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Found 65 results

  1. Hi guys. I've had three blood tests for celiac, all negative, and one biopsy that I'm still waiting for the results of. I have a lot of the symptoms, and my body has been breaking down and getting sicker over the past year. I have gut pain, constipation, piles, sometimes loose stools, gas, muscle pain, bone pain, a fuzzy/light head, noise and light sensitivity, bleeding gums and mouth ulcers. But the worst is chronic acid reflux, which has been resistant to treatment. The endoscopy I had on April 30th found a hiatal hernia, which I didn't have when I had my first endoscopy in 2015. The area was full of acid and bile, which I have always been able to feel, 24/7. For the last 6+ years I've been on the IBS and the acid reflux diet. No FODMAPS (which seems to be everything), and nothing with acid in, like citric acid. I've decided to go gluten-free now, without waiting for my results, and my father has just found out that his last blood test had raised transglutaminase and was "strongly suggestive of coeliac," which has motivated me even more. But finding gluten-free alternatives is proving difficult, especially bread. The problem isn't so much taste, as acid and IBS triggers in the ingredients. All the gluten-free breads I can find contain acids like citric acid, honey, vinegar, and apple, and others contain possible IBS triggers like bamboo fibre (?) and Quinoa, which the jury seems to be out on in regards to IBS. I suspect I have to continue avoiding these ingredients as my gut is very painful and sensitive, and I'm worried about worsening gut symptoms instead of healing. Are these ingredients actually safe when the problem is (or could be) gluten? Or do they tear through the gut if the gut is damaged? I wouldn't bother with bread, but I'm 10 pounds underweight and I get a lot of flak about it, and honestly I've been getting most of my calories through bread, and don't know how to get calories without it. There is so much food I have to avoid, if not "IBS" triggers, then acidic foods. I won't touch something acidic with a barge pole! I don't really know what my question is, I feel stumped here! But any ideas would be much appreciated. Also, I live in the UK, so some brands aren't available here. I wondered if supermarket-own gluten-free bread is OK for celiacs, as although it has the crossed grain symbol, isn't it manufactured in the same place, and therefore possibly contaminated? I thought I had this gluten-free-thing figured out months in advance (I've done a lot of reading since my doctor suggested celiac last year), but turns out, I haven't the foggiest what to do. I'm thinking of quitting food, to be honest with you. Thanks for any replies!😊
  2. I have been doing a lot of research and trial/error on finding the right products and food. It’s been 1 year since my diagnosis and it hasn’t been easy but definitely found my way. Anyway...the main reason I’m making this post is because I need to find a way to make companies aware of making gluten free products. I see too many of them are using shared equipment and it’s frustating!!!!! Thats like....giving something that is peanut free to a child but made in a facility where peanuts are all over the place. Why would they emphasize gluten free when it is not. I really wanna push companies to providing a separate room or building to manufacture their products. If they have the money, why not spend it knowing consumers such as myself would purchase it especially if it is gluten free?! Any ideas?
  3. Celiac.com 09/27/2016 - Healthy comfort food is hard to find in the supermarket—especially when you want it tasty, cheap and appealing to everyone. Rice pudding is the ultimate comfort food because it is found on almost every continent wherever rice is available (none was found on Antartica during my month there). Rice cream or pudding has many names- Arroz con leche in Spanish, Risalamande in Scandinavia, Pulut hitam in Malaysia, Riz bi halecb in Lebannon. But when you make your own from this simple recipe, alternative milk choices need to be carefully selected. Cow's milk is one of the big 8 allergens with increasing numbers of people avoiding the highly processed homogenized, pasteurized milk in the dairy case. I remember the days when milk spoiled in a week. Today, you know it is highly processed when the expiration date on the carton is 4 weeks from the day you purchase it. Individuals with celiac disease may also have an intolerance to the proteins in cow's milk so other sources need to be considered to avoid gastrointestinal inflammation. Soy milk is not a better choice because over 90% of the soybeans grown in the U.S. are genetically modified to withstand Roundup pesticide exposure. There is adequate research to indicate GMO soy products should be avoided. Don't be fooled by a major brand that has carefully selected wording on their carton to the contrary. There is insufficient non-GMO soybeans grown in the U.S. to produce all the soy milk products available in every supermarket across the nation. Besides, males should tread lightly in their consumption of phytoestrogen products like soy. Besides, a recent study done at Northwestern University in Chicago has indicated that soy oils are harmful to the lungs and cause increased asthma. This may be the tip of the iceburg of how dangerous GMO soy foods may be to overall health. Other choices for making rice pudding would certainly be better. The worst choice for making a healthy rice pudding is almond milk. USDA and the California Almond Board have allowed the false advertising and mislabeling of almonds as "raw". Pasteurized almonds sold as raw almonds or made into almond milk can be toxic. In 2007 it became mandatory to pasteurize almonds because of numerous salmonella foodborne illnesses. The treatment process approved by FDA (Food and Drug Administration) is propylene oxide (PPO). Even the EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) cautions about the neurological effects of PPO that have been observed in animals. Research also indicates PPO has caused tumors in animals and is a probable human carcinogen. Consumption of almonds and almond milk can be a health risk. The best choice of milk for a healthy rice pudding is coconut milk. It provides a creamy texture and delicate flavor. Don't worry about the saturated fat content in coconut. It is not a factor in coronary hart disease until the oil is hydrogenated into non-dairy products and toppings. Yes, supermarkets can be dangerous places but wise consumers can eat healthy by making simple home prepared meals and desserts. You can bring home that extra rice from the Asian restaurant and make it into rice pudding, or chose your favorite rice - jasmine is mine- and make a delightful rice pudding. Gluten-Free Rice Pudding Ingredients: 2 cups milk 3/4 cup uncooked rice (1 1/2 c cooked) 1 tablespoon honey Pinch of salt 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract or 2 inch piece vanilla bean Sprinkle with grated nutmeg Pomegranate seeds or raisins, optional Directions: Cook milk, rice, honey and salt (+ vanilla bean, if using) in saucepan over medium heat about 30 minutes until rice is soft, stirring frequently. Lower heat to simmer. Cover for 10-15 minutes until rice kernels soften and take up milk. Stir in vanilla extract. Divide into serving dishes. Sprinkle with nutmeg and top with pomegranate seeds or raisins. Makes 4 servings. Calories per serving (varies with milk choice) 88-112 Protein : 3-4 g Carbohydrates : 19 g Fat: 2-5 g Note: For special occasions, soak raisins in rum and serve on top with sprinkle of cinnamon sugar.
