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Found 2,344 results

  1. These recipes come to us from Jeanne Barkemeijer de Wit. I discovered that molasses and salt tastes a lot like soy sauce. (To me at least) Ive built a number of sauces around a core of ingredients. Basically I use variations containing varying amounts of balsamic vinegar, dark unsulfered molasses, fruits, turbanado (raw) sugar and sea salt. Here are a few of my recipes: Sweet and Sour Sauce 16 oz Pureed Strawberries (or other pureed fruit - fresh or canned) 1 cup turbanado (raw) sugar (For a sweeter taste add a can of frozen condensed fruit juice syrup. I like using Bacardis strawberry frozen margarita concentrate, but any frozen strawberry concentrate will work.) 8-16 ounces of sweet bell pepper - chopped 1 teaspoon fresh chopped garlic (or gluten-free powdered substitute) 1 teaspoon salt 4 oz molasses Combine all ingredients, pour over chicken, beef, or pork. Cook for 2 hours at 340 degrees. I sometimes add fresh strawberries to the dish an hour before cooking is finished. Alternative Soy Sauce 8 oz molasses, 3 oz. balsamic vinegar, sugar to taste. Teriyaki Sauce Add pureed pineapple (or strawberries) to the above Bar-B-Que sauce 16 oz stewed tomatoes pureed 16 oz molasses 6 oz balsamic vinegar teaspoon fresh crushed black pepper table spoon crushed garlic 16 oz canned peaches - pureed sweet red peppers to taste 1 cup turbanado (raw) sugar 1 cup green onions Combine all ingredients in large pot and cook for about an hour. If you want a thicker sauce you can add a tablespoon of corn starch, or cook the entire mixture at a slow boil (stirring frequently) until it reduces to the consistency you desire.
  2. This recipe comes to us from Ellen Switkes. 3 lbs. fish - salmon, white fish, etc (use 2 or 3 kinds of fish, both fatty and lean, salmon makes pink fish balls, whitefish from the east coast is traditional, here in California I use cod and salmon.) 3 large onions 1 egg 3 teaspoons salt (or more) ¼ cup potato starch lots of pepper Stock: Place fish skin/bones/head in a large pot with water to cover, add 2 carrots sliced thin and one onion sliced thin. Boil. Process all ingredients in food processor. Form fish balls either small or large as you like, drop into boiling stock and simmer for 2 hours. Remove fish balls to bowl, reduce stock, strain over fish and refrigerate. I like it when the stock gels a bit. Serve cold with horseradish.
  3. This recipe comes to us from Jay Berger 2 large Idaho potatoes, peeled and sliced 1/8-inch thick 2 large sweet potatoes, peeled and sliced 1/8-inch thick 1 ½ cup coconut or Darifree milk 2 tablespoon arrowroot 1 tablespoon salt 1 tablespoon roast garlic puree (blend minced garlic with the milk) ¼ teaspoon white or black pepper 1 pinch nutmeg 1 tablespoon chopped rosemary 2 tablespoon Gluten-free Casein-free margarine chopped & chilled Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Season potatoes with salt and pepper and layer in oiled 2 inch deep baking pan. Bring the rest of the ingredients just to a boil and pour over the potatoes while hot, until potatoes are almost covered. Dot with margarine. Bake at 400 degrees until tender, about one hour. To assemble the dish, slice the meatloaf into 1½ inch thick slices, and plate with a nice square of the potato non gratin, and the beans along side. Serve everything warm.
  4. 2 pounds ground chuck 1 large egg 1 package Lipton onion soup mix 2/3 cup gluten-free ketchup ½ cup grated Parmesan cheese ½ teaspoon pepper ½ teaspoon garlic powder Mix everything in a large bowl, shape into a loaf. Place on greased baking foil inside a 9 x13 pan. Spread about 2 T. more ketchup on top, if desired, as well as another little sprinkle of garlic powder. Tent more foil loosely over top. Bake at 350 for 40 minutes. Remove foil tent and bake another 15 minutes. Remove from oven and allow to sit for 10 minutes before slicing. I am able to find gluten-free ketchup at my local health food store. I have also used crushed gluten-free corn flakes in place of the parmesan, but I think the loaf holds together better with the cheese.
