microbiology and Immunology, KU Leuven–University of Leuven, Rega Institute; and VIB, Center for Microbiology in Leuven, Belgium; with Biostatistics, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen in Copenhagen, Denmark; the Laboratory of Genomics and Molecular Biomedicine, Department of Biology; the Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Basic Metabolic Research; the Department of Radiology, Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark; and the Department of Biomedical Sciences; and the department of Biostatistics at the Department of Public Health at the University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
  5. Celiac.com 12/06/2018 - The growing popularity of gluten-free foods has led to numerous new products for consumers, but it has also led to some problems. One recent study showed that up to one-third of foods sold as gluten-free contain gluten above 20ppm allowed by federal law. Other studies have shown that restaurant food labeled as “gluten-free” is often contaminated with gluten. The problem of gluten in commercial food labeled gluten-free is not isolated to the United States. Recent studies abroad show that the problem exists in nearly every gluten-free market in every country. In Australia, for example, researchers from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute in Melbourne found detectable gluten in almost 3% of 256 commonly purchased “gluten-free” manufactured foods, a study published in the Medical Journal of Australia on Monday says. Furthermore, the study shows that nearly 10% of restaurant dishes sold as "gluten-free" contain unacceptable levels of gluten. Now, the Australians have a stricter standard than nearly anyone else, so look for them to be on top of potential problems with gluten contamination in gluten-free products. The study did not name the food manufacturers responsible for the contaminated products, but did note that better, more frequent gluten testing by manufacturers would make gluten-free foods safer for people with celiac disease. In a related study, the same researchers found in May that nearly one in ten samples of “gluten-free” dishes from restaurants within the City of Melbourne contained gluten levels in excess of the official Food Standards Australia New Zealand definition of gluten-free. “It’s troubling to think that these foods could be hindering the careful efforts of patients trying their best to avoid gluten,” an author of the study, Dr Jason Tye-Din, said. A spokeswoman from Coeliac Australia said the organization was taking the findings seriously. “The research team that conducted this study has liaised with the food companies and is following up the positive samples with further retesting to ensure the issue is resolved,” she said. In addition to urging consumers to be diligent in reading labels, and to report any suspect products, “Coeliac Australia advises all people with coeliac disease to have regular medical check-ups as they do have a serious autoimmune condition and medical assessment is important to determine that their gluten-free diet is going well and no complications are developing.” Read more at: TheGuardian.com
  6. Celiac.com 12/01/2018 - If you’re looking for an easy, yet sure to please dinner, then this simple oven wonder is just what you need. The recipe is a delightful marriage of sizzling sausages, crisp, tender potatoes, and sweet cabbage. A final savory drizzle of brown butter and fried sage leaves seals the union. Ingredients: 4 uncooked gluten-free sausages of choice ¼ cup olive oil 1 small green cabbage (1½ to 1¾-pound), cut in 8 wedges through core 1¼ pounds small Yukon Gold potatoes, halved lengthwise 6 unpeeled garlic cloves, lightly crushed 4 fresh sage sprigs ½ teaspoon kosher salt ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper ¼ cup butter 20 small sage leaves Directions: Heat oven to 425 degrees. In a large bowl, toss cabbage lightly in oil. Lay wedges flat on foil-lined baking sheet, and drawn any excess oil drip back into bowl. Toss potatoes in remaining oil. Place potatoes cut sides down on a second foil-lined baking sheet. Drain any excess oil back into bowl. To each pan, add 3 garlic cloves and 2 sage sprigs seasoned with salt and pepper. Cover pans tightly with foil; roast for 20 minutes. Remove foil from pans. Lightly prick the sausages and toss in remaining oil; add to pan with cabbage. Switch roasting pans to opposite oven racks, and roast for another 15 minutes or so. Turn cabbage, potatoes and bratwurst; Continue roasting another 5 minutes or so, until everything is tender, golden and juicy. Transfer everything to a large platter. In a small skillet, melt butter over medium heat until it begins to foam. Add sage leaves; cook up to 60 seconds until butter is brown and sage is crisp. Spoon butter over everything on the patter.
  7. Celiac.com 11/30/2018 - By day, I am a special education teacher in a large public middle school. I am also the mother of three “children,” ages 27, 21, and 16. Several months after our oldest daughter Jennifer’s diagnosis with celiac disease, I too was diagnosed with it—this following a family screening, then a biopsy. Jen and I both had the good fortune of joining a strong local celiac support group. When we first made vacation plans to go to Disney World, our biggest dilemma was whether to drive to Orlando and save ourselves some money, or to splurge a little and fly. Due to Jennifer’s diagnosis several months before the trip, however, our dilemma had become whether to go at all! As parents of a newly diagnosed celiac we had our own issues to deal with, and after many months of Jennifer being ill, we were all emotionally drained. As her mom, I was determined to show Jennifer (and frankly myself as well) that her life would be “normal,” even without gluten. So began Jennifer’s first sojourn as a celiac. After doing some research I contact the executive chefs at each of the theme parks. At this point I was still naive enough to think that someone at Disney’s central reservations number would know these phone numbers. It took