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Found 2,289 results

  1. Celiac.com 10/17/2012 - This article originally appeared in the Winter 2012 edition of Celiac.com's Journal of Gluten-Sensitivity. It’s estimated that of the 3 million Americans with celiac disease, an autoimmune disease triggered by exposure to gluten-a protein component of wheat, barley, and rye-only 3% have been diagnosed. The good news for celiac patients who have been diagnosed is that the treatment for their condition is simple and doesn’t require the ingestion of drugs--a gluten-free diet. Unfortunately, celiac patients must deal with several challenges in maintaining a diet free of gluten, specifically the expenses involved. Compared with “regular” gluten-containing foods, gluten-free alternatives are more expensive. In fact, a study has indicated that gluten-free foods cost more than double their gluten-containing counterparts. In a study by the Dalhousie Medical School at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, prices were compared between food products labeled as “gluten-free” with comparable gluten-containing food products at two large-sized chain grocery stores. Unit prices of the food items in dollars per 100 grams were calculated for this purpose. According to the study, all the 56 gluten-free products were more expensive than their corresponding products. The average unit price for gluten-free products was found to be $1.71, compared with $0.61 for the gluten-containing products. This means that gluten-free products were 242% more expensive than gluten-containing items. Fortunately, celiac patients can receive tax deductions for certain expenses related with their gluten-free diet. To receive these benefits, celiacs must provide a doctor’s note confirming their celiac diagnosis and save their receipts for all their gluten-free foods and other products they purchase. The difference between the prices of gluten-free items compared to those of regular items is tax-deductible. Products that don’t have a gluten-containing counterpart, such as xanthan gum and sorghum flour, are totally tax-deductible. Shipping costs for online orders of gluten-free items are also tax-deductible. In order to file your claim, you should fill out a 1049 schedule A for medical deductions. For more information, contact a qualified accountant. There are other ways to avoid spending loads of money on gluten-free foods. For instance, stay away from gluten-free processed and “junk” foods such as snack foods and desserts made with refined carbohydrates and sugar and lacking nutrients. Not only will you save money, but you’ll safeguard your health. I recommend making meals comprised of nutritious, naturally gluten-free whole foods at home such as fruits, vegetables, dairy products, poultry, fish, meats, nuts and seeds, and eggs. These foods are packed with vital nutrients and don’t carry any additional costs. Make sure that no gluten has been added to such foods and they are safe from cross-contamination. Another way to save money is to make your own gluten-free mixes yourself, such as the ones I recommend on my gluten-free website. Instead of buying expensive commercial gluten-free baking mixes, you can create your own gluten-free flour mixes for a variety of foods such as pancakes, pizza, rolls, and muffins and store them conveniently in your refrigerator or freezer. I also recommend purchasing gluten-free ingredients in bulk online, as many websites offer great deals. These are just a few of the ways to save money on the gluten-free diet. It is unfortunate that gluten-free foods are more expensive than “regular” food items, especially to such an extraordinary degree, however savvy gluten-free dieters can through tax deductions and smart shopping choices cut down on their expenses. Perhaps in the future we will see a decrease in gluten-free food pricing, but one thing is for sure-we should consider ourselves lucky that we have found an answer to our health problems. Even if the gluten-free diet is expensive, at least it’s the road to greater health and quality of life.
  2. Celiac.com 05/24/2018 - England is facing some hard questions about gluten-free food prescriptions for people with celiac disease. Under England’s National Health Plan, people with celiac disease are eligible for gluten-free foods as part of their medical treatment. The latest research shows that prescription practice for gluten-free foods varies widely, and often seems independent of medical factors. This news has put those prescribing practices under scrutiny. "Gluten free prescribing is clearly in a state of flux at the moment, with an apparent rapid reduction in prescribing nationally," say the researchers. Their data analysis revealed that after a steady increase in prescriptions between 1998 and 2010, the prescription rate for gluten free foods has both fallen, and become more variable, in recent years. Not only is there tremendous variation in gluten free prescribing, say the researchers, “this variation appears to exist largely without good reason…” Worse still, the research showed that those living in the most deprived areas of the country are the least likely to be prescribed gluten-free products, possibly due to a lower rate of celiac diagnosis in disadvantaged groups, say the researchers. But following a public consultation, the government decided earlier this year to restrict the range of gluten free products rather than banning them outright. As research data pile up and gluten-free food becomes cheaper and more ubiquitous, look for more changes to England’s gluten-free prescription program to follow. Read more about this research in the online journal BMJ Open.
  3. Celiac.com 10/21/2014 - Insects offer one of the most concentrated and efficient forms of protein on the planet, and they are a common food in many parts of the world. So, could high-protein flour made out of crickets change the future of gluten-free foods? A San Francisco Bay Area company is looking to make that possibility a reality. The company, Bitty Foods, is making flour from slow-roasted crickets that are then milled and combined with tapioca and cassava to make a high-protein flour that is gluten-free. According to the Bitty Foods website, a single cup of cricket flour contains a whopping 28 grams of protein. So can Bitty Foods persuade gluten-free consumers to try their high protein gluten-free flour? Only time will tell. In the mean time, stay tuned for more cricket flour developments. What do you think? Would you give it a try? If it worked well for baking, would you use it?
  4. Celiac.com 06/08/2018 - A spat over gluten-free symbols turned legal recently, when Bob’s Red Mill filed a lawsuit against the Gluten Intolerance Group of North America in U.S. district court in Portland. Bob’s Red Mill is looking to continue using their current gluten-free logo without seeking permission from, or paying money to, the Gluten Intolerance Group (G.I.G.), which verifies and certifies gluten-free products through its Gluten-Free Certification Organization program. To date, the program has certified more than 30,000 products in 29 different countries. For its gluten-free labeling, Bob’s Red Mill currently uses a gluten-free circle symbol with “gluten-free” in larger letters in the middle. Above and below the gluten-free, in smaller font are the words “GLUTEN” and “FREE,” respectively. For their certification label, The Gluten Intolerance Group uses a similar “gluten-free” in a circle, with the words “Certified” and “Gluten-Free” in smaller letters above and below the circle, respectively. Bob’s Red Mill said in court documents that on May 17 it received a cease and desist e-mail from the G.I.G. The e-mail stated that G.I.G. has used their mark consistently in commerce since 2005, and demanded that Bob’s cease using their logo, saying it was similar to the G.I.G.’s logo and could confuse consumers into thinking the Group had certified the Bob’s Red Mill products, which it had not. The Food and Drug Administration’s says that a product labeled gluten-free must have less than 20 parts per million, and Bob’s Red Mill says they adhere to that standard. In court document, Bob’s said that “complying with G.I.G.’s demand would require a significant redesign and marketing process,” and that the “potential damages exceed $75,000.” The suit by Bob’s Red Mill claims that G.I.G. abandoned its application to register its gluten-free mark with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office on Feb. 13 of this year, and asks the court to declare that G.I.G.s gluten-free mark is unenforceable and merely descriptive. Basically, Bob’s seems to be launching a preemptive lawsuit to put G.I.G. on its heels before G.I.G has the chance to sue Bob’s. Stay tuned to see if this suit actually makes it to a trial, or if cooler heads prevail and the two sides work something out. The Gluten Intolerance Group was founded in 1974, and offers consumer support, advocacy and education to the gluten-free community. Bob’s Red Mill was founded in 1978, is a global provider of gluten-free milled grain products, and certified-organic milled grain products. Disclosure: Bob's Red Mill and G.I.G. have been sponsors of Celiac.com.
