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Found 2,289 results

  1. I have an immensely difficult time finding gluten-free, vegan, sugar-free, yeast-free bread products, so the ingredient list for this recipe couldn't be more ideal for a celiac. The only ingredients: teff, salt, and water. Injera is the bread staple of Ethiopia and is eaten by most households everyday. Injera is traditionally made solely with teff grain, although some modern recipes call for yeast or all-purpose flour as well. The high iron content of teff makes it a perfect choice for a bread substitute. This recipe is very easy however, injera requires advanced planning and will not work for a last minute meal, as it can take up to three days for the teff to ferment before cooking is possible. Traditional Ethiopian Teff Injera (Gluten-Free) Servings: 20 Ingredients: 3 cups ground teff 4 cup distilled water Himalayan salt to taste Olive oil for the skillet Note: This is a large batch, as I like to have left-overs. Also, the fermentation process takes a while, so it's nice to have some injera for later. For a smaller batch, cut the ingredients in half. Mix ground teff with the water and let stand in a bowl covered with a dish towel at room temperature until it bubbles and has turned sour. The fermentation process will take approximately 1-3 days. The fermenting mixture should be the consistency of a very thin pancake batter. Stir in the salt, a little at a time, until you can barely detect its taste. Lightly oil a skillet 8 inches minimum but you can also use a larger one. Heat over medium heat. Pour in enough batter to cover the bottom of the skillet; About 1/4 cup will make a thin pancake covering the surface of an 8 inch skillet if you spread the batter around immediately by turning and rotating the skillet in the air; This is the classic French method for very thin crepes; Injera is not supposed to be paper thin so you should use a bit more batter than you would for crepes, but less than you would for a flapjack pancakes. Cook briefly, until holes form in the injera and the edges lift from the pan; Do not let it brown, and don't flip it over as it is only supposed to be cooked on one side. Remove and let cool. Place plastic wrap or foil between successive pieces so they don't stick together. To serve, lay one injera on a plate and ladle your chosen dishes on top. Serve additional injera on the side. Guests can be encouraged to eat their meal without utensils, instead using the injera to scoop up their food. Important: Please use caution when eating with your hands. To avoid contamination make sure your hands are very clean with gluten-free soap before eating.
  2. I was at a Price Chopper today looking for Sir Kensington's condiments. (Thanks to Ennis for that recommendation ) I have been trying to find gluten-free, corn-free, soy-free, xantham gum-free condiments. The Sir Kensington's website has a store locator so that is really helpful. But at this store that is suppose to carry it, I couldn't find it. I was going to ask a store clerk, but happened to stumble upon another brand I noticed that mentioned gluten-free right on the label, and so I read the ingredients and was happily surprised - no soy, corn, or xanthan gum either. Yay! The brand is called Full Circle. There were a few different mustards (regular, dijon, spicy brown, and stone ground) and also a ketchup. It's not overly expensive either. And it's organic. I still have another store in town to look for the Sir Kensington, which I hope will indeed carry it, because I am still looking for a gluten-free, soy-free, corn-free, xantham gum-free mayo. But it's always nice to find more brands that are free of so many of the pesky ingredients some of us can't eat. If anyone knows of any other condiments free from all those ingredients, please feel free to share here. I am still working on going totally soy,corn, xanthan gum free. It does seem to take a little time to find all the foods and ingredients you love and use often. It's a nice feeling once you finally start getting there though. I LOVE this message board for people to share what they find. So, so far, gluten-free, soy-free, corn-free, xantham gum-free condiment brands - Sir Kensington: http://www.sirkensingtons.com/products Full Circle: http://fullcirclefoods.com/fc_products/condiments-sauces/ I did notice Full Circle has other foods like snack foods (chips, cookies, etc) and other things that might contain soy and I have no idea of any contain corn, etc. so check each ingredient list before buying. But as far as their condiments, all the ones I looked at so far are free from the above mentioned pesky ingredients. Kind of annoying that the Full Circle website doesn't seem to list ingredients for each product.
  3. Celiac.com 04/28/2018 - Looking for a tasty, memorable, gluten-free dish to star in your next breakfast or brunch production? This Spanish-style egg and potato omelette is just the thing. A simple blend of eggs, onions and potatoes is coaxed into a delicious, memorable entreé. For the eggs and potatoes: 1 pound Yukon Gold or other yellow potatoes 9 large eggs ¾ cup extra-virgin olive oil 1 medium yellow onion Coarse sea salt Freshly ground black pepper For the herbed mayonnaise: Handful of fresh dill. Or any blend of any herbs you like, including mint, basil and thyme ⅓ cup mayonnaise ½ lemon For the eggs and potatoes: Heat the oil in a 9-inch cast-iron or ovenproof skillet, over medium heat. Rinse and cut the potatoes into ¼-inch rounds, placing them flat in the skillet as you work. Peel the onion and cut into thin slices, adding them to the pan. Cook for about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally so the potatoes brown on both sides and don’t stick to the pan. Strain oil through a heatproof colander into a heatproof bowl. Position an oven rack 6 inches from the heated broiler element. Put aside at least 1 tablespoon of the onion-flavored oil; you can save the rest to use again later. Whisk the eggs in a large bowl, then season generously with salt and pepper. Add the drained potato-onion mixture and stir to coat. Coat the empty skillet with reserved oil and heat to medium high. Pour in the egg-potato mixture. Reduce the heat to medium-low; cook for about 5 minutes, until the edges are just set. Transfer to the oven and broil about 3 minutes, or until puffy and golden brown. Prepare the herbed mayo by mincing the dill or other herbs, and place in medium bowl, along with the mayo. Squeeze in the juice from the ½ lemon, stirring until well mixed. Use a thin spatula to loosen around the edges of the eggs and then under them. Slide cooked eggs and potatoes out of the pan and onto a cutting board. Sprinkle with a dash of salt, and allow to rest a few minutes. Cut into 6 equal wedges, and serve warm or at room temperature, with dollops of the dill mayonnaise.
