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Found 6 results

  1. Celiac.com 09/06/2018 - What are the most common foods that can trigger allergic reactions in people? First, and it's important to be clear about this, a food allergy is not to be confused with a food sensitivity. Food sensitivities are common and usually harmless, if sometimes uncomfortable. Food sensitivity can cause symptoms like gas, bloating, stomach upset, indigestion, and the like when some people eat certain foods. A food allergy, on the other hand, is an immune reaction that happens when the body mistakes harmless food, a peanut for example, for something that could make you sick. When you eat a food you're allergic to, your immune system thinks you’re body is being harmed, and reacts to protect you from that harm. This reaction can be as mild as a light skin rash or red, itchy eyes, or it could be serious enough to cause difficulty breathing, swelling, pain, shock and even death. An allergic reaction can happen very soon after eating an allergenic food, or it can happen many hours later. Either way, food allergies are potentially serious, and should be treated as such. According to WebMD, these nine foods account for about 90% of all food allergies: Peanuts Tree nuts, such as walnuts, almonds, pine nuts, brazil nuts, and pecans Soy Milk Eggs Wheat, barley, and rye—Celiac disease Oats Fish Shellfish Mild symptoms of a food allergy reaction include: Red, swollen, dry, or itchy skin and rash (hives or eczema) Runny or stuffy nose, sneezing, or a slight, dry cough Itchy, watery, red eyes Itchy mouth or inside your ear Funny taste in your mouth Upset stomach, cramps, vomiting, or diarrhea Though any of these foods can cause an allergic reaction, peanuts, nuts, fish, and shellfish are well known for causing severe allergic reactions. Symptoms of a sever allergic reaction to food include: Trouble breathing or swallowing Swollen lips, tongue, or throat Feeling weak, confused, or light-headed, or passing out Chest pain or a weak, uneven heartbeat If you suspect that you or someone you know is having an allergic reaction to food, especially a severe reaction, definitely seek medical attention immediately.
  2. Hi everyone. Sorry if this is old news, but I just found this website and it has where you can click on what allergens you are looking to avoid, like gluten, soy, lanolin, etc. https://www.skinsafeproducts.com/ It has things like body lotions, lip balm, makeup, etc. and you can search for specific products. Or you can also just click on what allergens you want to avoid and let it pull up pages of products that are free from those ingredients. I am seeing some foundation powder and such, and some body lotions, foot cream. Things like that. I doubt it's a complete list, but one more source to help in our searches.
  3. Celiac.com 03/23/2017 - Allergens in processed foods can be a significant problem in the confectionery industry. In the European Union, current estimates suggest that 17 million people suffer from food allergies and in recent years, the number of children under five years with significant food allergies has grown. Therefore, it is important to keep track of information and raise awareness among consumers and producers. It should also be noted that all the tragic events and unpleasant incidents related to food and quality level affect the economy of the entire food industry, not just one company. Managing food allergens is a first step in limiting these problems. Since the term allergy is often misused it must be distinguished from food intolerance. The consequences related to these two conditions are very different. Intolerance is rarely life-threatening. People with a food intolerance can usually eat small amounts of problematic foods without adversely affecting their health. Food intolerance can be caused by metabolic disorders such as lactose intolerance. People with food allergies may react strongly even to trace amounts of allergenic ingredients (with respect to foods to which they are allergic) present in food. They cannot tolerate even very small amounts of allergens in their diet, with the risk that allergens can cause serious reactions and even death. Below we present fragment of a list of allergens form REGULATION OF THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND OF THE COUNCIL No. 1169/2011 of 25 October 2011 on the provision of information to consumers about food. For more complete information, please refer to the original text of the regulation. List of allergens under REGULATION OF THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND OF THE COUNCIL (EU) No 1169/2011 of 25 October 2011: Cereals containing gluten, Crustaceans and products thereof, Eggs and products thereof, Fish and products thereof, Groundnuts (peanuts) and derived products, Soybeans and products thereof, Milk and products thereof (including lactose) Nuts, such as almonds, hazelnuts, walnuts, cashews, pecans, Brazil nuts, pistachios / pistachios, macadamia nuts and Queensland nuts and derivative products Celery and products thereof, Mustard and products thereof, Sesame seeds and products thereof, Sulphur dioxide and sulphites Lupin and products thereof, Mollusks and products thereof. Confectionery may include many ingredients from this list of allergens. The best way to treat allergies is to avoid the banned products. From the manufacturer's point of view it is important to ensure correct labeling of their own products. It is worth paying attention to this information because allergic customers and their care-givers read this information carefully and require precise administration and declaration of these allergens. Once they trust the brand they are likely to be loyal. Companies should therefore take steps to ensure that the ingredients are carefully and thoroughly listed. A risk factor which is worth noting is unintentional cross-contamination where a minimum amount of an allergen can be transferred during the process of manufacturing a product that is otherwise completely free of allergens. Producers should do everything possible to keep allergenic products and ingredients out of those products for which they are not intended. Cross contamination or inadvertent introduction of allergens into the product is generally the result of exposure of the product during processing or handling. Cross contamination is when there are many kinds of products produced on the same production line, re-processing, or due to ineffective cleaning or preparations containing dust from allergens. Although some phenomena cannot