several phone calls to discover that I needed to speak to Disney’s “Special Requests Reservation Person.” Her name was Linda and she magically (no pun intended) began to make things happen. She arranged for a refrigerator to be in the room at no extra charge, provided a brand new, still in the box, unopened toaster, and assisted me in making special gluten-free and lactose-free meal reservations sixty days in advance at full service Disney restaurants. Perhaps most importantly, Linda provided me with the names and numbers of the (mysterious) executive chefs. She also e-mailed the concierge at the Disney resort where we were staying and advised them they needed to get some gluten-free and lactose-free items in stock. However, this was not in place when we arrived—which caused me to make an “unhappy Mouseketeer” phone call. Shortly thereafter someone from guest relations at the resort went to Chamberlain’s and brought gluten-free waffles, cookies, and Lactaid milk directly to our room. So now everything seemed to be in place—well, you know what they say about the best laid plans! As luck would have it, there was a lightning storm in central Florida the day we arrived which resulted in no natural gas for two days. This became an excuse at several locations and a really good way to get me fired up, with or without the gas! I made an early morning call to Brenda, the executive chef at the Magic Kingdom, who seemed genuinely upset at Jennifer’s circumstance. Thankfully the gas crisis was also over at this point. She e-mailed all of the remaining restaurants, even if they were in Epcot or MGM, putting them on a sort of “alert.” Ultimately, this led to several chefs personally contacting either Jennifer or myself, which allowed us to pre-order her meals. Even after this, there were still some rough spots but good help was available. Marianne, the executive chef at MGM, was very helpful after Brenda contacted her. She had done some work with the celiac support group in Orlando, and knew enough to try to coordinate Jennifer’s meals at MGM so there was some variety. Chef Wendy at the Prime Time Cafe was especially thoughtful in her service. Although there is an executive chef at Epcot, the communication was weak and we had a less than pleasant experience trying to arrange for a much awaited gluten-free and lactose-free Mexican meal. Ironically, the restaurant that was the most accommodating also had the least amount of advanced notice, and was the only place Jennifer chose to go to more than once—Spoodles on the Disney Boardwalk. The chef was Damian and he really went out of his way to make a special dinner and a gluten-free and lactose-free fruit cobbler for dessert. Magic Kingdom restaurants also deserve some accolades. Cinderella’s Royal Table served Jennifer a gluten-free and lactose-free breakfast that was fit for a queen. Someone at Tony’s Town Square hightailed it over to Adventureland to get a Dole Whip for dessert (there are two types; the one with no ice cream is gluten-free and lactose-free—yes, I called Dole beforehand). Before leaving the Magic Kingdom if found out the following: The French fries at Casey’s at the end of Main Street are gluten-free, as is the Magic Kingdom popcorn. There is gluten-free ice cream at the Cone Shop on Main Street. Last, several of the full service restaurants had Tofutti on hand for us. My best advice would be to always speak directly to the chef—have some emergency rations on hand just in case—and consider renting a condo or room with a kitchenette. ©A Personal Touch Publishing, LLC. Donna’s daughter Jennifer wrote “When You’re A Teen” which appears in the book A Personal Touch On...™ Celiac Disease.
  8. 11/29/2018 - What do United States senators have that you don’t? Well, aside fro a plum job in the Capitol, they have regular access to this glorious bean soup that happens to be delicious, easy to make, and gluten-free. The soup’s ingredients include creamy navy beans, pig knuckle meat, butter, and chopped onion. It’s sure to be a big hit as a side to your next fall or winter dinner, or as a lunchtime meal by itself. Ingredients: 2 pounds dried white navy beans, cleaned and rinsed 1½ pounds smoked ham hocks ½ stick butter 4 quarts water 1 large russet potato 3 cups chopped yellow onion 3 teaspoons kosher salt ¾ teaspoon black pepper ⅓ cup chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley Directions: Wash the navy beans and run hot water through them until they are slightly whitened. Place beans into pot with hot water. Add ham hocks and simmer approximately three hours in a covered pot, stirring occasionally. Remove ham hocks and set aside to cool. Dice meat and return to soup. Rinse potato; pierce with a fork, and wrap potato in a paper towel. Microwave on HIGH until tender, about 4 to 5 minutes; peel and mash potato. Stir into soup. Lightly brown the onion in butter. Add to soup. Before serving, bring to a boil and season with salt and pepper. Top with parsley, as desired. Read more about this famous bean soup at the US Senate website.
  9. Celiac.com 11/27/2018 - If you’ve ever been to the highlands of Peru, then you might have tasted versions of this delicious and simple quinoa soup that is a common staple of local restaurants in the region. It’s a simple and highly versatile recipe, so add or subtract vegetables, as desired. Ingredients: 5 cups chicken broth 5 cups water 1-1½ cups cooked quinoa 3 cloves garlic ½ onion, diced 1 teaspoon oregano 1 teaspoon cumin 1 pinch chili powder 1 cup coarsely shredded carrots 1 cup zucchini, diced 1 cup sliced celery, diced Celery leaves Directions: Prepare quinoa ahead of time. Sauté onions until clear. Add garlic in the last moments and sauté until fragrant. In 5- to 6-quart slow cooker, combine cooked onions, garlic, chicken, carrot, celery, and other vegetables. Add spices. Gradually stir in broth and the water. Cover slow cooker; cook on low-heat setting for 6 to 8 hours or on high-heat setting for 3 to 4 hours. Add a few celery leaves, as desired. When vegetables are tender, but firm, stir in cooked quinoa, and serve hot.