  4. Celiac.com 04/27/2018 - The latest market research shows that the gluten-free food boom is being driven by people looking to improve their diets with healthier, more nutritious food, rather than concerns about gluten intolerance or celiac disease. A recent survey showed that gluten-free items were the top bakery choice for consumers. That news led DuPont Nutrition & Health to begin trials in its bakery center in an effort to improve their product offerings. The company said in a news release that the trend was driven by people looking to improve their diets with healthier food, rather than concerns about gluten intolerance or celiac disease. Additionally, consumers are looking for better quality and wider availability in their favorite specialty foods. Even though just under 1% of the population avoids gluten due to celiac disease, more than 10% of people in Italy and the U.K. choose gluten-free products, while in France and Spain, about 8% of consumers choose gluten-free. Obviously, these numbers greatly exceed the number of people with celiac disease, and that is part of the power driving the rapid expansion of gluten-free products. According to DuPont’s reading of the Mintel study data shows “untapped potential for bakers to develop more and better-quality products with extra nutritional benefits,” including products that are high in fiber, devoid of added preservatives, and low in saturated fats, carbohydrates and calories. These numbers help to dispel the idea that the gluten-free food explosion is simply a passing fad. In any case, building an association between good nutrition and gluten-free bakery products can only help food makers with global consumers who are actively seeking one. Read more at: fooddive.com
  5. Celiac.com 10/11/2012 - Would you be surprised to learn that a number of naturally brewed soy sauces are technically gluten-free? I was. I was recently doing some research for a catered even and needed to make a decision about what kind of soy sauce to use in the food preparation. Since the Korean food being served required a great deal of soy sauce for marinating purposes, the hosts were concerned that gluten-free tamari might end up costing too much. However, the event included a number of folks who eat gluten-free, and the hosts did want to provide food that everyone could eat. So, what to do? The restaurant making the food uses Kikkoman. Is Kikkoman safe to serve to people with celiac disease and gluten-intolerance? In an effort to answer that question, I did a bit of research. I was a bit surprised when my research led me to an interesting article on the naturally fermented soy sauce made by Kikkoman and Lima Foods, which are two major manufacturers of soy sauce. There are two ways to manufacture soy sauce. The first uses natural fermentation. The second uses chemical hydrolysis. Both methods will break down the complex proteins including gluten into smaller components such as amino acids and polypeptides. However, the soy sauces tested for the article were produced using natural fermentation. That's because chemically produced (or artificial) soy sauce is may contain toxic and carcinogenic components produced by hydrochloric acid hydrolysis. The article said that the soy sauces made by these companies actually met Codex Alimentarius standards for gluten-free foods, and that tests show their gluten content to be well under the 20ppm required for gluten-free products. The people who produced the article sent samples out to a major laboratory in the Netherlands for gluten analysis, and the results were surprising. Gluten content in both samples was well under the acceptable detection limit of 5ppm (see report). According to a new European laws, any product labeled gluten-free must contain less than 20 ppm gluten. The FDA has proposed the same 20 ppm level for their rule, which they look set to implement very soon. That means that the naturally fermented soy sauces that were tested meet gluten-free standards, and will likely not trigger adverse reaction in gluten sensitive individuals, especially considering the small daily quantities of soy sauce consumed. Anyone who does not trust this can, of course, choose soy sauces that do not contain any wheat to start with. Tamari soy sauces are typically produced without wheat, but some brands do not follow this tradition and are not wheat-free, so: Buyer beware. As for the catered event, after talking with the gluten-free guests, the hosts decided to go with traditional Kikkoman. They have not received any reports of illness or adverse reactions, even in the several people with high gluten-sensitivity. I'm sure there are plenty of gluten-free eaters who have plenty to say about soy sauce. What's your take on the test results? Source: Soya.be LAB RESULTS
