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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/07/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes

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Found 169 results

  1. I'll try to give a brief history before I ask my question to give some context. About two and a half years ago I noticed myself feeling "unusual" after eating meals, particularly lunch. I would nearly faint or my vision quickly black out over a second or two after standing in particular that sent me to my primary care, thinking I had developed orthostatic hypotension at only 29 years old. Ran MRI and CT of my brain, and MRA of my carotids, did some labs, and all was well so he pretty much wrote me off. A few months later and the left side of my body from face to toes would feel weak and burn (but without actual weakness) in sudden bouts lasting a couple hours. Naturally I freaked out and went to the ER thinking in having a TIA, again at an unusually young age. Well everything was normal. This got worse and lasted longer, and when my foot began to get "floppy", I sought out a neurologist. He did some basic labs which were normal and an EMG that was borderline and thought I had CIDP. I sought a second opinion with a university neurology department, had a lumbar puncture and MS protocol MRI including down my spine, all normal, told I had idiopathic small fiber naturopathy. Sought a third opinion (now just over two years have elapsed since seeing my PCP due to long follow-up intervals) from a neurologist that's double board certified in this area, did a thorough lab workup, and DGP IgG was very high (otherwise the celiac panel was normal), and everything else under the sun was normal. He said "looks like you got celiac disease. Better clean out your pantry." By this time I thought I was losing my mind, my whole body would feel like hellfire for hours a day and my feet flopped and my hands dropped things randomly. After about a week of a gluten free diet the burning was 75% better. I accidentally ate a chik-fil-a sandwich driving home late 3 weeks into it, not thinking until after I ate it. My gut felt like something was ripping it open and my body burned for 5 straight days. Never forgot again. Also pretty much confirmed the diagnosis since I'm still waiting on my upper endoscopy. So the question is this: do those of you with celiac neuropathy tend to have random sudden onset of numb or weak sensation on the whole of one side of your body, that switches sides, even on the same day? Lately my cheek around my left side of the lip and my left side of my tongue got numb too. I ask my neurologist these things whenever I follow-up and his answer is always "small fiber neuropathy causes all kinds of weird symptoms". I know what peripheral neuropathy is supposed to present as, but these autoimmune neuropathies don't seem to follow any rules. By the way, the burning and orthostatic hypotension are pretty much gone now on a gluten free diet for 5 months. The feet ate still floppy though.
  2. Hi all, new here and am hoping for some advice or to hear from people with a similar experience. In brief I have been having gradually worsening symptoms for about 6 months (but have been avoiding over eating wheat based products for about a year due to being suspicious after having minor problems). 1st noticed when I have certain foods, feel terrible the next day, tummy upset, gas, nausea, bloated feeling and general feeling of being unwell. Example being Veggie Sausages at the Café, Pasta, Digestive Biscuits. The latter gave me a tummy upset for 3 weeks before I realised what it was and stopped eating them. About ten days ago I had a wrap and a sandwich the same day and by the evening I had stomach pain + upset tummy, nausea and generally felt absolutely terrible. I then made a terrible mistake a few days later and had fish and chips and had the whole upset again but this time more tummy upset the next day. I don't think I had recovered from the previous incident as I have had fish and chips in the not to distant past with no problems. I went to a 'walk in doctor' as I work away from home during the week to have a chat and see if they can provide any advice. After explaining my situation the doctor focused on the change of bowel habit and my age and advised me to see my GP with a view of arranging an colonoscopy. Now I will not ignore this advice of course and am rather stressed over all this as I went in being down about the possibility of having Celiac and came out feeling even more stressed and worried I may have cancer. I am just wondering if anyone else has had such an experience with either Celiac or perhaps wheat intolerance. Why is it some foods, like the 'wrap' or 'digestive biscuits' that have such a terrible effect on me? Other's like a sandwich on it's own, maybe just a bit of bloating. A bit of history, I am a 52 year old male, medium height and build, not overweight. Hypothyroid and medicated for that for last 20 years with no issues. I also have some Vitiligo (only mentioned as it's also an auto immune 'thing'. I also have Barrett's esophagus and my last two scopes have been clear for any progression of any kind. I am due again at the end of the year (year 3) but will ask to go back early. One last point, I woke up the day after the 'wrap' incident with a dull pain/ache on my right side, lower belly. I can remember having this before on occasion on waking. Is this where something gets swollen from wheat intolerance by any chance? Regards to all, sm
  3. I was diagnosed 2 yrs ago. I have been gluten-free since, through these 2 yrs I have had minor issues with gluten through what I believe has been cross contamination. 2 days ago I had one chicken wing and the after it was hit wrenching stomach cramps, shaky, cold and clamy, lot's of bathroom trips and throwing up. What I wasn't expecting was the joint pain and body aches. The foggy brain is awful, I am not sure what is normal because this is my first serious gluten poisoning experince. It is day 3 and I still have diarrhea and feel like throwing up, and feel shaky and felt like I was going to faint at one point, also I haven't eaten other 1 apple and some water. The worst part of this is that I have 2 kids and my husband is not supportive he thinks I need to force my self to eat get out of bed and get over it like you would a cold or a flu. I am so tired and I am not craving food, is this normal? And does anyone else deal with non supportive family members who don't get how huge and serious this is????
