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Found 11 results

  1. Celiac.com 03/30/2018 - As most people know already, “al dente” is an Italian term that describes how pasta should be prepared—not too hard, and not too soft. Konjac Angel Hair Zero Calorie Pasta by Konjac Foods comes ready-to-eat in 8.8 ounce packages that are filled with water, so the noodles are kept wet and ready-to-eat within the package, and despite this, the Konjac noodles are still perfectly al dente—firm but not soft. Remarkably these noodles are marketed as “0 Calories,” and are free of sugar, fat, soy, and gluten. Their only ingredients are konjac glucomannan fiber, calcium hydroxide, and purified water. For those who don't know, konjac glucomannan (KGM) is “a water-soluable dietary fiber derived from the root of the konjac plant.” It is known as “moyu” or “juruo” in China, and “konnyaku” or “shirataki noodles” in Japan. Besides being a great noodle choice for those on a gluten-free diet, Konjac noodles are also ideal for people on weight-loss or diabetic diets, as they are high in fiber and contain zero calories. Amazingly, the shelf life of these individual serving-sized packages is one full year at room temperature, so you can feel free to stock up on them. Konjac Foods also makes “Konjac Gucomannan Powder” in 500g packages. One teaspoon of the konjac powder can be added to 8 ounces of your favorite drink, including in smoothies. The dietary fiber in konjac flour is also water soluble, and according to the maker it has: “a greater potential to reduce postprandial blood glucose, insulin, and serum lipid levels than insoluble fiber.” I tried both products, and found that the noodles were an excellent substitute for rice noodles in my homemade ramen. I also tried the noodles as a spaghetti replacement, and although they had a different texture than I'm used to, I really enjoyed it. The powder can be added as a fiber supplement to foods, drinks, and shakes, and I tried it in a smoothie. Anyone who is dieting to lose weight, on a gluten-free or diabetic diet, or just looking for a more healthy noodle substitute (that won't spike your blood sugar) will appreciate these Konjac Foods products. For more info visit their site.
  2. Celiac.com 02/19/2017 - I've been playing around in my kitchen and found a really interesting paleo side dish (or even a main!) can be created with kelp noodles. I know you're probably thinking: "Kelp? What?" But hear me out on this one. There's much more to kelp than just being huge plants that grow in the ocean! This impressive super food packs a nutritious punch with its high amounts of iodine, potassium, magnesium, calcium and iron, as well as vitamins, antioxidants, phytonutrients, amino acids, omega-3 fats and fiber. Wow! Not only do my gluten-free and paleo pals get to enjoy noodles, but on top of that you'll be nourishing your body in one of the most delicious ways I know of. And for my raw foodie friends, you'll be happy to know that these noodles are 100% raw. I enjoy these kelp noodles with a nut cheeze sauce that is full of flavor and love to pair them up with scallops or shrimp. A delicious and complete meal! Believe me, your non-gluten-free friends will be impressed with this creation as well as your kiddos. Try it out and let me know how it goes! Ingredients: 1 package Sea Tangle Kelp Noodles ½ cup nut cheeze (see below) â…› cup olive oil 1 teaspoon fresh rosemary, minced ¼ teaspoon Celtic sea salt 1 tablespoon lemon juice, freshly squeezed 1 teaspoon Coconut Aminos 3 tablespoons nutritional yeast ½ teaspoon black pepper Nut Cheeze Recipe Ingredients: 2 cups cashews (I soaked mine overnight) NOTE: I have used pignoli nuts in the past but that really makes this cheeze sauce pricey. 1 teaspoon fresh rosemary, de-stemmed and finely minced 3 tablespoons lemon juice, freshly squeezed 1 teaspoon Celtic sea salt 1 ½ cups water Equipment: VitaMix blender, Excalibur dehydrator Directions Prepare Sea Tangle Kelp Noodles according to package instructions. Combine with the rest of the ingredients, including the Nut Cheeze (below). Nut Cheeze Instructions Blend all ingredients together into a thick cream. Add more water, little by little, as needed. Time to serve! Enjoy! Notes The noodles can easily be made in a low-temperature oven as well as a dehydrator. So, do not be concerned with that. They will last for 3 days (longer if you reheat in an oven or microwave and have no raw concerns).