  4. Celiac.com 02/09/2018 - A newlywed couple have raised accusations of sick guests, inappropriate food, and breach of contract in filing suit against wedding vendors they say ruined their surprise vegan wedding, which was also to include gluten-free snacks for some guests. The wedding took place in May, 2017, and by Christmas, the family had already filed suit in Ramsey County against vendors Mintahoe, Inc., A'Bulae, LLC, and Bellagala for breach of contract. The lawsuit states the venue choice near Mears Park in downtown St. Paul was "absolutely contingent" on their commitment to provide a "delicious" vegan dinner to wedding guests. According to the couple, the main idea was to serve delicious food that guests would not suspect was "an entirely plant-based meal." The couple intended for the surprise to be revealed at the end of the night, when servers were to put out signs announcing that the entire meal had been vegan. Among the claims made by the family of the bride and groom are that a guest with celiac disease ate a seitan skewer that she believed was gluten-free, but which actually contained gluten, and that the guest became "very ill" as a result. The couple says the hotel's pastry chef took home the leftover vegan wedding cake the couple had ordered from an off-site vendor, instead of making sure it went to the wedding party. The couple's complaints go on to cite a litany of perceived offenses, including "horrific" food and service, "missing" bamboo shoots bean sprouts, too many carrots, and "horrific…sickeningly sweet," sauce that was not the peanut sauce they expected. The couple also complains that the groom's room before the wedding was "extremely hot and stifling," and disputes the cost of the menu for the wedding, which was mostly Thai food. In fairness, though, their main complaint seems to be that the food was terrible, rather than the fact that it wasn't vegan. The couple and mother-of-the-bride are seeking $21,721 for each of the seven counts of breach of contract, totaling $152,047, along with an award of damages to be determined at trial. What do you make of the situation? Right on the money, or a gluten-free bridge too far? Source: KTSP
  5. Celiac.com 12/11/2017 - With blazing progress in 3D printing technology, the future of numerous fields from house building to cake-making and, yes, cooking, is literally being written, or printed, before our very eyes. Food is definitely one of those arenas that will see major influence for 3d printing. In the future, more and more kitchens will come with one of more 3d printers that deliver highly customized food choices for chefs, on demand. Currently, platform for 3D printing personalized food are being developed for numerous applications, including gluten-free, vegetarian, vegan, and other specialized diet markets. In a talk presented at the 3D Printing and Beyond: Current and Future Trends conference at Hebrew university on October 25, Prof. Ido Braslavsky presented breakthrough 3D-printing innovations by Israeli and international experts from academia and industry. The conference was organized by the 3D & Functional Printing Center at the Hebrew University and Yissum, with the support of the Jerusalem Development Authority, the Ministry of Jerusalem Affairs and the Jerusalem Municipality. One breakthrough touted by Baslavsky was the ability to use 3D food printing to serve "numerous populations including the gluten-free, vegetarian and vegan markets, as well as the specialized diet market, for anyone from athletes to people with diabetes or celiac disease." In the very near future, chefs will be able to use a single machine to automatically prepare, mix, form and cook personalized food. Yaron Daniely, head of the university’s Yissum Research & Development technology-transfer company, called the technology nothing short of revolutionary. The self-assembly properties of nano-cellulose fibers enable the addition and binding of proteins, carbohydrates and fats as well as controlling the food’s texture. The food products could then be cooked, baked, fried or grilled while being printed out in the three dimensional space. "The idea is to enable full control of the substances used, for the purpose of creating healthy and tasty meals that can be eaten immediately. This has the potential to address a variety of challenges facing the field of nutrition, from the demand for personalized food … to addressing the problem of lack of food in developing countries," said Daniely. Will printed food be the future of eating, gluten-free and otherwise? Stay tuned for more news on that front. Read more at: Israel21c.org
  6. Celiac.com 12/01/2017 - Celiac disease is a genetically determined disorder in which affected individuals show an intolerance to ingested gluten (Food Safety Authority of Ireland [FSAI]). It is an inheritable, life-long disease and is characterized by an inflammatory reaction to dietary gluten in the human small intestine. The special feature of the disease is a flattening of intestinal villi along with crypt hypertrophy. As a result, it leads to significant loss of absorptive surface area and resulting malabsorption of nutrients, vitamins and minerals. Untreated celiac disease may be found in the context of symptoms like: anemia, bone diseases, infertility, neurological problems, cancer and other complications due to persistent inflammation and micronutrient deficiencies. Approximately 1% of the United States population has the disease, which is similar to its frequency in the United Kingdom. Only about 10% of affected individuals have been diagnosed thus far [Kagnoff MF (2007) Celiac disease: pathogenesis of a model immunogenetic disease. J Clin Invest 117: 41–49]. At present, the only suitable treatment is strict, life-long exclusion of gluten from the patient's diet. Although a large fraction of patients who attempt to follow such a diet still exhibit signs or symptoms of active disease, there is no available supplementary therapy for such conditions [Ehren J, Morón B, Martin E, Bethune MT, Gray GM, et al. (2009) A Food-Grade Enzyme Preparation with Modest Gluten Detoxification Properties. PLoS ONE 4(7): e6313. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0006313]. Gluten is defined as a protein fraction from wheat, rye, barley, oats or crossbred varieties and derivatives thereof. Some persons are intolerant to this group of proteins that are insoluble in water and 0,5 M sodium chloride solution [Commission Regulation (EC) No 41/2009 concerning the composition and labeling of foodstuffs suitable for people intolerant to gluten. Official Journal L 16/09 21 January 2009]. To address this problem, the food industry is developing new products for people affected by celiac disease. These new foods are very helpful in diversifying the celiac diet. More available products will increase nutrient consumption, including fiber and minerals, which are often lacking in restrictive diets. Production of gluten free products involves the fulfillment of specific requirements. These products must be free of gluten, which is present in most components of confectionery production. Labeling of the final product is subject to the European Community Commission Regulation No 41/2009 of 20 January 2009, which sets conditions that must be fulfilled by manufacturers. The composition and labeling of foodstuffs suitable for people who are intolerant to gluten is divided into two categories of products according to the nutritional purpose: Gluten free for people intolerant to gluten, and very low gluten content [Wojtasik. A, Daniewski W., Kunachowicz H., 2010. Ocena wybranych produktów spożywczych w aspekcie możliwoÅ›ci ich stosowania w diecie bezglutenowej. Bromat. Chem. Toksykol., XLIII, 2010, 3, str. 362-371]. Selected paragraphs of these labeling rules are quoted below: Foodstuffs for people intolerant to gluten, consisting of or containing one or more ingredients made from wheat, rye, barley, oats or their crossbred varieties which have been especially processed to reduce gluten, shall not contain a level of gluten exceeding 100 mg/kg in the food as sold to the final consumer. The labeling, advertising and presentation of the products referred to in paragraph 1 shall bear the term ‘very low gluten'. They may bear the term ‘gluten-free' if the gluten content does not exceed 20 mg/kg in the food as sold to the final consumer. Oats contained in foodstuffs for people intolerant to gluten must have been specially produced, prepared and/or processed in a way to avoid contamination by wheat, rye, barley, or their crossbred varieties and the gluten content of such oats must not exceed 20 mg/kg. Foodstuffs for people intolerant to gluten, consisting of or containing one or more ingredients which substitute wheat, rye, barley, oats or their crossbred varieties shall not contain a level of gluten exceeding 20 mg/kg in the food as sold to the final consumer. The labeling, presentation and advertising of those products shall bear the term ‘gluten-free'. Where foodstuffs for people intolerant to gluten contain both ingredients which substitute wheat, rye, barley, oats or their crossbred varieties and ingredients made from wheat, rye, barley, oats or their crossbred varieties which have been especially processed to reduce gluten, paragraphs 1, 2, and 3 shall apply and paragraph 4 shall not apply. The terms ‘very low gluten' or ‘gluten-free' referred to in paragraphs 2 and 4 shall appear in proximity to the name under which the food is sold. To achieve gluten content as described above, special conditions in work environment must be instituted. Preparation of high quality products that are safe for people affected by celiac disease, the production process must be controlled not only at the production plant. Origin, breeding, harvesting, storage and transport of ingredients must be also taken into account. The best way to ensure the customer about the safety of a given product is to implement a specially designed quality management plan from the very first step of production. In order for products to be gluten-free or reduced in gluten when they reach the consumer, the gluten-free quality of the product must prevail at every stage of production. Cross contamination is the process by which a reduced-gluten or gluten-free product loses that status. It has come into contact with something that is not gluten-free. Cross contamination may happen during primary production, harvesting and storage of grain, during the manufacture of gluten-free or reduced gluten food in the same plant where gluten-containing food is produced. Cross contamination may also occur as a result of poor re-work, incorrect formulation, product carry-over due to use of common equipment, clean-up or sanitation, poor equipment design, human error or the presence of gluten products near exposed product lines. Potential risks, preventative measures and critical control points need to be identified in the handling of ‘gluten-free' or ‘very low gluten' products. (Deibel, Kurt, Tom Trautman, Tom DeBoom, William H. Sveum, George Dunaif, Virginia N. Scott, and Dane T. Bernard. 