  5. This recipe comes to us from Dave Fisher. 1 cup of Hunts tomato sauce (gluten-free) 1 ½ tablespoons gluten-free barbecue sauce 1 tablespoon granulated sugar 1 ½ lbs. ground sirloin (10% fat) 6 tablespoons all-purpose flour (rice flour or Bette Hagman flour mix) ¾ teaspoon salt (I use less) 1/3 teaspoon onion powder (McCormick) ¼ teaspoon ground black pepper Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Combine the tomato sauce, barbecue sauce and sugar in a small saucepan over medium heat. Heat the mixture until it begins to bubble, stirring often, then remove it from the heat. In a large bowl, add all but 3 tablespoons of the tomato sauce to the meat. Use a large wooden spoon or your hands to work the sauce into the meat until it is very well combined. Combine the remaining ingredients with the ground sirloin -- flour, salt, onion powder and ground pepper. Use the wooden spoon or your hands to work the spices and flour into the meat. Load the meat into a loaf pan. Wrap foil over the pan and place it into the oven for 30 minutes. After 30 minutes, take the meatloaf from the oven, remove the foil and drain the fat. Using a knife, slice the meatloaf all the way through into 8 slices while it is still in the pan. This will help to cook the center of the meatloaf. Pour the remaining 3 tablespoons of sauce over the top of the meatloaf, in a stream down the center. Dont spread the sauce. Place the meatloaf back into the oven, uncovered, for 25-30 minutes or until it is done. Remove and allow it to cool for a few minutes before serving. Serves 4.
  6. This recipe comes to us from Jonathan Hammer. Follow standard beer brewing procedures with respect to sterilization and fermentation. Recipe Per 1 gallon product: 1 pound buckwheat honey 1/3 ounce Challenger Hops Yeast nutrient Water to make 1 gallon Ale Yeast Reserve small amount of hops. Boil honey, water, and bulk of hops for 30 minutes. Add reserved hops and boil for another 5 minutes. Strain off the hops. Cool to room temperature. Add yeast nutrient as per package directions. Transfer wort to glass carboy. Prepare yeast as per package directions and add. Fermentation can last up to 6 weeks. When fermentation is complete, siphon into another glass carboy and store in a cool location for clarification (about 2 more weeks). Siphon off clarified brew into a pot and add ¼ cup dissolved Dextrose (corn sugar primer) per gallon. Bottle immediately. Age for another 2 weeks or until tired of waiting and drink (hopefully not all at once, but celebration is appropriate at this point). Note that some additional clarification may take place; sediment will gather in the bottom of the bottles. Also, this stuff definitely improves with age. I think the secret to getting a flavorful beer is in using buckwheat honey which is very dark and rich, and a fairly strong flavored hops. This is to my taste. Other combinations of honey and hops, however, will yield different tastes. I understand that there are about 300 different types of honey available and who knows how many different types of hops, so an infinite variety of different tasting honey-based ales can be made. Well, maybe not infinite, but at least there are enough combinations to keep someone drunk for a few hundred years trying to test them all. Honey suppliers in the US may be found from the national honey boards web site at http://www.nhb.org. It is interesting to note that in northern Europe and England honey based ales were brewed well before knowledge of malting barley made its way north from the middle east. The reformation probably played a major role in England in the demise of mead and honey-ales (Protestants did not need as many candles as Catholics, less bees were kept, and consequently the price of honey soared). The availability of cheap barley malt and cheap imported French wines probably sealed the fate of mead and honey-ales, along with their numerous variations. Aside from finding a gluten-free beer, I have enjoyed researching the history of beer, wine, and mead.