  10. Celiac.com 11/26/2018 - Many people with celiac disease suffer from headaches. A team of researchers recently set out to more thoroughly explore the relationship between celiac disease and headaches. The research team included Panagiotis Zis, Thomas Julian, and Marios Hadjivassiliou. They are variously affiliated with the Academic Department of Neurosciences, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Sheffield S10 2JF, UK, and the Medical School of the University of Sheffield in Sheffield, UK. The team's goal was to establish the relationship between headaches and celiac disease, and vice versa, to explore the role of a gluten-free diet, and to describe the imaging findings in celiac patients affected by headaches. For their systematic review and meta-analysis, the team reviewed 40 articles published in the the PubMed database between 1987 and 2017. They included information regarding study type, population size, the age group included, prevalence of celiac disease among those with headache and vice versa, imaging results, the nature of headache, and response to gluten-free diet. They found that the average pooled rate of headaches in celiac patients was 26% (95% CI 19.5–33.9%) in adult populations and 18.3% (95% CI 10.4–30.2%) in pediatric populations. The headaches usually resemble migraines. Children with headaches of unknown origin, have celiac disease rates of 2.4% (95% CI 1.5–3.7%). There is presently no good data for adult populations. In such cases, brain imaging can be normal, but can also reveal cerebral calcifications with CT, white matter abnormalities with MRI, and deranged regional cerebral blood flow with SPECT. The good news is that a gluten-free diet seems to be an effective treatment. Up to 75% of celiac patients saw their headaches resolve when they followed a gluten-free diet. Celiac patients have high rates of idiopathic headache (that is, headaches of unknown cause), and patients with such headaches have higher rates of celiac disease. Therefore, patients with headache of unknown origin should be screened for celiac disease, since they may gain symptom relief from a gluten-free diet. Source: Nutrients 2018, 10(10), 1445; doi:10.3390/nu10101445
  11. Celiac.com 11/22/2018 - Figuring out the best way to make sure that oats are gluten-free is an interesting and important piece of the gluten-free manufacturing puzzle. That’s partly because getting representative test samples for antibody-based testing is challenging when analyzing whole grains for gluten. Moreover, when whole grains are ground into flour for testing, confocal microscopy studies have shown that gluten tends to exist as aggregates within the starch background, making single-sample testing inaccurate and complicating the ability to arrive at an accurate average from multiple samples. In addition, whole-grain products are riskier for gluten-free consumers, because contamination is localized to specific servings, rather than being distributed throughout the product. This makes parts-per-million values less relevant for whole-grain products. Intact grains, seeds, beans, pulses, and legumes offer an alternative opportunity for gluten detection, in that contaminating gluten-containing grains (GCGs) are visible and identifiable to the trained eye or properly calibrated optical sorting equipment. A team of researchers recently set out to assess the use of visual inspection for assessing levels of gluten-containing grains in gluten-free whole oats, grains, seeds, beans, and legumes, and to determine a Gluten Free Certification Organization threshold level for the maximum number of GCGs within a kilogram of non-gluten grains sold as specially processed gluten free product. Researchers LK Allred, C Kupper, and C Quinn are affiliated with the Gluten Intolerance Group of North America, 31214 124th Ave SE, Auburn, WA 98092. In their study, they ran 180 samples containing one or two wheat, rye, or barley grains through an optical sorter at the Grain Millers, Inc. facility 30 times each. In every base, the sorter diverted the GCGs into the smaller stream of rejected material. The calculated probability of detection, or in this case probability of rejection from the oat sample for all three grain types, was 1.00, with a 95% confidence interval of 0.96–1.00.” Their study showed that a gluten grain threshold of 0.25 GCG/kg can be achieved for oats, and is, likely achievable in other cereals, beans, pulses, legumes, and seeds with naturally lower levels of GCGs. Their conclusions rest in part on data quality, and the assumption of a low false-negative rate. Their conclusions were supported by optical sorting verification done by Grain Millers, Inc., and by Discovery Seed Laboratories and Kent Agri Laboratory Ltd, which are CFIA-accredited seed testing facilities. One way to ensure that gluten levels in gluten-free flour remains below 20 ppm might be to visually examine intact grains, seeds, beans, pulses, and legumes; this process is called “hand sorting.” GCGs are generally visible and identifiable to the trained eye or properly calibrated optical sorting equipment. This potentially offers exciting possibilities for creating a system to physically spot-check batches of gluten-free oats. Basically, gluten levels below 20ppm are achievable by both hand and optical sorting. However, a properly calibrated optical sorter is much faster, and much more accurate than hand sorting. Also, as the report states, “even with well-trained personnel, hand picking for grading has shown accuracy in the range of 86–90%, and we have assumed a 14% non-detection rate with the proposed sampling plan presented.” A non-detection rate of 14% could lead to gluten levels as high as 140,000 ppm, compared with optical sorting alone. General Mills claims their optical sorting equipment achieves under 20 ppm. For companies that have access to optical sorting equipment, such as General Mills, employee performance can also be checked by running the batch of material they have accepted through the sorter to determine whether any GCGs have been missed. Employees who do not accurately detect the GCGs in these samples must be retrained and monitored to ensure accuracy. Properly calibrated optical sorting looks to be the best way to sort gluten-containing grains from large quantities of oats and other materials. Any human role in such an undertaking would largely be relegated to spot-checking and re-scanning sub-samples to confirm overall results. This study authors rather diplomatically note that their study does not serve as a validation for either the Purity Protocol or the mechanical sorting method of producing gluten-free grains, “but rather demonstrates that achieving the proposed threshold is possible under both systems.” However, the fact is that even Purity Protocol oats will have to be inspected at some point, using either optical sorting, human sorting, or a combination of both. The reality is that inspecting oats for GCGs using humans alone is both time-consuming and fraught with error. That potentially means increased production costs. In the end, a combination of optical sorting systems and humans checking each other might be the way to go. For now, studies like this one will help us narrow down the best practices and help to ensure that we take the best path toward the manufacture of gluten-free oats. Read more at the JOURNAL OF AOAC INTERNATIONAL VOL. 101, NO. 1, 2018
  12. Hello, What does my results mean? Am I allergic to gluten? tTg-IgG 8.62 tTg-IgA 3.02 Anti Gliadin IgA 93.24 And what’s the normal range for each? Thank you!
  13. Celiac.com 11/20/2018 - This soup is not fancy, but it is easy to make and super versatile. You can mix and match vegetables to your heart’s content. It makes a great addition to your fall and winter slow cooker recipe box. Basically, just chuck everything into a slow cooker and come back later to dinner. Ingredients: 6 cups chicken broth 1 large onion 4 medium red potatoes, cubed 2 medium carrots, peeled and sliced ½ head of broccoli, cut to bite sized chunks Nice handful of spinach, chard, or mustard greens 1 medium zucchini, cut to ½ inch slices 4 cloves garlic, chopped or minced 2 tablespoons dry white wine A few sprigs of fresh sage or dried herbs de Provence OPTIONAL: Shredded chicken Directions: Chop and sauté a large onion and a few cloves of garlic and a tablespoon or two of olive oil. When onions are translucent, place in slow cooker pot or a large stockpot. Wash, peel, and chop the potatoes, carrots, broccoli, greens, and squash, and add them to the pot. Add chicken broth and white wine. Season with salt and pepper, and dried herbs. Cook in a slow cooker or stove top until the vegetables are soft, then use an immersion blender to blend to your desired level of chunkiness. If you have no immersion blender, then blend small batches of a cup or two at a time to desired chunkiness. Season to taste with salt and pepper, then serve with greek yogurt. To upgrade, add a swirl of olive oil and garnish with toasted pumpkin seeds or other seeds.