  3. Here's a dish that makes an excellent alternative to standard dinner fare. Aside from a bit of chopping, it's easy to make, healthy and delicious. Glass noodles give this dish a naturally gluten-free appeal. Ingredients: 12 ounces large shrimp, peeled and deveined 8 ounces dried broad bean noodles, soaked 30 minutes ¼ cup dried shrimp, soaked (optional) 2 cups chicken stock 1 medium zucchini, halved and sliced 1 large carrot, sliced thin 2 teaspoons soy sauce 1 tablespoon vegetable oil 1 small sweet onion, cut into small wedges 1 scallion julienned 3 cloves garlic, minced 1 teaspoon Shaoxing wine (Rice wine, sake, clear vermouth, or even white wine will all work in a pinch) 1 teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon sugar ½ teaspoon sesame oil â…› teaspoon white pepper cilantro, to garnish (optional) As with many dishes, it is helpful to prepare all of your ingredients before you begin cooking. Heat a wok over medium high heat and add the oil, onion, garlic, and dried shrimp. Stir-fry until the onion is translucent. Add the wine and stir-fry for another 30 seconds. Add the chicken stock, salt, sugar and broad bean noodles. Turn down heat to low and let everything simmer for about 10 minutes. Add the zucchini and carrots along with the soy sauce, sesame oil and white pepper. Turn the heat up to medium and cook for another 5 to 10 minutes, reducing almost all of the liquid. If you like your noodles a bit more soupy, you can add more chicken stock. Stir in the shrimp and scallions and cook for another 2 minutes, or until the shrimp is just cooked through. Garnish with cilantro and serve.
  4. Celiac.com 03/03/2015 - You can make this with rice noodles or pure buckwheat soba noodles. The key is to cook the noodles only until they're halfway done, and then remove them from the hot water. They should be pliable, but still firm in the center. Pan-frying will finishes the cooking process. Add chicken, or shrimp, and you have the makings of a great meal. Ingredients: 6-8 ounces of boneless chicken chunks, or cleaned, shelled and deveined shrimp 6 ounces gluten-free buckwheat soba, or rice noodles 2 large eggs, beaten 3 tablespoons soy sauce, more to taste 1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger 2 teaspoons rice wine or rice vinegar 1 teaspoon sesame oil 2½ tablespoons cooking oil, more as needed 5 garlic cloves, thinly sliced 2 cups washed baby spinach or Chinese broccoli leaves 1 to 2 teaspoons Sriracha or other hot sauce, as desired 1 teaspoon gluten-free fish sauce (I use Squid brand) One bunch thinly sliced scallions, both white and green part Juice of ½ lime, to taste 1 cup cilantro leaves, rinsed ¼ teaspoon kosher salt, more as needed ¼ teaspoon ground black pepper Directions: In a small bowl, combine the scallions, soy sauce, ginger, rice wine or vinegar, sesame oil and salt. Let stand while you prepare the noodles. In a large pot of boiling water, cook noodles until they are halfway done. They should be soft on the outside, but firm on the inside. Drain well and toss with ½ tablespoon of the peanut oil to keep them from sticking, and spread them out on a plate or baking sheet. In a large skillet over medium-high heat, warm the remaining 2 tablespoons of cooking oil. Add the garlic and cook until crisp and golden around the edges, 1 to 2 minutes. Add half the scallion mixture and stir-fry until fragrant, about 1 minute. Cook the chicken or prawns by stir-frying it in the same wok/skillet until nearly done, then removing it and setting it aside. Add noodles; stir-fry until noodles are hot and lightly coated with sauce, about 30 seconds. Add spinach, fish sauce, sriracha, remaining scallion mixture, salt and pepper, and continue to stir-fry until the spinach begins to wilt. Add the cooked chicken or shrimp back into the wok at the same time as the eggs. Stir until chicken/shrimp and eggs are cooked, about 1 to 2 minutes longer. Remove from heat and stir in lime juice. Garnish with cilantro and sesame seeds or peanuts.