  5. I miss biscuits more thananything. Before going gluten-free, I loved to eat biscuits andgravy, strawberry shortcake (on homemade biscuits) and warm biscuitswith honey! There is nothing that compares with the satisfaction ofeating a warm homemade biscuit. Which is why the following recipe isso exciting. This is a recipe that can be manipulated to cater tospecific dietary restrictions-even mine! There are dairy-free,soy-free and egg-free options included. It might take a couple triesfinding the right combination for you, so spend a day making somedelicious gluten-free home-style biscuits. Home-style Drop Biscuits(Gluten-Free) Servings: 16 largebiscuits Ingredients: 1 ½ cup brown rice flour 2 cup corn starch orpotato starch or tapioca starch ½ cup soy flour orsorghum flour 2 teaspoons baking powder 1 ¾ teaspoons salt 1½ teaspoons teaspoons baking soda 2 teaspoons xanthan gum 1 stick of butter or gluten-free butter substitute(chilled in the freezer) 1 ¼ cup soy milk 1 ¼ cup water 1 tablespoon cider vinegar 1 egg, beaten (or the equivalent amount ofyour favorite egg replacement) To Make: *Note: 1. If you’re not vegan or dairy free, feelfree to use 1 c. buttermilk in place of the soy milk and vinegar. Ifyou’re allergic to soy, try using your usual milk substitute andkeep the vinegar in the recipe. Also reduce the liquid if necessary, you don't want the batter to be too runny. Preheat your oven to 350F degrees. In a large mixing bowl thoroughly combine the flour (a fork works well for this), bakingpowder, salt, baking soda, and xanthan gum. For an easiertime working with the butter, grate the butter into the flour usingthe small holed side of a box grater. Mix the butter into the flourso that there are no large balls of grated butter. Add the soy milk, water, vinegar and beaten egg to the flourand stir until the dry and liquid ingredients are combined. Using a large spoon, drop the dough onto agreased pan to make 16 biscuits. Cook at 350F degrees for 15 minutesor until golden brown.
  6. Celiac.com 07/27/2010 - Many businesses contact us here at Celiac.com, wanting to know how to start a gluten-free business. There are many important things to consider before you open your gluten-free business to celiac and gluten intolerant customers. The following information is intended to help those looking to comply with celiac standards of gluten-free food. Start-Up: To begin, it is important to take take inventory of celiac contamination requirements. Will your gluten-free business also sell gluten-containing foods? If so, cross contamination will be an issue. If your company will be solely a gluten-free accommodating business, it will make your challenges fewer, but there are other important factors to consider such as contamination, suppliers and certifications. Before you begin your journey into providing gluten-free products, it is important to think like a celiac. Contamination & Cross-Contamination: Cross-contamination occurs when a gluten-free product comes into contact with other gluten based products. Cross contamination can occur in a variety of ways, but it usually begins where food is prepared and packaged, such as with the supplier or the manufacturer. However, cross-contamination can occur from other sources as well. If you plan to sell gluten containing pizza and gluten-free pizza, for example, then you will have an entirely new set of concerns. If you make the pizza dough in-house, there is a very good chance that gluten flour will permeate in the air for hours after using, coating your surfaces and creating a health hazard for the gluten-free folks. And if you bake the gluten and non-gluten pizza's in the same oven, then you will also need to take that into consideration, as that is also a source of cross-contamination and can render your gluten-free pizza inedible for sensitive celiacs. If your gluten-free food is stored in the same place as the gluten-containing food, you may have also a health hazard on your hands. Basically, it's a good rule of thumb to follow the celiac guidelines set for keeping a gluten-free kitchen. There are many considerations to take into account when supplying gluten-free food and while keeping a pristine business will be your best friend, sometimes even that isn't enough. Suppliers: Suppliers are a very important factor when starting a gluten-free business. It is important to research the product sources before using an ingredient source. If an ingredient source is contaminated by gluten, then your products could also be contaminated by gluten. So if you are looking to buy gluten-free rice flour for example, the reliability of your rice flour to be gluten-free will depend greatly on your supplier. It is important to carefully research the product supplier before using them. There is nothing worse than buying large quantities of food labeled “gluten-free” that actually contain gluten. Remember, it is up to a product's manufacturer to guarantee that their products are gluten-free. They must research their ingredient suppliers, and follow-up with them periodically, as sources and ingredients can change at anytime without notice. Gluten-Free Certification: If you plan to operate a gluten-free business then getting your products certified gluten-free is the best way to go. Not all gluten-free certifications are created equal. There are various gluten-free labels ranging from legitimate to not so legitimate, so it is important to research the most reliable, and best gluten-free label for your products. Getting your product 'gluten-free' certified will put your consumers at ease and increase your sales. It will also put you at ease knowing that you are providing the best gluten-free product you possibly can.
  7. This recipes comes to us from Melissa Boucher. 4 ½ cup gluten-free flour 1 ¾ cup sugar 7 teaspoons baking powder 2 teaspoons salt ½ teaspoon nutmeg ½ teaspoon cinnamon 3 eggs 2 teaspoons gluten-free vanilla 2 cup milk or water 1 cup oil Mix dry ingredients together. At medium speed beat eggs and vanilla. Add rest of wet ingredients. Add dry mixture. Makes about 2 dz. donuts. These freeze well and can be put in the microwave--80% power for 20-30 seconds.
