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Found 5 results

  1. Celiac.com 06/11/2019 - A potentially major breakthrough in celiac disease treatment owes at least part of its success to a simple drive-in hamburger from Seattle's beloved and legendary Dick's Drive-In. If you have celiac disease, and haven't heard of PvP Biologics, you likely will. PvP originated in 2011 as an award winning student biology project at the University of Washington Institute for Protein Design, a lab that has created several successful startups. PvP's enzyme-driven product, KumaMax, is designed to break down gliadin, the part of gluten that triggers an autoimmune reaction in people with celiac disease and gluten sensitivity. Like most similar enzyme therapies, KumaMax is not designed to be a cure for celiac disease, but to help prevent adverse reactions from accidental gluten contamination. KumaMax is designed to break down gluten in the stomach, and to help prevent a gluten reaction. Celiac.com covered part of the PvP story in 2017 in our article "Takeda Taps PvP Biologics to Develop Celiac Disease Therapy." That story covered PvP's deal with Japanese drug giant Takeda, which gave the startup $35 million to complete a phase 1 clinical trial, at which point Takeda has the option to purchase the startup. Apparently, when it was time for PvP Biologics to test KumaMax, the research team needed to make sure their enzyme would work in the stomach, and work only against gluten proteins, not against meat or dairy proteins. The team wanted a meal that would allow them to test the gluten-neutralizing properties of their drug in conditions that mimicked the human stomach. For that meal, the team turned to Dick's Drive-In, purveyors of fine burgers. “We got a hamburger and a vanilla milkshake from the Dick’s Drive-In in Wallingford,” said Ingrid Pultz, co-founder and chief scientific officer of PvP. “If we were going to get a hamburger, it might as well be from Dick’s. It’s a Seattle institution.” Team members labeled the food as lab equipment. They then blended and acidified the mixture, to mimic the stomach environment, and added the KumaMax enzyme. The enzyme worked well enough to become PvP's lead molecule, and to earn the support of Takeda. So there you have it. KumaMax, the breakthrough gluten dissolving enzyme that may offer celiacs some protection against accidental gluten ingestion has its roots in a simple hamburger and milkshake from Seattle institution, Dick's Drive-In. Read more at Geekwire.com
  2. Celiac.com 01/03/2009 - Recently on a gluten-free forum, I found a post asking for advice on what to do after a woman had accidentally consumed a large amount of gluten. After unknowingly eating from her daughter’s takeout box, the woman had realized her mistake and was simply devastated to have broken her diet and subjected herself to the old, too-familiar symptoms that were on their way. It was interesting reading the various responses, which resulted in a debate over whether or not to induce vomiting, drink pineapple juice, take enzymes or engage in a certain illegal activity. In all the debate, the woman eventually disappeared off the forum, which probably meant that she took some action or another, though I never heard the final result. This whole subject inspired some research on my part. I first consulted my extensive gluten-free library, which led me to one solitary, repetitive answer: do not eat gluten. In a world where doctors and authors alike are so concerned that their advice on the subject will lead people with gluten sensitivities to forgo a gluten-free diet in favor of a “band aid” of sorts, that finding a documented recommendation is near impossible. These experts are right to reinforce the importance of maintaining a gluten free lifestyle, and the fact that there is no “cure” for gluten intolerance and celiac disease (other than complete avoidance of gluten from wheat, barley and rye). But mistakes do happen, and from time to time people do get "glutened,” and when they do, which action is best? No matter what the size is of the offending dose of gluten, all experts agree, inducing vomiting is too dangerous and disruptive to the body to be considered. But there is one option that at least two noted experts in field of celiac research agree upon: enzymes. When I contacted the renowned Dr. Kenneth Fine of EnteroLab, and asked him if perhaps a dose of enzymes that are designed to break down gluten might help, he had this to say: “The good news is that everyone will survive and recover from the gluten exposure. The enzymes you mention might help, but not completely, unless they consumed at the same time (as the gluten) for best