1997. A Comprehensive Approach to Reducing the Risk of Allergens in Food. Journal of Food Protection. Vol. 60, No. 4: 436-441) Raw Materials Origin To minimize risk, producers of raw ingredients have to implement appropriate control practices during crop production, harvesting and storage. Plants should originate from certified seeds which guarantees a high level of species purity. Cleaning of sowing machines is also important because seeds from the previous planting can contaminate new crops. The same rule applies to equipment used for harvesting and transportation. Storage areas should be thoroughly cleaned before filling with new crops. Every magazine should be identifiable and people responsible for crop delivery must be informed and instructed to maintain a gluten free workplace. Producers should produce representative samples for laboratory analysis to verify their product's "gluten free" status. Even on the first level of food production, which is plant growing, training and supervision of employees and producers is critical for maintaining the non gluten status of raw materials. Good training of all staff working at these first stages will help to avoid potential sources of food allergens. This type of training should increase awareness about food allergens and the consequences of unintentional consumption by allergic persons. Workers should be encouraged to report any suspected breaches of protocol to their supervisors and suggest possible improvements [Australian Food and Grocery Council, Food Industry Guide to Allergen Management and Labelling - 2007 Revised Edition]. Transport Suppliers of raw materials are obligated to have good allergen management practices to minimize the risk of cross contact between raw materials. Suppliers should provide information identifying any products that contain allergens, the origins of allergenic materials, or those that are likely to cross contamination with allergens. Vendor audits are recommended to verify and explore potential contact with allergenic substances [Australian Food and Grocery Council, Food Industry Guide to Allergen Management and Labelling - 2007 Revised Edition]. Storage Manufacturing plants should be designed to accommodate all aspects of the quality control and allergen management plan,. Storage of raw materials should prevent mixing allergens with non allergenic ingredients. To meet this condition, allergenic materials should be kept at separate facilities, or when this is impossible, all raw materials should be covered to avoid allergenic dust contamination. Clear and visible labeling of containers and all equipment should also be implemented. Tools and equipment used for different materials must also be kept separate [Guidance Note No. 24 Legislation on ‘Gluten-free' Foods and Avoidance of Cross-contamination during Manufacture of ‘Gluten-free' or ‘Very Low Gluten' Products Published by: Food Safety Authority of Ireland 2010, ISBN 1-904465-71-4]. Production To minimize the risk of unintentional contamination of products good manufacturing practices – the Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) and Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) plan must note all specific conditions. The production plan should be designed to avoid production of allergenic and non allergenic foods during the same shift. If this is impossible, non allergenic products should be produced first to avoid contamination from dust. Ingredients containing gluten should be identified by color-coded containers or stickers. Ingredients containing gluten must be added at the end of the shift after gluten free products are completed and removed. Rework containing gluten should be reused into the same products. Appropriate employee training and labeling for rework can also help to minimize the risk of cross contamination through human error. The possibility of contamination can easily be minimized by using dedicated equipment for the gluten free products. When it is impossible to have a separate building, the use of special barriers is necessary. The use of separate space and separate containers for all materials (as above) is recommended for gluten free production. In such conditions ventilation and dust flow must be well controlled. Dust flow in the plant has a potential to carry over allergens from separate spaces of facilities. [Guidance Note No. 24 Legislation on ‘Gluten-free' Foods and Avoidance of Cross-contamination during Manufacture of ‘Gluten-free' or ‘Very Low Gluten' Products Published by: Food Safety Authority of Ireland 2010, ISBN 1-904465-71-4]. Packing and labeling are also important elements in preventing cross contamination. Packing equipment may also be a source of contamination. The packaging machines and material should be checked for any allergens, e.g. foil coated with releasing agents derived from wheat flour. Appropriate labeling should be use to inform customers who are affected by coeliac disease. Correct labeling should reflect actual and real composition of the product. Labels must also fulfill legislative requirements. To facilitate recognition of gluten free products, labeling must be clear and readable. EU legislation regarding food labeling imposes an obligation to provide true and clear information about ingredients. Alerts to all allergenic ingredients, starch source (plant from witch starch originates) and gluten content are required. The manufacturer is obligated to ensure readability of the above information. Directive 2003/13/EC of 10 February 2003 posted in the Official Journal of the European Union requires that food manufacturers should place notification on labels of any of the fourteen groups of potential allergens responsible for more than 90% of allergic reactions if they have been used as food ingredients (including alcoholic drinks), regardless of the allergen content. The list of allergenic ingredients is constantly being updated. Also, the components derived from allergenic substances must be listed as potential allergens [ Czarniecka-Skubina E., Janicki A. 2009. Znakowani produktów żywnoÅ›ciowych. Informacje żywieniowe i zdrowotne. PrzemysÅ‚ Spożywczy, StyczeÅ„, 34-36; Commission Directive 2003/13/EC of 10 February 2003 amending Directive 96/5/EC on processed cereal-based foods and baby foods for infants and young children. Official Journal of the European Union L 41/33, 14.2.2003] Codex Alimentarius has proposed the introduction of the following descriptions in the vicinity of the product name. If the product comes from natural raw materials that do not contain gluten, it is described as "gluten free by nature," or "product may be used in gluten-free diet" [Hoffmann M., JÄ™drzejczyk H. 2007. Å»ywność bezglutenowa – legislacja i aspekty technologiczne jej produkcji. PostÄ™py Techniki Przetwórstwa Spożywczego, 1, 67-69]. Products low in gluten, are marked with the inscription: "very low gluten foods", "low gluten foods", or gluten-reduced foods [Wojtasik. A, Kunachowicz H., Daniewski W. 2008. Aktualne wymagania dla produktów bezglutenowych w Å›wietle ustaleÅ„ kodeksu żywnoÅ›ciowego. Bromat. Chem. Toksykol., XLI, 2008, 3, str. 229-233; Darewicz M., Jaszczak L.; „Oznakowanie produktów stosowanych w diecie osób chorych na celiakiÄ™", PrzeglÄ…d Piekarski i Cukierniczy, march, 2012.]. Training Employee awareness at all levels of production, beginning with plant growing to finished preparation of proper labels is necessary throughout the gluten free production chain. Everybody must be informed about the consequences of gluten consumption by coeliac patients. Staff who are employed from time to time must be also well trained. Implementation of control procedures and proper documentation will be very helpful in maintaining control. Documentation of the training of every new employee needs to be prepared and maintained. All working stuff and implemented methods must be supervised all the time [Guidance Note No. 24 Legislation on ‘Gluten-free' Foods and Avoidance of Cross-contamination during Manufacture of ‘Gluten-free' or ‘Very Low Gluten' Products Published by: Food Safety Authority of Ireland 2010, ISBN 1-904465-71-4]. By taking into account all aspects mentioned above and striving to make continuous improvements, manufactures are able to produce safe, high quality gluten free products. The human factor is one of the most important elements in this process because only human mistakes can lead to contamination and only good training and awareness at every stage of production stage can produce the best possible product. Implementation of quality management systems like HACCP or GMP assures customers of food quality and safety, while also allowing the producer to lower production costs related to potential human mistakes. However, nothing will really change the fact that all of the factors described above must be implemented in everyday production, ensuring that they are not simply ideas on the piece of paper. Implementation is the key.
  7. Celiac.com 11/24/2017 - Do you have an emergency survival kit at home should disaster strike? Does that include drinking water and gluten-free provisions for at least a few days? The fallout from the latest string of disasters still looms over parts of America; over Houston, Florida and neighboring states devastated by Hurricanes and by resulting floods; and over northern California communities devastated by wildfires. That got us thinking about emergency kits. Gluten-Free-free emergency kits, to be precise. What's in Your Emergency Gluten-Free Food Kit? This list is by no means authoritative or final. In fact, we are inviting you to share any favorites or ideas you may have for your own emergency kit. Your Gluten-free Emergency Kit should include the following: Water: You'll need a minimum of 3 days worth of drinking water for ever person. This includes water for cooking and other non-drinking uses. When it comes to water, it never hurts to have more than you need, so consider stocking even more than a 3 day supply. Food: When assembling a survival kit, you want to put together a kit that will feed each family member family 2 cups of prepared meals 3 times a day. Canned foods like black beans are essential. Any of the following food items are good to have in your kit: Rice, Quinoa and Other Gluten-free Grains: Organic grains like rice and quinoa make great additions to an emergency kit. Be sure to soak your grains before you cook them. If you're on a grain-free diet, quinoa works well, if you can tolerate it. Dried Potatoes: Dried potato flakes can be used to make mashed potatoes. Pasta: Gluten-free pasta are good additions to any emergency kit. Gluten-free Crackers or other snacks: Gluten-free crackers can be part of a no-cook meal, especially when combined with canned tuna or other fish. Canned Pasta Sauces: If you're stocking gluten-free pasta, then be sure to stock your favorite pasta sauce. Pomí makes a boxed pasta sauce that packs easily for emergency storage. There are a number of canned pasta sauces on the market, so stock whatever you like. Canned and Dried Meats: Jerky, Spam, Dried Salami, and Canned Tuna or other Fish make excellent additions to any emergency kit. Homemade jerky can be kept in an air-tight container for about a year. It's a great source of protein, and a great no-cook snack with options like beef, bison, pork, turkey and salmon. Spices and Gluten-free Bouillon cubes or packets: Since you may be making things like rice, or quinoa, or other things that may need some spices to lively them up, spices are a smart addition to your emergency kit. Make sure yours are gluten-free. Keep your kit in a cool, dry place that can be reached in an emergency. Consider building your kit around a printed menu that can be prepared with the items you have stocked. Remember, since gas and electric may not be functioning in an emergency, you may not have full cooking facilities, so plan meals that you can make with minimal preparation and fuss. Want someone to make your emergency kit for you? Check out https://www.emergencykits.com/emergency-food/gluten-free.
