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Found 7 results

  1. Celiac.com 08/17/2016 - Cereal-maker General Mills is looking to patent method and system for manufacturing gluten-free oats. The application for patent protection covers numerous mechanical separation processes on a variety of grains, including oat grains and gluten-containing grains, using, among other things, width grading steps, multiple length grading steps, aspirating steps and a potential de-bearding step. Federal labeling regulations require products labeled 'gluten-free' to have gluten levels below 20 ppm. The process allow the production of oat grains with gluten levels below 20 parts per million, and optimally at 10 ppm. The resulting oats are gluten-free oats and suitable for use in a variety of gluten-free oat food products, including cereal and granola products, according to the patent US 2016/0207048 A1, filed on July 21st 2016. Mechanical separation techniques, such as these covered by the patent application, have the potential to be highly efficient and economical. The patent does not mention more expensive optical systems. Oats are naturally gluten-free, but, according to the patent, "oats cultivated in North America, Europe and other parts of the world commonly are contaminated by gluten-containing grains such as wheat, barley, rye and triticale." Contamination can result from rotating grains on the same crop land, and from harvesting, transporting, storing and merchandising. General Mills experienced problems with wheat contamination of gluten-free products last year, when they were forced to recall an estimated 1.8 million boxes of gluten-free Cheerios and Honey Nut Cheerios at its Lodi, Calif., plant. The product was contaminated with gluten. However, the company has maintained that the gluten contamination was due to an employee processing error, not any defect in their grain sorting equipment covered under the patent protection. Stay tuned to find out if General Mills receives their patent, and if their process has a significant impact on the quality, availability and cost of gluten-free oats.
  2. Celiac.com 07/01/2017 - Calgary University's Faculty of Arts and Markin Undergraduate Student Research program is designed to give recipients a leg up on research projects that can help advance their academic goals. For one such recipient, Karen Tang, those goals include helping individuals "to effectively self-manage celiac disease and follow a strict gluten-free diet, by teaching people evidence-based strategies." For Tang, the opportunity allows her to combine her interests of psychology and self-compassion with her desire to help chronic disease populations. For those coping with celiac disease, strategies such as self-compassion can be an effective tool for managing their well-being. Tang has been heavily involved in the pilot study for the Promotion of Optimal Well-Being, Education and Regulation for Celiac Disease (POWER-C). The study is the first program specifically designed to teach individuals evidence-based strategies for coping with celiac disease and to help them effectively manage their illness. Tang has spent the fall and winter committed to helping individuals with celiac disease effectively manage their illness, to enhance their health and their quality of life. For many, a strict lifestyle change comes with its own set of problems and challenges. Research indicates that approximately less than 42 per cent of individuals with celiac disease adhere strictly to a gluten-free diet. Tang says, "The purpose of this research is to help individuals to effectively self-manage celiac disease and follow a strict gluten-free diet, by teaching people evidence-based strategies." Ms. Tang presented an update on her research at a mini-symposium on April 7, 2017. Read More at Calgary University's UToday
  3. Celiac.com 09/27/2016 - After repeated shareholder requests, and a public admission from the CEO that the company had "really screwed up the gluten free stuff," Starbucks is announcing an expansion gluten-free and other specialty options. Until now, Starbucks has relied heavily on packaged foods to meet the rising demand for gluten-free food raises. As part of a new effort to change that, the company recently released its latest offering, the organic gluten-free, vegan, kosher chickpea puff called Hippeas, which is currently available in white cheddar and fajita flavors. Over the years, numerous shareholders have demanded that Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz add more food options for people who are either allergic to gluten or choose to eat gluten-free. At the 2015 shareholder meeting, Schultz said the company had plans to address the gluten-free issue because it represents a "big opportunity." He added that, to that point, the company had "really screwed up the gluten free stuff." Some gluten-free options are available regionally at various Starbucks, such as the Marshmallow Dream bar and the Kind Bars, but there has been little in the way of quality gluten-free options that are local, aritisanal, etc. "Items in our pastry case can be subject to cross contamination and we use shared equipment," Starbucks spokeswoman Erin Schaeffer said in an email response to questions. "So adding gluten-free options to our broader food portfolio has posed a challenge that we continue to explore." The market for packaged gluten-free foods is estimated at more than $3 billion and is continuing to grow. Last year, Starbucks launched the Retail Brand Partnership team, which is tasked with finding packaged goods that satisfy various dietary specialty needs. Read more in Bizjournals.com.