  5. Soba is a Japanese classic. These noodles were originally made with pure buckwheat, which is naturally gluten-free. These days, you can still find pure buckwheat soba noodles at many Asian grocers, or online. This version marries gluten-free pure buckwheat noodles, steak, snow peas, and a few other simple ingredients to deliver dish that pays homage to soba's traditional roots. Ingredients: 1 package (8.8 ounces) soba (Japanese buckwheat noodles) 1 pound skirt steak, cut to fit in skillet 1 pound snow peas, stem ends removed 2 large shallots, thinly sliced and separated into rings 6 garlic cloves, coarsely chopped 2 scallions, finely chopped 1/4 cup chopped cilantro 1 teaspoon finely grated lime zest, plus 2 tablespoons fresh lime juice Kosher salt and ground pepper 1 teaspoon honey 2 tablespoons gluten-free soy sauce NOTE: Cook steak rare to medium-rare for this dish. Do not cook steak beyond medium-rare. Directions: Add 1 teaspoon of salt to a pot of boiling water. Add noodles and cook until al dente. Rinse in cold water, drain, and set aside. Heat a large skillet over medium-high. Season steak with salt and pepper. Cook (in batches if necessary), turning once, until medium-rare, 2 to 6 minutes per side. Transfer steak to a cutting board, and loosely tent with aluminum foil. Reserve pan juices in skillet. Add garlic, shallot, and toss with juices, cook bout 1 minute. Add soy sauce, lime zest, lime juice, honey, and 2 tablespoons water, as needed. Cook another minute, stirring well. Add snow peas to skillet, and cook on medium-high heat, tossing occasionally, until tender, but crisp, 2 to 3 minutes. Add noodles. Cook until warmed through, about 20 seconds. Transfer to serving bowls. Slice steak and arrange over the top of the noodles, and add any pan juices. Top with cilantro, and serve.
  6. or at least it wasn't for me! I was told by different online sites that our Chilis (Savannah) provided a gluten free menu. I decided to give it a try. Ordered completely gluten free stuffs. Explained to them that I not only had celiac but also had crohns, and asked several times to make sure they were indeed gluten free. I couldn't believe the flare up I had! I called them and asked them about their menu.....they told me that they boil veggies in the same water that noodles were boiled in.....hello???!! That's NOT gluten free. They apologized and sent me coupons (which was awesome of them btw) and I decided to go back....and the flare up happened again to spite the fact I was even more careful at what I had to eat. This flare up I had was no joke. I'm simply not going back. What do you do to make sure you don't get cross contamination at resturants?
  7. As a kid, shrimp was one of my perpetual favorite foods. If something had shrimp in it, I'd probably eat try it. Shrimp is the reason I first tried gumbo, teriyaki, scampi, fried rice and coconut curry. I think that the vast majority of my exposure to international cuisine came out of my love for the lowly, bottom-dwelling, water bug that is the shrimp. I still one them to this day. This recipe grabs them hot off the grill and tosses them into a pile of rice noodles in a delicious Southeast-Asian inspired sauce. This is a great way to dip your culinary toes in Asian waters without breaking the bank or freaking out the taste buds of more timid eaters. Ingredients: 14 ounces flat rice noodles ½ cup fresh lime juice ⅓ cup fish sauce ½ cup packed light brown sugar 2 cloves garlic, finely chopped 1 to 2 teaspoons Asian chili sauce (such as Sriracha) 1 pound medium-large shrimp, peeled and deveined 1 medium bunch asparagus, trimmed 5 ounces Shiitake mushrooms, trimmed 1 medium carrot, shredded ½ cup fresh cilantro Directions: Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Add the noodles and cook as the label directs; drain and rinse with cold water. Meanwhile, whisk the lime juice, fish sauce, brown sugar, garlic, chili sauce and 1/3 cup water in a medium bowl. Transfer 1/4 cup of the marinade to another bowl and toss with the shrimp. Toss another 1/4 cup marinade with the asparagus and mushrooms in a third bowl. Let the shrimp and vegetables marinate 10 minutes at room temperature. Toss the noodles with the remaining marinade. Heat a grill or grill pan to medium-high. Grill the shrimp, asparagus and mushrooms until the shrimp is just cooked through and the asparagus is slightly tender, 2 to 3 minutes per side. Halve the mushrooms and cut the asparagus into pieces. Stir in the noodles and cook another minute or two, stirring well with a wooden spoon to prevent sticking. Divide the noodles among bowls and top with the shrimp, asparagus, mushrooms, carrot and cilantro.