  8. Celiac.com 11/15/2017 - Quinoa is regarded as safe for people with celiac disease. For many years, some celiac support groups listed quinoa as unsafe due to cross-contamination concerns. But any grain is unsafe for celiacs if it is contaminated with wheat, rye or barley. Some grains have a higher risk of such contamination, others have a low risk. Based on its low risk for cross-contamination, Celiac.com has had quinoa on our safe list since 1995. A vast amount of evidence supports that listing. The latest research shows that celiac patients can safely tolerate up to 50 g of quinoa daily for 6 weeks. The researchers in this test point out that further studies are needed to assess long-term effects of quinoa consumption. In the short-term test, the researchers looked at 19 treated celiac patients who ate 50 g of quinoa every day for 6 weeks as part of their regular gluten-free diet. The team evaluated diet, serology, and gastrointestinal parameters, and made histological assessments of 10 patients, both before and after they consumed quinoa. The results show that celiac patients seem to tolerate quinoa well, and it doesn't trigger any symptoms or cause any gut damage or dysfunction. The team found normal gut structure and mucosa to confirm that assessment. In fact, patients saw a general improvement histological and serological results, so better gut conditions and less blood antibodies to gluten in patients who ate quinoa. Celiac patients who ate quinoa for 6 weeks also experienced a mild reduction in blood pressure. Overall, this is the first clinical study to show that celiac patients can safely tolerate up to 50 g of quinoa daily for 6 weeks. Obviously, future studies need to look at the safety of long-term quinoa consumption. That said, quinoa seems to be safe for celiac patients on a gluten-free diet. If you really want to be sure, quinoa grown in main producer countries of Bolivia, Peru and Ecuador, where practically no wheat is grown, is probably the safest bet for those on a gluten-free diet.
  9. Celiac.com 10/30/2017 - Say what you will about the gluten-free food craze, but one of the benefits of the popularity of gluten-free food is that it now shows up in what would have previously been some very strange, or in this case, remote places. Like a food truck in Elko, Nevada. The Sisters Food Truck, owned by Jennifer Saxton of Spring Creek, opened for business this summer, and she can often be found at the Conoco station on Idaho Street. Saxton is one of six food trucks licensed to do business in Elko. Saxton offers salads and meatball subs with a choice of colorful sauces including spicy Korean, creamy alfredo, bloody Mary-style or marinara. Saxton develops the recipes with the help of her two sisters, and gets tasting feedback from her family. For Saxton, rich colors are key to her presentation, and to her customers' satisfaction. She believes strongly in "eating the rainbow," and her customers have been impressed enough for her to build a strong clientele of repeat customers. Nutrition is every bit as important as the appearance for Saxton. Her son, Jace, has type 1 diabetes and Celiac disease. The nutritious meals she began preparing for Jace at home have inspired her food truck's gluten-free menu offerings. Saxton is looking to expand into to food preparation for people with special dietary needs. Winters are cold in Elko, so when temperatures plummet, Saxton plans to prepare orders in her food truck's commercial kitchen, and to deliver them in her pickup.
  10. Digestive Upset Causes Beyond Gluten When you have Celiac disease, you have a damaged digestive system. This requires that extra care should be taken to avoid foods and additives that are known to cause digestive side effects. Many of the people who successfully recover their health after going gluten free will speak about having to make other dietary changes. These additional changes generally involve removing other foods not thought of to have gluten. Some of these other foods do in fact contain gluten. Some of it will be in the various ingredients in packaged foods, or cross contamination during some point in the production line. But others will actually not contain gluten, but do contain other substances that further irritate the damaged digestive systems that those with Celiac Disease have. Some terms that are heard these days are: Leaky Gut Intestinal Permeability Microbiome Probiotics and Prebiotics These all relate to managing the digestive system. It can get a bit overwhelming when you start digging into these subjects, since there appears to be an endless amount of info to learn. Many of them don't directly speak about Celiac and gluten. Others will disregard gluten problems, and be disrespectful of Celiac sufferers. However, the core theories, and core research backed information coming out of these topics carry an extremely important message: Put good stuff into your diet, and take damaging stuff out. Groundbreaking Advances in Digestive Health Importance Research in the last few years is really starting to get the core understanding of how this works, and realizing it's much more important than anyone dreamed of. This research is really just the beginning. The research will continue, and much more will be learned over the coming years. Some core concepts that have come out so far are: The main part of the immune system resides in the stomach. The microbiome is the core of the immune system. The microbiome is the bacteria in our systems, with "ground zero" being the stomach and digestive tract. Modern life as lived for the last 100 to 150 years has seriously changed the composition of the microbiome, and not for the better. The microbiome can be "changed" via diet. (The details of this are still in their infancy, so much more will be learned in the coming years.) Every person has a unique microbiome, thus meaning solutions will be unique to every single person. (This is why some treatments, diets, etc. have such dramatically different results from person to person.) As people with Celiac disease, who still struggle with not feeling well, we can use this to tailor a truly unique diet plan for our life, and for our wellness. We all must start with removing gluten, ALL gluten, from our diets. Unfortunately, that does mean some dramatic lifestyle changes. If we all lived in Utopia, we could just snap our fingers and have a proper gluten free product available for everything we're used to eating. But we don't live in Utopia. We live in a culture that is obsessed with gluten. It's everywhere. As many of you are aware, first hand, eating gluten free is being treated like a fad. That means that your need for 100% gluten free foods are being disregarded, and not truly taken seriously. By restaurants, food manufacturers, your friends, your family, etc. Far too many people think "just a little is okay." If you REALLY want to get well, then you need to control your food 100%. That can be inconvenient. It involves a big learning curve. However, it's vital to understand that with practice, this truly will become second nature. But only if you take the initiative to educate yourself fully. If you rely on someone else to make some or all of these decisions, you will not get better. You will continue to be sick, and you will continue to suffer. As you learn about taking control of eating gluten free, you'll run across a lot of conflicting info. You'll just have to work through the conflicting info, to find what's actually true. A Core Step in Recovery A big first step in getting control is to eat only food. That may sound silly, but there's a ton of stuff in the products that we buy that isn't really food, and the vast majority of them can irritate various parts of our bodies. Manufacturers use a lot of additives to mimic the taste, texture and actions of more expensive food ingredients, and to allow them to sell items that if made with real foods would not be able to be packaged and sold long after they were made. If you're still struggling with feeling well, and feeling frustrated that you can't eat "normal" then it may be time to get back to basics for a while, until you can learn more. It really is better to feel well and have what you may think of as a restricted diet. When you feel well, you can make better decisions, plan more, get a bit more creative in your meal planning, etc. Change Our Attitudes, Change Our Destiny A change in our attitude about food will also go a long way to help us deal with the needed changes. For example, we may think we're being deprived by not being able to eat "normal." However, if you think the "Standard American Diet" (the SAD diet) is "normal," then it may be time to rethink the wisdom of that. The SAD diet has come to be known as one of the worst ways to eat that the world has seen. It causes severe chronic illness, and is massively contributing to decades of illness for many Americans. Earlier I said that our culture is obsessed with gluten. This is clearly seen when you look at the last several Food Guides that the USDA has put out. The current version recommends 5 to 8 servings per day of grain products (for adult women and men). That's a LOT of grain. That's a LOT of bread. We're being told that we must eat grains to provide the following (per current USDA MyPlate site): fiber some B vitamins - folate / folic acid; thiamin, roboflavin, niacin iron magnesium selenium When we cut out gluten containing grains, we pretty much cut out getting these above nutrients from grains. It's almost impossible to get these nutrients in the same quantities from non gluten grains. However, all is not lost. It's very easy to get these nutrients in other common foods in our diet (if we don't follow the USDA MyPlate recommendations). You can get a ton of fiber from adding leafy greens, vegetables, some fruits, nuts, and seeds. All of the B vitamins in the processed grains, those mostly used in the US and other developed countries, are added. The fact is that the processing of foods strips out most of the natural B vitamins. It's super easy to get these vitamins from meat, dairy, nuts, seeds, beans and vegetables. Be sure to eat all of those foods. If you have some other reason to exclude some of those foods, then get some proper advice from someone who properly understands eating gluten free AND your other limitations. Remember that part of the reason we think we must have these very high levels of grains is that's what the marketers have told us. Even the USDA is really just a group of growers in the US that grow mostly grains (along with a large portion raising livestock). The USDA's food guides have been shown repeatedly to NOT be based on truthful, valid research. Take a Step Back, Keep it Simple to Start So, when you're planning your gluten