  7. This recipe comes to us from Jay Berger 1 ½ tablespoons olive oil ¼ teaspoon dried hot pepper flakes 1 garlic clove, minced 3 tablespoons thinly sliced scallion including the green part 1 teaspoon dried rosemary, crumbled ½ cup fresh Gluten-free Casein-free bread crumbs Salt and pepper to taste 1 ¼ pound trimmed and Frenched single rack of lamb (7 or 8 ribs) Watercress sprigs for garnish, if desired In a small skillet heat the oil over moderate heat until it is hot but not smoking, add the red pepper flakes, and cook them, stirring, for 10 seconds. Add the garlic and cook it, stirring, for 30 seconds. Add the scallion and the rosemary and cook the mixture, stirring, for 10 seconds. Stir in the bread crumbs and salt and pepper to taste and remove the skillet from the heat. Heat an ovenproof skillet over moderately high heat until it is hot and in it brown the lamb, seasoned with salt and pepper, turning it, for 5 minutes, or until the sides and the ends are browned evenly. Pour off any fat from the skillet, arrange the lamb, fat and meat side up, and pat the crumb mixture evenly on the fat and meat side of the lamb. Bake the lamb in the middle of a preheated 475 degree F. oven for 15 minutes, or until a meat thermometer registers 130 degrees F. for medium-rare meat. Transfer the lamb to a platter, let it stand, uncovered, for 10 minutes, and garnish it with the watercress.
  8. This recipe comes to us from Lisa: 1 large egg ¼ cup rice milk ½ cup brown rice flour ¼ cup tapioca flour 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon pepper Spices (mix in with ingredients above) 1 pinch thyme 1 pinch oregano 1 pinch rosemary 3 pinch sweet basil 3 pinch parsley 1 baked garlic 1teaspoon Gluten-free Casein-free baking powder-put in last Mix the above ingredients together in a bowl and soak chicken pieces in this mixture. In a separate bowl crush ¼ cup Lay Brand original regular potato chips (as fine as possible) or brown rice bread crumbs. Dip chicken in potato chips or brown rice bread crumbs. Deep fry for 5 minutes.
  9. This recipe comes to us from Jan Ryan. 2-10 oz. package gluten-free elbows 1-10 oz. package frozen, chopped spinach, cooked Double the gluten-free cream of mushroom soup (above). Use canned mushrooms. Add milk to fill evaporated milk can to top. (Is this confusing? You dont need the whole can of evaporated. Milk, just ½ C. So add 2% milk to remaining evaporated milk in can to refill can) One 12 oz. can solid white tune (gluten-free) Salt & pepper to taste Cook noodles and drain. Mix all together. Fill 2 regular casserole dishes. Crumble Barbaras Crisp Rice Cereal over top. Bake at 350 degrees. for 1 hour uncovered.
  10. This recipe comes to us from Phyllis Chinn. 12 tortillas - spray with oil and roast at 350 until crispy (turning once). Reserve. Sauce: 2 Tablespoon butter 2 cloves garlic, minced ¾ teaspoon chili powder ½ teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon ground pepper ¼ teaspoon cayenne ¼ teaspoon ground cumin 2 Tablespoon gluten-free flour 1 cup chicken broth ½ cup milk 3 Tablespoon sour cream Melt butter and sauté garlic until soft; add spices, flour, and mix well. Add broth, milk and cook until thickened, stirring constantly. If too thick, add more broth. Remove from fire and stir in sour cream. Set aside. Meat/vegetable mixture: 1 ½ pounds ground beef; brown and set aside. 1 Tablespoon butter 1 onion, chopped 1 clove garlic, minced 1 small green bell pepper, cored, seeded, and chopped 8 oz. mushrooms, sliced ½ cups sliced ripe olives 1 10 oz. can of Rotel tomatoes (Rotel tomatoes are a southern type of canned tomato with chilis - it contains tomatoes with juice, chopped green chili peppers, salt, and spice) Melt butter and sauce vegetables until cooked through - add Rotel tomatoes and beef. Cook down until no longer juicy. 2 cups shredded Colby or cheddar cheese Break up crisp tortillas into large pieces and layer ½ of them in 8 x 12 oiled casserole. Layer ½ of meat mixture; ½ cheese; ½ sauce; rest of chips; rest of meat; rest of cheese; and rest of sauce. Bake at 350 until bubbly. Note: 4 cups cooked, shredded chicken or turkey may be substituted for beef.