  14. Celiac.com 11/17/2018 - This soup works great as a dinner starter. It also works great as a full meal when paired with a salad and some good gluten-free bread. Pair it with half a sandwich for a great lunch. The recipe works great if you happen to have leftover chicken in the fridge. If not, you can use rotisserie chicken or leftover holiday turkey. Ingredients: 2½ cups chopped cooked chicken 5 cups chicken broth 5 cups water 1 cup cream 1 medium onion, chopped 2 cups sliced fresh mushrooms 1 cup coarsely shredded carrots 1 cup sliced celery One 6 - ounce package long grain and wild rice mix 1 teaspoon salt 2 teaspoons onion powder 1 teaspoon garlic powder 1 teaspoon dried parsley 1 teaspoon Italian seasoning Celery leaves, as desired Directions: Sauté onions in a skillet over medium heat until translucent. In 5- to 6-quart slow cooker, combine translucent onions, cooked chicken, mushrooms, carrot, celery, cream, rice mix, celery leaves, and the spices. Note: Beware of the spice packet that come with the wild rice mix. Use it only if you are certain it is gluten-free. If you use the packet, omit the other spices. If not, use the spices listed. Gradually stir in the chicken broth and the water. Cover slow cooker; cook on low-heat setting for 6 to 8 hours or on high-heat setting for 3 to 4 hours. Serve warm.
  15. Celiac.com 11/15/2018 - Gluten-free products, marketed as such, were largely unknown 20 years ago, but the gluten-free industry is set to reach an estimated $2.34 billion in sales by 2019. That’s more than double figures for 2014. The growth has been exponential. What sets gluten-free foods apart from other culinary trends or diet fads is that they address a legitimate health concern that affects millions of people around the world. With the massive influx of gluten-free products, and the expansion of “gluten-free” restaurant options, it’s easy to forget that gluten exists in some obvious and not so obvious places that people with celiac disease need to avoid. Here are 15 foods or food ingredients that many people wrongly assume are gluten-free: Beer Light or dark, lager, IPA or Stout, traditional beer is brewed with barley, and is not gluten-free. However, a number of major and micro breweries create tasty gluten-free alternatives. There are a number of tasty, award winning beers that are brewed from gluten-free ingredients and are fully gluten-free. There are also gluten-reduced beers. These beers are brewed like traditional beers and EU regulations allow for gluten-removed beer to be labeled as gluten-free. Plenty of people with celiac disease do fine drinking these beers, but many do not. Know your beer, know your body, and drink accordingly. Read more at Celiac.com's Oktoberfest Beer Guide! Gluten-free vs. Gluten-removed Beers. Barbecue Sauce Many barbecue sauces use artificial colors, flavorings or thickeners that may contain gluten, so it’s important to check labels, and even contact a manufacturer if you're not sure about something. Couscous, Tabbouleh and Falafel Couscous and bulgar are wheat and are used in many different Middle-eastern foods, and some people do not realize that they contain gluten. Bulgar or couscous are also used to make another popular Middle-eastern dish called tabbouleh (salad). Couscous or wheat flour are sometimes used to make falafel, so be sure to ask about the ingredients before eating. Candy Always be careful about candy. Many candies are safe and gluten-free, but many candies are not. Sometimes trusted products can change. Read labels, check websites, contact manufacturers as needed, and be careful! If you’re not sure, Celiac.com’s Annual Safe Gluten-Free Halloween Candy List is a good place to start. Cookie Dough This might seem obvious, but cookie dough, unless specifically gluten-free, almost always contains standard wheat flour and is not gluten-free. Dried Spices Some manufacturers actually use flour to keep their spices from clumping. Pay special attention to spice blends and mixes, including curry powders, which may contain wheat. Gravies, Soups, Sauces and Mixes—Packaged, Canned, or Jarred If you’ve ever made gravy from scratch, you might recall that it involves making a roux, a paste of butter and flour which thickens the gravy and gives it a nice sheen. Well, roux is also used as a thickening agent in many packaged, canned or jarred gravies, soups, sauces and mixes. Even some fresh soups may contain wheat or flour. Gazpacho, for example, can be made gluten-free, but most recipes call for a piece of bread soaked in sherry vinegar and blended into the soup. When it comes to gluten in soup, eater beware! Hot Dogs & Sausages The bun is an obvious source of gluten, but the dog itself can contain traces of wheat as well in the form of both filler and binder. So check labels, know the ingredients, and double-check when it comes to hot dogs and sausages. Ice Cream Although many ice creams are gluten-free, some may contain wheat in the form of added ingredients, like cookie dough, toppings or candy pieces. Double-check the ingredients to be safe. Packaged Deli Meats, Marinated or Pre-Seasoned Meats & Vegetable Proteins Packaged, marinated meat, fish, chicken, or other meats may contain gluten as a binder or hidden ingredient. Some vegetable-based proteins like Seitan contain gluten. Also, many deli meats claim to be gluten-free, but the same companies have released specific lines of gluten-free meats, raising the question of why they needed a separate product in the first place. Deli meats are controlled by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, not the Food and Drug Administration, which currently uses a different gluten-free standard. Prescription Drugs, Vitamins and Supplements Even though they are not technically foods, and they are meant to keep you healthy, prescription drugs, vitamins and supplements may contain gluten as binders, typically in the form of wheat starch. Ask you pharmacist for guidance, read labels closely, and make phone calls to companies or visit their Web sites to be sure. Salad Dressings Many salad dressings have updated their recipes to exclude any wheat or barley-derived additives, but some still contain gluten, especially the powdered mix kind. Soy Sauce Most soy sauces contain wheat and should be avoided. Be sure to find a gluten-free soy sauce. Sushi Although raw fish by itself is gluten-free, there are many ingredients in sushi rolls and other items that contain soy sauce and other sources of gluten. The seaweed wrappers in sushi may contain soy sauce, and the wasabi or fake crab may contain gluten. Teriyaki sauce is another source of gluten because it is made with soy sauce. See our How to Safely Order Sushi article for more info. Teriyaki Sauce Teriyaki is nearly always made with made with soy sauce, and most commercial brands contain wheat, so be careful. Read more on: Celiac.com UNSAFE Food List Celiac.com SAFE Food List Celiac.com's SAFE and UNSAFE Halloween Candy List