free diet, remember that you don't have to fill your plate with as many grains as you may be used to. Get back to the basics. Plan out some home cooked meals, made with pure, fresh foods. This may be something you haven't done much of, since our culture is so used to buying mostly prepared foods, but with some practice, and some basic planning, you'll be well on your way to making significant progress in getting well. Here's a super simple dinner plan, to get you started, when you have no idea how to start: Choose your favorite PROTEIN - meat, beans. Pick your favorite single herbs to prepare them with. Add some diced onions or garlic. Cook. Choose 2 different colored VEGGIES, steam them, or cut up and eat raw - have one be green, the other one be a nice vibrant color. Choose a STARCH - brown rice, potatoes, yams, etc. Boil and serve with butter. Make a SALAD, with a base of leaf lettuce, and at least 4 other veggies, all different colors. Make a salad dressing from scratch: 1 crushed garlic clove, 1/4 c apple cider vinegar, 1/2 c olive oil, 1 tsp raw honey, 1/4 tsp salt, 1/8 tsp pepper. Place in a container and shake. You can take this basic plan, and adjust one thing at a time by finding a recipe you like that fits the gluten free, processed food free criteria. Over time, you'll start to build a wonderful collection of recipes that suit you and your family. Be sure to let us all know in the comments below when you try this, how it went, and be sure to tell us what you ate! Bon Appetit! Thora Toft - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - References and further research: Time to Run - Recommended dietary allowance (RDA) USDA - Choose MyPlate website Excerpt from “Sugar Crush: How to Reduce Inflammation, Reverse Nerve Damage and Reclaim Good Health” by Richard Jacoby and Raquel Baldelomar
  11. Celiac.com 09/26/2017 - If you've ever eaten any of the gluten-free foods made by Amy's, then you know their commitment to taste, quality, and solid gluten-free options. Bolstered by their success in the commercial grocery markets, Amy's is moving into fast food. Not just fast food, drive-through fast food. Amy's Drive Thru opened its first location in Rohnert Park, California back in 2015, where it was quickly embraced as a healthier, more ethical alternative to other fast food chains. Amy's Drive Thru is now set to open a second store in Corte Madera in 2018, followed by five more locations in northern California. All Amy's food is 100% vegetarian and organic, with a menu ranging from burgers and burritos to pizza and mac-n-cheese, and, of course, plenty of gluten-free and vegan options. Made from organic, locally sourced ingredients where possible, the recipes are often come from the family recipe books of Amy's own employees. For early birds, Amy's also offers a breakfast menu. So if you're find yourself in looking for quick, delicious gluten-free options in northern California, look for Amy's Drive Thru.
  12. Celiac.com 09/20/2017 - A half-time report on what we've learned about each other so far in the Relational Aspects of Food Sensitivities research. The study is geared toward gaining perspective on the perceived impact one adult's food restrictions cause in a household when cohabitating with other adults. It may ultimately yield strategies to address the social and emotional impact of living with food sensitivities. It aims to provide coping strategies, solidarity and empowerment to our community. If you haven't had a chance to take the survey, unfortunately it's not too late. If you have, thank you! More about the survey will appear in the next issue and the four lucky $25 Amazon gift card winners will be announced next month as well. Here's what we've learned so far: Ninety-six percent (96%) of those who took the survey have a diagnosis that leads them to be on a gluten-free diet. Fifty-one percent (51%) have been diagnosed for 8+ years; 28% have been diagnosed between 4-7 years, 13% between 1-3 years, 5% between 7 months and 1 year, and 3% between 0-6 months. Most began eating a gluten-free diet immediately after being diagnosed. Fifty-two percent feel that the way they were diagnosed affects how seriously the other adult(s) living in the household take their dietary requirements and 23% report that the way they were diagnosed doesn't affect the behavior of the other residential adults at all. When it comes to how diagnosed, 73% were diagnosed by an MD; 12% by themselves; 5% by a Practitioner, 5% by "Other;" 3% by a Naturopath and 2% by a Nutritionist. Forty-six percent (46%) report that they check in with a medical or health professional to monitor their health/diet once a year, and 21% get checkups several times a year. Most of us get our medical, health and dietary information we implement into our lifestyle from online sources (39%), books/magazines (21%) and from the MD (17%). The other 23% who took the survey get information from TV/Media, friends, and other sources. Because of the high-quality content available on websites such as Celiac.com, 87% report they are definitely not confused as to which foods are considered to be gluten-free. Sixty-percent (62%) of the respondents' report that other adults in the household are definitely not confused as to which foods are considered to be gluten-free. Ninety-two percent (92%) of us are not confused about what constitutes a "healthy diet." Thirty-eight percent (38%) feel they eat a healthy diet all the time, 48% eat a healthy diet most of the time, 11% eat a healthy diet sometimes, and 3% never eat a healthy diet. Our diet includes gluten-free grains 83% of the time, while 17% of us are grain-free. Adult cohabitants 'almost always' follow the same dietary requirements as we do in 56% of the households, 'sometimes' in 32% and 'rarely' in 12% of the households. Fifty-seven percent (57%) of us report that we eat different foods than the other adults living in the household 'sometimes,' while 22% of us do that 'rarely' and 21% almost always eat different foods. Adults with food sensitivities in 19% of the households enjoy meals prepared by another adult most of the time, 'sometimes' in 46% and never in 36% of the homes. Sixty-seven percent (67%) of those who eat meals prepared by another adult in their household trust that the meals are safe for them to eat. Fifty-one percent (51%) of those who took the survey report that someone else in the household prepares meals for them one to five times a week while 45% report they make all of their meals themselves. Most of us (95%) never cheat on the gluten-free diet. Demographics of the Respondents Eighty-five percent (85%) of the respondents are female and 15% are male. Ninety-two (92%) are white, most (65%) live with one other adult. Thirty-four point sixty two percent (34%) have a Bachelor's degree and 23% have a Masters degree. Household income was between $75-149K for 33% of the respondents. In-Depth Interview – Phase II For those of you who answered, "yes" to the Phase II interview (the longer-term portion of the research) and haven't heard from me yet, please be patient. I'm working with some time constraints now that fall quarter classes have begun and will be contacting some of you in the coming months to schedule a time to talk.
  13. Celiac.com 07/20/2017 - It is common for school teachers in the United States not to know what student has celiac disease, or allergies of any sort. Most schools don't have formal systems so that the principal, school nurse, teacher, or cafeteria workers know when a child has celiac disease or food allergies. An informal game of roulette is played, where everyone assumes that everything is fine – that is, until a child has a heath reaction. In Montreal, Canada, the Lester B Pearson School Board has taken a different approach to dealing with food allergies and conditions such as celiac disease that their students might have. They regard these health conditions to be so important that how to handle them is present in their official Policy on Safe and Caring Schools. To summarize what they do, at the beginning of each school year parents are sent a form requesting them to inform the principal, homeroom teacher, and other relevant school personnel about health conditions and allergies. This includes children who have celiac disease and gluten issues. If a child changes schools, or if a student in an existing school gets a new health diagnosis or has newly identified health needs, this information should be made known to school personnel. A photograph of the student is taken and put on a card with the health condition so that others in charge may know that a particular child has gluten issues. In the cafeteria, workers have the photos of the children posted in the kitchen where they can see them so that they can know that brown-haired Lucinda in fifth-grade has celiac disease and should be served only foods that are safe for her. Children may not know what foods have gluten in them and which do not, so they may not always be the best informants for identifying which foods being served are safe for them and which are not. Given that additives may vary according who is doing the cooking or what ingredients are used, a food like macaroni and cheese may be made with wheat pasta, making it unsafe, or corn, rice or quinoa pasta, rendering it acceptable. Both may look identical to the naked eye, but they aren't so it is a food service worker's obligation to know whether Lucinda can have the dish or not. Likewise, teachers may be given the photograph and health card so that they remember when Billy brings in cupcakes for his birthday celebration, that there are gluten-free ones available (hopefully!) in the cafeteria freezer that can be pulled out and given to Lucinda so she is not left out. The photograph technique is especially helpful when there are new cafeteria workers or substitute teachers or other personnel who may not know a child's food allergy situation like someone who interacts with the child every day might. The Lester B Pearson schools' Food and Nutrition Policy is based in Canada's Food Guide and Policy on Health Eating and Active Living. All schools in Canada are to adhere to the same set of standards. This means that a celiac child living in Vancouver should be just as safe eating at school as one in Ottawa or one in Halifax. Having national standards that are uniformly enforced helps to make all children safe. Making sure that children's food consumption is safe for all of them, especially in public institutions like schools, is part of their human rights according to the Convention on the Rights of the Child. It is the responsibility of adults who are in local parent organizations to be in charge of the oversight and safety of all children and to think through food risk and safety policies.
