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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/07/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes

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Found 32 results

  1. Sex

    I’ve recently started being more active with my dating life and gave my partners the talk about being careful when they kiss me but I was wondering if you can be contaminated with oral sex at all
  2. Celiac.com 07/20/2017 - It is common for school teachers in the United States not to know what student has celiac disease, or allergies of any sort. Most schools don't have formal systems so that the principal, school nurse, teacher, or cafeteria workers know when a child has celiac disease or food allergies. An informal game of roulette is played, where everyone assumes that everything is fine – that is, until a child has a heath reaction. In Montreal, Canada, the Lester B Pearson School Board has taken a different approach to dealing with food allergies and conditions such as celiac disease that their students might have. They regard these health conditions to be so important that how to handle them is present in their official Policy on Safe and Caring Schools. To summarize what they do, at the beginning of each school year parents are sent a form requesting them to inform the principal, homeroom teacher, and other relevant school personnel about health conditions and allergies. This includes children who have celiac disease and gluten issues. If a child changes schools, or if a student in an existing school gets a new health diagnosis or has newly identified health needs, this information should be made known to school personnel. A photograph of the student is taken and put on a card with the health condition so that others in charge may know that a particular child has gluten issues. In the cafeteria, workers have the photos of the children posted in the kitchen where they can see them so that they can know that brown-haired Lucinda in fifth-grade has celiac disease and should be served only foods that are safe for her. Children may not know what foods have gluten in them and which do not, so they may not always be the best informants for identifying which foods being served are safe for them and which are not. Given that additives may vary according who is doing the cooking or what ingredients are used, a food like macaroni and cheese may be made with wheat pasta, making it unsafe, or corn, rice or quinoa pasta, rendering it acceptable. Both may look identical to the naked eye, but they aren't so it is a food service worker's obligation to know whether Lucinda can have the dish or not. Likewise, teachers may be given the photograph and health card so that they remember when Billy brings in cupcakes for his birthday celebration, that there are gluten-free ones available (hopefully!) in the cafeteria freezer that can be pulled out and given to Lucinda so she is not left out. The photograph technique is especially helpful when there are new cafeteria workers or substitute teachers or other personnel who may not know a child's food allergy situation like someone who interacts with the child every day might. The Lester B Pearson schools' Food and Nutrition Policy is based in Canada's Food Guide and Policy on Health Eating and Active Living. All schools in Canada are to adhere to the same set of standards. This means that a celiac child living in Vancouver should be just as safe eating at school as one in Ottawa or one in Halifax. Having national standards that are uniformly enforced helps to make all children safe. Making sure that children's food consumption is safe for all of them, especially in public institutions like schools, is part of their human rights according to the Convention on the Rights of the Child. It is the responsibility of adults who are in local parent organizations to be in charge of the oversight and safety of all children and to think through food risk and safety policies.
  3. Are all soy ingredients similar when it comes to allergies? In other words, if you are allergic to soy, would you react to all types of soy?..ex)soy lecithin, defatted soy flour, etc? I'm asking because my daughter doesn't react to those 2 types of soy(defatted soy flour is found in kinnikinnik's gluten-free pancake mix and soy lecithin in other types of gluten-free food), so would it be safe to have her try foods that have other forms of soy? ex) soy protein. Excuse me if these questions seem silly or have obvious answers but I'm still somewhat new to what to look out for and learning every day!
  4. So, I have full blown Celiac's disease, and after I had gotten all gluten out of my system, I adopted new allergies. I am suddenly allergic to both latex, and bandage adhesive. I'm allergic to my dog suddenly. And I am allergic to almonds all the sudden too. My friend who also has Celiac's noticed similarities with this, for she got random new allergies as well when she went gluten free. I have "Silent Celiac's" and have absolutely no symptoms when I eat gluten except mild nausea and body aches, and I'm starting to wonder if going gluten free is worth it, because I didn't improve most of my health issues I have from other diseases. And my celiacs wasn't burdensome to begin with.
  5. Celiac.com 02/03/2017 - Feeding kids restricted to a "special" diet due to food allergies or sensitivities can be both challenging and expensive. Two Kansas moms turned their experience meeting those challenges with their own children into a full-blown community service, dedicated to helping parents feed kids with food allergies on the cheap. Emily Brown's daughter suffers from allergies to milk, eggs, wheat, soy, and peanuts. Avoiding such common ingredients really pushed up the Brown family's grocery bills. A single loaf of gluten-free bread can exceed $6.99. Such high costs led the women to seek federal assistance, but allergen-free food options in the Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) program had limited offerings for their children. For example, the program substitutes corn tortillas instead of bread, and rice instead of pasta, which wasn't so appealing to the kids. With that in mind, Brown and her friend, Amy Goode, swung into action and set up the ReNewed Health Food Pantry in Overland Park, Kansas, along with a nonprofit to help low-income families with food allergies. ReNewed is believed to be the first such pantry in the U.S., though a similar community food pantry recently opened in Philadelphia. Read more: fox4kc.com.