  6. Celiac.com 04/26/2018 - Emily Dickson is one of Canada’s top athletes. As a world-class competitor in the biathlon, the event that combines cross-country skiing with shooting marksmanship, Emily Dickson was familiar with a demanding routine of training and competition. After discovering she had celiac disease, Dickson is using her diagnosis and gluten-free diet a fuel to help her get her mojo back. Just a few years ago, Dickson dominated her peers nationally and won a gold medal at Canada Games for both pursuit and team relay. She also won silver in the sprint and bronze in the individual race. But just as she was set to reach her peak, Dickson found herself in an agonizing battle. She was suffering a mysterious loss of strength and endurance, which itself caused huge anxiety for Dickson. As a result of these physical and mental pressures, Dickson slipped from her perch as one of Canada's most promising young biathletes. Eventually, in September 2016, she was diagnosed with celiac disease. Before the diagnosis, Dickson said, she had “a lot of fatigue, I just felt tired in training all the time and I wasn't responding to my training and I wasn't recovering well and I had a few things going on, but nothing that pointed to celiac.” It took a little over a year for Dickson to eliminate gluten, and begin to heal her body. She still hasn’t fully recovered, which makes competing more of a challenge, but, she says improving steadily, and expects to be fully recovered in the next few months. Dickson’s diagnosis was prompted when her older sister Kate tested positive for celiac, which carries a hereditary component. "Once we figured out it was celiac and we looked at all the symptoms it all made sense,” said Dickson. Dickson’s own positive test proved to be both a revelation and a catalyst for her own goals as an athlete. Armed with there new diagnosis, a gluten-free diet, and a body that is steadily healing, Dickson is looking to reap the benefits of improved strength, recovery and endurance to ramp up her training and competition results. Keep your eyes open for the 20-year-old native of Burns Lake, British Columbia. Next season, she will be competing internationally, making a big jump to the senior ranks, and hopefully a regular next on the IBU Cup tour. Read more at princegeorgecitizen.com
  7. Celiac.com 11/24/2014 - Following a strict gluten-free diet is the only way to treat celiac disease. However, researchers have been lacking clear agreement on how and when to assess gluten-free dietary adherence in celiac patients or how to determine its effectiveness on villous atrophy. To address this reality, a team of researches conducted a prospective study to determine patient adherence to a gluten-free diet, and its effect on histological recovery after 1-year of gluten-free diet. The research team included G. Galli, G. Esposito, E. Lahner, E. Pilozzi, V. D. Corleto, E. Di Giulio, M. A. Aloe Spiriti, and B. Annibale. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Digestive and Liver Disease, the Department of Haematology, the Department of Pathology, and the Department of Digestive Endoscopy at Sant'Andrea Hospital Sapienza University Rome in Rome, Italy, and with the Centro Ricerche S. Pietro, Ospedale S. Pietro in Rome, Italy. Between 2009 and 2012, the researchers enrolled 65 consecutive newly-diagnosed adult patients (median age 38 years, 18–70) with biopsy-proven atrophic celiac disease. The researchers assessed patients after one year of gluten-free diet, using duodenal histology, serological assays, symptom reports and a dietary interview based on a validated questionnaire. They defined complete histological recovery as the absence of villous atrophy and ≤30/100 intraepithelial lymphocytes. The team found that 81.5% of patients showed adequate gluten-free diet adherence (ADA), whereas 18.5% had inadequate adherence (IADA). Overall, 66% of ADA patients achieved complete histological recovery, but no IADA patients recovered (P < 0.00001). Interestingly, ADA patients who achieved complete histological recovery showed about the same antibody seroconversion and symptoms as those who achieved partial histological recovery with P = 0.309 and P = 0.197, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that, for ADA patients with incomplete histological recovery, Marsh 3C was still a risk factor (OR 8.74, 95% CI: 1.87–40.83). This study shows that 66% of adult celiac patients who successfully follow a gluten-free diet can make a complete histological recovery after 1-year. However, patients with severe histological damage at diagnosis who successfully follow a gluten-free diet remain at risk for incomplete histological recovery 1 year later. Lastly, patients who do not follow a gluten-free diet have no hope of making a full histological recovery. For clinicians and doctors, this data should serve as a guideline for determining gluten-free diet adherence in celiac patients, and determining the level of patient recovery. For celiac patients, the data should serve to demonstrate the importance of following a strict gluten-free diet. Source: Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics 2014; 40(6):639-647.
  8. Hi all! Just saw this giveaway on my Facebook homepage and thought I'd share. Enjoy Life, Gluten Free and More, Nima, Spokin, and Sittercity are giving away a free trip to Palm Springs (and it's allergy-friendly / gluten-free!). The post said you get free airfare for two, 3 night stay, free Nima starter kit, Enjoy Life snacks, + 3 month membership to the Sittercity babysitting app. Here's the link to enter: https://bit.ly/2qICWsV. I entered with 3 different emails. Good luck friends!