  4. Celiac.com 03/08/2018 - A team of researchers recently set out to study delays in diagnosing patients who have biopsy-proven celiac disease with gastrointestinal complaints, compared to those without non-gastrointestinal complaints. The research team included Marco A. Paez, MD, Anna Maria Gramelspacher, MD, James Sinacore, PhD, Laura Winterfield, MD, and Mukund Venu, MD. They are variously affiliated with the Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Howard College of Medicine, Washington, DC; the Department of Medicine, the Department of Public Health Sciences, the Division of Gastroenterology, and the Department of Medicine at Loyola University Medical Center in Maywood, Illinois. The research team first conducted a medical chart review of 687 adult patients diagnosed with celiac disease. All patients they studied had biopsy-proven celiac disease and were grouped according to presence or absence of gastrointestinal symptoms before diagnosis. The team found 101 biopsy-proven celiac patients that met their study criteria. The groups were roughly equal in size, with 52 patients showing gastrointestinal symptoms before diagnosis, and 49 with no gastrointestinal symptoms. The results for the groups were starkly different. Statistical analysis revealed an average diagnosis delay of 2.3 months for the group with gastrointestinal symptoms, while the group that showed no symptoms showed an average delay of 42 months. That’s a difference of nearly 3½ years. Nearly half of the patients with non-gastrointestinal symptoms had abnormal thyroid-stimulating hormone, as opposed to 15.5% in the gastrointestinal symptom group (P = .004). Nearly 70% of patients without gastrointestinal symptoms had anemia, compared with just 11.5% of the group with gastrointestinal symptoms. Also, nearly 70% of patients in the non-gastrointestinal symptom group showed abnormal bone density scans, compared with 41% in the gastrointestinal symptom group. The team saw no sex differences on chi-squared analysis between the 2 groups. Although there is growing awareness of celiac disease, the delay in diagnosis for patients without gastrointestinal symptoms remains prolonged, with an average delay of 3.5 years for celiac diagnosis, compared with just over two months for those with symptoms. Clearly, more needs to be done with regard to diagnosing celiac disease in patients who show no symptoms. On the upside, researchers are currently working on ways to better diagnose celiac disease via faster, more accurate tests, even in patients who have already gone gluten-free. Source: PlumX Metrics
  5. Hi, im just wondering how long you all waited for your results for endoscopy biopsy? I rang the lab today and apparently they have already been sent to my gp! That seems really quick to me! Also what were your symptoms? i went gluten free about 10 years ago. Was having stomach issues. Did every test but the endoscopy (I chickened out). Fast forward stomach issues returned. So return for a bunch of tests. Got diagnosed with Hashimotos. So Doc recommended confirming celiac. Gluten challenged. Omg that really sucked! Crippling pain, tired all the time. Toilet drama, I looked pregnant, so much so that people actually asked! So bloated! Gong to Gp tomorrow...
  6. Beginning a few months ago, I thought I was just gluten intolerant. Then I started to really question what was wrong with me. Since I was a baby, I had intolerance to dairy. They would make us drink milk at school, and they (the government, basically) told us it was essential to our health. Yet, I was always in the health room after lunch in pain. Everyone thought I was faking it because I didn't like being at school. It wasn't until I entered high school that I diagnosed myself as lactose intolerant. I never had those stomach aches, gas, etc. again as long as I didn't consume dairy. Since I was 20, I lost a lot of weight. My BMI is 19.0, but it was 18.2 when it first happened. To maintain my weight, I don't exercise, and I overeat. This is not how things are supposed to be! I miss working out! I don't like worrying about eating when I don't want to. I'm pale, I'm cold, I can't sleep because I get a pins-and-needles feeling all over my body, sometimes I'll lose feeling in a toe, I've been told I look unhealthy, or like a ghost, I have no energy anymore, my anxiety, anger, and other mood issues are through the roof. I developed borderline personality disorder (ironically, probably, and partially stems from the emotional neglect of my parents about my physical and mental health for all those years. Saying it's all in my head, etc. I actually cried 3 times today, first time in months. My mom doesn't believe anythings wrong with me. I stayed up all night interpreting my DNA results to try getting her to believe me. We've been fighting all day. She always tries to minimize my problems and calls me a bypochondriac). My hair is becoming finer and possibly even thinning. I was diagnosed with ADD, bipolar, and psychosis. At about 17, I developed acid reflux - lots of throat-related issues like clearing it a lot, and post-nasal drop. All of this happened at the same time, basically. About 1 year ago. I had a genetic test done. There are two haplogroups related to celiac, I have the HLA DQA1 version (the most common). There are 13 (I believe) SNPs related to celiac disease. I have 12. My cousin had a similar issue and did NRT. And she's never felt better. They didn't give her diagnoses but told her to watch her dairy intake. What are your thoughts? Is it safe to assume I have the disease? I want to be myself again, but I don't know how to do that unless I know what's causing the problem. And please please please don't tell me to see a doctor, because some of us can't afford it, nor can we afford putting another medical issue on our profile. Thank you!
