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Found 8 results

  1. Celiac.com 10/05/2017 - Recent data show that more adults with celiac disease may face a higher risk for cardiovascular disease compared with the general population. A team of researchers recently set out to investigate the association of with cardiovascular disease risk factors at late adolescence in a cross-sectional population-based study. The research team included Assa A, Frenkel-Nir Y, Tzur D, Katz LH, and Shamir R. They are variously affiliated with the Institute of Gastroenterology, Nutrition and Liver Disease, Schneider Children's Medical Center, Petah-Tikva; the Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, and with the Medical Corps of the Israeli Defense Force. The study group included 2,001,353 Jewish Israeli adolescents who underwent general health examinations from 1988 to 2015. The average participant age was 17.1 years of age. Additional participant information included demographic measures, blood pressure, resting heart rate, and risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease. The team identified a total of 10,566 cases of celiac disease. They conducted multivariate analysis that showed average diastolic blood pressure to be significantly lower in celiac patients; 72.0±8.7 in celiac men vs 70.4 ±â€Š8.5 in non-celiac men; and 70.0 ±â€Š8.3 in celiac women vs 69.0 ±â€Š8.2 in non-celiac women. There were no differences in systolic blood pressure, while resting heart rate was slightly higher in celiac patients, with an absolute difference of 0.4 beats per minute. The team saw no increase in blood pressure, or in rates of overweight and obesity among celiac patients. Patients with celiac disease far more likely to have non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, hypercoagulability, and hyperlipidemia, than were non-celiacs. By age 17, people with celiac disease have a higher prevalence of risk factors for cardiovascular disease compared with the general population. There is, however, neither increase in blood pressure nor increase in overweight and obesity rates. Source: J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2017 Aug;65(2):190-194. doi: 10.1097/MPG.0000000000001487.
  2. Celiac.com 03/20/2017 - Researchers really do not have really good data on rates of celiac disease in the general population of children in the United States. A team of researchers recently set out to estimate the cumulative incidence of celiac disease in adolescents born in the Denver metropolitan area. The research team included Edwin Liu, Fran Dong, MS, Anna E. Barón, PhD, Iman Taki, BS, Jill M. Norris, MPH, PhD, Brigitte I. Frohnert, MD, PhD, Edward J. Hoffenberg, MD, and Marian Rewers, MD, PhD. Their team collected data on HLA-DR, DQ genotypes of 31,766 infants, born from 1993 through 2004 at St. Joseph’s Hospital in Denver, from the Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young. For up to 20 years, the researchers followed subjects with susceptibility genotypes for celiac disease and type 1 diabetes for development of tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies (tTGA). The team was looking for patients who developed either celiac disease autoimmunity (CDA) or celiac disease, and they defined CDA as persistence of tTGA for at least 3 months or development of celiac disease. Marsh 2 or greater lesions in biopsies or persistent high levels of tTGA, indicated celiac disease. For each genotype, the team assessed cumulative incidence of CDA and celiac disease. To estimate the cumulative incidence in the Denver general population, they weighted outcomes by each genotype, based on the frequency of each of these genotypes in the general population. They found that, of 1.339 patients they studied, 66 developed CDA and met criteria for celiac disease, while 46 developed only CDA. Seropositivity for tTGA resolved spontaneously, without treatment, in 21 of the 46 patients with only CDA (46%). The team estimated the total incidence for CDA in the Denver general population at 5, 10, and 15 years of age was 2.4%, 4.3%, and 5.1% respectively; incidence values for celiac disease were 1.6%, 2.8%, and 3.1%, respectively. This 20-year prospective study of 1.339 children with genetic risk factors for celiac disease showed the total incidence of CDA and celiac disease to be high within the first 10 years. Although more than 5% of children may experience a period of CDA, that is, persistently high celiac autoantibodies, not all of them develop celiac disease or require gluten-free diets. Sources: Gastroenterology.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1053/j.gastro.2017.02.002 gastrojournal.org