  16. Celiac.com 11/14/2018 - You don’t have to be a researcher to figure out that, for all the improvements in gluten-free food products in the last few years, gluten-free foods are still expensive and largely inferior in terms of quality and nutrition compared to their non-gluten-free counterparts. Most of the locally available gluten-free flour products are developed by large U.S. and European companies with global distribution. This can mean high local prices. Higher prices mean that some gluten-free products can remain out of reach for people who need them. Researchers in Kazakhstan may have figured out a way to change that reality by creating high quality gluten-free products at low prices. The Kazakh Research Institute of Agricultural Products Processing have developed a method for producing local, affordable gluten-free products, according to the press service of Astana city administration. According to the results of the survey, in Kazakhstan, more than two-thirds of patients with celiac disease are children under 11, while 15 percent are children aged 11-12 and 17 percent are people aged 21-35. “Gluten-free products cost ten times higher than gluten-containing products. Not every family can afford this. We are very interested in producing local products that are not inferior in quality to foreign ones,” said Chief Specialist of the Crop Production Research Laboratory Olga Polubotko. The institute is researching flour confectionery mixes and cereals. They have identified corn, rice, buckwheat, millet and flax grown in various regions of the country as naturally gluten-free raw materials. According to the researchers, imported products contain a large amount of starch and artificial additives. They intend to develop domestic products with less starch and additives using mainly ingredients from the region. Academic Secretary of the Kazakh Research Institute Darigash Shaimerdenova says that a Finnish group is interested in working with Kazakhstan to develop gluten-free pasta. The institute also conducts research to produce other varieties of foods including lactose-free lactic acid, pectin-containing, fat-free products without trans-isomers based on leguminous crops. Look for more news regarding the development of better, more nutritious, more delicious gluten-free food as stories unfold.
  17. Celiac.com 11/12/2018 - Here’s an uplifting celiac story. Now, this happened a while back, but it's all just coming to light in the way that so many warm and fuzzy family stories do. It starts like this: Once upon a time, a simple check for celiac disease opened the door to parenthood for couple. Just over ten years ago, AnnMarie Bradley from Celbridge, Co Kildare, thought she’d never become a mother. After two devastating miscarriages over a decade, Bradley, who is 47 years old, and her husband Christopher (48) were at wit’s end. "I was just heartbroken,” said Ms Bradley. Then, a simple visit to her doctor changed everything. A blood test indicated she might have celiac disease, which further evaluation confirmed. She began a gluten-free diet, and less than a year later, Bradley was pregnant with her son, Cameron. “Being a mother had been everything I'd wanted," she said. Cameron is nearly 16 now, and has an 11-year old sister, Emily. And they all lived happily and gluten-free ever after. In the UK, the Coeliac Society advises women struggling to conceive to consider celiac testing. Read more at: Independent.ie
  18. Celiac.com 11/10/2018 - If you’re looking for a great dinner hit, here’s a recipe for a tasty, beef tenderloin. Just grab a cast-iron skillet, brown the tenderloin, toss it in the oven to roast, then use the hot pan to cook the mushrooms. Ingredients: 2 pounds beef tenderloin, trimmed and tied 1 pound brown mushrooms, trimmed and sliced ¼-inch thick 1 teaspoon cooking oil 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, divided 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil ⅓ cup finely chopped shallots 3 large garlic cloves, minced ⅓ cup cooking sherry or dry white wine 1½ teaspoons finely chopped fresh thyme Kosher salt Cracked black pepper Directions: Pat beef dry. Let stand at room temperature for 30 minutes. Position rack in center of oven, and heat oven to 425 degrees. Season beef on all sides with 2 teaspoons each kosher salt and pepper. Heat canola oil in a 12-inch ovenproof skillet over medium-high heat. Add beef and sear on all sides for 8 to 10 minutes. Transfer skillet to oven. Roast about 30 to 35 minutes, until internal temperature reaches 135 degrees. Transfer beef to a platter; tent loosely with foil while preparing mushrooms. Add 1 tablespoon butter and the olive oil to same skillet. Add mushrooms and a pinch of kosher salt. Cook over medium-high heat, stirring occasionally, until mushrooms begin to turn golden, 6 to 8 minutes. Add shallots; cook and stir for 2 minutes. Add garlic; cook and stir for 30 seconds. Season with salt and pepper. Carefully add sherry; cook and stir until almost evaporated, about 1 minute. Stir juices from tenderloin platter into mushrooms with remaining tablespoon butter and thyme. Slice beef and serve with mushrooms.