  7. I've recently been to my GP 3 times in the last 2 weeks. It started with a rash on my side that was diagnosed as shingles. About 5 days later, a different extremely itchy rash developed on my thighs, buttocks, lower back and biceps. Small red and raised, but would become hive like once inflamed. I went back to the GP one more time where they prescribed prednisone until I could see the dermatologist (tomorrow). I've never even considered this being celiac as I don't have any digestive issues outside of diarrhea after lunch which I've always attributed to coffee consumption. Just trying to gauge the possibility for celiac going into tomorrow's tests. Thanks
  8. Hey there, I'm new! I've spent quite some time on this site reading up and thought I'd ask the experts. In end of November I started experiencing symptoms (toilet and gas focus) which in January really started escalating enough to send me to the doctor. I explained my symptoms and got a blood test and results about 10 days ago. My 'Deamidated Gliadin IgA was high at 31 U/mL (normal being <15) while the other results were all normal. Doc told me to go to GI for endoscopy, although stated this isn't a 'huge' increase. Meanwhile my symptoms started escalating to the occasional vomit, massive fatigue and feeling like I would collapse while walking to work. I'm reading a lot about this now (though still don't feel knowledgeable at all), and I'm wondering 1) does this number give any indication of celiac as a stand alone? No family history. 2) Is it possible that if it could be celiac, that it can happen so quickly? It just seems to be so sudden so I'm quite confused. I'm seeing the GI next week for next steps. It's just been a tough couple of weeks and I don't seem to get much help from the GP. Any tips would be appreciated!
  9. Celiac.com 01/03/2018 - A recent study indicates that symptoms for some autoimmune disease can vary depending on the time of day. A substance called transcription factor BMAL1 plays a crucial role in the human molecular clock, regulating biological pathways that drive 24 hour circadian rhythms in behavior and physiology. The molecular clock has a major influence on innate immune function, and disturbances in circadian rhythms are associated with increases in multiple sclerosis (MS), for example. But, researchers just don't have much good information on the factors that influence this association. A team of researchers recently set out to better understand the factors that influence this association. The research team included Caroline E. Sutton, Conor M. Finlay, Mathilde Raverdeau, James O. Early, Joseph DeCourcey, Zbigniew Zaslona, Luke A. J. O'Neill, Kingston H. G. Mills, and Annie M. Curtis. They are variously affiliated with the Immune Regulation Research Group, Trinity Biomedical Sciences Institute, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland; the Inflammatory Research Group, School of Biochemistry and Immunology, Trinity Biomedical Sciences Institute, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland; and with the Department of Molecular and Cellular Therapeutics, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI), Dublin, Ireland. In a recent study, the research team found that BMAL1 and time-of-day regulate the accumulation and activation of various immune cells in a CNS autoimmune disease model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). In myeloid cells, BMAL1 maintains anti-inflammatory responses and reduces T cell polarization. Loss of myeloid BMAL1 or midday immunizations to induce EAE create an inflammatory environment in the CNS through expansion and infiltration of IL-1β-secreting CD11b+Ly6Chi monocytes, resulting in increased pathogenic IL-17+/IFN-γ+ T cells. These findings show the important role played by the molecular clock in processing innate and adaptive immune crosstalk under autoimmune conditions. Understanding the exact ways in which the human molecular clock influences innate immune function, and by extension, autoimmune diseases, will help doctors to better understand these disease, and to develop better approaches to treatment, among other things. Source: Nature.com
  10. Hi everyone. I'm 24 and have had digestive issues for years. After a endoscopy/colonoscopy with still no results, I decided to try and eliminate some foods myself to see if I could solve the problem. I tried dairy in September, but after not seeing much of a difference I reintroduced dairy (without any issues) and took out Gluten, starting October 31. I read the recommended test period is 3 weeks, so after 3 weeks with little results, I reintroduced gluten back in on Wednesday, Nov 22 (it the 26th now). I didn't have any reaction Wednesday, Thursday, or Friday, but on Saturday I didn't have much of an appetite and started to have D later in the afternoon that's still going into this morning. I guess I'm trying to determine whether I ate something that didn't agree with me or if this is a late reaction to eating gluten. From your experience, is it normal to not have any sort of reaction until a few days later? Keep in mind, I don't have celiacs, I was seeing if I have an intolerance. Thanks!