  9. Celiac.com 04/20/2018 - A digital media company and a label data company are teaming up to help major manufacturers target, reach and convert their desired shoppers based on dietary needs, such as gluten-free diet. The deal could bring synergy in emerging markets such as the gluten-free and allergen-free markets, which represent major growth sectors in the global food industry. Under the deal, personalized digital media company Catalina will be joining forces with Label Insight. Catalina uses consumer purchases data to target shoppers on a personal base, while Label Insight works with major companies like Kellogg, Betty Crocker, and Pepsi to provide insight on food label data to government, retailers, manufacturers and app developers. "Brands with very specific product benefits, gluten-free for example, require precise targeting to efficiently reach and convert their desired shoppers,” says Todd Morris, President of Catalina's Go-to-Market organization, adding that “Catalina offers the only purchase-based targeting solution with this capability.” Label Insight’s clients include food and beverage giants such as Unilever, Ben & Jerry's, Lipton and Hellman’s. Label Insight technology has helped the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) build the sector’s very first scientifically accurate database of food ingredients, health attributes and claims. Morris says the joint partnership will allow Catalina to “enhance our dataset and further increase our ability to target shoppers who are currently buying - or have shown intent to buy - in these emerging categories,” including gluten-free, allergen-free, and other free-from foods. The deal will likely make for easier, more precise targeting of goods to consumers, and thus provide benefits for manufacturers and retailers looking to better serve their retail food customers, especially in specialty areas like gluten-free and allergen-free foods. Source: fdfworld.com
  10. Betty Wedman-St Louis, PhD, RD

    Cannabis and Gluten

    Celiac.com 04/13/2018 - Is cannabis gluten-free? That is a frequent question I receive now that over 50% of the United States has approved medical cannabis and some states have also included recreational cannabis. Let's begin be describing cannabis as an oral medicine that has been used since the Chinese treatise on pharmacology described Emperor Shen Nung in 2737 BCE using it. In 1850 cannabis was listed in the U.S. Pharmacopoeia as a cure for many ailments. By the early 1900's Squibb Company, Eli Lilly and Park-Davis were manufacturing drugs produced from marijuana for use as antispasmodics, sedatives, and analgesics (pain medication). Today, hemp seed and hemp oil products are widely available. They provide CBD or cannabidiol - the non-psychoactive cannabinoid from various Cannabis sativa strains grown for high CBD levels. In order to be legal in the U.S. these products must contain less than 0.3% THC, the psychoactive cannabinoid in cannabis. CBD products can be consumed as capsules, tinctures, "gummy" chewables, lollipops, and numerous edibles like brownies, chocolates, and granola bars. The nutritive value of cannabis is presently described as that of hemp seed since no scientific analysis of Cannabis sativa has been done. Hemp is one of the world's most nutritious foods with high quality protein and essential fatty acids found in its seeds. Hemp contains all eight essential amino acids and can be sprouted for use in salads and shakes. Celiacs with protein allergies to eggs and soy need to be cautious when adding hemp and CBD products to their diet regimes. The major proteins in hemp are albumen and edestin. Hemp is a nut so those celiacs with nut sensitivities need to consider that. Others may be limiting their lectin intake and need to limit CBD products until processing evaluations can indicate levels resulting in the products. CBD oils contain linoleic and linolenic fatty acids which are important in reducing inflammation. They can be used in salad dressings, mashed potatoes and substituted for olive oil in recipes. Since these essential fatty acids must be obtained in the diet, using hemp or cannabis CBD products can enhance health. Cannabis products- particularly CBD- have been overlooked by individuals needing symptom relief from neurological (Parkinson's, ALS, Multiple Sclerosis, migraine), immune (cancer), and gastrointestinal disorders (Crohn's disease, IBS). When choosing cannabidiol-CBD products be sure to check that they have been tested for pesticides, heavy metals, and microbiological contaminants. Today, more hemp is sold to pet owners as bird seed than used by humans. But as more individuals learn of the botanical benefits of cannabis, they should consider adding it to their diet and supplement regime. My book, Cannabis-A Clinician's Guide (CRC Press 2018) reviews the science and clinical uses of cannabis along with how to use it in recipes.
  11. Celiac.com 10/10/2014 - If you’ve ever had the pleasure of eating El Salvadoran, Nicaraguan, southern Mexican food, then you might be familiar with fried plantains. Plantains are like big bananas. When fried, they are soft, sweet and delicious. They can be eaten as a meal, or as a desert. They can even be served for breakfast with rice, beans and corn tortillas. They are often served with Mexican style sour cream, or ‘crema.’ Fresh plantains are common in the local restaurants, and ubiquitous in the local Mexican and Central American markets around San Francisco. Ingredients: ½-1 cup oil for frying 4-6 plantains (make sure they are very mature, not green—brown and soft is best) Directions: Heat oil in a large, deep skillet over medium high heat. Peel the plantains and cut them in half. Slice the halves lengthwise into thin pieces. Fry the pieces until browned and tender. Drain excess oil on paper towels. Serve as a side dish to a main meal, with refried beans and Mexican style sour cream.