  19. Celiac.com 11/09/2018 - Adjusting to the obvious guidelines of a gluten-free diet is challenging and often overwhelming. You soon learn that what is gluten-free today may not be gluten-free tomorrow—mainly because companies can change their recipes, suppliers, or production methods. As if that weren’t bad enough, you begin to realize that gluten is ‘hidden’ in foods. How is one to keep up to date with all of this? Don’t despair, as there are many avenues of help available to you. Thanks in large part to Andrea Lavario and her Task Force, congress will soon be requiring companies to list ingredients that heretofore have been disguised under auspicious names such as ‘vegetable protein’ and ‘food starch’ (see Autumn 2004 Journal of Gluten Sensitivity, pg. 1). There are also a few reliable food lists on the internet that are compiled by people who call companies regularly to check out dubious ingredients. Some of the posted lists are out of date and unreliable, so check the validity of the sight before relying on the information given. So what are the hidden sources of gluten? Let’s examine our homes first. Do you toast your gluten-free bread in the same toaster that is used for wheat-based bread? Yes, those tiny wheat crumbs that remain in the toaster could contaminate your gluten-free bread. Invest in a dedicated toaster for gluten-free products. If you toast wheat-based hamburger buns and hot dog buns on the same grill as gluten-free ones, this could be another breeding ground for cross-contamination. Grill the gluten-free foods first, and afterwards clean the grates thoroughly (Put the grates in your oven before running the self-cleaning cycle). If you are baking both gluten-free and wheat-based cookies during the holidays, make the gluten-free ones first. If you bake with wheat flour first, there could be some residual flour dust in the air and on your counters (Wheat flour can remain in the air for up to 24 hours!). Wood cutting boards are porous and gluten may become embedded in them—use a marble cutting board instead. Finally, beware of knives. At breakfast, do the gluten-consuming members of your family spread peanut butter on their toast, and then double-dip to get a little more peanut butter out of the jar? If so, get a peanut butter jar just for you. When they double-dip, some of their wheat crumbs may be getting into the jar and will eventually contaminate the dollop you retrieve from the jar. Non-food items also pose gluten challenges. Do you use latex or rubber gloves to wash dishes? These may be dusted with wheat or oat flour. Make a phone call to your doctor, dentist, orthodontist and periodontist and request that they use non-powdered gloves. Gluten hides in art supplies, such as paints, clay, play dough, and glue. It is also present in many personal items such as lipstick, lip balm, sunscreen, shampoos, soaps, cosmetics, and skin lotions. Household products such as cleaning solutions, detergents, even bar soap may contain gluten. Fortunately, you can refer to lists on the internet for ‘safe’ alternative brands that are available. Medications frequently contain gluten. Pills may be dusted with flour during manufacturing and capsules may have gluten present in the oil inside. Frequently your pharmacist will be able to tell you if any given medication is safe for you, but you may have to call the manufacturer. Again, there are websites that have gluten-free medications listed. Oats remain a food of debate. While ‘pure’ oats may be safe for some celiacs, it is very difficult to find ‘pure’ oats that are grown and processed in the U.S.A. Some celiacs are able to consume oats imported from Ireland, while others have reactions to them. Even the safe flours (rice, potato, tapioca, bean) can be contaminated if they are milled or processed in a facility that processes wheat, rye or barley grains. A call to the processing company will tell you if they have machinery and facilities dedicated to gluten-free grains only. If you purchase imported flours from an oriental store, you obviously are not able to contact the manufacturer. Many of the Asian plants are dedicated exclusively to processing rice products, especially those in Thailand, but some are not. It is your personal decision whether or not to trust the purity of items purchased from abroad. Reading labels is a highly refined art form. Not-so-obvious terms on labels signal gluten, like malt, graham, spelt, kamut. If you pick up a jar of chili powder it may or may not contain wheat flour which can be added to keep it from clumping—but even if it does you likely won’t find wheat listed on the label. There are foods that you think are 100% pure, but when you examine the label, other ingredients have been added, like tomato paste. Rice syrup may use barley enzymes. Yeast may be grown or dried using wheat or barely ingredients. At the grocery store beware of anything that is processed. If it is not a whole food, it may contain gluten. Common culprits include rice or corn cereals, soups, snack foods, lunch meats, sausages, and hot dogs. Shortening may contain vitamin E processed from wheat germ. Just when you thought it couldn’t get any more confusing, you find hieroglyphics on labels. Letters like HVP (hydrogenated vegetable protein), HPP (hydrolyzed plant protein), and TVP (textured vegetable protein). Other confusing ingredients are maltodextrin, stabilizers, binders, fillers, natural flavor, vegetable gums, and mono & diglycerides, to name just a few. Enriched products should be avoided unless you are certain of the sources of ‘enrichment’. See the Safe & Forbidden Lists for detailed lists of ingredients and their gluten-free status. Finally, re-check labels each time you buy a product. Companies change their recipes periodically. Duncan Hines Vanilla Ready-to-Spread Frosting used to be gluten-free, as were Pringles Potato Chips—but both manufacturers recently began adding wheat starch to these products. It should be noted that Duncan Hines received so many letters and calls of protest about wheat being added to their frosting that they have switched back to the original gluten-free recipe—but check the label before purchasing. Product ingredients may change from one batch to another. Cool Whip usually does not contain wheat, but occasionally it is added. Archway macaroons are sometimes made with potato starch and sometimes with wheat starch. The lists above are not intended to overwhelm you, but to make you more aware of the problem that you face, and to help you become more alert. With practice and time, screening for gluten becomes second nature. Now for the good news! By 2006, food labeling will disclose many of the hidden ingredients now on labels, including wheat (barley and rye do not have to be disclosed, but are used far less frequently than wheat). Kraft Foods is already beginning to post labels reading “Gluten Free” on many of their products; other companies will follow their lead. Many grocery store chains are responding by setting up entire gluten-free sections. Gluten-free companies and bakeries are springing up every day. Food chains are recognizing the needs of celiacs and are catering to this new market—Godfather’s Pizza now offers a gluten-free pizza crust (beware!) and many restaurants like Outback Steakhouse now offer gluten-free menus upon request. As each month passes, it is becoming easier and easier to identify gluten-free products—and the number of products made for celiacs will continue to grow as time goes on. Connie Sarros’ Tortilla Tower This recipe is from my book: Wheat-free Gluten-free Cookbook for Kids and Busy Adults. It takes just 15 minutes to assemble and uses no special utensils or equipment. Ingredients: ½ pound lean ground beef (some discount super stores add ¼ teaspoon pepper ½ teaspoon oregano 1 jar (15 ounce) GF spaghetti sauce 1 egg 1 cup GF small-curd cottage cheese 4 GF corn tortillas 1 cup GF shredded sharp cheddar cheese Directions: Preheat oven to 350F. In a skillet over high heat, brown ground beef, breaking it up into small pieces with a fork as it browns. Drain off any fat. Stir in pepper, oregano and spaghetti sauce. Cover pan and simmer over medium/low heat for 5 minutes. In a small bowl, whisk the egg slightly, then stir in the cottage cheese. Spoon ¼ cup of the meat mixture in the bottom of a 9-inch pie plate. Place 1 tortilla on top of the sauce in the plate. Spread 1/3 of the cottage cheese mixture on top of the tortilla. Top with ¼ of the meat sauce, then ¼ of the shredded cheese. Repeat these layers 2 more times. Top with the last tortilla, remaining meat sauce, and remaining shredded cheese. Bake for 30 minutes. After removing from oven, let Tortilla Tower rest for 5 minutes before cutting. Cut into 4 wedges to serve.