  11. Celiac.com 11/25/2017 - We have long known that gluten intolerance, both celiac disease and gluten sensitivity, are highly associated with neurological symptoms. Migraines, ataxia (unstable gait), seizures, schizophrenia – the list is long. But a recent research study just published last month sheds some new light on exactly what the mechanism may be. Understanding why these debilitating symptoms occur as a result of a gluten intolerance will, hopefully, go a long way toward increased awareness among the lay public and clinicians alike. It is certainly true that too many millions of Americans suffer the effects of a gluten intolerance unknowingly. They only know that they feel unhealthy but have no idea that gluten is the culprit. The digestive tract is sometimes called the second brain. Some say that is because it is second in importance to the brain. After all, if the food that is consumed doesn't turn into fuel that can effectively feed the 10 trillion cells in the body, those cells will be unable to perform their job and keep the body healthy. In fact, poor digestion is absolutely linked to poor health and increased onset of degenerative disease. This article in Current Pain and Headache Reports looks at another possibility for naming the digestive tract the second brain, and it simply stems from anatomy. The digestive tract actually has a ‘mind of its own'; more correctly, it has a nervous system of its own, called the enteric nervous system. ‘Enteric' simply means having to do with the intestine. This nervous system, according to research, is very similar to the brain housed in the head in that it is bathed in similar chemicals (called neurotransmitters – which, interestingly enough, are mostly produced in the gut!). It sends and receives impulses and records experiences and is influenced by emotions. Some proof of the latter: Have you ever been nervous and had diarrhea? This particular study stated that experiencing ‘adverse events' created a state of hypervigilance (a state of being overly responsive - not a good thing) in the nervous system which was associated with migraines and IBS. Such ‘hypervigilance' was previously only associated with the central nervous system – the one attached to the brain in the head. This group of researchers suggests that the initiation of hypervigilance may very likely lie in the enteric nervous system also. What this means is that if the small intestine is genetically sensitive to gluten and gluten is ingested, it could set off a nervous system response that could create disabling diseases, such as migraines and IBS, but likely others as well. The take-away message is that it is truly critical to diagnose gluten intolerance as soon as possible. Once that hurdle is surmounted it then needs to be followed with a program of nutrition, lifestyle and diet that will ensure healing of the small intestine and a ‘calming' of the hypervigilant nervous system. You may sometimes hear this referred to as healing a leaky gut. Here at HealthNOW we often see this clinically in patients who seem intolerant to many different foods and can't seem to enjoy stable improvement of their symptoms, even after they eliminate gluten from their diet. The reason for this insufficient improvement is that a comprehensive follow-up program is missing – a program that addresses what we call the Secondary Effects of Gluten. This entails evaluating for any other food sensitivities, cross reactive foods, a tendency towards autoimmune disease, the presence of any infectious organisms, healing the leaky gut, balancing the probiotic population, and more. While increasing awareness of the presence of gluten intolerance is absolutely critical, neglecting the secondary effects, as mentioned above, can result in long-term ill health that is truly preventable. Have you experienced such symptoms? Have you removed gluten but are only partially healthier? I'd love to hear from you. To your good health.
  12. Hello everyone! I am new here. I went to urgent care for nerve pain last week (hands and feet going numb, tingling, burning etc) My doctor did not want to see me and told me to go to urgent care. I thought the pain was caused from my back because I have a ton of back problems. Anyway, at urgent care the doctor asked if I have celiac disease. I said "No but my grandma does." she straight up said "you have it." no tests nothing, but she has it and said my symptoms reflect the disease. Anyways it makes sense to me and I think I might have it. I have a lot of symptoms and I would like others input. Here is a list: I am a 24 year old female. I am average weight and height. Migranes every day since I was 14. I had to get a cat scan after I fainted in class. They found nothing and put me on meds that didn't work. When I was 15 I had anemia. At 16 I was vitamin D deficient. I got blood work done a few months ago and no longer have anemia After that I had terrible anxiety and depression. Put me on meds that didn't work. Back problems for no reason (started when I was 18) herniated disk, multiple bulging disks, my disks are loosing fluid, scoliosis, Stomach problems, 2 years ago I started to feel nauseous every day, worse in the morning, I'd dry heave every morning or puke. Some days I'd puke up bile. This is still going on. They ran tests on my liver (high liver enzymes and fatty liver) and a gallbladder test, came back normal. I go poop 5-10 times a day. The stool is always loose. Once in awhile it is solid. Sometimes I go so much, when I wipe I start to bleed and it is painful. I have 3 breaks at work, I go before my break and right before it ends. Its embarrassing. So some days I go number two at work 6 times in one day! I always feel like I am on my period, I have skinny days where I can wear a size 9 but somedays for no reason I swell up and my size 11 pants are tight and hurt because my pelvic area is tender. I had an ultrasound, they found one cyst. A few months back I lost 15 pounds in two weeks, I could barely eat I felt so sick all the time. Then a few months later I gained 20 pounds in two weeks. I till wasn't eating. I went up multiple sizes and it just hurt. I never have an appetite. I started to get a random rash, my scalp itched, my knees and my elbows. It went away it was just weird. It lasted about a month and my doc said it was ecsema. Now I can't loose the weight. I am vegetarian, tried working out but can't loose anything. (by working out I mean walking. I literally don't have energy to do anything else) I get puffy eyes. Bad allergies, and sinus pressure every day of my life. On allergy meds that kinda help. I noticed a lot of these symptoms get worse after I eat gluten. I just started keeping track after the doctor mentioned this. I also have just been getting nerve pain, my arms and legs cramp up, my feet cramp up and get stuck, my hands and feet go numb, tingle, and BURN. I am tired all day every day even if I sleep 10 plus hours. Everyday I feel like I lifted weights and did full body work outs and everyday I feel hungover even though I did not drink any alcohol. I get tired from folding laundry and can barely function. All I want to do is lay in bed. Some days I drink 5 cups of coffee and an energy drink and I'm still tired. I also have brain fog and bad memory problems lately. I am messing up at work with the way I feel. I literally feel like my body is telling me something wrong. Sometimes my body aches so much I think I have fibro or (cancer) thats really how bad I feel. One day after my legs were cramping all day I had weird red patches all over my legs. I was freaked out. Any input would be great. Of course having celiac would suck but I feel so bad every day an answer to my problems would be amazing. I can't keep living like this. I noticed after I eat gluten, about an hour after, I feel depressed for no reason. Sometimes I cramp up and my stomach is tender. I don't know what to do.