  11. This recipe comes to us from Oliver. ½ cup gluten-free margarine 2 cups onion, chopped 2 cups celery, chopped ¼ cup parsley, fresh, chopped 8 oz. mushrooms, chopped 11-13 cups dried out gluten-free bread cubes 1-2 tablespoons poultry seasoning 1-1 ½ teaspoons salt 1-2 teaspoons thyme ½ tsp black pepper 1-2 teaspoons sage, ground 3-4 cups chicken broth 2-4 cups chicken cooked, diced 2 eggs, beaten 1 teaspoons baking powder Melt margarine in a skillet and sauté onion, celery parsley and mushrooms. Put gluten-free bread cubes in a large bowl. Add all the seasonings and toss well. Pour in broth to make mixture quite moist. Fold in diced chicken. Add eggs and toss together well. Add the baking powder and mix well. Place stuffing mixture in a greased 9 x 13 baking pan and cover with foil. Bake at 350F for 30 minutes, remove foil and continue baking for another 15 to 20 minutes.
  12. Use good quality cheese and plenty of it. This turns out a tender cracker that is layered like the best pastry. The flavor is of toasted cheese. Adapted from Crackers! by Foust and Husch. 2 cups fine rice flour 1 teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon cayenne pepper (optional; more for a hotter cracker) 1 teaspoon finely ground mustard seed 6 Tablespoons (¾ cup) butter or margarine, softened 12 ounces cheddar cheese, shredded 3 egg yolks 2 Tablespoons water Salt for the tops (optional) Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. In the food processor or in a large bowl, combine 1-½ cup flour (reserve ½ cup), salt, cayenne and ground mustard. Cut the butter into the flour mixture until it resembles coarse meal. Mix in the cheese. Stir well until the cheese is evenly coated. In a separate bowl, mix together the egg yolks and the water. Add the egg mixture to the flour mixture and blend to form a dough that will hold together in a cohesive ball. Add more flour from the reserved half cup, as needed, to make a workable dough. Wrap the dough in wax paper and chill one hour. Divide the dough into two equal portions for rolling. On a gluten-free- floured surface or pastry cloth, roll out to a circle approximately ½ inch thick. The dough will be crumbly and a bit hard to manipulate, but dont let this worry you, it doesnt hurt the final product. Cut this circle in four equal pie segments. Gently lift each of the segments one at a time and, without rotating them, stack them so that the straight edges form the sides of a square. Press this gently and roll it out again. (This is what makes the cracker flaky.) Repeat cutting, lifting and rolling out two more times. Roll the dough thinner the last time, about 1/8 inch thick. If desired, sprinkle top lightly and evenly with salt and roll over it lightly with the rolling pin. With a sharp knife (or rolling pizza cutter, if you have one), cut the dough into 1-inch squares and place them on an un-greased baking sheet. Prick each square 1 or 2 times with the tines of a fork. Bake for 10 minutes. Remove any crackers that are already browned through. Turn the rest and bake an additional 5 or 6 minutes, or until medium brown. Remove to a rack to cool. Yield: 70-80. For another variety, leave out the cayenne, mustard and cheddar cheese and substitute 12 oz. Feta cheese. This makes a cracker with a little tang to it. I suspect you could substitute any hard or crumbly cheese.