  8. Celiac.com 06/09/2018 - If you haven’t tried savory porridge, then you’ve been missing out. This combination of brown rice, steel cut oats and quinoa makes a nice introduction. The perfectly boiled egg takes it to the top. Dress it up with as many vegetables as you like. You can make it a day or two ahead of time, and just top with vegetables to make a tasty, portable lunch. Ingredients: 4 large eggs, room temperature ⅓ cup brown rice, rinsed well ⅓ cup red quinoa, rinsed well ⅓ cup steel cut oats, rinsed well 2 ounces fresh pea sprouts 2 medium shallots, peeled, halved through root 1 1” piece ginger, peeled, crushed ¼ cup gluten-free tamari or soy sauce Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper 2 teaspoons toasted sesame oil, divided 2 radishes, thinly sliced 1 small Persian cucumber, diced 1½ cups spinach, wilted Sliced almonds, more fresh pea shoots, fresh cilantro leaves, and chopped scallions, as desired Directions: Bring shallots, ginger, rice, quinoa, oats, and 4 cups water and 4 cups of chicken broth to a boil in a large saucepan, reduce heat, and simmer for about 1½–2 hours, stirring often after the first hour of cooking to prevent sticking. Cook until mixture is thick like porridge and rice is very soft, and beginning to break down. Stir in more water as needed to achieve desired thickness. Discard shallots and ginger and stir in soy sauce; season with salt and pepper. Add pea shoots and cook just until shoots are wilted and tender, about 1 minute. Meanwhile, bring a large saucepan of water to a boil, then carefully add eggs. Boil exactly 6 minutes, then transfer eggs to a large bowl of ice water; saving hot water for wilting the spinach. Let eggs cool and peel. Serve porridge drizzled with oil and topped with soft-boiled eggs, wilted spinach, cucumber, radishes, peanuts, cilantro, and scallions, as desired. Note: You can cook the rice and quinoa up to 2 days ahead. Reheat in the microwave before adding soy sauce and remaining ingredients.
  9. Celiac.com 05/21/2018 - Just a year ago, Starbucks debuted their Canadian bacon, egg and cheddar cheese gluten-free sandwich. During that year, the company basked in praise from customers with celiac disease and gluten-sensitivity for their commitment to delivering a safe gluten-free alternative to it’s standard breakfast offerings. But that commitment came to an ignoble end recently as Starbucks admitted that their gluten-free sandwich was plagued by “low sales,” and was simply not sustainable from a company perspective. The sandwich may not have sold well, but it was much-loved by those who came to rely on it. With the end of that sandwich came the complaints. Customers on social media were anything but quiet, as seen in numerous posts, tweets and comments pointing out the callous and tone-deaf nature of the announcement which took place in the middle of national Celiac Disease Awareness Month. More than a few posts threatened to dump Starbucks altogether. A few of the choice tweets include the following: “If I’m going to get coffee and can’t eat anything might as well be DD. #celiac so your eggbites won’t work for me,” tweeted @NotPerryMason. “They’re discontinuing my @Starbucks gluten-free sandwich which is super sad, but will save me money because I won’t have a reason to go to Starbucks and drop $50 a week,” tweeted @nwillard229. Starbucks is not giving up on gluten-free entirely, though. The company will still offer several items for customers who prefer gluten-free foods, including Sous Vide Egg Bites, a Marshmallow Dream Bar and Siggi’s yogurt. Stay tuned to learn more about Starbucks gluten-free foods going forward.
  10. Celiac.com 06/06/2018 - Endometriosis is an often painful medical condition in which tissue that normally lines the inside of your uterus, known as the endometrium, begins to grow outside the uterus. There is a bit of research data to support the idea that a gluten-free diet can improve the symptoms of endometriosis for some people. Mainly a 2012 clinical study that showed 75 percent of endometriosis patients reported major improvements after 12 months without gluten. That bit of news has prompted more than a few women to try the diet, and more than a few to blog about it. One example is this blog entry by Lindsay Burgess. According to Burgess, She adds that gluten can “increase inflammation and can also cause digestive issues such as bloating and constipation,” which are common complaints from many who suffer from endometriosis. The basic theory is that endometriosis involves a good deal of inflammation, and that a gluten-free diet will somehow help to reduce inflammation in general, and that the overall result will be a reduction of symptoms and an overall improvement in the endometriosis. Burgess says the endometriosis diet is largely about “cutting down/out inflammatory foods and replacing them with foods that can really support our bodies.” So, it’s not just about eliminating gluten, it is also about eating foods that promote overall health. Nothing wrong with promoting overall health by eating more nutritious foods. A more general question might be: Can eating a more nutritious diet help to improve overall health and thus help to improve symptoms of endometriosis? Perhaps, but eating a more nutritious diet is always a good idea. There’s still no solid medical evidence to show that eliminating gluten alone will help to improve endometriosis, tough, it’s certainly worth a try. Remember, though, that many gluten-free foods are highly processed, and many are high in salt, sugar and fat, compared with their non-gluten-free counterparts. That means that simply giving up gluten likely won’t improve your diet, to say nothing of your endometriosis. So, the take away here is that eating a more nutritious diet is never a bad idea, and that diet can include gluten-free foods, and these foods may improve your general health or your endometriosis. Endometriosis can be a painful, frustrating experience, but going gluten-free is unlikely to improve your condition, and very unlikely to “cure” it. Officially, for people who do not have medical condition that requires them to avoid gluten, it’s probably best to resist the gluten-free diet. So, the short of it is that, if you wish to eat gluten-free, then go ahead. But if you don’t have celiac disease or some other gluten sensitivity, don’t expect health or medical miracles, even for endometriosis. Any benefits gained by a more nutritious diet can likely be gained with a diet that is not gluten-free. Of course, a balanced and nutritious gluten-free diet likely won’t harm you. Otherwise, you can choose to eat an anti-inflammatory diet that is not gluten-free and probably get similar results. In any case, be careful, choose carefully, and pay attention to your body. There’s a good article on this at EndometriosisNews.com. They also have a helpful link about getting started on a gluten-free diet for endometriosis.