  13. Celiac.com 10/23/2017 - What's the relationship between celiac disease and liver histology, serology and treatment response? Celiac disease is diagnosed on the basis of ESPGHAN criteria, and clinical response to gluten-free diet. Researchers have noted histological abnormalities on liver biopsies in patients with celiac disease, but have rarely described the abnormalities in detail. A team of researchers recently set out to assess the histological spectrum of 'celiac hepatitis' and to see if a gluten-free diet can reduce such features. The research team included K Majumdar, P Sakhuja, AS Puri, K Gaur, A Haider, and R Gondal. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Pathology, and the Department of Gastroenterology at the G B Pant Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research, New Delhi, India. Their team analyzed twenty-five patients with concomitant celiac disease and hepatic derangement for clinical profile, laboratory investigations and duodenal and liver biopsy. They then made a histological comparison of pre- and post-GFD duodenal and liver biopsies, where possible. They found that fifteen patients with celiac disease later developed abnormal liver function tests. They also found that 7 out of 10 patients with liver disease showed tissue positive transglutaminase, while 6 of the 10 had antigliadin antibodies. Eight patients showed serological markers for autoimmune liver disease (AILD). Liver histology ranged from mild reactive hepatitis, chronic hepatitis, and steatosis to cirrhosis. They found six patients with liver biopsies made after a gluten-free diet. Five of these patients showed a decrease in steatosis, portal and lobular inflammation and fibrosis score. From these results, they concluded that celiac hepatitis could be a distinct condition, and that patients may present with either celiac disease, or with secondary hepatic derangement. They recommend celiac evaluations for patients with AILD, unexplained transaminasaemia or anemia. This is one of the few studies to show the range of histological changes to the liver in patients with 'celiac hepatitis'. They note that the adoption of a gluten-free diet in such patients may help to improve symptoms of 'celiac hepatitis'. Source: J Clin Pathol. 2017 Sep 29. pii: jclinpath-2017-204647. doi: 10.1136/jclinpath-2017-204647.
  14. Please help, I am 30.All my life from childhood I had upset stomach pain and cramps.As a child was frequently treated for giardia and still had cramps.As a child so strange I had bumps with water on skin.Not redness nothing else.Just bumps filled with water all over my body.Later I never had these.But in my early teens I started with fatigue anxiety.Then extreme fatigue.Hair fallen.Eyebrow loss over a few years to nonexistent eyebrow.Always low iron even with supplementing.Low vitamin D3.Low calcium and magnesium.Gastrointestinal for a few months now I have cramps daily.Diarheea almost daily.Treated for parasites and giradia.nothing changed. OTHER symptoms. Bone pain.Spinal pain.Headache.Eye floaters.Done MRI and eye exams nothing all clear Low iron again at blood work. Low exercise tolerance. So bloated I seem like pregnant in 9 months even !!!if i lost weight the last three months Itchiness all over body but no bumps just redness Itchiness extreme on the scalp. Petechiae small red spots all over my body this is for years now. Tried gluten free even though in my country very hard to keep up with this. Only for few days then gave up and tried again and so on. Did some blood work but only 2 antobodies and not IGa and Igg judt one of them.Negative.this was two years ago. I don't know what to do. Oh and mouth ulcers. And have gas i am afraid because i can hardly control because i am extremely bloated. I am desperate. Thanks.