  4. Celiac.com 11/16/2015 - P.F. Chang's seeking to dismiss an amended complaint filed by a woman who claims the restaurant chain violated federal anti-discrimination laws by charging higher prices for gluten-free items than for non-gluten-free items. Plaintiff Anna Marie Phillips initially sued P.F. Chang's in California state court in December, but P.F. Chang's got the case moved to U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California. Lawyers for P.F. Chang's first moved to dismiss Phillips' class action in February, claiming her celiac disease does not make her a disabled person under the Americans with Disabilities Act. Federal Judge Ronald Whyte heard oral arguments in May, and "tentatively granted" the motion to dismiss, with a final ruling to be issued later. In August, the federal judge granted P.F. Chang's motion to dismiss Phillips' original complaint. The court ruled that the plaintiff failed to allege facts showing that the restaurant chain discriminated against her and other guests with celiac disease or a gluten allergy/intolerance, by charging $1 more for some gluten-free menu items compared to non-gluten-free versions of menu items with a similar name but prepared and handled much differently. However, Whyte did grant Phillips a leave to amend, while expressing his "reservations" that she could ever mount a viable claim using her discrimination theory. P.F. Chang's, in its Sept. 24 motion to dismiss the amended complaint, contends the new complaint asserts the same disability-discrimination claims and offers "few additional facts" and "none that warrant a different result." The plaintiff asserts, P.F. Chang's notes, that the gluten-free menu items are "essentially the same" and are "not truly different dishes" because they have the same basic ingredients. What do you think? Are restaurants wrong to charge more for gluten-free food? Share your thoughts and opinions below. Read More: Legalnewsonline.com
  5. Celiac.com - 06/24/2016 - What are the main factors facing children with celiac disease as they transition into teenagers and young adults? There isn't much good data on the transition and transfer of care in adolescents and teens with celiac disease. Recently, a team of 17 physicians from 10 countries, and two representatives from patient organizations examined the literature on transition from childhood to adulthood in celiac disease. Their The Prague consensus report looks to shine some light on the best options for providing optimal transition into adult healthcare for patients with celiac disease. The research team included Jonas F Ludvigsson, Lars Agreus, Carolina Ciacci, Sheila E Crowe, Marilyn G Geller, Peter H R Green, Ivor Hill, A Pali Hungin, Sibylle Koletzko, Tunde Koltai, Knut E A Lundin, M Luisa Mearin, Joseph A Murray, Norelle Reilly, Marjorie M Walker, David S Sanders, Raanan Shamir, Riccardo Troncone, and Steffen Husby. See the numerous author affiliations below. For their study, the team searched Medline (Ovid) and EMBASE for a period covering 1900 and September 2015. To assess evidence in retrieved reports, they used the Grading of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation method. The current consensus report aims to help healthcare personnel manage celiac disease in the adolescent and young adult, and provide optimal care and transition into adult healthcare for patients with this disease. In adolescence, patients with celiac disease should gradually assume exclusive responsibility for their care, although parental support is still important. Patients should talk with their doctors about dietary adherence and consequences of non-adherence during transition and beyond. In most adolescents and young adults, routine small intestinal biopsy is not needed to reconfirm a childhood diagnosis of celiac disease based on European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) or North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (NASPGHAN) criteria, However, a biopsy may be considered where pediatric diagnostic criteria have not been fulfilled, such as, in a patient without biopsy at diagnosis, when additional endomysium antibody tests have not been performed to confirm 10-fold positivity of tissue transglutaminase antibodies, or when a no biopsy strategy has been adopted in an asymptomatic child. Source: Gut doi:10.1136/gutjnl-2016-311574 The research team members are variously affiliated with the Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden, the Department of Paediatrics, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden, the Division of Epidemiology and Public Health, School of Medicine, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK, the Division of Family Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden, the Department of Medicine and Surgery, University of Salerno, Salerno, Italy, the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), San Diego, California, USA, the Celiac Disease Foundation, Los