  11. Celiac.com 05/29/2018 - The quest for gluten-free product glory just took an interesting turn. Certainly, the explosion of gluten-free products, and their corresponding popularity among consumers is not news. Gluten-free products are a multi-billion dollar industry, and the vast majority of gluten-free products are purchased by people who do not have celiac disease or a dietary sensitivity to gluten. Consumers can now buy nearly every kind of product imaginable in a gluten-free version. There are gluten-free make-ups, gluten-free shampoos, conditioners, and lotions. There’s even been some research to suggest that gluten in orthodontic retainers might be an issue, and so maybe we can expect to see gluten-free retainers soon. But gluten-free condoms? Yes, gluten-free condoms are a thing. And not just one single thing. Numerous organic condom manufacturers are touting their condoms as gluten-free. Brands include Glyde, Green Condom Club, Sustain, and now Lola. Lola is an all-natural personal care company that just launched a line of condoms that claim to be free of paraben, fragrance, casein, and, of course, gluten. Do condoms actually have gluten in the first place? Maybe not. According to Lola co-founders Alex Friedman and Jordana Kier, while most condoms don't contain gluten, those that contain lubricant might. That’s because gluten is commonly used as an emulsifier, stabilizer, and/or filler in personal care products. Because the Food and Drug Administration classifies condoms as medical devices, condom regulations don’t require manufacturers to declare gluten as an ingredient. Certainly there are numerous areas where hidden gluten can be a concern for some consumers, especially those with celiac disease or gluten-sensitivity. And personal beauty care products, prescription and over the counter drugs, and other health care products are one of those areas. Making a strong claim to be gluten-free may be a way for manufacturers like Lola to differentiate itself from products that may contain gluten, or other products that may not include gluten, but may also not declare that clearly. So, for anyone worried about such things, and willing to pay a premium price (a 12 pack of Lola’s gluten-free condoms retail for $11), then gluten-free condom bliss awaits you; or something like that. What do you think? Are gluten-free condoms a genuine product advance? Just another marketing gimmick? A product you would try? More info is at: menshealth.com
  12. Celiac.com 06/04/2018 - Spring means fresh vegetables, and fresh vegetables mean soup. Minestrone soup is one of the great dishes of spring. There are many versions, and many of them are delicious. I tend to favor those with a lighter touch. This version makes a clear, light, delicious minestrone broth that is perfect for showing off your fresh garden vegetables. The gluten-free meatballs help take this soup to eleven. Ingredients: 3 ounces ground beef 3 ounces ground pork 5 cups chicken broth ½ cup fresh gluten-free breadcrumbs 6 tablespoons finely grated Parmesan, divided, plus more for garnish 1 large egg, whisked 4 garlic cloves, 2 minced, 2 sliced thin 2 tablespoons chopped fresh chives 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 1 teaspoon Italian dried seasoning 1 leek, white and pale-green parts only, cut into ¼-inch rounds 1 cup carrots, peeled and cut to ½-inch rounds 1 cup (packed) baby spinach Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper Directions: Mix chicken, beef, egg, gluten-free breadcrumbs,, Italian seasoning, 3 tablespoons Parmesan, 2 minced garlic cloves, chives, ¾ teaspoon salt, and ¼ teaspoon pepper in a medium bowl. Form into meatballs ½-inch-diameter. Heat oil in a small pot over medium heat. Cook meatballs about 3 minutes, until golden brown. Move meatballs to a paper towel to drain away cooking oil. Add leek to pot and cook, stirring often, until beginning to soften, about 3 minutes. Add 2 thinly sliced garlic cloves; cook for 1 minute. Add broth and 2 cups water; bring to a boil. Stir in carrots, add meatballs, and simmer until carrots are tender, and meatballs are cooked through, about 3 minutes. Add spinach and remaining 3 tablespoons Parmesan; stir until spinach wilts and Parmesan melts. Season with salt and pepper. Ladle soup into bowls. Garnish with grated Parmesan.
  13. Celiac.com 06/01/2018 - Sharon Stone is gluten-free and glamorous. Even at 59, the veteran screen star manages to look great and keep landing new work. Stone is in the news recently, promoting her work in two new projects. Stone currently stars in Steven Soderbergh’s innovative murder mystery “Mosaic,” which began as an app and evolved into a full-blown HBO mini-series. She also stars in the romantic comedy “All I Wish,” which premiered at the end of March. A recent article in the New York Times details Stone’s picks for makeup, hair and beauty products, along with some tips on diet and fitness. Among her diet tips, the seasoned star shares the fact that she has celiac disease, so she eats gluten-free. She also avoids processed food, caffeine, and rarely drinks soda or alcohol. For more on Sharon Stone, including her beauty and health routines, check out other recent articles.
  14. Celiac.com 05/25/2018 - People with celiac disease need to follow a lifelong gluten-free diet. However, once their guts have healed, they can still be sensitive to gluten. Sometimes even more sensitive than they were before they went gluten-free. Accidental ingestion of gluten can trigger symptoms in celiac patients, such as pain in the gut and diarrhea, and can also cause intestinal damage. A new drug being developed by a company called Amgen eases the effects of people with celiac disease on a gluten-free diet. Researchers working on the drug have announced that their proof-of-concept study shows AMG 714, an anti-IL-15 monoclonal antibody, potentially protects celiac patients from inadvertent gluten exposure by blocking interleukin 15, an important mediator of celiac disease, and leads to fewer symptoms following gluten exposure. The drug is intended for people with celiac disease who are following a gluten-free diet, and is designed to protect against modest gluten contamination, not to permit consumption of large amounts of gluten, like bread or pasta. AMG 714 is not designed for celiac patients to eat gluten at will, but for small, incidental contamination. Francisco Leon, MD, PhD, study director and consultant for Amgen, says that their team is looking at AMG 714 “for its potential to protect against modest contamination, not deliberately eating large amounts of gluten, like bread or pasta.” Amgen hopes that AMG 714 will help celiac patients on a gluten-free diet to experience fewer or less sever gluten-triggered events. Findings of the team’s first phase 2 study of a biologic immune modulator in celiac disease will be presented at the upcoming Digestive Disease Week 2018. Read more at ScienceDaily.com
  15. The following gluten-free carrot cake recipe is truly a traditional cake. Full of some of the most common allergens like, dairy, eggs and nuts. I tend to experiment with new recipes by replacing ingredients I can't tolerate, with ingredients I can. For example, many recipes allow you to substitute eggs with applesauce. The nuts can be left out-for those allergic to nuts, and the cream cheese can be substituted for dairy-free cream cheese. When substituting however, ratios will be different and it is a good idea to know what ratio of applesauce (for example) equals 4 eggs. Ratio quantities will also greatly depend on your taste buds, but if this recipe is okay for your diet, dig in and enjoy! Cake Ingredients: 1 cup pecans - toasted and finely chopped 2 ½ cups carrots - finely grated 2 cups gluten-free all purpose flour 1 tsp. baking soda 1 ½ tsp. baking powder 2/3 tsp. salt - finely ground 1 ½ tsp. cinnamon 4 large eggs - room temp 1 ½ cups granulated sugar 1 cup vegetable or canola oil 2 tsp. vanilla Cream Cheese Frosting Ingredients: 1/4 cup unsalted butter - room temperature 8 ounces cream cheese - room temp 2 cups powdered sugar 1 tsp. vanilla 1 lemon - finely grated lemon zest only To Make: Start by toasting the pecans in the oven at 350 degree F for 6-8 minutes. Remove from the oven, allow to cool and chop finely. Next, finely shred 2 ½ cups of carrots. Finally, combine the gluten-free flour, baking soda, baking powder, salt, and cinnamon in a bowl, set aside. Beat the 4 eggs on medium speed for about 1 minute, reduce the speed and slowly pour in the granulated sugar. Once the sugar and eggs are combined (about 3-4 minutes) slowly pour in the oil and vanilla. Next, add the flour mixture and beat just until combined. Finally, use a spatula to fold in the carrots and toasted pecans. Divide the batter between two well greased 9 inch round cake pans. Bake at 350 F for 25-30 minutes. Cool in the pan for 10 minutes before inverting onto a cooling rack. Baking Directions: Divide batter between 2 well greased 9 inch round cake pans. Bake at 350 degrees F for25-30 minutes. Allow to cool in the pan for 10 minutes before inverting onto a cooling rack. * Note: This cake can also be made into a single layer 9x13 cake, simply increase baking time to 30-40 minutes. While the cake is cooling, beat together the butter and cream cheese. Next, add the powdered sugar, vanilla, and lemon zest. Beat until thoroughly combined. Place one layer of cake on a platter, spread an even layer of frosting on top of the cake. Add the second layer of cake. Use the remaining frosting to cover the top and sides of the cake. *Idea: Use remaining or extra pecans to decorate the outside of the cake.