  12. Celiac.com 10/10/2016 - Good news for anyone on a gluten-free diet who misses their beloved Lucky Charms breakfast cereal. Lucky Charms joins a number of General Mills' other brands with gluten-free versions, including Chex and Cheerios. In this case, the company turned an old brand into a gluten-free product. Like Cheerios, Lucky Charms are made from oats, which are gluten-free, except that most major commercial oat supplies have minor, but problematic, amounts of other grains. To solve that, General Mills has created a process that sorts "out the small amount of wheat, rye and barley in our supply of whole oats that are inadvertently introduced at the farms where the oats are grown, or during transportation of the whole oats to our mill," according to the company. General Mills has applied for patents on their unique sorting process that ensures General Mills’ gluten-free cereals meet the FDA's strict guideline for gluten free, said Emily Thomas, senior marketing manager for Lucky Charms in a press release. One advantage of General Mills sorting process is that it allows the company to formulate gluten-free options without altering their recipes, or changing their flavor. One thing consumers can count on, says Thomas, is that “…the recipe won't change. It will maintain the same great, magically delicious taste that Lucky Charms fans love." Read more: Investopedia
  13. Celiac.com 04/03/2018 - A gluten-free diet is crucial to avoiding problems associated with celiac disease. However, many gluten-free foods come with drawbacks that are important to understand. Also, not all gluten-free food is created equal, not all gluten-free foods are healthy, and simply going gluten-free may not resolve all of your issues. Here are some things to keep in mind about a gluten-free diet: Gluten-Free food is more expensive than food made with wheat flour. In fact, gluten-free substitutes are about twice as expensive as standard foods. They are more costly to make, and they sell in lower volume, which pushes up retail prices. Like many of their non-gluten-free counterparts, gluten-free foods can be highly processed. Processed foods can promote inflammation, which is one of the things that people with celiac disease are trying to avoid. Gluten-Free does not automatically mean nutritious. In fact, gluten-free food is generally less nutritious than similarly processed foods made with wheat flour. Foods that are naturally gluten-free will generally be healthier than gluten-free substitutes. That may seem obvious, but if you look at the gluten-free food aisle in your local store, you will see many highly processed foods that are not any better than their gluten-containing counterparts in terms of general nutrition. Gluten-free foods are often higher in carbohydrates and calories than their non-gluten-free counterparts. Gluten-Free food is higher in salt than its non-gluten-free counterparts. Recent products tests show that most gluten-free snacks tested are far saltier than their non-gluten-free alternatives. Of 106 products surveyed, researchers found that many gluten-free snacks have up to five times more salt than non-gluten-free counterparts. Gluten-Free food is higher in fat than its non-gluten-free counterparts. Gluten-Free food is higher in sugar than its non-gluten-free counterparts. Gluten-Free ingredients don’t always mean gluten-free food. The news is riddled with stories about gluten contamination in restaurants, pizza joints, etc., that claim to use gluten-free ingredients. Examples of companies that rolled out gluten-free pizza only to be met with complaints by people with celiac disease include: California Pizza Kitchen, Domino’s pizza, and Papa John’s, among others. The longer you avoid gluten, the more sensitive you may become. For many people with celiac disease, the longer they avoid gluten, the more sensitive they become. This can mean stronger, more lengthy reactions to seemingly minor gluten ingestion, so be careful. A gluten-free diet will not reverse osteoporosis, or iron and calcium deficiency. If your celiac disease progressed for a long time before your diagnosis, then the odds are much more likely that you have suffered from osteoporosis, iron and calcium deficiency. A gluten-free diet alone will not reverse osteoporosis, or calcium deficiency. In such cases, you will need to consult your doctor for proper treatment. Osteoporosis is especially problematic in women with celiac disease.
  14. There's been some confusion as to whether Lipton's Onion Soup mix contains gluten. Officially, Lipton's lists the ingredients as: Onions (deyhydrated), salt, cornstarch, onion powder, sugar, corn syrup, hydrolyzed soy protein, caramel color, partially hydrogenated soybean oil, monosodium glutamate, yeast extract, natural flavors (wheat), disodium inosinate, disodium guanylate. Also, some folks point out that the kosher version lists yeast extract from barley as an ingredient. Others point out, as does the website for Unilver, which makes Lipton products, that Lipton Onion Soup mix is "made in a facility that also processes milk, eggs, soy, wheat, sesame and sulfites." To be on the safe side, I usually make my own mix and store it for later use. Here's a great recipe for a tasty gluten-free onion soup mix that tastes very much like Lipton's, and works great as a substitute in other recipes. It goes great in meatloaf, stew, and works well to make dip. Ingredients: 1½ cups dried minced onion ¼ cup beef bouillon powder (gluten-free) 2½ tablespoons onion powder ½ teaspoon crushed celery seed ½ teaspoon sugar Directions: Combine all ingredients and store in an airtight container. About 5 tablespoons equals a single 1¼-ounce package of Lipton's mix.
  15. Scott Adams

    Corn Bread (Gluten-Free)

    This recipe comes to us from Janet Wolkenstein 1 ¼ cups yellow corn meal ½ cup white rice flour ¼ cup tapioca flour ¼ cup sugar 2 teaspoons baking powder ½ teaspoon salt 1 cup skim milk ¼ cup vegetable oil 1 egg, beaten Combine dry ingredients in a bowl and stir together until evenly mixed. Stir in milk, oil, and egg and mix just until dry ingredients are moistened. Pour batter into a greased 8 or 9 inch pan (or can use muffin tins if desired). Bake at 400 for 20-25 minutes or until light golden brown and wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean. Makes about 8-9 servings. You can substitute 1/3 cup dry milk and 1 cup water for the skim milk, or a gluten-free non-dairy milk substitute if needed.