  15. Celiac.com 10/18/2017 - Celiac disease is a chronic inflammatory disease of the small intestine mucosa due to permanent intolerance to dietary gluten. A team of researchers recently set out to clarify the role of small intestinal epithelial cells in the immunopathology of celiac disease, especially the influence of celiac disease-associated bacteria. The research team included G Pietz, R De, M Hedberg, V Sjöberg, O Sandström, O Hernell, S Hammarström, and ML Hammarström. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology, and the Department of Clinical Sciences and Pediatrics at Umeå University, in Umeå, Sweden. The team collected duodenal biopsies from children with active celiac disease, treated celiac disease, and a group of clinical control subjects. They then purified intestinal epithelial cells, and analyzed them for gene expression changes at the mRNA and protein levels. To assess how interferon-γ, interleukin-17A, celiac disease-associated bacteria and gluten influence intestinal epithelial cells, they used two in vitro models for human intestinal epithelium, small intestinal enteroids and polarized tight monolayers. In patients with active celiac disease, intestinal epithelial cells significantly upregulated more than 25 defense-related genes, including IRF1, SPINK4, ITLN1, OAS2, CIITA, HLA-DMB, HLA-DOB, PSMB9, TAP1, BTN3A1, and CX3CL1. Of these genes, 70 percent were upregulated by interferon-γ via the IRF1 pathway. Notably, IRF1 was also upregulated by bacteria associated with celiac disease. Intestinal epithelial cells also expressed the NLRP6/8 inflammasome yielding CASP1 and biologically active interleukin-18, which induces interferon-γ in intraepithelial lymphocytes. Over-expression of IRF1 appears to be a key factor in the epithelial reaction in celiac disease. This may be inherent, but may also be due to presence of undesirable microbes that trigger or influence IRF1. From this study, the researchers conclude that activation of IRF1 and IRF1-regulated genes together, both directly and via the interleukin-18 dependent inflammasome, would greatly increase the severity of the inflammatory response, and trigger the pathological gut response that is common in active celiac disease. Could this provide a key to unlocking the mysteries of celiac disease and its associated symptoms? Source: PLoS One. 2017 Sep 21;12(9):e0185025. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0185025.
  16. Brand new here. I'm searching for all the help I can get, and, well... I figure you all are "experts" I have suspected for Years that my daughter is Gluten sensitive or allergic (and my husband as well, and my MIL because my daughter is SO much like her). The doctor I approached on the subject said to put her on a gluten free diet and if she does better, then I'll know. I want to have her tested before we go gluten-free, but I don't know how to ask for that (we've moved to a whole new state, so new drs) Her symptoms that make me suspicious are: Eczema that appeared at 2m old (but went away) and Dermatitis herperiformis that is very mild, toddler tummy that never went away, and off and on complaints of pain in her legs and feet; pain so bad she doesn't want to walk. She has been complaining for a couple days, so that is what has led me here. Granted, she is my fastest growing child... she's 7 and is now taller than her petite 9yr old sister (my mother in law was a tall woman, and so is my father so genes are at play), but the extra fat she carries (born with) I suspect has to do with gluten. My husband I suspect as well because he has (for as long as I've known him) body wide acne, became lactose intolerant (gas, cramps, diarrhea), and occasionally other foods will set off the irritated bowel type symptoms as well. He also gets psoriasis rash on his face and scalp. I wonder at times if gluten is the culprit for his mental health and sleep issues as well. Need to get him tested as well. We are on an extremely tight budget, and all the work needed to provide gluten free meals seems like a very daunting task. I'm quite overwhelmed by it, and it Really doesn't help that my family, Especially my husband, is stuck on the processed foods that taste "better". So with all that... Any advice would be helpful.... am I on the right track with these symptoms? Questions welcome. p.s. My mother was diagnosed by small intestinal biopsy, to have "the start of celiac damage" so she has been eating gluten-free since July. She pays for it dearly every time she consumes G now, with major gas, and cramps, etc. Unfortunately she is allergic to soy and has found that Quinoa makes her lips burn and swell so that's out the window. I too have begun reacting to soy with blisters and throat tightness, so changes are in store for me too.
  17. Celiac.com 09/25/2017 - There are currently several efforts underway to develop successful commercial enzyme treatments for celiac disease. Efforts include looking at the digestive enzymes in plants, such as the papaya and star fruits, including such predatory plants, such as the pitcher plant. One focus has been on developing enzymes that can break down gluten before it can trigger an immune reaction. This could prove helpful to many people with celiac disease. One such enzyme under development is Latiglutenase, formerly known as ALV003. Latiglutenase is a new name for an enzyme therapy designed to be taken with meals. The idea is that a person with celiac disease would take an enzyme tablet with a meal. If the meal had mild gluten contamination, the enzyme’s two recombinant proteins would break gluten into fragments that are not toxic to the immune system, thereby preventing exposure, and symptoms. But the stomach is a notoriously difficult environment to work in, so what seems like a simple idea quite a challenge from a science and biology perspective. Seeking to explore the ability of Latiglutinase to improve symptoms, a team of researchers recently set out to test latiglutenase on celiac patients who are seropositive despite following a gluten-free diet. The research team included Jack A. Syage, Joseph A. Murray, Peter H. R. Green and Chaitan Khosla. They are variously affiliated with the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester USA, the Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University, New York, USA, the Departments of Chemical Engineering and Chemistry, Stanford University, USA, and with ImmunogenX, Newport Beach, USA. "Though the ALV003-1221 trial was inconclusive regarding histologic improvement from latiglutenase, the evidence for symptom benefit, which is more quickly achieved, is quite convincing and clinically relevant," Joseph Murray, MD, of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., said in a press release. In these trials, patients with celiac disease who were seropositive despite following a gluten-free diet saw major improvement in symptoms when taking latiglutenase with meals, according to a post hoc analysis of the CeliAction study. The team was really hoping to see histological improvement, but they feel satisfied that this trial shows, says Dr. Murray, that a "therapy to help patients struggling with symptoms due to celiac disease is now within reach." Stay tuned for more on efforts to develop effective enzyme treatments for celiac disease. Read more: Dig Dis Sci. 2017 Doi:10.1007/s10620-017-4687-7.