  16. Celiac.com 05/26/2018 - If you haven’t tried a savory pancake, then you’ve been missing out. In many places in the world, savory pancakes are more common than the sweet pancakes. They make a great lunch or dinner twist. This gluten-free version combines scallions and peas, but feel free to add or subtract veggies at will. Serve pancakes them warm with butter for a delicious twist on lunch or dinner. Ingredients: 3 large eggs 1 cup cottage cheese ½ stick salted butter, melted ¼ cup all-purpose gluten-free flour 2 tablespoons vegetable oil plus more for skillet 1 cup shelled fresh or frozen peas, thawed 4 scallions, thinly sliced, plus more for serving 1 teaspoon kosher salt plus more, as desired Directions: If using fresh peas, blanch the peas about 3 minutes in a small saucepan of boiling salted water until tender, about 3 minutes (don’t cook frozen peas). Drain well. In a blender, add eggs, cottage cheese, flour, 2 tablespoons oil, and 1 teaspoon salt, and purée until smooth. Transfer batter to a medium bowl and stir in peas and scallions. Batter should be thick but pourable; stir in water by tablespoonfuls if too thick. Heat a lightly oiled large nonstick skillet over medium heat. Working in batches, add batter to skillet by ¼-cupfuls to form 3-inch-4-inch rounds. Cook pancakes about 3 minutes, until bubbles form on top. Flip and cook until pancakes are browned on bottom and the centers are just cooked through, about 2 minutes longer. Serve pancakes drizzled with butter and topped with scallions. Inspired by bonappetit.com.
  17. Celiac.com 05/19/2018 - Looking for a nutritious, delicious meal that is both satisfying and gluten-free? This tasty quinoa salad is just the thing for you. Easy to make and easy to transport to work. This salad of quinoa and vegetables gets a rich depth from chicken broth, and a delicious tang from red wine vinegar. Just pop it in a container, seal and take it to work or school. Make the quinoa a day or two ahead as needed. Add or subtract veggies as you like. Ingredients: 1 cup red quinoa, rinsed well ½ cup water ½ cup chicken broth 2 radishes, thinly sliced 1 small bunch fresh pea sprouts 1 small Persian cucumber, diced 1 small avocado, ripe, sliced into chunks Cherry or grape tomatoes Fresh sunflower seeds 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper Directions: Simmer quinoa in water and chicken broth until tender. Dish into bowls. Top with veggies, salt and pepper, and sunflower seeds. Splash with red wine vinegar and enjoy!
  18. Celiac.com 05/18/2018 - Across the country, colleges and universities are rethinking the way they provide food services for students with food allergies and food intolerance. In some cases, that means major renovations. In other cases, it means creating completely new dining and food halls. To document both their commitment and execution of gluten-free and allergen-free dining, these new food halls are frequently turning to auditing and accreditation firms, such as Kitchens with Confidence. The latest major player to make the leap to allergen-free dining is Syracuse University. The university’s Food Services recently earned an official gluten-free certification from Kitchens with Confidence for four of the University’s dining centers, with the fifth soon to follow. To earn the gluten-free certification from Kitchens with Confidence, food services must pass a 41 point audit process that includes 200 control check points. The food service must also agree to get any new food item approved in advance, and to submit to monthly testing of prep surfaces, to furnish quarterly reports, and to provide information on any staffing changes, recalls or incident reports. Kitchens with Confidence representatives also conduct annual inspections of each dining center. Syracuse students and guests eating at Ernie Davis, Shaw, Graham and Sadler dining centers can now choose safe, reliable gluten-free food from a certified gluten-free food center. The fifth dining center, Brockway, is currently undergoing renovations scheduled for completion by fall, when Brockway will also receive its certification. Syracuse Food Services has offered a gluten-free foods in its dining centers for years. According to Jamie Cyr, director of Auxiliary Services, the university believes that the independent Gluten-Free Certification from Kitchens with Confidence will help ease the anxiety for parents and students.” Syracuse is understandably proud of their accomplishment. According to Mark Tewksbury, director of residence dining operations, “campus dining centers serve 11,000 meals per day and our food is made fresh daily. Making sure that it is nutritious, delicious and safe for all students is a top priority.” Look for more colleges and universities to follow in the footsteps of Syracuse and others that have made safe, reliable food available for their students with food allergies or sensitivities. Read more.
  19. Celiac.com 02/08/2017 - "What if the kid you bullied at school, grew up, and turned out to be the only surgeon who could save your life?" --Lynette Mather If you ask any high school senior what in their life has changed the most since kindergarten, statistics show that many would answer moving from one school to another. However, the more drastic of changes are seen such as illnesses diagnosed during these critical school ages. In 2009 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, and that diagnosis has impacted my life in both positive and negative ways for my past, present, and future time at Indiana Area High School and beyond. Personally I have had to deal with bullying because of my disabilities. Bullying by definition is the use of force or coercion to abuse or intimidate others. I along with 20% of my peers nationwide in grades 9-12 (The Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System) experience bullying in many different forms. Bullying can be teasing, hitting, leaving someone out, whispering behind backs, online harassment, shoving, remarks about race, sexuality, and disabilities. Before my diagnosis I was considered "normal" but as a result of my illness and "strange" dietary needs therefore I have been bullied. However, looking back on my experience I am happy to have dealt with the resistance because it has made me a better, more confident individual. I, like three million fellow Americans nationwide (National Celiac Disease), must deal with the stress of having celiac disease. I was diagnosed in 2009 after having lost my eyesight to a migraine. Celiac Disease is an often under-diagnosed autoimmune disease wherein the person cannot eat wheat, rye, barley, or oats, otherwise known as gluten, because their antibodies will attack their own system leading to other serious health issues such as cancer. Celiac Disease is spread through genes; my entire family, including my father, mother, and sister, has this disease. However, even with the growing awareness of celiac disease, there is also a growing skepticism. "Critics" of my disease claim that the gluten free diet is a fad. Many celebrities have tried to lose weight and failed to stay on this difficult diet. Restaurant chains are coming out with new gluten free menus every day to raise prices and profits, though they refuse to educate their servers about what someone with a gluten "allergy" cannot eat. While some people are sympathetic and know the outstanding facts about celiac disease, most of the population stays in the dark about this ailment. This causes frustration for people with celiac disease, like me, to have to deal with the resulting brick wall of resistance. In my small community it is very rare for someone to have such a disease that the public knows little about. This can cause doubt and disbelief, especially at a high school where everyone is just trying to "fit in". When I was diagnosed in 2009, I had just started ninth grade and I had also started playing two high school sports, softball and tennis. For the softball team it was a well-known fact that after every away game the softball boosters would buy each girl a twelve inch sub from a local deli to eat on the way home. Whenever my parents and I contacted the booster president to explain the situation with my disability and that I simply would like to have a salad, we were met with backlash. I did not understand at the time