  16. The California Cider Company was founded in Graton, California in 1993. The ACE brands are ACE APPLE, ACE PERRY, ACE APPLE HONEY, ACE BERRY, ACE JOKER, ACE PUMPKIN, ACE PINEAPPLE, ACE BLACKJACK 21 and SPACE. The ciders range from the dry JOKER to the sweeter ACE BERRY and the champagne-like BLACKJACK 21 made with all local Sonoma apples. SPACE is a bloody orange mimosa at 6.9%abv. ACE Ciders are available in 46 states, go to acecider.com for more details. All our styles are all natural, all fruit and gluten-free and vegan. The ciders are unpasteurized but cold filtered 4 times so that they are fresh and clean to the taste. They are a lower calorie , lower alcohol alternative to wine and beer and very refreshing. The California Cider Company is the largest, independent, family owned cidery in the US, with we believe the best range of ciders for all tastes. Visit our site for more info: acecider.com.
  17. Looking for something easy, off-beat, nutritious and gluten-free? Well, look no further than these baked sweet potato chips. Just grab a couple sweet potatoes, slice, bake slightly and then toast to desired crispness. Add your ingredients of choice, and chow down. Ingredients: 2-4 sweet potatoes Almond butter, peanut butter, or sunflower seed butter Blueberries Pomegranate seeds Directions: Heat your oven to 350°F. Use a knife, or vegetable slicer to slice your sweet potatoes to about ¼-inch thick. Place a wire baking rack on top of a large baking sheet and then place each slice on the wire rack. Bake for 20-25 minutes until they start to get soft, but tender enough to toast up later. Lightly toast each slice to desired crispness, then add almond, peanut or sunflower seed butter and top with blueberries or pomegranate seeds, as desired. Dig in! Storage tip: Cool any extra slices, pop them into a glass container, and store them in the fridge for up to a few days.
  18. Celiac.com 04/04/2018 - Meal kits are a growing business segment, and an increasingly popular part of dinner for many busy working people. Meal kits typically include the ingredients necessary to make a complete meal, delivered to your door on a regular basis. For example, a company called gFoodNow offers a variety of Gluten-Free Mealkits starting a only $6.99 per serving. Another company called Green Chef has now included gluten-free meal options. Business Insider’s Connie Chen recently tried Green Chef’s meal offerings, and wrote about her experience for the magazine. In the interest of transparency, Business Insider openly declares that it has an affiliate partnerships with Green Chef, which provides them with revenue. As such, their review should be taken with a grain of salt. That said, the idea of a reliable, good quality meal kit that is gluten-free, easy to prepare and tasty to eat will likely interest more than a few people with celiac disease. The meals Chen tried for one week included Orange Dijon Chicken, Hawaij-Rubbed Steak, and Red Lentil Tikka Masala. Each kit came with a recipe card that listed all meal ingredients, including known allergens, as well as the basic tools required to prepare each meal. The meals can be prepared with simple kitchen tools, including a knife, pot, measuring cup, sauté pan, baking sheet, oil, salt, and pepper. In addition to offering gluten-free meal kits, Green Chef offers six more two-person meal kits at the following price points: Omnivore, $11.99/meal Carnivore, $13.49/meal Gluten-free, $13.49/meal Vegan, $11.99/meal Paleo, $14.99/meal Vegetarian, $10.49/meal Keto, $14.99/meal Chen did not try the gluten-free meal kits, but instead tried the omnivore kits. We have yet to try Green Chef, but look forward to reaching out to the company. If you have tried Green Chef’s gluten-free meals, we would love to hear about your experience. Meantime, you can browse all of Green Chef’s meal plans here. You can read Connie Chen's report for Business Insider here.
  19. Celiac.com 03/31/2018 - If you’re gluten-free and need chocolate chip cookies, and you need them in a hurry, then this recipe for flourless chocolate chip cookies is your new best friend. Just toss some white beans, almond, peanut or sunflower butter together with a few other simple ingredients, toss them on a parchment covered baking sheet, and violá, gluten-free chocolate chip satisfaction. Ingredients: 1.33 ounce 70-85% dark chocolate bar, broken 1 can white beans (drained, rinsed) ⅓ cup almond butter, peanut butter or sunflower seed butter 2 tablespoons honey or maple syrup 1½ tablespoons vanilla extract ¼ teaspoon sea salt ¼ teaspoon baking powder ¼ teaspoon baking soda ¼ teaspoon xanthan gum Instructions: Heat oven to 350F. Use a food processor to blend all ingredients except chocolate. Take care to blend all of the white beans thoroughly, until smooth. Transfer to a mixing bowl and stir in dark chocolate pieces. Spoon dough onto baking sheets lined with parchment paper. Bake for 20-25 minutes, until golden brown. Makes 12 regular cookies or 24 mini cookies.