  18. Celiac.com 08/25/2017 - Japanese drug maker Daiichi Sankyo will pay $300 million to settle thousands of federal and state court lawsuits over its top-selling blood pressure drugs, Benicar, Benicar HCT, Azor and Tribenzor, according to the lead Plaintiffs' lawyers. The settlement was reached in the federal multi-district litigation (MDL) case titled In re: Benicar (Olmesartan) Products Liability Litigation, MDL 2606, pending in the U.S. District Court for the District of New Jersey, Camden Division. Overseeing the federal MDL litigation are the Honorable Judge Robert Kugler and the Honorable Magistrate Judge Joel Schneider, who handled the settlement negotiations. The agreement covers about 2,500 claims by individuals who claim severe and sometimes life-threatening gastrointestinal injuries after using medications containing the active ingredient olmesartan medoxomil (Benicar, Benicar HCT, Azor and Tribenzor). Numerous reports have tied Olmesartan to sprue-like enteropathy and changes in the intestinal tract that mimic those seen in celiac disease, and inhibit a person's ability to absorb nutrients. The parties reached the resolution as they maneuvered ahead of pre-trial hearings, and an expected trial in federal court. Christopher L. Coffin and Adam M. Slater, Co-Lead Counsel for the Plaintiffs, praised the settlement as an excellent outcome for the Plaintiffs. In a statement, Coffin said that they were "very pleased with the outcome of this hard-fought litigation. This is a gratifying resolution for thousands of patients who suffered severe gastrointestinal injuries while using these blood pressure medications." Under the settlement, former olmesartan users who have claims, and who meet certain criteria will be eligible for compensation. For more information go to OlmesartanProductLitigationSettlement.com.
  19. Hey guys, I will try and keep this as short and concise as I can. About a year ago, I had a very long day at work and ate a lot of chicken wings and a very poor diet. The next week, I felt terrible. I head headaches, GI issues, fatigue and some muscle aches and nasal congestion. I thought it was just a stomach bug, but a cycle of this sickness continued throughout the whole summer. Basically every other week I would be sick with fatigue, headaches, nausea, GI issues and I felt feverish and nasal congestion. I finally went in for blood work (CBC, vitamin and mineral levels were tested) and everything came back normal. I was perscribed a probiotic and it didnt help. A couple months later, I went in for a colonoscopy and an endoscopy and tested negative for Celiacs and just had mild acid reflux. I still stopped eating gluten since January and felt better. However, there were still times that I felt "crappy" again. This could have been from cross contamination or me just eating gluten. But basically, I came home from college and I felt great for about 6 weeks. Then, I accidentally ate Ragu sauce that was not gluten free and I felt crappy again with feverish feeling, headaches, fatigue, nasal congestion and diziness. Ever since then, I have felt "crappy" 3 seperate times. Two weeks ago, I ate meatloaf twice with bread crumbs and a whole beer (which i knew was gluten). A couple days after I ate the meatloaf, I started to get headaches and the past couple days (about a week after drinking the beer) have been terrible with bad headaches, body aches and feverish with nasal congestion again (so ive been sick for about 12 days in a row now) I am scheduled to go in to see an allergist in about a month..... 1) What tests should I ask for? I think that I have a gluten intolerance or a sensitivity..... 2) Do my symptoms match up with a person with a gluten intolerance? THANK YOU FOR READING THIS WHOLE THING. I REALLY NEED AND APPRECIATE THE HELP!!!