why a parent would refuse to supply another child with food after a physical activity when everyone else was getting a meal. This quickly made me an outcast on the softball team as the "strange girl with the made up disease", causing me to feel stressed and awful about myself over something that I could not control. I would have loved to have been able to "fit in" and eat the subs like my teammates rather than being different, especially after growing up able to eat gluten! It was a hard transition to make. I went from being able to eat the subs, donuts, pizza, and any other fast-food product to a strict dietary regime. After my long process through the education system, I finally got the meal I had a right to have. Unfortunately, the boosters' actions, forced us to go through the school system to "prove" I had a legitimate excuse not to eat the subs. I was distanced from other members of the team and, in subsequent years, had to deal with backlash from my teammates. They do not understand that it is not a personal choice to avoid gluten. I have a disability. I simply cannot eat it. Instead, they go back to the first year when I was eating the same foods they ate, and I get blamed for wanting to be "special" and get the more expensive food. I know that I am not alone in my struggle and that people with celiac disease around the world deal with what I deal with everyday - just like others who are bullied for being different. The after effects from my being bullied have shown themselves even in everyday situations. I have learned a great deal about myself and respect for other individuals' differences. I believe that if I had not been bullied I would not have the self-confidence, integrity, sense of right and wrong, or leadership skills that I have now. It has allowed me to go above and beyond in tough situations, knowing that I can overcome them. I know that even though the times are tough with my disability, and that while others may never understand mine, I can certainly understand and respect theirs. I respect and do not judge others simply based on what they can or cannot eat. I also know that just because someone does not "look" ill on the outside does not mean they are not dealing with something awful on the inside. This allows me to make friends easily and to understand others more effectively. Being bullied has also allowed me to learn new leadership skills that I use in my volunteer work. I am confident in myself that I can go forward into the world of higher education and succeed because of the values I now hold dear. The most drastic change I have encountered in my high school career is the diagnosis of celiac disease in 2009. This diagnosis has impacted my life in both positive and negative ways, in the past, present, and future at Indiana Area High School and beyond. I have had to deal with bullying because of my disabilities. Bullying, by definition. is the use of force or coercion to abuse or intimidate others. I along with 20% of my peers nationwide in grades 9-12 (The Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System) experience bullying in many different forms. After dealing with the effects of my being bullied, I know that it has made me a better person. I can travel the world and make lasting relationships based on acknowledging and respecting differences in every person I encounter.
  20. Celiac.com 05/16/2018 - Galectins are a family of animal lectins marked by their affinity for N-acetyllactosamine-enriched glycoconjugates. Galectins control several immune cell processes and influence both innate and adaptive immune responses. A team of researchers recently set out to assess the role of galectins, particularly galectin-1 (Gal-1), in the treatment of celiac disease. The research team included Victoria Sundblad, Amado A. Quintar, Luciano G. Morosi, Sonia I. Niveloni, Ana Cabanne, Edgardo Smecuol, Eduardo Mauriño, Karina V. Mariño, Julio C. Bai, Cristina A. Maldonado, and Gabriel A. Rabinovich. The researchers examined the role of galectins in intestinal inflammation, particularly in Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, and celiac disease patients, as well as in murine models resembling these inflammatory conditions. Maintaining the fine balance between host immunity and tolerance promotes gut homeostasis, and helps to prevent inflammation. To gain insight into the role of Gal-1 in celiac patients, the team demonstrated an increase in Gal-1 expression following a gluten-free diet along with an increase in the frequency of Foxp3+ cells. The resolution of the inflammatory response may promote the recovery process, leading to a reversal of gut damage and a regeneration of villi. Among other things, the team’s findings support the use of Gal-1 agonists to treat severe mucosal inflammation. In addition, Gal-1 may serve as a potential biomarker to follow the progression of celiac disease treatment. Gut inflammation may be governed by a coordinated network of galectins and their glycosylated ligands, triggering either anti-inflammatory or pro-inflammatory responses. That network may influence the interplay between intestinal epithelial cells and the highly specialized gut immune system in physiologic and pathologic settings. The team’s results demonstrate that the anti-inflammatory and tolerogenic response associated with gluten-free diet in celiac patients is matched by a substantial up-regulation of Gal-1. This suggests a major role of this lectin in favoring resolution of inflammation and restoration of mucosal homeostasis. This data highlights the regulated expression of galectin-1 (Gal-1), a proto-type member of the galectin family, during intestinal inflammation in untreated and treated celiac patients. Further study of this area could lead to better understanding of the mechanisms behind celiac disease, and potentially to a treatment of the disease. Source: Front. Immunol., 01 March 2018. The researchers in this study are variously affiliated with the Laboratorio de Inmunopatología, Instituto de Biología y Medicina Experimental (IBYME), Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Buenos Aires, Argentina; the Centro de Microscopía Electrónica, Facultad de Ciencias Médicas, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Córdoba, Argentina; the Instituto de Investigaciones en Ciencias de la Salud (INICSA), Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Córdoba, Argentina; the Laboratorio de Glicómica Funcional y Molecular, Instituto de Biología y Medicina Experimental (IBYME), Consejo de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Buenos Aires, Argentina; the Sección Intestino Delgado, Departamento de Medicina, Hospital de Gastroenterología Dr. C. Bonorino Udaondo, Buenos Aires, Argentina; the Unidad de Patología, Hospital de Gastroenterología, Bonorino Udaondo, Buenos Aires, Argentina; the Instituto de Investigaciones, Universidad del Salvador, Buenos Aires, Argentina; and the Departamento de Química Biológica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina.
  21. Celiac.com 05/11/2018 - Nestled in the foothills of Tuscany just a few miles north of Lucca, the Italian village of Fabbriche di Vallico is home to a famous chestnut mill that still produces chestnut flour. One of a very few in existence, and one of just two left in the region, the town’s mill is the only one to produce exclusively gluten-free flour. In fact, this quiet village about forty miles northwest of Florence has been making gluten-free chestnut flour since 1721. These days the town is known for for its hotels, such as the Renaissance Tuscany II Ciocco Resort & Spa that overlooks the Lucca valley. The hotel offers tours to the traditional Fabbriche di Vallico mill, which produces exclusively gluten-free flour, where guests can learn about the ancient tradition of grinding autumn chestnuts into sweet gluten-free chestnut flour and maybe even meet mill owner Fosco Bertogli, who's revived the nearly 300 year tradition. After the tour, visitors can learn to make pasta from these chestnuts with the property's head chef. Mr Bertogli tells me his "passion" is what got the mill running again in 1999. He sells the delicious, high quality chestnut flour for between ten and 12 euros for a one kilogram bag. Read more about this romantic gluten-free travel experience at DailyMail.co.uk.