  14. Celiac.com 07/10/2017 - For anyone with celiac disease or gluten intolerance who was wondering how well food manufacturers are complying with FDA standard for gluten-free labeling, or wondering exactly how gluten-free is my gluten-free food, some early answers are in, and the news looks good. A recent report by the agency indicates that the vast majority of food manufacturers are getting it right, and, correcting where they do get it wrong. The FDA's final rule for compliance in gluten-free labeling was August 5, 2014. To gauge compliance in gluten-free food labeling, the agency conducted a sampling assignment of products labeled "gluten free" from July 2015 to August 2016. The compliance testing is an important part of the FDA's mission to ensure that products labeled on or after the compliance date are properly labeled as "gluten-free." In all, the agency's team analyzed more than 250 types of products, and tested 702 individual samples in the categories of cereals, grain bars, and flours. Their complete survey showed that just five samples from one product source contained gluten in excess of the regulatory limit of 20 parts per million (ppm). That left the overall gluten-free product-based compliance rate above 99.5 percent. The good news here is that producers major gluten-free food products are doing a very good job of following FDA labeling standards. Also, the manufacturer of the samples that showed gluten levels above 20 ppm carried out a voluntary recall, conducted an extensive root cause analysis, and immediately implemented additional corrective actions to prevent recurrence. Follow-up testing by the FDA showed acceptable levels of gluten. This is the first hard data the FDA has gathered regarding compliance with gluten-free labeling standards. To see such high levels of compliance and responsiveness by manufacturers is encouraging. Read the Analytical Results of FY2015/16 Gluten-Free Food Product Sampling. SOURCE: FDA.gov
  15. Hi everyone, I'm new to this forum (and diet) & have been having a lot of trouble trying to find foods I can eat based on the results I recently received after a food intolerance blood test. Google isn't helping me answer all my questions, and my naturopath is on vacation for the next 2 weeks, so I was hoping some of you informed folk could help? My main intolerances include: Dairy (cow, sheep, goat, casein) Barley & wheat - (I am OK to eat gluten, durum, wheat bran, buckwheat, millet, rye, oats...) Pea Corn Potato Rice Cashew nut & pistachio Yeast (brewer's) - baker's is fine Bean (Red Kidney & White Haricot) Egg white - (egg yolk is OK, and baked eggs are fine) Orange Cabbage (Savoy/White) Mustard Seed The odd thing is, I am okay to eat gluten (gliadin) itself, but eliminating wheat from my diet puts me on a gluten-free diet. Does anyone know what kinds of flours are appropriate substitutions given my intolerances? (ie, sorghum, quinoa, semolina, spelt, etc.). Most places use rice, potato or corn as substitutions, all of which I think are safe to say I cannot have. My list of questions of what I CAN eat, if anyone can help answer their groupings or categories: Baking powder corn syrup, rice vinegar, sweet potatoes/squash lima, black, pinto, mung beans & chickpeas quinoa & farro It's been difficult trying to create a diet and figure out places I can safely dine out without having to worry. Thanks so much for your help. Cheers! A
  16. Celiac.com 07/04/2017 - Once upon a time, maintaining a gluten-free diet was a challenge, especially for college kids. In many ways, it still is, as college students face numerous challenges that others do not. However, things are changing, and much of that change is being driven by colleges and universities seeking to better serve their students with food sensitivities and allergies. More and more, colleges in America are doing more to step up their food services for their students with food allergies and sensitivities. Cornell University has quietly worked to phase gluten out of its main dining hall. For the last several years, students and others have been enjoying various gluten-free meals at Risley Dining Room without fanfare. From rice noodles at stir-fry station, to gluten-free flour in the brownies and biscuits. A recent gluten-free facility certification from Kitchens with Confidence, allowed Cornell to re-introduce Risley Dining as a 100% gluten-free, tree-nut-free, and peanut-free kitchen. In 2016, Kent State University became the first university in the country to feature an entirely gluten-free dining hall on campus. The move to convert Kent State's Prentice Café to gluten-free facility has helped the university emerge as a leader in gluten-free campus food services. Meanwhile, out west, Mills College is working hard to make sure the meals are good to eat and good for the planet. Their dining facility serves local and organic ingredients as much as possible, and prepare food from scratch in small batches to keep dishes fresh and healthy. Mills' website describes their food as "fresh, locally sourced, and delicious." Food and drink website the Daily Meal regularly lists Mills in its 75 Best Colleges for Food in America, while the Princeton Review consistently names Mills as one of the greenest colleges in the nation. Other colleges and universities that earn high gluten-free food marks are Baylor University, Tennessee University, Georgetown University, Oregon State, Bard College, University of Wisconsin Madison, Southern Methodist University, University of Arizona, Ithaca College,Texas A&M, University of Notre Dame, University of New Hampshire, SUNY Potsdam, and Tufts University. Source: thecampanil.com
  17. I am really struggling with finding meals I can make that is gluten free, dairy free, chocolate, and soy free. I am struggling to find meals and snacks for on the go and traveling. I have trouble coming up with a variety of different meals for dinner. I am getting sick of rice, potatoes, chicken, and beans as my main dish. I have yet found a good cookie recipe or any kind of dessert that isn't dry. I need so advice on where to look or if you know any good recipes. It would be very helpful if anyone had any quick dinner meals as well. I have been unable to cook more than and 20 minutes due to vertigo and balance issues. thanks
  18. i love icecream but i don't know how to make icecream myself at home from eggs, Can anyone help please?