  20. Celiac.com 11/08/2018 - With the popularity and sales growth of gluten-free and other "free from" product categories outpacing their traditional counterparts, more major food manufacturers are moving to provide products for those customers. In the food and beverage sector "free from" products are growing faster than their standard counterparts, according Nielsen data. Antibiotic-free products enjoyed growth rates of nearly 20 per cent last year, followed by soy-free with 19 per cent, and hormone and antibiotic-free at 15 per cent. That means major manufacturers are looking to meet the increasing demand for foods that are "free from" gluten, antibiotics, pesticides or genetic modification, among other things. Consider cereal giant General Mills Inc., which makes the popular breakfast cereal Cheerios from naturally gluten-free oats. In theory, oats are gluten-free, but commercial oats also typically contain small amounts of wheat, barley or rye that can find their way into the oats via shared processing channels. To ensure that every final box of Cheerios was gluten-free when it left the factory, General Mills worked on finding a reliable way to sort through the one billion pounds of oats it uses each year. That solution took five years and involved teams of engineers, and the retooling of numerous machines, along with the construction of a specially-built eight-story sorting facility. "We knew if we wanted to take our Cheerios gluten free, we needed to create our own system," said General Mills spokesperson Mike Siemienas. Other examples of companies looking to adapt to new customer demands are McDonald’s Corp., which plans to source more than 20 million of its Canadian Angus burgers over the next year from sustainable sources. Meanwhile, Tyson Foods Inc., is looking to make inroads into to the organic market with its recent purchase of organic chicken producer Tecumseh Poultry. Major U.S. wheat miller Ardent Mills has created “The Annex,” a unit devoted to the future of specialty grains and plant-based ingredients. As the market continues to grow, look for more manufacturers to offer gluten-free and other specialty foods at markets near you. Read more at: TheStar.com
  21. Celiac.com 11/03/2018 - I’ve been looking for new ways to enjoy Brussels sprouts lately. This recipe is simple to make and packed with deliciousness. All you need is some some good ham, a leek, orange juice, cider vinegar, salt pepper and olive oil, and wham, you’ve got a great start to a tasty dinner. Ingredients: 2 pounds Brussels sprouts, trimmed; halved if large 2 tablespoons olive oil ½ cup diced good quality country ham 1 large leek, halved lengthwise, rinsed and thinly sliced crosswise ½ teaspoon salt ¼ teaspoon freshly cracked black pepper 3 tablespoons freshly squeezed orange juice 1 tablespoon cider vinegar Directions: Fill a large stock pot about half way with water, add a teaspoon or two of salt, and bring to a boil over high heat. Add sprouts and cook for 5 to 6 minutes until crisp, but fork tender. Drain sprouts into a colander, discarding the cooking water. Return empty pot to heat and reduce heat to medium-high. Add olive oil, ham, leek, salt and pepper. Cook and stir for 2 to 3 minutes until leeks are just tender. Add sprouts; cook and stir for 2 minutes more or until heated through. Drizzle with orange juice and vinegar, and toss until coated. Transfer to a serving dish. Cover sprouts with pan juices and serve.
  22. Celiac.com 11/01/2018 - A terse one-star TripAdvisor review expressed outrage over the lack of gluten-free bread at a family funeral, and slammed the hotel that hosted the reception for the perceived offense. Complaining that, among other things, she had to "munch on some lifeless salad" after the wake reception failed to meet her dietary requirements, a user, known as "Jan" poured her frustration upon the Elmbank Hotel in York. According to Jan, the staff at the Elmbank informed her that why had no gluten-free option, and asked her to bring her own bread. She wrote that she called the hotel a few days before the event, and was “told they don't have gluten-free bread, but if I wanted to take my own they'd make a sandwich for me.” Apparently, Jan chose not to bring her own bread, as she was reportedly “shocked” to discover that they had no gluten free bread on offer. Her outrage on full display, Jan added that "In this day and age you'd think they 'd get their act together, it's quite a common dietary requirement, adding that she had to "sit there, at lunch time, munching on a chicken drumstick and some lifeless salad. Next stop Tesco's on the way past!" In all, Jan gave the funeral reception just one TripAdvisor star, and said that she would never go back again. It didn’t take long for the internet to reply with characteristic mockery. Jan’s review was tweeted by a woman who lives near the hotel who seemed to enjoy the reaction from other users. The tone-deaf nature of Jan’s "munch on some lifeless salad" comment was mentioned in one of the replies. One person wrote: "The genuine coeliacs I know would never complain about this sort of thing." Another said: "I'm glad she was so sensitive and didn't miss the real point of why she was there!" Commenters also took aim at Jan’s admission that she was gluten-free ‘by preference,’ with one user writing: "Glad you saw fit to add the *by preference. I don't know a coeliac who could be this insensitive, they know suffering and would never be so insensitive. Those who 'choose' are princesses." Okay, perhaps the funereal nature of the proceedings makes Jan’s complaint a bit tacky, but does she have a point in general about accommodations for gluten-free eaters? How about you? Been to any tough non-gluten-free funerals or other events lately? Read more in TheSun.co.uk
  23. Celiac.com 10/31/2018 - It’s official. Twitter official. Kourtney Kardashian has made peace with wheat and dairy, and called off her highly touted gluten-free, dairy-free diet. After several years of avoiding them like the plague, the celebrity is now on good terms with both gluten and dairy and is ready to accept them back into her diet. In a new post on her website, the ever busy Kardashian says she’s relaxing a bit, and allowing for dietary deviation and occasional indulgences "in moderation." Kardashian and gluten are not exactly new besties. For now, Kardashian says, she plans to remain gluten-free and dairy-free at home, but more flexible when traveling and dining out. "Lately, I've been less strict about avoiding gluten and dairy…Everything in my pantry is still free of dairy and gluten, so when I'm at home, it's still how I eat," she writes. "But when I go out, or have a craving, I'll have whatever I want. I try to do everything in moderation in my usual routine." In addition Kardashian noted recently on her website that, in addition to a few choice supplements, she usually starts her day with “one tablespoon of organic apple cider vinegar mixed into a glass of water." Can’t get enough? Follow Kourtney Kardashian on Twitter: @kourtneykardash