  20. Celiac.com 09/24/2010 - A team of researchers recently found that people with celiac disease, even those following a gluten-free diet, also commonly suffer from sleep disorders that are related to depression, anxiety and fatigue. Since anxiety and depression both occur at higher rates in people with celiac disease than in the general population, the researchers were curious to see how celiac disease might affect quality of sleep. The research team included F. Zingone, M. Siniscalchi, P. Capone, R. Tortora, P. Andreozzi, E. Capone, and C. Ciacci. They are affiliated with the Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine at Federico II University of Naples in Italy. In addition to finding that sleep disorders commonly affect people with celiac disease, regardless of gluten-free status, they also found that sleep disorders are less common in celiacs who score higher on quality of life scales, while those with low quality of life scores suffer at higher rates. For their study, the team evaluated people celiac disease at diagnosis, celiacs on a gluten-free diet at follow-up, and a group of healthy control subjects. All patients completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), SF36, Zung and Fatigue scales and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). Their results showed that people with celiac disease at diagnosis and those following a gluten-free diet showed higher PSQI scores than did healthy volunteers (P < 0.001). PSQI scores were no lower for those following a gluten-free diet than for the others with celiac disease (P = 0.245). People with celiacs disease at diagnosis and those on a gluten-free diet scored similarly on the other tests, but differed sharply from the healthy control subjects. Patients who had higher individual scores for overall physical and mental fitness (r = −0.327, P = 0.002, and r = −0.455, P < 0.001, respectively) had higher overall PSQI scores. Factors influencing sleep quality were depression (r = 0.633, P < 0.001), fatigue (r = 0.377, P < 0.001), state anxiety (r = 0.484, P < 0.001) and trait anxiety (r = 0.467, P < 0.001). So, if you or someone you love has celiac disease, be prepared to address sleep issues, and maybe consider doing everything possible to ensure a good night's rest. Source: Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics. DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2036.2010.04432.x
  21. Celiac.com 03/30/2018 - The latest Gluten-Free Food Market Report offers a comprehensive global market evaluation, including enabling technologies, key trends, market drivers, challenges, standardization, regulatory landscape, opportunities, future road map, value chain, ecosystem player profiles and strategies. The report also includes global gluten-free investment forecasts from 2017 to 2022. The report covers top gluten-free manufacturers, including General Mills, Hain Celestial Group, Dr. Schar, Freedom Foods, Gruma, Kellogg, Kraft Heinz, Doves Farm, Amy’s Kitchen, Blue Diamond Growers, Enjoy Life Foods, Boulder Brands, and Bob’s Red Mill. The report focuses on the global market for gluten-free food products, especially in North America, China, Europe, Southeast Asia, Japan, India. The report is divided into sections based on manufacturers, regions, type and application, and covers the categories of bakery, confectionery, cereals and snacks. It is targeted at supermarkets and hypermarkets, convenience stores, speciality stores, online retailers, other relevant retailers. The report offers analyses of the global Gluten-Free Food market and its commercial landscape, along with insights into the Gluten-Free Food production processes, major issues, and solutions that may help manufacturers to mitigate product development risk. It is designed to provide readers with a comprehensive understanding of the most relevant forces driving and restraining the gluten-free food market and their projected impact. Readers of the report will gain potentially valuable information about the market strategies being embraced by major gluten-free businesses, along with projected directions in the gluten-free food market. Anyone curious about the report may request a sample.
  22. Celiac.com 03/15/2018 - How many times have you discovered a great gluten-free beer, only to find out it’s not available where you live? Gluten-free beer is enjoying tremendous growth in terms of both brewing ingredients and strategies, and in terms of the types of beer being produced. There are literally dozens of gluten-free beers being brewed today that did not exist a few years ago. Still, one of the more common complaints has to do with the general lack of availability. Even locally available products might only appear in a few stores. Edinburgh’s Bellfield Brewery is about to change all of that, when their Bellfield IPA, and their Bohemian Pilsner become available at 54 Morrisons stores across the UK, and online. Run by a team that includes two guys with celiac disease, Bellfield started in 2015 with sole goal of making exceptional beers that just happen to be gluten-free. The company has already won several major awards for its modern, gluten-free beers; not as gluten-free, but in straight up head to head competition with traditional beers. In the last year, Bellfield has won two awards in the World Beer Awards and their IPA has been consistently ranked among top ten IPAs in the UK. Brewer and business development manager, Kieran Middleton, says the deal with Morrisons in England, bring Bellfield’s beers to customers, far from Edinburgh. “As a young company we are so proud to have this opportunity to supply one of the UK’s leading retailers. We set out to create “Craft Beer For All” great tasting beers, that everyone can enjoy,” he said. The deal will give Bellfield wide UK coverage with all the major distributors and wholesalers, including Bidfood, Matthew Clark, Pigs Ear, Amathus, Inverarity Morton, Pivovar and a number of leading online beer shops. Read more at: BQlive.co.uk
  23. Celiac.com 03/22/2018 - If you haven’t already heard about Kidfresh, you probably will. In case you’re not familiar, Kidfresh is basically a conspiracy between parents pediatric nutritionists and top chefs to slip hidden vegetables and extra nutrition into tasty frozen meals for kids. Kidfresh offers a line of children's favorites reinvented and enriched with hidden vegetables, and wholesome ingredients, without any artificial flavors, colors, or preservatives. The Kidfresh line of frozen meals is nationally distributed and available in over 10,000 stores. Founded by Matt Cohen and Gilles Deloux, two fathers looking to create better, more nutritious frozen meal choices for children. Kidfresh looks to offer convenient, tasty meal options for busy parents, while delivering more nutritious, healthier products than leading brands. Kidfresh grew from a single concept store in New York City to become a nationwide brand, now available in over 10,000 grocery stores across the country. The reason you’ll likely be hearing more about Kidfresh in the near future is that they are launching a new line of gluten-free and organic products. Beginning in spring 2018 Kidfresh will introduce a new Gluten Free White Mac 'n Cheese, to be followed by several new certified organic items, including a Wagon Wheels Mac 'n Cheese. "We're so excited to introduce these new products," says co-founder Matt Cohen. "Kidfresh moms have asked us about Gluten Free options and we've worked hard to develop the best tasting White Mac 'n Cheese out there. Getting into organic is also strategic for Kidfresh, broadening our appeal towards Millennials that are more focused on organic ingredients." So keep your eye out for Kidfresh products, and be sure to let us know how you think they are doing in the gluten-free department. Read more at PRNewswire.com.