  19. Celiac.com 06/17/2017 - Hello, my name is Gerry. I am a certified Medical Technologist currently working as a Clinical Systems Analyst. I was diagnosed with celiac disease in 2006 by blood/biopsy. I have two wonderful children, 1 of whom has screened positive for a celiac gene pair. My strong background in Medical Technology assured a quick diagnosis once symptoms appeared. Since then, I have been living a strict gluten-free life. I have gone through nutritional counseling at Mayo Clinic and have an enhanced background with my understanding of the world of gluten. I use my experience and knowledge to accurately base my decisions on whether a product is safe for me. To prove my diet to be effective, I have had my TTG levels measured every 6 months since 2006—all were negative. Also, I have had 3 biopsies after beginning my gluten-free life and all were negative for villous atrophy. I do understand that my medical follow-ups do not prove that I am not ingesting small amounts of gluten; they simply indicate that I am not reacting. As for me, I view the gluten-free life to be much simpler and cheaper than it once was, and fear that strict gluten labeling guidelines have the potential to negatively shape the gluten-free life that I know and live today. Within the last few years, I have been receiving emails to ask my support regarding the FDA's gluten-free labeling rule. At first, I was a supporter as I wanted to support the celiac community since I was part of it. However, after I sat down and really thought about it, I am questioning the benefits of a strict gluten labeling act. In fact, I am predicting a negative impact if gluten labeling guidelines are too strict. When I started my gluten-free life in 2006, my grocery bill was atrocious. I was paying very high prices for the simplest of things. Tortilla chips $3.89 for a 6 oz bag. $3.99 for 8 oz of mustard. $5.99 for gluten-free mayonnaise. As the years moved on I noticed two changes that positively impacted my life as a celiac. The first is that many manufacturers have a list of their gluten-free products on their website along with explanations of how their company handles gluten. The second is the fact that many generic/in-store-brand companies are now labeling their products as "Gluten Free" or "Naturally Gluten free". Because of these two advancements, my life is so much easier and much more cost effective. This makes it easy to stick with my diet and keep my health safe and spirits up. Currently, if a product is made without gluten, it can be labeled as "gluten-free". Many products are available at a fraction of the cost and they are safe. Now that my family eats gluten-free, I have noticed that in today's world my grocery bill seems much more normal and realistic: gluten-free mustard $1.29; gluten-free mayonnaise $1.59;20 oz bags of tortilla chips labeled gluten-free $2.59; 8 oz bag of gluten-free cheese $1.99. You see, living a gluten-free life with today's rules is easy and I believe it to be safe if we are careful and make educated decisions. At this time we have many inexpensive non-brand/in-store brand name products that are widely available. I know of some stores that have 20+ pages of gluten-free items on an excel spreadsheet for their own brand of products, including medications. There are stores that update these lists quarterly, and most are listed by bar-code number. I can simply print the list and buy all of my products safely and inexpensively. I could easily make a phone call to clarify items that I may disagree with, or inquire about cross-contamination. Are these products that I speak of above tested for gluten? I don't believe so. Are these products free of gluten ingredients? I trust that they are. Is there cross-contamination? Maybe. It is easy for me to call and ask about their product lines. Are these products safe for me? I believe so, as I have the blood tests to prove they have been safe for me. Phone calls to companies on products that are not labeled as "gluten-free" are still the norm even though they are getting less frequent. As an expert, I am able to screen who I am talking to and the company's knowledge about gluten. I have been able to make accurate judgments on these products as well as deciding whether I believe them to be safe. In many of the cases, the company claimed their product to be free of gluten and I felt comfortable consuming the product. Yes, there were companies that didn't have acceptable knowledge/quality control and I didn't feel these products were safe so I didn't consume them. My first question to the celiac community is this. Do we need a strict gluten-free labeling act when we already have companies testing for gluten and providing safe products? If we want our products batch tested for gluten, we can simply purchase the ones that are currently available as there are many. If we want to know the threshold that the company considers as gluten-free, we can call them and they will tell us. Are there currently batch tested gluten-free products on the market? Absolutely. Many companies state on their packaging that they have been tested to under 20 or 40 ppm. If a company is testing, they make it known on the label and in the price of the product. My next question is what will a strict gluten-free labeling act do for us? I believe that it will ensure that a product is safe for celiac patients defining what a product needs to be in order to be labeled as gluten-free. Simple-yes. How do we suppose a company is going to know if their product is gluten-free? Well, if you ask me, it will NEED to be tested. Who will pay for this testing? I believe that the celiac community (the consumers) will be paying for this in higher food prices. If a company has to test a product to label it gluten-free, the price will need to go up in order to pay the cost of the testing and the quality control program for the company. We know this to be true as these products are already accessible. I see a possible negative impact of this labeling act if it were to be made too strict. I believe that manufacturers that do not test for gluten may need to pull their "gluten-free" labeling from the package. This could eliminate most of the inexpensive safe products that I currently purchase today. We know there are many manufacturers out there that label products as gluten-free as they simply do not use gluten ingredients. I believe these products may recede. I am not so sure a company will be able to label these products as gluten-free without first testing them. Even if they are allowed, I am not so sure they will take the risk. Therefore negatively impacting our pricing/availability. Will Gluten free lists on websites go away too? I believe these could fade or be at risk as well. If there is a law/act that dictates the amount of gluten in a product, I would think that a company would not create gluten-free lists of products without proving them to be gluten-free by some form of testing in an attempt to avoid legal action against them. What about our phone calls to companies asking if their products are gluten-free? Will they have a gluten-free list to review? I would tend to think that they may not be provided with a gluten-free list to reference. I have a hunch they may say, "We do not test any of our products for gluten and therefore are unable to tell you whether the product is gluten-free". I know that reply will complicate my life in many ways. The first thing that comes to my mind, in this regard, are the calls to pharmaceutical companies regarding medications. I feel that there are better ways to change the labeling as we know it that would offer a more positive effect on the celiac community. Maybe just changing the package labeling to force companies to list wheat, oats, rye, and barley on the packaging. How about requiring mandatory labeling of products that share lines with "gluten" containing ingredients? When we look at the big picture, I think it is safe to theorize that the impact of strict gluten labeling guidelines goes far beyond just providing safe products. In conclusion, I ask these questions. Will a strict gluten labeling act have the potential to negatively impact the celiac community by increasing prices and decreasing availability? And lastly, have we looked at the possible outcomes from all angles?
  20. Celiac.com 05/09/2017 - For years, industry observers, health experts and even food companies have questioned the staying power of gluten-free food. With more people than ever embracing gluten-free products and gluten-free diets, including a majority of folks who do not have celiac disease, gluten-free food has never been more popular. There have also never been more gluten-free products hitting store shelves. Couple that with the fact that U.S. sales of gluten-free products are projected to exceed $2 billion by 2019, and the market for gluten-free products looks as solid as ever. But, do hidden caveats await potential investors, especially on the retail end? Maybe. There's a great article over at Fooddive.com about the challenges of succeeding in the gluten-free grocery business especially on the retail end. The article interviews a number of major gluten-free retailers, and notes that the higher margins and intense customer loyalty that come with gluten-free products also come with warning signs that may portend a looming downturn. Far from being doom-and-gloom, the article includes some interesting insights on the strategies and tactics being used by retailers to bolster their gluten-free sales. Read more at Fooddive.com.
  21. Celiac.com 04/21/2017 - Adults who have gluten sensitivities cohabitating with non-gluten sensitive adults may have a lot of unanswered questions that need to be asked. Dramatic changes in one family member's diet can have profound effects on a household (Bacigalupe & Plocha, 2015). Numerous studies document how parents and children handle everyday living when the child has food intolerances, but very few studies focus on adults living with food sensitivities. Wouldn't you like to know how other adults with food sensitivities adapt and manage over the long haul? Questions like: Does the person with the sensitivity live in fear of cross-contamination? Does the household employ methods to ensure s/he is safe? If so, what are those methods? Do the non-sensitive members of the household feel resentment? Or have they grown weary of compliance over the long haul? How adherent is the sensitive adult? Is it worth a little risk for a little pleasure once in a while? What do these cohabitating adults do to exist gracefully? These questions will be asked in a forthcoming study (on Celiac.com), and the results will be shared with viewers/readers. Food allergies affect 15 million Americans (FARE, 2015), which means that adults with food sensitivities have gone from being rare to more commonplace as the population ages (Norling, 2012). Dietary restrictions due to disease will soon become common in many households and this can be problematic because severe dietary constraints are positively associated with diminished family social activities (Komulainen, 2010). Studies indicate that adults cohabitating, when one has food sensitivities and others do not, could potentially result in problems between members of the household creating feelings of uncertainty and potentially less adherence to the diet. Regimented dietary requirements affect the quality of life when virtually every bite of food must be scrutinized before consumption. For some households, compliance may fall on the shoulders of the person who cooks. The cook in the household, caregivers, and everyone sharing the same kitchen, must be actively involved in protecting the person with the sensitivities keeping gluten-containing crumbs off the counter, out of condiment jars, thoroughly cleaning utensils, etc. (Crowley, 