  3. Celiac.com 01/04/2017 - A team of researchers recently set out to investigate the impact of celiac disease diagnosis on anthropometric measures at late adolescence, and to assess trends in the prevalence of diagnosed celiac disease over time. The research team included Amit Assa, Yael Frenkel-Nir, Ya'ara Leibovici-Weissman, Dorit Tzur, Arnon Afek, Lior H Katz, Zohar Levi, and Raanan Shamir. They are variously affiliated with the Institute of Gastroenterology, Nutrition and Liver Disease, Schneider Children's Medical Center, Petach Tikva, Israel, the Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel, the Medical Corps of the Israel Defense Forces, Ramat-Gan, Israel, the Institute of Gastroenterology, Rabin Medical Center-Beilinson Campus, Petach Tikva, Israel, and with the Ministry of Health in Jerusalem, Israel. Around 17 years of age, most of the Israeli Jewish population undergoes a general health examination, before enlistment in the Defense Forces. Individual medical information, diagnoses, etc., are entered into a structured database. For their population based study, the research team reviewed the enlistment data base for celiac disease cases between the years 1988 and 2015. In all, the team reviewed the medical records of 2,001,353 individuals, focusing on body measurements and physical health at the age of 17 years. Overall, they found and assessed 10,566 cases of celiac disease (0.53%). Multivariable analysis showed that adolescent boys with celiac disease were leaner (Body Mass Index 21.2±3.7 vs 21.7±3.8, p=0.02), while girls with celiac disease were shorter (161.5±6 cm vs 162.1±6 cm, p=0.017) than the general population. The prevalence of diagnosed celiac disease increased from 0.5% to 1.1% in the last 20 years, mainly among females, who saw a rise of 0.64% vs 0.46% for males. Celiac disease rates were far lower in people of lower socioeconomic status, and those of African, Asian and former Soviet Union origin. However, the clinical relevance of the small differences suggests that when celiac disease is diagnosed during childhood, final weight and height are not severely impaired. The team's cohort supports an observed rise in celiac disease diagnoses in the last couple of decades. Source: Arch Dis Child doi:10.1136/archdischild-2016-311376
  4. Celiac.com 06/23/2016 - Digestive Disease Week 2016 took place in San Diego from May 21-24. Among the presentations given was one that stood out for its obvious health impacts. That presentation was given by Jonathan Cordova, DO, pediatric gastroenterologist at the University of Chicago Medical Center. His presentation tied celiac disease to major depressive disorder in adolescents, and stated that most adolescents with celiac disease have symptoms consistent with the disorder. Dr. Cordova said that "...interim analysis does suggest that a majority of adolescents living with celiac disease may have symptoms consistent with major depressive disorder," and that the depression has a negative impact on their quality of life, "but does not appear to be associated with their celiac disease state." That is, the depression does not seem to be impacted by how well their celiac disease is doing. Healthy gut and gluten-free diet, or unhealthy gut, with symptoms, it doesn't seem to matter. The depression levels seem about the same whatever the case. A number of recent studies indicate that depression and anxiety are the main reasons people with celiac disease report decreased quality of life, Dr. Cordova and his colleagues wrote. But, most of these studies were done on adults, almost none used adolescents, and adolescents may be more susceptible to depression. The research team was able to connect celiac disease with mental health disorders in adolescents by administering questionnaires to adolescents and their parents. Average age of adolescents was 14.6 years at the time of survey and 11.2 years at the time of diagnosis. The researchers found no correlation between celiac disease and depression, anxiety, ADHD, age at survey, quality of life, age at diagnosis or length of time on a gluten free diet. However, the majority of adolescents and parental reports screened positive for major depressive disorder. Interestingly, a parent's perception of the state of their child's celiac disease impacted their perception of depression in their child. Dr. Cordova says that "the data suggests that early screening for depression in any adolescent with celiac disease is crucial to help optimize behavioral health," Dr. Cordova's team plans to follow these patients into young adulthood, and aims to re-screen them again in 5 years. Reference: Cordova J, et al. Abstract #844. Presented at: Digestive Disease Week; May 21-24, 2016; San Diego
  5. Celiac.com 08/02/2013 - A great deal of effort goes into determining the best procedures for screening for celiac disease. Ideally it would be great to test everyone, but that is currently too expensive on such a large scale. So, one of the things researchers study is how to get the best results with limited resources. To better understand the cost-effectiveness of universal screening for celiac disease versus screening only patients who are at risk for or showing symptoms of celiac disease, a team of researchers looked specifically at the high risk, and associated costs, of non-traumatic hip and vertebral fractures if celiac disease is untreated or undiagnosed. Their results appear in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. The team found that the current