always be prevented, by developing and implementing controls to reduce contact between allergens and other products, consumer safety and trust can be enhanced. One of the tools to help in the control of allergens is an integrated quality management system which includes an inspection for all allergens. An allergen Management Plan is a key element of efforts to ensure a safe product. This plan is a written document that lists the storage, handling, processing, packaging, and identification of allergenic foods and ingredients. But this is not a one-time effort. An allergen control plan must be implemented, enforced and audited and constantly updated. Every time you make a change in the manufacturing process or a product, you must evaluate your plan and, where necessary, update it. Of course every employee is an important part of the plan, and everyone must understand their role and the responsibilities they bear. Raising awareness among the employees in this area, through training, should also be documented. The plan must also take into account the cooperation with suppliers of raw materials. Not all of the recommendations of the quality control system may be used in any food processing plant. Despite this, consider any threat and determine the extent to which it may affect a business and its suppliers. And have procedures in place for allergen control. The risk assessment should be conducted in order to develop a plan for the control of allergens. The assessment should start with raw materials, their storage, each stage of production, packaging and labeling of the finished product. It should define the critical points where allergens may be introduced into the product and establish a system for monitoring these points to avoid unintentional cross contamination. This plan is part of health care, the acquisition and maintenance of consumer confidence, and also provides financial protection and preserves the manufacturer's reputation. Product labeling should assist consumers who have allergies or intolerances by providing them with more comprehensive information on the composition of the food they buy. Caution in the labeling of allergens is a voluntary warning to consumers added to the list of ingredients (eg. it may contain milk). When should we use labels informing about the possibility of allergens? In order to warn consumers about trace amounts of allergens we should use them only when it has been found that occasional contamination of the product cannot be avoided. This decision should be based on a thorough evaluation process and allergen control plan, if it is determined that unintentional cross-contamination cannot be eliminated by careful labeling of allergens. Caution in the labeling of products that may contain allergens can never be used as a substitute for good manufacturing practices or an allergen control plan.
  4. Celiac.com 06/03/2011 - The folks at Disney are earning major kudos from people with celiac disease, gluten intolerance, and other food allergies. That's because for more than a decade, Disney has worked to provide information and options for guests with food allergies. In 2011, Walt Disney Parks and Resorts received an award recognizing its leadership and commitment in the area of food-allergy awareness by the Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network. Disney's journey from a provider of traditional food offerings to a leader in best practices for food allergies began 12 years ago when a Disneyland Resort chef received phone call from a mother concerned about gluten-free options for her child. Since that time, Disney has worked to craft an extensive food program that offers meals to suit the needs of guests with food allergies and other dietary preferences. According to Disney network chief executive officer, Julia Bradsher, Disney's Parks and Resorts operation has the most extensive program that she is aware of. She adds that the parks have "been doing this for quite some time, so I think they were ahead of the curve." Disneyland Resort recently set up a web page that lists comprehensive information to help guests make informed decisions about where they can find food in the parks meets their needs. The company has also set up a special hotline number where park guests can call ahead with specific food requests. That number is 714-781-DINE. If you’re planning a trip to Walt Disney World and would like to call ahead to discuss special dietary needs, guests may call 407-824-5967. Certified executive chef Bill Orton says that “the resort helps thousands of visitors" with their dietary needs, and handles most needs immediately.
  5. Celiac.com 08/31/2012 - Since August 4th, 2012, Canadian Food Allergen Labeling Regulations require all food products containing gluten, or any of ten other major allergens, to clearly state their presence on the label. This change marks an important step in consumer safety that will benefit the estimated three million Canadians with celiac disease and gluten sensitivity, as well as others with sensitivities to major food allergens. For people with celiac disease, consuming gluten can cause anemia, nutritional deficiencies, a blistering skin rash, and an increased risk of other autoimmune diseases such as Type 1 diabetes. It can also lead to some cancers of the gut. One major problem for people with celiac disease or gluten sensitivity is that, unless clearly stated on the label, it can be difficult to tell whether or not gluten is present in foods they may buy. A 2009 Health Canada survey of approximately 7,000 people revealed that 96.1% of individuals read every ingredient on all food products to figure out whether the product contains gluten. Nearly eighty percent of those surveyed said that their greatest challenge was with incomplete labeling. For people who are sensitive to gluten and/or other major allergens, this new labeling rule will remove much of the guesswork from grocery shopping, and substantially reduce the risk to individuals sensitive or intolerant to gluten or other allergens. Those risks include an estimated 14,000 emergency hospital wards each year that are the result of reactions to gluten and other allergens, which carry a projected $5 million in extra health care costs. Source: PRWeb
  6. The April, 1999 Tufts University Medical Letter stated that according to the Food Allergy Network, the following eight foods cause 90 percent of all allergic reactions: Peanuts Tree nuts (such as almonds, cashews, pecans, and walnuts) Fish Shellfish Eggs Milk Soy Wheat.
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