  20. This is gonna be long! Hi, I'm Emma! I know that nothing short of getting tested will show for sure, and nobody but my doctor can tell me. All I'm asking for is opinions But in order for me to get a blood test I keep trying to explain my (extremely severe) fear of needles. I have to be heavily sedated and medicated in order to get it done and he won't move on from Valium which didn't work (and they gave me a big enough dose for a grown man, they said. It had no effect.) I asked people on quora about it and they all suggested like therapy and mental coaching but they don't understand that when I'm in that state I have physically hurt nurses, doctors, dentists- I can't be talked down at all and need to be sedated. Long story short, a blood test is a dream. My doctor also wants to check for anemia, hypothyroidism, PCOS, and something else I can't remember because of my symptoms. For starters, I know for a fact I'm gluten intolerant. It's a long story but I went on a pre-packaged gluten free meal diet for about four months and then when I went off it and had gluten it was like my entire brain swelled up. My partner said it was like I was emotionless. I couldn't think, or really put thoughts together. It felt like (and I literally did) I could stare at a wall with my mouth open drooling. It just dumbfounded me. I asked my gluten intolerant relative and she said I probably did have gluten intolerance. When I went back on my gluten free food for another three months, and then back off it again, and the same cotton-stuffed head feeling (among other things) came back, I knew it wasn't a fluke. Especially considering gluten was the only ingredient that changed when I did that diet. I've been extremely tired for my entire life, my doctors prescribed me adderall and Wellbutrin to keep me in a semi awake state. I've slept over 30- consecutive hours, and still woke up tired. This eased up with gluten free but considering I'm back eating gluten now (and have been for awhile...it's hard not to. I'm kind of gluten adapted at this point but can tell that a lot of thoughts are foggy and sort of out of reach. Not as clear as when I'm gluten free) my memory is kind of foggy and I can't recall if my sleep issues completely went away but I know they were a lot better. I have soft teeth, I get cavities from almost anything. I read that enamel erosion is common with celiac people. I read somewhere about skin elasticity with celiac disease. When I was growing up I got stretch marks really hardcore even though I was young and not severely obese (just a chubby kid. No reason for my skin to be so extreme. I'm just thinking there had to be another reason because kids have the most collagen in their skin, so why did mine tear so easily?) I have diagnosed depression, ADD, chronic fatigue and motion sickness (this doesn't necessarily have anything to do with gluten intolerance I just notice it eases up as well when I take gluten away.) it seems like no matter what supplements I take or changes I make nothing eases my symptoms but things really improve without gluten. As for digestive issues, those cleared up with gluten free too but considering I only tried gluten free when I was 20 (22 in two weeks), most of my life has been bad digestive issues so I don't actually know what's normal and what's not. Also, my dad (who I've always been more similar to in terms of genetics.) had a camera thing in his intestines done, and his results were what the doctors said were "irritation (I can't remember the word, I think it was irritation) consistent with celiac disease." This is all I can remember for now. Does anyone have any thoughts?
  21. I have just been diagnosed with celiacs and believe that I have had it for years but my doctors didn't catch it. Anyways around the time where my symptoms started getting worse which was 3 years ago I started getting migraines when I would eat chocolate. I am wondering if anyone else experienced this and if it got better once you went on a gluten free diet. I can easily try for myself but knowing how sick it made me last time I'm nervous to introduce it back into my diet. Thank you!
  22. I found this article about glyphosates interesting. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3945755/
  23. I was gluten free for about a year and feeling great, then I started eating twizzlers and wasn't really thinking about the gluten in them. I was started to feel off all the time. Then I got a really bad cold virus and wanted some warm chicken noodle soup and ate that for about 2 weeks and of course wasn't feeling well because I already had a cold. Then I just completely crashed one day. Started having extreme fatigue and weakness. Muscle pain. Stomach problems. Anxiety and panic attacks. I immediately stopped eating the noodles and went back to gluten free. I noticed that eating oats caused the same reaction. Now it is two months out and I am still feeling weak and fatigued. Other symptoms are: hard time sleeping, muscle pain, crying easily, panic attacks, reactions to almost everything I eat now. However it is gradually seeming to subside. Questions...Can gluten have a cumulative affect where the symptoms just keep getting worse the more you keep eating and eventually cause a crash? Can the symptoms last for 2-3 months or longer? Can oats cause the same reaction (the oats were gluten free)?
  24. Hi, I've struggled with GI issues (IBS, GERD) and poly-cystic ovarian syndrome for the last 5-6 years (I am 26). My reflux has been continually getting worse and my doctor was concerned since I take high doses of Zantac. They referred me to specialty clinic for endoscopy. During my EGD doctor noticed lots of inflammation and he left a note stating that my villi in small intestine were flat. Only post op notes were to wait for the biopsy results of duodenum and along stomach; and to try another med. I've been having a lot of fatigue and easy bruising the last few months on top of worsening reflux. I've been primary surviving on chicken, bread, carrots...but it wasn't helping like it normally seemed to. Last week I started having joint pain that moves and comes/goes, as well as tingling in my hands and feet. After the tingling/joint pain started I stopped eating gluten/complex carbs because I thought maybe it was related to blood sugar; reflux is a little better but joint pain is not. Does this sound familiar to anyone? I had some blood work done for vitamins/minerals and liver function. Nurse over phone said it seems within normal limits; but that my liver function was on the lowest end of normal (AST =10). I have an appointment with my regular doctor tomorrow; as of Friday they didn't have my results but they wanted to follow up on joint pain/tingling.
  25. I've posted about this before, but I'm about 14 weeks in and have seen very little improvement. Did any of you take a long time to feel better, and do you think I should cast my doubts aside?