  6. Before I get into the neurological symptoms, let me give you a synopsis of my background and family history. Both my parents smoke and my dad was always a heavy drinker. My mom had GERD / Acid Reflux pretty much her whole life and it should be noted that she's basically 100% Norwegian (I've read that Northern Europeans have GERD and gastrointestinal issues more than anyone else - same with the Irish). My mom was also recently tested positive for Celiac Disease (our diets growing up was filled with wheat products, so connecting the dots here, I think she was being bombarded with gluten and her body couldn't handle it). She would have severe mood swings, especially towards my dad (who is now passed on). Her acid reflux got so bad that she went in for an endoscopy and they told her that she had Barrett's Esophagus. She's still alive to this day though and seems to be holding up reasonably well. My sister also has severe acid reflux and panic attacks. Now to get to my own history. I was born in 1983. As a baby, I had severe eczema, and would rub certain areas of my body (such as my wrists) raw on the carpet, because I was constantly itchy. I would also constantly spit up breast-milk and even the baby formula. My parents had a hard time figuring out what to feed me! We would also drink tons of cow's milk. That finally hit a brick wall around age 25 (in 2008), when I started noticing that if I drank straight cow's milk I would end up with (and still do end up with if I drink it) sulfur burps which taste and smell like rotten eggs. I even tried drinking raw cow's milk one time and the result was the same, I was burping rotten egg smelling burps and would get diarrhea! This is also around the time when I noticed my acid reflux getting worse and worse. In 2009, I started lifting weights again after taking a long break from high school. When I would do any squatting motion exercises such as dead-lifts or squats, I'd almost pass out because I couldn't catch my breath afterwards. I finally went in for an endoscopy and they told me that my esophagus was raw and red. I also should note that I've read getting anesthesia and all the drugs they give you during that time, can cause long-term psychological issues, especially anxiety, which I never really had until after that year. I realized that I couldn't do those squatting exercises or anything that put pressure on the abdomen area, since it would push acid back up into my esophagus. I decided to start lifting weights on an empty stomach and that did work for awhile but I couldn't figure out why my acid reflux was still so bad. Acid shooting back up into the esophagus, is caused by inflammation. This affects the Vagus Nerve (which is the longest cranial nerve). Some of the main functions of the Vagus Nerve include, 1. Breathing 2. Speech 3. Sweating 4. Helping in keeping the larynx open during breathing 5. Monitoring and regulating the heartbeat 6. Informing the brain of the food that is ingested and food that has been digested 7. The Vagus Nerve performs the major function of emptying the gastric region of food Any damage to the vagus nerve causes Gastroparesis which is losing the muscular function in the stomach and intestines. This results in food being emptied slowly, that leads to other problems such as fermentation of food in the stomach and food getting compressed into hard pellets which can cause severe problems if the pellets get stuck in the intestine. Especially in people with diabetes, when sugar levels get high and are not well controlled, it can result in the vagus nerve damage. This can result in anxiety / panic attacks, OCD (Obsessive Compulsive Disorder), trouble swallowing, chills, asthma-like symptoms, heart palpitations, tingling / numbness in extremities and limbs, blood in the stool, hard of breathing, anxiety attack-like symptoms, canker sores, nightmares (including hypnogogic and hypnopompic auditory / visual hallucinations, such as hearing a gun shot upon waking up, even though no gun was fired), dry mouth, heart attack-like symptoms, and more (I had all these symptoms too btw). I believe that since our bodies are intolerant to wheat and dairy products, it is causing inflammation in the body, which then causes all these other symptoms. So at that point, I began having hallucinations (including hypnopompic and hypnagogic hallucinations). They were mainly auditory hallucinations and some (but fewer) visual hallucinations. They started around 2013, when I got sick with the flu and also had an in-grown toenail (I had to get it cut out by the doctor and it was the worst pain of my life!). I was extremely religious back then (I left my faith last year at end of 2015) and felt like these were omens or signs for some of the things that were deemed ‘sinful’. I then had a breakup with a gluten-free who lived in Montana and the auditory hallucinations continued. I’ve been having them again starting in 2016 after getting sick with a chest respiratory infection (I’m seeing a trend here with getting sick and having these), which I believe were caused by the Autumn Rhinitis / Hay Fever Allergies. I was at the gym around the start of August 2016, and I felt like I couldn’t catch my breath after each set of lifting. I went home and haven’t been back to the gym since. I was having trouble breathing just walking up a flight of stairs, and it was a daily nightmare until I