  8. Throughout southeast Asia, street vendors prepare cheap, delicious noodles on the spot. Place an order and watch the cook's hands become a blur of ingredients dancing in a hot wok. A flash of alchemy and heat turn oil, meat, vegetables, and noodles into a piping hot delicacy that can be enjoyed just about any time of day. One day, after nursing a hankering for Asian-style noodles, I discovered spaghetti-style rice noodles at my local Asian grocery store. I picked up some sesame oil and some veggies, hit the butcher for a pork chop, and the rest, as they say, is history. Well, actually, there was a bit of experimentation first, but that's a story for another time. Right now, you are about to enjoy delicious, healthy, cheap gluten-free noodles. Ingredients: Rice Noodles (Spaghetti style) ¼ cup Sesame Oil ½ pound Pork, cubed ¼ cup Cilantro, chopped ½ cup Scallions, chopped 1/4 Onion, wedged and sliced 1 Clove Garlic, minced ½ cup Sweet Red Pepper, chopped ½ cup Carrot, chopped ½ cup Broccoli 1 cup Collard, Chard or similar Greens, chopped 1 teaspoon Sugar 1 sprig of Mint (optional) Splash of Rice Vinegar Directions: First, you'll need some rice noodles that are about as thick as regular spaghetti. Boil about 3 quarts of water, and chop some sweet red bell pepper, carrots, garlic, onion, scallion, broccoli, and some kind of greens, like collard greens. Also, you'll need some cilantro, a pinch of sugar and maybe some mint. Slice and cube the pork chop (use any kind of meat you like, or make it vegetarian style). Put the rice noodles a dish that can take heat, and cover them with hot water for a few minutes until they soften up a bit. When they are flexible, but still firm, strain them, but don't rinse them. When the noodles dry out a bit, use a fork and scissors to cut them in half. Heat some sesame and/or olive oil in a frying pan on high heat. When the oil starts to smoke, add the carrots, the peppers, stir 10 seconds, add garlic, meat, and broccoli. Toss quickly over a high heat for one minute. Add rice noodles and continue to toss or stir rapidly for 30 seconds. Add greens and fish sauce and toss or stir rapidly for another 30 seconds. As pan dries up a bit, add a splash of chicken broth and a pinch of sugar. Stir or toss for 15 seconds. Pour into large bowl, garnish with cilantro, a splash of rice vinegar and serve.
  9. This recipe comes to us from J. S. Weihofen. Homemade Gluten-Free Pasta 1/3 cup tapioca flour 1/3 cup cornstarch 2 tablespoons potato starch ½ teaspoon sea salt 1 tablespoon Xanthan gum 2 large eggs 1 tablespoon vegetable oil Combine flours, salt and gum. Beat eggs lightly and add oil. Pour egg mixture into flour mixture and stir. This will feel much like pastry dough. Work together into a firm ball. Knead for a minute or two. Place ball of dough on your bread board and roll as thin as possible. One pasta book suggests you should be able to see the board through the dough. The dough is tough and although almost transparent, will still handle well. Slice the noodles into very thin strips or if using for lasagna, into 1-1/2 x 4 rectangles. The pasta is now ready to cook or to freeze uncooked for later use. Cook the pasta in salted boiling water to which 1 tablespoon of oil has been added, for 10 to 20 minutes depending on the thickness and the size of your pieces. You will have to test for doneness. Makes 3 servings as noodles alone and 5 to 6 servings in a mixed casserole. SPAGHETTI: Use the spaghetti cutter on your pasta machine. Cook for 10 minutes in boiling salted water to which a tablespoon of oil has been added. CHOW MEIN NOODLES: Make the pasta and cut as if for spaghetti. Then cut these strips into 1 to 1-1/2 pieces. Drop uncooked into hot oil and cook for a few seconds (they will probably take less than 1 min). Remove from oil and drain on paper towels. Then use immediately or freeze. Makes about 5 to 6 cups chow mien noodles.
  10. This recipe comes to us from the McMartins. ½ cup rice flour ½ cup potato flour 1/3 cup cornstarch ½ teaspoon Salt 1-2 tablespoon Vegetable Oil Optional: 2 eggs, lightly beaten Sift dry ingredients into a bowl...repeat 3 - 4 times...make a well in the center and add the oil and the eggs or enough water to equal 2 eggs. Gradually draw dry ingredients from the edges of the bowl into the liquid to form a stiff dough. Use hands to knead the dough into a smooth ball. Generously dust board and rolling pin with rice flour. Roll out the dough as thin as possible. Cut into noodles. The pasta is now ready to cook or freeze uncooked for future use. Cook in boiling salted water for about 10 minutes or until al dente. Notes: Dough is fragile and needs gentle handling. It is not suitable for use in a pasta maker. Vegetable oil is variable...add enough to make a smooth ball. Noodles require longer cooking time then wheat pasta does. Food processors are not recommended in this recipes preparation.
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