  24. Celiac.com 10/30/2018 - Products with “gluten-free” were unknown just 20 years ago. Now, driven by new labeling standards and demand that far exceeds those on medical diets, the market for gluten-free foods is expected to hit $2.34 billion in sales by 2019. That’s more than double the 2014 level. How has the influx of new gluten-free products in the last few years changed the experience of people with celiac disease? A team of researchers recently set out to investigate how the recent proliferation of the gluten‐free industry has affected individuals living with celiac disease, with a primary focus on their social lives and relationships. The research team included J. A. King, G. G. Kaplan, and J. Godley. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Sociology, Faculty of Arts, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada, and the O’Brien Institute for Public Health, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. The team employed interpretive phenomenology for study design and analysis. Team members held semi‐structured interviews with 17 adults with clinically diagnosed celiac disease in Calgary, Alberta. They recorded the interviews and transcribed them for analysis. These 17 Canadians living with celiac disease reported that they perceive the growth of the gluten‐free industry as a "double‐edged sword." Although they are grateful for more readily available, more palatable gluten‐free options, they are increasingly faced with misunderstandings about the severity of celiac disease as a perceived result of many non-celiac disease individuals subscribing to the gluten‐free diet. Participants also felt they may be perceived or even perceived themselves differently, such as "high maintenance," etc. To help mitigate these social ramifications of following the gluten‐free diet, participants utilized various strategies. According to the study’s authors, simply telling celiac patients to adopt a gluten‐free diet ignores the regular challenges faced by those patients. The authors of the report are calling for doctors to consider the indirect burdens for celiac patients who must adopt a gluten-free diet when making their recommendations. But how? The report says nothing about what exactly doctors are supposed consider, or what they should tell patients about the challenges of a gluten-free diet. People with celiac disease probably do need more information up front as they begin to follow a gluten-free diet, but clearly far more input and study are needed. This study tells us that seventeen people in Alberta, Canada say that being gluten-free by medical necessity is both easier and more challenging than it was in the past. That it was both more manageable, but also more stressful, because gluten-free fad dieters are confusing everything. What are we to make of this? Talking informally with 17 celiac patients and writing up the results may not rise to the level of a solid study, and their input doesn’t really tell us much about how to improve their situation. Also, blaming the popularity of the gluten-free diet as a cause of confusion or stress in people with celiac disease could be an overreaction. Remember, ten or twenty years ago when most people had nearly zero awareness of celiac disease or the gluten-free diet? That included doctors who were trying to diagnose it. To have these inconvenient misunderstandings, people must first have some idea that celiac disease exists, and that a gluten-free diet is part of it. Is it possible that, as annoying as such misunderstandings may be, they represent progress, however incremental? Perhaps the annoyances are real, perhaps they are perceived. Perhaps they are a reflection of slowly rising awareness levels. But the study doesn’t tell us any of these important details. Again, there’s little question that people with celiac disease need more information up front as they begin to follow a gluten-free diet, but clearly more input and study is needed so that we can come up with an accurate picture of the challenges and provide the best ways to meet them. What’s your experience of the rapidly changing gluten-free landscape? Read more at: JOURNAL OF HUMAN NUTRITION & DIETETICS. First published: 02 October 2018 https://doi.org/10.1111/jhn.12597
  25. Celiac.com 10/27/2018 - Looking for a simple one-pot meal that can handle family dinner as easily as it can tackle a casual get-together? This recipe marries the flavors of hard cider and chicken with Brussels sprouts and apples to deliver a knockout dish with a tasty sauce that goes great with rice or mashed potatoes. Ingredients: 4 slices bacon, chopped 6 bone-in, skin-on chicken thighs (about 2½ pounds) 2 medium tart red apples, cored and cut into wedges 1 12-ounce bottle hard apple cider, such as Crispin, Harpoon, or Doc’s Draft 2 tablespoons chopped fresh thyme 2 tablespoons whole grain mustard 1 teaspoon kosher salt 2 cups fresh Brussels sprouts, trimmed and halved if large Directions: In large skillet cook bacon over medium heat until crisp; remove from pan, reserving drippings in skillet. Add chicken, skin side down, and cook about minutes until skin side is browned. Turn the chicken and cook another 5 minutes or so, and remove from skillet. Add apples to the skillet and cook 4-5 minutes, stirring until browned on both sides; remove from skillet. Drain and discard drippings from skillet. Add cider, thyme, mustard, and salt to skillet, scraping up any browned bits. Bring to boil and reduce heat. Put the chicken back in the skillet. Cover and simmer 10 minutes. Add Brussels sprouts. Cover and cook 5 minutes. Add apples and cook, uncovered, 3 to 5 minutes more or until chicken is cooked through. Serve with chicken thighs, Brussels sprouts, and apples with rice or potatoes. Top with cider mixture.
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