  13. This recipe comes to us from Janet Wolkenstein Perfect for Thanksgiving or Christmas). Note this recipe has 2 parts: cornbread croutons, and the stuffing ingredients after the croutons are made. Cornbread croutons: 2 cups yellow corn meal 1 tablespoon sugar 2 teaspoons baking powder ½ teaspoon salt 1 cup skim milk ¼ cup vegetable oil 1 egg, beaten Combine dry ingredients in a bowl and stir together until evenly mixed. Stir in milk, oil, and egg, and mix just until dry ingredients are moistened. Pour batter into a greased large cookie sheet to form a thin (¼ inch, approx.) layer. Bake at 400 for 10-15 minutes until done, (be careful not to overcook the bottom). (If the top is still very light when the underside is done, you can put the pan under the broiler for a few seconds to lightly brown it, if necessary.) When cooked, remove from oven and, using a pizza cutter, score the sheet of cornbread in a grid pattern with each cut being about ½ inch wide. Let cool and break apart to form ½ sized croutons. Stuffing Recipe: 1 batch cornbread croutons as above. 1 - 12 oz roll of Jones Original breakfast sausage (can use another brand if you like, but Jones tastes good and has no artificial ingredients or gluten). 2 stalks chopped celery (optional) ¼ cup lightly chopped walnuts (optional) salt pepper marjoram sage thyme garlic powder Crumble sausage into small pieces and cook in pan, draining well when done. Mix cooked sausage with croutons in large plastic or Ziploc bag, making sure they are evenly intermixed. Add chopped celery and walnuts if desired (can use more or less walnuts or celery if you are particularly partial (or not) to one or the other). Mix evenly. Add pepper, sage, thyme, marjoram, and garlic powder to taste. ( I use a few shakes of each from the spice containers, mix, taste, and adjust as necessary.) Save the salt for last; you may not need to add any since the sausage is moderately salty already. Also, if you use a large Ziploc type bag to assemble the ingredients, you can just shake it well when you add each one, and it gets things blended easily. Just make sure its sealed properly or else you will have stuffing EVERYWHERE! This will make enough stuffing for one large bird, or one small bird plus an extra small pan that you can bake on the side.
  14. This recipe comes to us from Jay Berger. For the glaze: 2 ounces favorite oil 1 large onion, chopped 4 cloves garlic, chopped 1 chipotle pepper, chopped (usually find dried in produce section or canned in Mexican section, med. hot) 1 arbol chili, stem removed (usually find dried in produce section) 1 tablespoon cracked black pepper 2 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce 2 cups orange juice 2 cups Gluten-free Casein-free barbecue sauce 6 dashes Tabasco style hot sauce 2 lemons juiced Kosher salt to taste For the pork loin: 3 pounds pork loin 4 tablespoons olive oil 2 tablespoons kosher salt 2 tablespoons cracked black pepper Preheat oven to 350 degrees. For the glaze: In a small saucepot add canola oil and sauté onions and garlic until translucent. Then add chipotle and arbol chilies and continue to cook until chills start to toast. Then add cracked black pepper and deglaze with Worcestershire sauce and orange juice. Reduce orange juice until starts to thicken. Then add in your favorite barbecue sauce and reduce to low heat. Continue cooking for about 15 minutes. Season with hot sauce, lemon juice and to taste with salt. Strain barbecue sauce and set aside. For the pork loin: On a large sheet pan rub the pork loin with olive oil and season with salt and cracked pepper. Roast in a 350 degree oven (basting with the citrus glaze about every 15 minutes) until the internal temperature is about 140 degrees. Let meat set up for about 5 minutes and slice.
  15. This recipe comes to us from Lisa McKinney. This is a good hearty, brothy soup recipe I found. Hope you all enjoy it too. 1 ½ pounds ground round 2 cups diced onion 2 cups sliced celery 2 cups coarsely chopped cabbage 3 cups thinly sliced carrots 1 teaspoon salt-free herb-and-spice blend ½ teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon freshly ground pepper ¼ teaspoon dried whole basil ¼ teaspoon dried whole oregano 3 10-½ oz. cans low-sodium chicken broth 1 28-oz. can whole tomatoes, undrained and chopped Cook meat, onion and celery in a large Dutch oven over medium heat until meat is browned, stirring to crumble. Drain meat mixture in a colander; pat dry with paper towels. Return meat mixture to pan. Add cabbage* and remaining ingredients; bring to a boil. Cover, reduce heat, and simmer 1 hour or until carrot is tender. Yield: 16 servings (about 108 calories per 1-cup serving). *I find if I add the cabbage when directed, it becomes too mushy for my tastes and I add it about 20 minutes or so before the soup is done. Also, I add, subtract and substitute ingredients as I desire for taste and to make it go farther, so I can freeze the extras. (Re-heat frozen soup slowly in a double-boiler or microwave to avoid making it mushy).