  22. This recipe comes to us from Fiddle-Faddle in the Gluten-Free Forum. This is an adaptation of Robyn Ryberg's biscuits, found here on celiac.com. Ingredients: 1/3 cup shortening ½ cup potato starch ¾ cup cornstarch 1 ¾ teaspoon xanthan gum 1 tablespoon baking powder ¼ teaspoon baking soda 1 tablespoon sugar ¾ cup milk ½ teaspoon salt ½ cup shredded sharp cheddar cheese ¼ cup butter, softened (optional--makes a very fattening biscuit!) ********************************** Another ¼ cup butter, melted, mixed with ¼ - ½ teaspoon garlic powder Directions: Preheat oven to 375F. In medium bowl, blend all ingredients except for last two. Mix very well to remove any lumps. Dough will be quite soft and a bit sticky. Roll or pat our dough on a lightly floured (cornstarch) surface. Dough should be about ½ inch thick. Cut out biscuits with 2 ½ inch cookie cutters. An inverted glass will also do the job. Place biscuits on lightly-greased baking sheet. Bake for 12-15 minutes, until lightly browned. As soon as they come out of the oven, brush with melted butter/garlic combination. Makes 6-8 large biscuits.
  23. Celiac.com 01/02/2018 - Sandwich lovers can get mighty particular about which breads make the best sandwich. There's plenty of room for opinion, and personal taste can include opinions on toasting versus non-toasting, seeded versus non-seeded, white versus whole grain, and on and on. That means that this list of gluten-free sandwich breads is not meant to be authoritative. It is not written in stone. In fact, it is subject to revision based on input and suggestions by our readers. That said, these are some of the stand-out gluten-free sandwich breads that we have tried. Bread Srsly Bread Srsly uses long fermentation of organic millet, sorghum and arrowroot with a wild sourdough culture to deliver a tasty gluten-free classic with a delightful sourdough tang. Okay, it's not pre-sliced, so technically it may not quality as sandwich bread, but I'm such a fan of Bread Srsly. Toast this bread up and it makes a lovely base for a sandwich. The tangy sourdough is perfect for ham, or tuna salad, or just a bout anything else you want on your sandwich. Breadsrsly.com Canyon Bakehouse Canyon Bakehouse makes a wide variety of gluten-free bread products. Canyon's gluten-free breads can also be stored at room temperature without becoming crumbly, making them perfect for sandwiches. Canyon. Breads are also excellent for grilled sandwiches. Certified gluten-free, Dairy Free, Soy Free, Nut Free, Non GMO. Canyonglutenfree.com Franz Seattle favorite Franz bakery makes a respectable sandwich bread. Franz makes gluten-free bread with a nice, chewy consistency that doesn't crumble, so you can make a sandwich with or without toasting. Great for lunches! Franzbakery.com Glutino Glutino gluten-free breads come in four styles: Cinnamon Raisin; Multigrain; Seeded and White. Glutino breads are light enough to eat right out of the bag. They also come in a nice, full size slices so you can make a proper sandwich. Glutino.com Rudi's Once found only in the frozen section, Rudi's now makes a soft, fluffy sliced bread that can be eaten right out of the bag. Rudi's keeps it simple with just two varieties of gluten-free fresh sliced bread, Original and Multigrain. Both are perfect for sandwiches as is, but toast up nicely. RudisBakery.com Schär Schär uses top quality rice, corn or buckwheat, along with sorghum, a traditional African grain, or quinoa, to make its long-fermented gluten-free sourdough sliced loaves and baguettes. Sourdough enzymes help the bread to stay fresh longer after baking, enrich the bread with vitamins, and eliminates the need for artificial preservatives. Schaer.com Trader Joe's Yes, Trader Joe's offers a gluten-free bread. Trader Joe's Gluten Free Whole Grain Bread is dairy, soy, nut, and gluten-free. It's made with brown rice flour, teff (a grass cultivated for grain), whole grain amaranth, whole grain sorghum (also in the grass family, and cultivated for grain), tapioca, potato, and flaxseed meal. According to Trader Joe's website, their Gluten Free Whole Grain Bread is “lower in fat, with fewer calories than its big-brand counterpart.” Traderjoes.com Three Bakers Three Bakers gluten-free sliced sandwich bread comes in four varieties: White Bread Whole Grain; 7 Ancient Grain Whole Grain Bread; Rye Style Whole Grain Bread; and MAXOMEGA™ Whole Grain AND 5 Seed Bread. Threebakers.com Udi's Gluten-Free White Light, airy and fiber-rich, Udi's popular sandwich loaf bread is made with all natural ingredients without added fillers. Udisglutenfree.com
  24. Celiac.com 05/02/2018 - Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder, not an allergy. Celiac disease affects abut 1 in 100 people, and requires professional diagnosis and treatment with a gluten-free diet. There is a good deal of confusion and inaccurate information about celiac disease and a gluten-free diet. Here are some important things to know about celiac disease: 1) Celiac Disease Doesn’t Always Have Obvious Symptoms People with celiac disease may have few or no symptoms. In fact, these days, most people diagnosed with celiac disease, report few or no symptoms. Classic gastrointestinal symptoms include bloating, diarrhea, gas, constipation, and gut pain after consuming wheat, barley or rye. Other prominent symptoms can include fatigue, headache, poor weight gain, and depression. Less classic, but still common celiac symptoms include one or more of the following: anemia, anxiety, skin rashes, infertility, irritability, joint pain, pale mouth sores, thin bones, tingling and/or numbness in hands and feet. 2) No Symptoms Doesn't Mean No Damage The level of celiac-related symptoms or complaints a person has does not equate to the level of gut damage. Few or no symptoms does not mean little or no gut damage. People can have severe celiac symptoms, yet relatively light gut damage on biopsy, or conversely, they can have light symptoms and still have serious gut damage on biopsy. 3) A Simple Antibody Test Can Point the Way If you suspect celiac disease, be sure to talk with your doctor. A simple antibody test or two is usually sufficient to rule celiac disease in or out. If the test is positive, then a doctor will likely recommend a biopsy for confirmation. Recent studies show that a combination of two antibody tests may be better than biopsy. Usually, patients need to be eating wheat when they are tested for celiac disease, but that is changing. There are also some promising new approaches to blood testing for celiac disease. 4) Early Diagnosis is Key The longer you go without treatment, the higher the risk of gut damage, and the greater the likelihood of developing associated conditions. Early diagnosis is especially important in the elderly, as they have a greater risk of developing associated conditions and complications from untreated celiac disease. Still diagnosing celiac disease can be tricky and can take time, partly because the symptoms can be vague, seem unrelated, and can mimic other conditions. 5) No Cure Currently, there is no cure for celiac disease. Several companies are working to develop a vaccine, or other immune therapy for celiac disease, but until we see a major scientific breakthrough, there is no cure for celiac disease. 