2012; Bollinger, 2005; Merras-Salmino et al., 2014). Of course, those living with sensitivities know there is a lot more to staying "clean and safe." Family members who share a home with someone with pervasive food sensitivities must express empathy to ensure harmony and compliance (Komulainen, 2010). However, compliance comes with a price -- every meal must be planned and cooked using alternative ingredients to avoid accidental ingestion. This takes diligence, education and ability to accomplish meal after meal (Jackson et al., 1985) especially when allergies are to ubiquitous foods such as dairy, soy, gluten or corn. Dietary restrictions can cause misgivings on the part of the other family members, who may feel deprived of their favorite foods, compromised with recipe adaptations, or forced to unwillingly comply with the other person's diet. On the contrary, the person with food sensitivity may feel pressure not to comply with the diet in order to conform to the other adult's culinary demands. In the Jackson et al. study, forty percent of people with Celiac disease did not comply with the diet because it was too difficult (1985). The relationship between the cohabitating adults may be further complicated as trust issues develop between the sensitive adult and the cook, if the sensitive adult suspects foods that make them sick are creeping into their diet. Other food-sensitive adults report non-adherence because it is "too much trouble" and causes "social isolation" (Coulson, 2007). Non-adherence for those with sensitivities can lead to reactions, anaphylactic shock and even to death (Lee et al., 2003). Even those who do not react immediately risk long-term illness with non-compliance. In my twelve years experience working with people in this arena, I have observed that dietary adherence in the household seems to go through phases. The first phase is what I'm calling the "transition" stage when a person is newly diagnosed, and everyone in the household is learning the new rules. The second stage is the "status quo" stage where cohabitants understand, and hopefully comply. Finally, the third stage is what I'm terming as 'turbulent' when other adult household inhabitants are feeling weary of compliance, may have doubts about the other's sensitivities, or even rebel. This stage may be triggered by an event that disrupts the "status quo", such as a holiday where traditional foods are expected, and where their gluten-free substitutions may not be as satisfying to the other household members. It may be triggered when the food sensitive adult decides they may be reacting to different foods than they thought before, and want to experiment with dietary changes. Dynamics between cohabitants may become turbulent during these times. After the event, the household adjusts back to equilibrium until the next triggering event, which throws them into a different part of this phase-cycle, where they may cheerfully welcome a "transition," or react with "turbulence." This cyclical pattern seems to continue as cohabitants move in and out of phases as life-events occur. One of the goals of this survey will be to determine the validity of this cycle. I also want to test the hypothesis that a component of household compliance may also be associated with the status of the adult who has the dietary restrictions – whether the head of the home enjoys full household compliance, or if a subordinate adult must comply while others are eating the foods s/he are sensitive to. Another factor that may affect compliance is how the sensitive adult was initially diagnosed. Did a medical doctor conduct tests? Or did they read an article, and notice that they had symptoms consistent with gluten sensitivity and decide to go "gluten free?" Does the diagnostic process affect the compliance of the other adult members of the household? There are many factors that need to be assessed in order to help those of us who have food sensitivities who are living with other adults. This survey/study will focus on family interactions when dealing with dietary restrictions, with the potential to increase family member's compliance. It will seek to gain insight on the impact food restrictions for one adult has on the rest of the family. This study has social significance because family unity in the future may rely on developing constructs for compliance to address this emerging social problem. I'll collect data for this study and then share it with Celiac.com and the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity readers in order to create awareness by thoroughly examining the lifestyle of food sensitive people, shedding light on how social influences affect dietary adherence. As a PhD student at the University of Denver, and an adult with Celiac disease and a lifetime of other food allergies, living with another adult who has no food sensitivities, I know first-hand that it takes cooperation and commitment from everyone to ensure my health. I hope the study can help others improve their quality of life with the insight gained from conducting this study. I'll be launching this study on Celiac.com. Thank you to Scott Adams for allowing this study to be conducted on Celiac.com.
  22. Celiac.com 03/31/2017 - Imagine going to restaurants in the future and having your gluten-free food made and prepared to order using a 3D printer. That's the future envisioned by WASP, an Italian company on a mission to use 3D printing technology to solve serious problems that afflict people. WASP is in the business of improving quality of life through 3D printing, from spinal care to architecture to athletics, including their latest effort with celiac disease. Inspired by the opening of a 3D printed pop-up restaurant, Food Ink., WASP wants to allow restaurants to easily set up gluten-free kitchens inside their regular kitchens; something that is currently a challenging and expensive task. WASP envisions dedicated 3D printing equipment strictly for preparing gluten-free foods, with no risk of contamination from the other food prep equipment in the rest of the kitchen. To achieve their goals, the company enlisted the help of Francesco Favorito, a chef who specializes in gluten-free foods and who founded Zeroinpiú, a line of gluten-free flour and pastry mixes. Favorito devised a special gluten-free pastry mix, which he then put into a modified a DeltaWASP 20 40 by incorporating an extruder that heated and pre-cooked the mix during extrusion. The products were then finished in normal oven. At Sigep, a baking and coffee expo held each January, the WASP 3d food printer stirred considerable interest from attendees. Another demonstration of the printer was given at Carnival in Opificio Golinelli at the beginning of February, this time with the participation of Francesco Bombardi, an architect, designer and the founder of Fab Lab Reggio Emilia. Bombardi is also the founder of Officucina, a specialized space dedicated to food innovation and equipped with 3D printers, lasers, and other advanced technology. WASP says it learned a great deal from the early trials. For example, adding heated butter increases fluidity and helps the mixture extrude more smoothly. WASP notes that, even though the printer's main purpose is to create safe gluten-free foods for people with celiac disease, it can also be used to create complex shapes that would be impossible using normal methods. Are you ready for some 3D printed gluten-free food from your favorite restaurant? Stay tuned for updates on this and other stories about gluten-free end celiac-friendly food technology. Source: 3DPrint.com
  23. Ever since I got real sick a few months back and finally got diagnosis with celiac I haven't been able to eat anything without pain. The pain varries, I cooked my food tonight I made a sweet and sour chicken recipe I found online and I've made it for the passed few months, I'm now starting to realize that every time I eat this dish my stomach feels like it's been punched a thousand times. Same feeling I had when I eat onions, any kind of onions I used to be able to eat onions can't anymore, I can't drink milk or soy, and it's getting expensive to buy all this gluten free stuck which I'm not even sure is with the whole Cherrio thing my doctor told me that even though it said gluten free that it was cross with some kind of gluten product I don't know. I don't know why my stomach gets sore after eating this, I cut out the soy and I cutout the garlic, I don't use any seasoning maybe it's the apple cider vinegar and the pineapple may be too much, whatever the case is I'm never eating this again. This is the r recipe I used http://mygluten-freekitchen.com/sweet-and-sour-chicken-gluten-free/ (sorry if we're not allowed to share links.) I also can drink coke out a can but not out a bottle if I drink any soda out a bottle it makes my stomach hurt as if I can drink coke out a can and i'm fine. I also can't put sugar in my tea as it makes my stomach cramp up. I've cutout pork, and hamburger meat, I only eat chicken right now thinking about cutting that out too. I don't eat sea food, I used to throw it up everytime I ate it when I was young so I'm kind of turned off by it now. I'm just tired really, of hurting every day I suspect I have IBS, I've been to about 5 different docs all say I'm fine ask if I'm eating any gluten. I make sure I'm not there only two resturants where I live that have gluten free things and when I eat out I go there and make sure to talk to the person preparing it. Make sure they aren't blending anything. Ever since I got so sick a few months back and had to go to the ER it has scared me, I've been so cautious of what I eat now, everyday I read every little thing and get almost triggered when I see someone eating a sandwich (ha.) I don't know it's like getting sick and cutting out gluten has messed up my body, i was sick before but now it's just all the time. I think it's IBS because of the gas the bloating and the constpation but the doctors just say it's GERD. I don't know guys...thanks if you read all of that I know I'm rambling and have a lot of typos just looking for someone to relate to.
  24. I miss Chinese Food, and pizza, I miss just getting something to go and going out eating hamburgers and what not. The gluten free bread never taste the same not to me anyway. I miss eating the hot and sour soup that was my favorite comfort food. I get a bit jealous here at work when they have food parties with all kinds of hotdogs and hamburgers, cookies and cakes, I don't think most people even know what celiac is. When you think of a cook out or going out to a food festival you think of a lot of breaded products, some people say "oh just a bit won't hurt you." Or it's just a crumb." They don't get it, my father still hasn't gotten it either, he offers me gluten products all the time saying "I'm sure this won't hurt." A bit silly I know, but never realize how much I would miss gluten, it's mainly the Chinese food I miss. I love Asian food but most of it if not all has gluten.
  25. Very disappointed. I'm in Russia and there are not many gluten-free options for snacks (I would have been more prepared but I was ordered to go gluten-free a week before I had to leave for this 3 month long stint). Anyway, I found some Dr. Korner caramel rice cakes labelled "Gluten free" and bought them, trusting the label (which I will not do again). Ate almost the whole pack last night before becoming curious about the ingredients. Yeah, first ingredient is barley. Today, my skin itches, my stomach felt like lead this morning, and my lips are swollen and have sores. I wrote something on their FB page but who knows if it will do any good. EDIT: They approved my FB post, and the UK and Russian entities have separate pages. I posted on the UK page, and they do not label this product as gluten-free in the UK.