  16. This recipe comes to us from Kimberly Dungan. This is using an 8x8 casserole dish: Just add the appropriate amounts to all the ingredients to make a larger dish. Fill your casserole dish with potatoes (line them up to fill it so you know how many to use). Peel and boil the potatoes (cutting them into small chunks will allow faster cooking). Drain the potatoes and put them onto a cookie sheet Bake for ten minutes (not any more ­ they will get a hard crust otherwise) in a 375 degree oven. After taking them out of the oven, put into a large mixing bowl, set aside. Chop ½ onion and 3 slices of Fat Free Jennie-O Turkey bacon (or regular bacon) into small pieces. Sprinkle garlic (to taste ­ about 1 tbsp), 2 tbsp. of cumin over onion and bacon and sauté for 1-2 minutes on high in a tbsp. of olive oil. Remove from heat and add 1-2 tbsp. of butter to melt over top. Mash the potatoes with ¼-½ cup of plain rice milk and 3 slices of Veggie Slices pepper jack cheese. Add 2 tbsp. Dijon Mustard Add the onion mixture. Mash together Put into casserole dish and bake for 30 minutes (same 375F degree oven). If you make a double recipe or have extra, add egg to mixture, make into patties and fry in olive oil until crisp edges for breakfast! Options: Use ¼ cup cream instead of rice milk and cheese Use Anaheim roasted peppers and Chipotle peppers (a smoky mix of sauce and peppers) instead of bacon (this is quite hot) Or, use squash instead of peppers. Also, could make with skin-on potatoes. Breakfast options: Instead of egg, make into patties and coat with white rice flour, fry in olive oil
  17. This article comes to us from Frederik Willem Janssen, Zutphen, The Netherlands, e-mail: teizjanz@PI.NET. If you have specific questions about it, please contact him directly. The Codex Alimentarius provides the gluten-free standard for European food manufacturers. This article will deal with foods that are officially labeled as "gluten free." In the European Union there is a directive on foods for special dietary uses (89/398/EEG), and this directive is the basis for all national legislation in the countries of the European Union. Though the directive deals with gluten-free foods there is no assigned limiting level of gluten for gluten-free food yet, so it is up to the national regulatory bodies of the member states to set their own level. There is however, an international body handling these matters: Codex Alimentarius. Codex Alimentarius is a Geneva based International organization jointly run by the WHO and the FAO, and its aim is to establish worldwide standards for foods in the broadest sense. Food legislation in many countries is based on Codex Standards, although it is not mandatory to implement them in all cases. There is a Codex committee producing standards on food labeling, on hygiene, on composition etc., etc. There is a committee on Foods for Special Dietary Uses (FSDU) and ... there is a Standard on gluten-free Food! The oldest Standard dates from 1981, and it says that foods may be labeled as "gluten-free" only if the nitrogen content of the protein derived from wheat is less than 50 mg N/100 gm on dry matter, which may be equivalent to about 20-30 mg gliadin in wheat starch. The calculation is quite complicated by the fact that most of the protein in wheat starch is "starch granule protein" and not gluten. There is a new Codex Standard in preparation, and a proposal to set the limiting level of gluten to 200-mg gluten/kg (20-mg/100 g) gluten-free food on dry matter. If we assume that half of the gluten is gliadin, this equals 10-mg gliadin/100 g o.d.m., so the level has gone down by a factor two in comparison to the "old" standard. If accepted, the new standard will be valid for end products and not for raw materials. In my previous posting I already mentioned that there are comments on the proposal from Sweden ( One of the reasons why the level in the Standard has not yet been effected (the proposal has been dealt with already two years ago) is that there is no validated analytical method (ring-tested) available to check compliance to this level. Though it might look rather simple to analyze gluten, it is generally done with an Enzyme Linked Immuno Sorbent Assay - ELISA, it is in fact very tricky, and especially as the term gluten is very imprecise. Gluten is a mixture of gliadin and glutenin - each composed of several sub-fractions - and its composition with respect to sub-fractions is cultivar dependent. There is