results.” And like all good doctors, he did go on to warn, “Avoidance is still the best policy.” Shari Lieberman, PhD, CNS, FACN and author of The Gluten Connection very humbly admits that “gluten slips happen.” She also devotes a couple of pages in her book to research conducted using digestive enzymes to help manage those occasions when gluten does make its way into your diet, citing a research example in which “The study demonstrates that enzyme therapy can substantially minimize symptoms in people with celiac disease who are exposed to gluten.” The enzyme used in this study does not seem to be currently available, but other gluten enzymes are at your local health food store. I contacted one company in regard to their product, which according to them helps to reduce inflammation caused by the introduction of gluten in an individual with celiac disease or gluten intolerance. According to them their enzymes will not prevent all damage, but may reduce some inflammation and help the body to better digest the protein. Ultimately, gluten sensitive individuals should recover from one accidental “gluten slip” here and there, and keeping some digestive enzymes handy to help cope with such an accident is not a bad idea. But do keep in mind that repeated offenses, even the most minute, will damage your body and prevent it from healing. Enzymes help treat the symptoms, but only complete avoidance of gluten can treat the disease.
  3. Hi, I had a bad accidental glutening incident recently. I purchased a box of chocolate in Poland which looked safe to eat. Stupidly, I assumed if there were gluten ingredients, that would be called out in the allergen warning. That turned out not to be the case, and I had a reaction. My typical symptoms are usually a kidney or bladder infection, depression, anxiety, memory problems, issues with focusing and concentration. All of which I have been experiencing since I ate the chocolate. I'm not sure which ingredient is the culprit, but I'm guessing that a cheap, not fully distilled alcohol was used. Normally, I have no problems with distilled grain alcohols. Just wanted to pass my experience along and hopefully save someone else from the same mistake. I've listed the ingredients below. -Marie Ingredients listed as follows: sugar, corn syrup, cocoa mass, cocoa butter, alcohol, stabilizer (invertase), emulsifiers (soy lecithin, polyglycerol, polyricinoleate, and sorbitan tristearate), artificial flavors. Allergen warning states that it contains soy, and may contain traces of egg or milk.
  4. Rather than ask related question in several other threads and hijacking everyone else I decided I should ask this: I have had a really bad couple of weeks. I thought it was allergy and weather extremes. I've always had this sort of thing, migraines, various autoimmune problems and that could of course be exactly why the last couple of weeks have been bad but how do I know the difference? Years ago I began having migraines, problems with my pituitary that went undiagnosed then underdiagnosed and then other autoimmune problems began. I was born with pretty bad allergies. In general I have to say there is improvement because I'm not eating obvious gluten. Before now I ate whole foods, fresh or frozen veggies and fruit, eggs, milk, cheese, homemade yogurt, brown rice, single spices (not blends) and healthy fats. I haven't had much trouble figuring out what was safe to eat and gluten free because eating the way I do is straightforward. I know what is in my food because it's recognizable and I put it there. So, What is the best approach to getting gluten out of my life? I'm single so I don't share dishes, pot, pans and utensils. Will I need to buy some things new because they have been contaminated beyond what the dishwasher can clean? Living in an apartment means having your stuff at the mercy of your neighbor's bugs (something I learned the hard way years ago) so I always keep things sealed in airtight containers or bags. Most people who cook and don't do this have all sorts of stuff in their cabinets, refrigerator and freezer that I don't, but every-time something is opened, I know there are unintentional traces left behind. Do I need to hire cleaning of the areas that could be contaminated like kitchen cabinets, drawers, pantry and surrounding surfaces and carpeting? How far can the contamination travel? How do the rest of you know the difference between migraine, brain fog and feeling sick because of mold in the spring or from accidental glutening? I don't doubt anymore that I have a problem with gluten. I just don't know how to tell it apart from whatever else is going on.
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