  24. Jules Shepard

    Gluten-Free Matzo (Matzah)

    Matzo is the oldest and most well-known (edible) symbol of the exodus of the Jews from Egyptian slavery. According to the Bible, Aaron and Moses warned of 10 plagues sent to cause Pharaoh to free the Jews. When the final plague killed all the first-born sons of Egypt but passed over the Jewish houses, Pharaoh finally released the Jews from their bondage in Egypt. However, they were forced to leave in such great haste that their bread dough did not have time to rise, leaving them with what we now know as "matzo" (matzah, matza, matzoth, matzot), or unleavened bread. While matzo was the humble food of slaves, it also recalls a great moment of freedom. During Passover, special foods like matzo are eaten to symbolize both the bitterness of slavery and the sweetness of freedom. Gluten-free participants in Passover rites have typically not been so free to share in this great tradition, however. Matzo is manufactured for Passover using wheat flour; thus, we must think outside the proverbial cracker box to explore our safe and tasty options. Like any other wheat flour recipe we might long to enjoy again, devising a gluten-free solution is as simple as: modify, substitute and perfect using gluten-free ingredients. You will be pleasantly surprised not only at the crunchy lightness of this recipe, but also at its simplicity! Since matzo must be made and baked within 18 minutes to prevent any leavening in the dough, you have no time to dawdle with a intricate details. This 5 ingredient recipe takes only 20 minutes from start to finish! Like many of the recipes coming out in my third book (to be released this summer of 2010!), this recipe is not only gluten-free, but also dairy-free, soy-free, egg-free and vegan. Enjoy! Ingredients: 1 cup Jules Gluten Free All Purpose Flour (kosher) ½ cup almond flour 4 Tbs. extra virgin olive oil 3 Tbs. water ½ tsp. sea salt or kosher salt Directions: Preheat oven to 450 F (static) 425 F (convection, preferred). Whisk together Jules Gluten Free All Purpose Flour and almond flour then add in the liquid slowly while stirring with a fork or pastry cutter. If the dough is too dry, add additional water by the ½ teaspoonful in order to get dough wet enough to form a ball but not be sticky. Form a ball with the dough and pat out onto a clean surface or pastry mat dusted with Jules Gluten Free All Purpose Flour. Pat with your fingers to flatten the dough and roll to the thickness of matzo, then prick with a fork. Sprinkle with additional coarse kosher salt, if desired. Bake for 10 minutes on a parchment-lined baking sheet, or just until slightly browned. Serves: 4.
  25. Celiac.com 03/20/2018 - Juicy, delicious scallops get the cold-weather treatment with this delightfully simple recipe. These lightly spiced scallops are a perfect way to celebrate the approach of spring, while winter still digs in for a fight. They go great with your favorite white wine, and are sure to leave your diners smiling. Butternut squash and warm spices make a base for fresh sea scallops in this tasty gluten-free entree . Ingredients: 12 medium sea scallops 1 package butternut squash 1 tablespoon butter 1 pinch cayenne pepper ½ teaspoon ground ginger, separated ½ teaspoon ground coriander ¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon 2 tablespoon quality cooking oil salt pepper Directions: Bring salted water to a boil in a covered stockpot. Add squash; cook 13 to 15 minutes or until very tender. Drain well. Transfer to food processor along with butter, cayenne, ⅛ teaspoon ground ginger, and ⅛ teaspoon salt. While squash cooks, pat scallops dry with paper towels. In small shallow bowl, combine coriander, cinnamon, ¼ teaspoon ginger, and ¼ teaspoon black pepper. Sprinkle scallops with ¼ teaspoon salt to season both sides. Press 1 side of each scallop into spice mixture; set aside, spice sides up. In 12-inch skillet, heat oil on medium-high to a point just below smoking. Add scallops, spice sides down. Cook 2 to 3 minutes or until browned. Turn over; cook 2 minutes or until golden brown and opaque in center. Remove from heat. Purée squash until smooth. Divide between serving plates, and top with scallops. Garnish with chives. Grab your favorite wine or gluten-free beer, and dig in.
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