also an effect on the recovery caused by the heat processing of the food, and although excellent work has been done by Dr Skerrit of CSIRO in Australia to circumvent this problem (he designed a method based on omega gliadin, which is the most heat stable gliadin fraction), there is still a feeling that this method still needs to be improved. Remember that agencies charged with enforcement of food laws must be able to bring suits against producers of non-complying gluten-free foods. So analytical methods need to be robust and accurate. Codex Alimentarius bases its standard on scientific facts, and thats why there is no zero tolerance. There is simply no scientific evidence that this is required (at least there is no concordant view among scientists about the maximum tolerable gluten intake), and it is reasoned that any unduly reduction in the permissive level will reduce the number of gluten-free food available unnecessary. Though Codex Alimentarius has been criticized in the past for being a food-producer driven body it is still the only world-wide forum for food standards, and its role within the framework of the GATT and WTO makes its work of sterling importance in settling trade disputes. In 1993 the National Food Alliance (UK NGO) produced a report titled "Cracking the Codex." This report stated that even though the voting in Codex is nationwide, and quite often by consensus, there is a large impact of the producer lobby, especially in the preliminary stages of decision making. Even though there is no implemented standard in national legislation many countries will stick to the Codex Standard. The conclusion is that in many countries food labeled as "gluten free" will almost definitely contain gluten. As the regulatory agencies of most countries will not press charges against producers of gluten-free foods if the level is below the Codex Standard limit (though, as said, some countries may have lower regulatory levels). Codex Standards still do not have the status of national laws.
  18. Holmes GK, Prior P, Lane MR, Pope D, Allan RN Gut 1989 Mar;30(3):333-8 Gastroenterology Unit, General Hospital, Birmingham. PMID: 2707633, UI: 89212172 Two hundred and ten patients with coeliac disease previously reported from this unit were reviewed at the end of 1985 after a further 11 years of follow up. The initial review at the end of 1974 could not demonstrate that a gluten free diet (GFD) prevented these complications, probably because the time on diet was relatively short. The same series has therefore been kept under surveillance with the particular aim of assessing the effects of diet on malignancy after a further prolonged follow up period. Twelve new cancers have occurred: of which one was a carcinoma of the esophagus and two lymphomas. Thirty nine cancers developed in 38 patients and of 69 deaths, 33 were the result of malignancy. A two-fold relative risk (RR) of cancer was found and was because of an increased risk of cancer of the mouth and pharynx (RR = 9.7, p less than 0.01, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.0-28.3), esophagus (RR = 12.3, p less than 0.01, CI = 2.5-36.5), and of non-Hodgkins lymphoma (RR = 42.7, p less than 0.001, CI = 19.6-81.4). The results indicate that for coeliac patients who have taken a GFD for five years or more the risk of developing cancer over all sites is not increased when compared with the general population.
  19. Author: Bardella MT; Fraquelli M; Quatrini M; Molteni N; Bianchi P; Conte D Address: Cattedra di Gastroenterologia, Universit a degli Studi di Milano, IRCCS Ospedale Maggiore, Italy. Source: Hepatology, 1995 Sep, 22:3, 833-6 The prevalence of hypertransaminasemia and the effect of gluten-free diet (GFD) were evaluated in 158 consecutive adult celiac patients, 127 women and 31 men, aged 18 to 68 years (mean, 32). At diagnosis, 67 patients (42%) had raised aspartate and/or alanine transaminase levels (AST and ALT; mean, 47 IU/L, range, 30 to 190; and 61 IU/L, range, 25 to 470, respectively), whereas 91 patients had normal liver function tests (LFT). Patients with and without hypertransaminasemia were comparable for epidemiological data, body mass index (18.5 vs. 19.6), and severity of intestinal histological involvement. All patients were given a strict GFD and were followed for 1 to 10 years (median, 4). At 1 year, a highly significant improvement in intestinal histology was observed in both groups.
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