Angeles, California, USA, the Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University, New York, New York, USA, the Division of Gastroenterology, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio, USA, the Primary Care and General Practice, School of Medicine, Pharmacy and Health, Durham University, Stockton on Tees, UK, the Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Dr. von Hauner Children's Hospital, Munich, Germany, with Hungary, representing the Association of European Coeliac Societies, (AOECS), with the Department of Gastroenterology and Centre for Immune Regulation, Oslo University Hospital Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway, the Department of Paediatrics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands, the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Immunology Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA, Columbia University Medical Center-Division of Paediatric Gastroenterology, New York, New York, USA, Anatomical Pathology, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, School of Medicine & Public Health, Newcastle, Australia Academic Unit of Gastroenterology, Royal Hallamshire Hospital & University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK, the Institute of Gastroenterology, Nutrition and Liver Diseases Schneider Children's Medical Center of Israel, Tel-Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel, the Department of Medical Translational Sciences & European Laboratory for the Investigation of Food Induced Diseases, University Federico II, Naples, Italy, and the Hans Christian Andersen Children's Hospital, Odense University Hospital, Odense C, Denmark.
  6. Celiac.com 09/30/2010 - New York arena football kicker, Craig Pinto, will attempt to set a world record for most field goals kicked within a twelve hour period, and to raise money and awareness for celiac disease. Pinto's effort will get underway on October 10, 2010, when he begins kicking field goals for 12 straight hours. In addition to raising money and awareness for celiac disease, a condition in which people who consume proteins found in wheat, rye, or barley suffer damage to their digestive tracts, Pinto, who has lived with celiac disease for more than a decade hopes to show that people with celiac disease can remain physically active, and even excel in their chosen activities. “With something that has affected me, and is so close to my heart, it only makes sense to utilize things I love – kicking and football – to raise money and awareness for my other passion,” says Craig. “And that is spreading the word and educating people about Celiac Disease.” Each field goal must be kicked from at least forty yards away from the goal post, and will be judged by official referees to make sure each kick meets specific record breaking criteria. All proceeds will benefit the Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University. For more information or to make a donation visit www.kicking4celiac.com. Bethpage High School 10 Cherry Avenue Bethpage, New York 11714 October 10th, 2010 7:30 a.m.-7:30 p.m.
  7. Celiac.com 07/30/2007 - A study published in the journal Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology suggests that a newly proposed system of classifying duodenal pathology on celiac disease provides an improved inter-observation than the less Marsh-Oberhuber classification, and offers an advance towards making a simpler, better, more valid diagnosis of celiac disease. Celiac disease is presently classified according to the Marsh-Oberhuber system of classifying duodenal lesions. Recently, a more elementary method has been suggested. That method is based on three villous morphologies—non-atrophic, atrophic with villous crypto ratio <3:1, and atrophic, villi idnetectable—combined with intraepithelial counts of >25/100 enterocytes. The study team chose a group of sixty people to be part of the study. Of the 60 patients the team studied, 46 were female and 14 were male. The average age was 28.2 years with a mean range of 1-78 years. 10 people had celiac disease, 13 had celiac disease with normal villi, but a pathological increase in epithelial lymphocytes >25/100 & hyperplastic crypts. 37 patients had celiac disease with villous aptrophy. Patients were given biopsies, with at least 4 biopsies were taken from the second part of the duodenum. Biopsies were fixed in formalin and processed according to standard procedures, with cuts at six levels, and stained with hematoxylin resin. The slides were sent randomly to 6 pathologists who were blind to one another. The results showed that this new method of classification yielded better inter-observer agreement and more accurate diagnosis that the more difficult Marsh-Oberhuber system. Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology 2007;5:838–843 health writer who lives in San Francisco and is a frequent author of articles for Celiac.com.
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