standard practice of screening adolescents who are either symptomatic or at high-risk for celiac disease proves to be more cost-effective than universal screening. They also found that screening helps to prevent decreased bone mineral density, which can affect up to 70 percent of untreated celiac patients, and often leads to osteoporosis and non-traumatic hip and vertebral fractures. Overall, blanket screening and selective screening both had similar lifetime costs and quality of life ratings, but screening only those at risk or with actual symptoms proved to be more cost effective in preventing bone loss and fractures among patients with undiagnosed or subclinical celiac disease. They noted that additional analyses looking at risk and cost of other potential consequences of undiagnosed and untreated celiac disease, such as anemia, infertility and malignancy, might change the cost-effectiveness balance more in favor of universal screening for celiac disease. Source: American Gastroenterological Association
  6. Psychosomatics 45:325-335, August 2004 Celiac.com 07/30/2004 - Past studies have reported a higher prevalence of depressive symptoms in adults with celiac disease, perhaps due to serotonergic dysfunction, and an increased prevalence of depressive and disruptive behavioral disorders in adolescence with the disease, especially before treatment. In an effort to further study any possible connections, researchers looked at 29 adolescents with celiac disease and 29 matched controls. The researchers used semi-structured psychiatric interviews and symptom measurement scales to examine all subjects. Their findings indicate that the subjects with celiac disease had significantly higher prevalence of major depressive disorder compared to the controls--31% versus 7%, and a significantly higher prevalence of disruptive behavior disorders--28% versus 3%. The researchers also found that most of the mental disorders occurred before the patients were diagnosed and treated with a gluten-free diet. The prevalence of current mental disorders was similar in both of the groups studied.
  7. BMC Psychiatry 2005, 5:14 Celiac.com 05/09/2005 – Past studies have linked depression and behavioral disorders in teenagers with untreated celiac disease. Researchers in Finland conducted a study that was designed to determine what effect a gluten-free diet has on the psychiatric symptoms of adolescents with celiac disease, and specifically on the hormone prolactin (thyroid function) and on large neutral amino acid serum concentrations. Nine 12 to 16 –year-old adolescents with celiac disease were evaluated using the semi-structured K-SADS-Present and Lifetime Diagnostic interview, and seven were followed up after 1-2, 3 and 6 months on a gluten-free diet. The researchers found that pre-gluten-free diet adolescents with celiac disease and depression had significantly lower tryptophan competing amino-acid ratios and free tryptophan concentrations, and had significantly higher biopsy morning prolactin levels compared to those without depression. After three months on a gluten-free diet the researchers noted a significant decrease in the patients psychiatric symptoms that coincided with a decrease in celiac disease symptoms and prolactin levels, and a sharp increase in serum concentrations of tryptophan competing amino-acid ratios. The researchers conclude that their findings support the idea that untreated celiac disease in adolescents can create serotonergic dysfunction due to the impaired availability of tryptophan, and this may play a role in depressive and behavioral disorders.
  8. Diabetes Care 2004;27:1294-1298. Celiac.com 11/29/2004 - In an effort to determine the prevalence of biopsy-confirmed celiac disease in Italian children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes, and to determine whether age at onset of diabetes is independently associated with the diagnosis of celiac disease, Dr. Franco Cerutti and colleagues at the Universita di Torino, Italy looked at 4,322 children and adolescents (4-11 years old) who had type 1 diabetes. Yearly celiac disease screening was performed on them by using IgA/IgG anti-gliadin and IgA anti-endomysium antibodies, and those with positive antibody results were given a biopsy for confirmation. Out of 4,322 children screened 292 or 6.8% had celiac disease. In 89% of cases diabetes was diagnosed before celiac disease. Using logistic regression analyses the researchers determined that those diagnosed with diabetes at a younger age, those who are female, and those with a thyroid disorder are independently associated with the risk of having both diabetes and celiac disease. The researchers conclude: "We have provided evidence that 1) the prevalence of biopsy-confirmed celiac disease in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes is high (6.8%); 2) the risk of having both diseases is threefold higher in children diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at age 9 years; and 3) girls have a higher risk of having both diseases than boys."
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