6) Gluten-Free Diet is Mandatory A gluten-free diet is the only treatment for celiac disease. For people with celiac disease, a gluten-free diet is mandatory, not optional. If people with celiac disease consume wheat, rye or barley proteins they risk causing serious damage to their health, including gut damage and potential cancer, especially in the long term. 7) Full Gut Healing Can Take Time Recent studies show that most people with celiac disease begin to see gut healing in the first year or year and a half. The vast majority of celiacs on a gluten-free diet heal within two to three years. Gut healing usually corresponds to healing in other affected parts of the body, such as improvements in bone microarchitecture, neuropathy, and other areas of celiac-associated damage. 8) Gluten Sensitivity Can Increase The longer you go without gluten, the more sensitive you may become to accidental gluten ingestion. It’s not uncommon for people with celiac disease to see their sensitivity to gluten increase in the weeks and even years after they give up gluten. That can mean that accidental gluten ingestion can bring on symptoms that are more severe than their original complaints. For many people, this sensitivity may slowly taper off and decrease over time. For others, sensitivity remains high and requires extra vigilance about to make sure food is gluten-free. Remember, increased gluten sensitivity does not equal increased gut damage. For some, a fully healed gut may be more sensitive to gluten than a damaged one, and vice versa. Among people on a gluten-free diet due to celiac disease, sensitivity can vary. 9) Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity (NCGS) is a Thing You can be sensitive to gluten and not have celiac disease. Researchers have recently confirmed a condition called non-gluten sensitivity. People with this condition experience celiac-like symptoms when they consume gluten. However, they typically do not test positive for antibodies to gliadin, and they typically have a clean biopsy, so no gut damage. Some studies have cast doubt on the existence of non-gluten-celiac sensitivity. Other studies have shown that many people with NCGS react to gluten. Still other studies show that Fructan has emerged as one possible culprit. 10) You Can Still Live a Healthy Life and Eat Delicious Food Having celiac disease means making some important adjustments to your diet, but it’s still possible to live a healthy life and eat tasty food. Read more about the best gluten-free breads, burgers, pizzas, and all your favorite gluten-free treats. Here is a list of SAFE and UNSAFE foods for people with celiac disease. Here is a list of easy, list of easy, delicious gluten-free recipes. Here is a list of great gluten-free sandwich breads. Here is a list of great gluten-free Mexican Fast Food Chains. Here's a recipe for a delicious gluten-free No-Bake Cheesecake. Knowledge is Power Use Celiac.com, and the Celiac.com Forums to get important information and to share your experience with others like you. Other great celiac disease resources include: The Mayo Clinic Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University Gluten Intolerance Group of North America
  25. Celiac.com 03/20/2015 - Mexican food and tacos are one of my most consistent gluten-free food options. If I'm on the road, or pressed for time, sometimes fast food chains are the only option. But not all Mexican fast food chains are created equal when it comes to gluten-free options. Some do a good job, others do not. So here is a list of Mexican fast food chains that do a good job with gluten-free food options. As always, your individual experience at any of these restaurants may vary, so observe, ask questions about any item you're not sure about, and gauge your comfort level accordingly. If you have feedback, or know of any other Mexican fast food chains that offer good gluten-free food options, be sure to tell us in the comments below. Best Mexican Fast Food Chains: #1: Chipotle Chipotle gets high marks for gluten-free options. Pretty much everything that is not served with a flour tortilla is gluten-free. So, at Chiptole, that means all soft and hard corn taco shells, all meats, beans, vegetables and sides are gluten-free. #2: El Pollo Loco El Pollo Loco is another chain where you can get a good, healthy meal without thinking too hard about gluten. El Pollo Loco gluten-free menu includes their flame grilled Mexican chicken, corn tortillas, pinto beans, refried beans, avocado salsa, Cotija Cheese, mixed vegetables, and flan. Basically, avoid any flour tortillas, and you can easily eat gluten-free at El Pollo Loco. #3: Jimboy's Tacos Jimboy's has long been a favorite of mine, because they prepare all their food fresh from scratch and offer a pretty robust gluten-free menu that includes Jimboy's original tacos, including bean, ground beef, chicken, steak, and carnitas, Tacoburgers, Taquitos in both ground beef, and chicken, Tostadas, including bean, ground beef, chicken, and steak, Ground Beef Kid's Taco, Ground Beef Pepper Poppers, and Jimboy's Guacamole & Sour Cream. #4: Baja Fresh Baja Fresh offers a pretty good range of options for gluten-free eaters. Gluten-free options include Baja Tacos made with corn tortillas, any “Bare style” burrito, and any Baja Ensalada with choice of steak, chicken, or grilled shrimp, as well as grilled vegetables, carnitas, rice, and both varieties of beans. All Baja Fresh dressings and salsas are gluten-free. #5: Qdoba Qdoba is another fast Mexican food chain that offers a solid eating experience for gluten-free diners. Qdoba's gluten-free menu options include all Chicken, Chorizo, Flat Iron Steak, Ground Sirloin, Pork, and Seasoned Shredded Beef. Also gluten-free are their Soft White Corn Tortilla, Cilantro Lime Rice, Black Beans, Tortilla Soup, all Salsas and Dressings, 3 Cheese Queso and Guacamole. #6 Taco Cabana I had the good fortune of trying Taco Cabana on a trip to Albuquerque a while back. I was not disappointed. Taco Cabana does gluten-free eaters right with a wide variety of gluten-free options, including their Black, Borracho, and Refried beans, their Barbacoa, Chicken Fajita Meat, Rotisserie Chicken, Shredded Chicken Taco Meat in their Crispy Tacos, Chorizo, Chalupas or Nachos Steak Fajita Meat, Ground Beef Taco Meat (Crispy Tacos, Chalupas or Nachos), and Street Tacos in both Chicken & Steak. As with most places on this list, diners can substitute corn tortillas for flour tortillas in all tacos, fajitas, & plates. Other gluten-free options include Guacamole, Hash Brown Potatoes, Pico de Gallo, Rice, and Salsas – Fuego, Roja, Verde, Ranch, and Sour Cream. #7: Mighty Taco Mighty Taco makes it easy on gluten-free eaters by offering any taco with a corns shell, and most anything else on their menu except flour tortillas. Mighty Taco's gluten-free menu includes: Mighty Taco with Seasoned Ground Beef or Chicken, Mighty Pack with Seasoned Ground Chicken, Refried Bean and Cheese, Meatless Mighty, Veggies and Cheese, Seasoned Ground Chicken, Seasoned Ground Beef, Fajita Chicken, Buffito Chicken, and the Taco Beef Salad, Mighty Chicken Salad, Chicken Fajita Salad, and the Chicken Buffito Salad.
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