started looking into ways to help solve my issues (which I’ll get into in a minute). I also don’t have a great sleep schedule from working late night shifts, so I’m typically always sleep deprived. I should also mention that I think I have formed P.T.S.D. (PTSD - Post Traumatic Stress Disorder) from watching a music video where it showed a death. The image of the woman dying kept playing in my head (this also happened around August 2016). Then on top of all that, I was lifting weights 2 times a week (full body workouts), doing H.I.I.T. (High Intensity Interval Training) a couple times a week in the morning, AND working night shifts. On top of all that, my dad died last year (October 3, 2015) and within a week afterwards around October 10th, I ended up with appendicitis so I had to get the appendectomy surgery to get my appendix removed. A few weeks later, I walked away from my faith (not due to emotional reasons, but due to extensive research, which was already in the process starting at the beginning of 2015). So I lost my dad, my faith and my appendix within a month's time period. It put a lot of stress on me I think. I’m 33 years old, so still somewhat young, but I think I was pushing my body to the limit, and it’s been affecting my brain chemistry. Not only that, but recently, I put the other dots to the puzzle and found out that I also have gluten intolerance / Celiac / Coeliac, so I’ve stopped eating gluten (and dairy) products. I also have done a few sessions of AAT (Advanced Allergy Therapy), by a doctor named Dr. Jill Cohn in the San Francisco / Berkeley / Oakland Bay Area. You don’t even have to be there in person for her to treat you, she does it all online through a conference call on a site similar to Skype. You can watch testimonials on YouTube as well, and I’m here to tell you that her system did cure me of Ragweed allergies. I now understand that because I was pushing my body to the limit as well as trying to stay 500 calories below maintenance (to cut fat and get shredded), that my body wasn’t getting the proper nutrients and vitamins due to eating wheat and gluten (as well as dairy). This damages the alveoli and villi in the intestinal tract which are crucial for absorbing the nutrients from your food. I also found out that my body reacts poorly to chocolate as well. Chocolate is a 'stimulant' and has been proven to affect the brain the same way that cannabis / marijuana will. This could be some of the problems you all are facing as well. At that point, your body is so run down, that it will start attacking ‘harmless’ invaders, such as ragweed pollen, pet dander or even just simple dust particles, which this process of your body in attack mode, will cause inflammation, hence the reason I was having trouble breathing (my body developed exercise-induced / allergy-induced asthma). Not only that, but when your body is so run down and not getting the proper nutrition, it can cause psychosis and schizophrenic symptoms as well! I started taking a ton of supplements and they’ve helped tremendously. Here are a few to get you started. Try these and eat a balanced diet for a couple months. I’ll bet you start to feel better and the hallucinations diminish. 1. Vitamin D3 (Jarrow Brand 5,000IU – take two to four per day) – This is especially necessary if you live above the 37 degree parallel (latitude) in the Fall and Winter (typically from September to March). The sun only produces Vitamin D3 in our body when it is 50 degrees (altitude not temperature) above the horizon and even during the Spring and Summer, this only occurs from around 10AM in the morning to 2-3PM in the afternoon. So you have only a 4 to 5 hour window in the morning to afternoon when the sun is producing Vitamin D3, which most people aren't really out during those times, because of work schedule. This is why around 75 to 80% of the world population are D3 deficient! A good source of information on this is Dr. John Cannell. Go research how vital and important D3 is for us! You want your ng/ml (nano-grams per milliliter of blood) to be from 50 to 100 (or even slightly over 100 is fine too!). 2. Magnesium (CALM BRAND) – Magnesium is the driver for Vitamin D3. It’s very important and we don’t get enough of it in our diet on average. 3. Vitamin C (take around 2,000mg per day) – Look up Dr. Thomas Levy and Dr. Linus Pauling for good information on this. The Liposomal type of Vitamin C is the best kind! 4. Vitamin K2 (different from Vitamin K1 – Get the Jarrow Brand called Vitamin K-Right) – Millions of people take calcium supplements to maintain healthy bones. Yet few patients or physicians realize that optimizing bone integrity involves more than taking a single mineral supplement. A critical additional component for bone and cardiovascular health is vitamin K2. Recent research has revealed that, without vitamin K2, calcium regulation is disrupted. In fact, low levels of vitamin K2 are associated with an increased risk of heart disease and atherosclerosis. K2 is the gateway that allows calcium to get to your bones. When you take vitamin D3, your body creates more of these vitamin K2-dependent proteins, the proteins that will move the calcium around. They have a lot of potential health benefits. But until the K2 comes in to activate those proteins, those benefits aren't realized. So, really, if you're taking vitamin D, you're creating an increased demand for K2. And vitamin D and K2 work together to strengthen your bones and improve your heart health.For so long, we've been told to take calcium for osteoporosis... and vitamin D3, which we know is helpful. But then, more studies are coming out showing that increased calcium intake is causing more heart attacks and strokes. That created a lot of confusion around whether calcium is safe or not. But that's the wrong question to be asking, because we'll never properly understand the health benefits of calcium or vitamin D3, unless we take into consideration K2. That's what keeps the calcium in its right place. 5. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) Ubiquinol – it’s a substance similar to a vitamin. It is found in every cell of the body. Your body makes CoQ10, and your cells use it to produce energy your body needs for cell growth and maintenance. It also functions as an antioxidant, which protects the body from damage caused by harmful molecules. (Get the Jarrow Brand – no I don’t work for them, but I’ve heard they are the best in all of these, and it’s what I take). 6. Vitamin B-Right (Jarrow) which has all of the B vitamins in it. Niacin (B3) has proven to be very helpful for those with Schizophrenia and Psychosis. Look up Dr. Abram Hoffer and his research on mental illness and Niacin. Careful with Niacin in huge quantities, as it will cause a 'flushing' effect, but you still want enough to get the benefits. 7. Oxylent (which is one of the best tasting and best multi-vitamins out there in my opinion). It’s got most of all you need in there when included with what I mentioned above. (Those are the main ones above, but here are a few other supplements I take. ChlorOxygen, Serrapeptase {SerraGold Brand}, mushroom supplement called 'Breathe' by New Chapter Life-shield, HealthForce Green Alchemy Protein Powder, HealthForce Vitamineral Green, Probiotics, MSM, Bragg's Apple Cider Vinegar, local honey, and avocados for potassium, along with getting at least a half gallon of water per day - which I drink at least 32 oz. to 50 oz. of water on an empty stomach every morning). Within a month of taking all this (I started on November 2nd, 2016), I’m now feeling about 95% back to my normal self. The other 5% is caused by my poor sleeping habits, as well as stress. I now realize that these psychological issues were all subconscious from the heavy religious indoctrination. If I had never been introduced to these religious ideas, I’m sure I’d not have these particular religious themed hypnopompic and hypnagogic hallucinations. When it first started, I was seeing visuals such as numbers and objects floating in the air upon waking up, which, they’d disappear within a few seconds. I also hear voices, which would say terrible things, and then the voices would continue in my head as if it were having dialogue with me in my own mind. I would feel like God hated me, due to the content of what was being said. I’m pretty sure I have some sort of religious trauma after leaving my faith and also, after my dad dying within the last year (2015). They actually have a name for this type of PTSD and it’s RTS (Religious Trauma Syndrome). You can find some good material through Dr. Marlene Winell online if you suffer from the religious form of PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder). Anyways, I hope all of this helps someone else who may be going through similar! Just know you’re not alone and it’s more than likely happening because of nutrient deficiency and/or a traumatic experience you suffered as well as your diet if you are gluten intolerant / lactose intolerant. These aren’t devils, demons, hobgoblins or ghouls harassing you, this is all natural phenomena and it can be treated with the right diet, the right supplements and proper sleep! I am still getting cross-contaminated (or there is a cross-reactor food that mimics gluten and/or dairy) somewhere in my diet, so my psychological issues persist, including waking up feeling like something is trying to talk to me in my mind. I am trying to figure that out now. But they also have supplements you can take that will break down gluten if you are accidentally 'glutened.' Here is a study I found from WW2, that correlates to mental disease and gluten / wheat below. "One of the first hints that these circumstances could have implications for the psychological sciences was the observation that, in several countries, hospitalization rates for schizophrenia during World War II dropped in direct proportion to wheat shortages. In the United States, where over that same period the consumption of wheat rose rather than diminished, such rates increased instead (Dohan, 1966a,b). In South Pacific islands with a traditionally low consumption of wheat, schizophrenia was only found in 1 person out of 30,000. When Western grain products were introduced into their society, it dramatically rose to 1 person out of 100! (Dohan et al., 1984)."
  7. I was diagnosed with Celiac Disease in May 2016 and have been following a strict diet since then. Some of the symptoms have been relieved with following the diet. For instance, I have gained 8 lbs back (out of the 25 lbs that I lost) and my stomach symptoms have become less severe. However, I still have nausea on a daily basis and I still have episodes of an irritable bowel 2 or so days out of the week. I have gone to the doctor and got an EGD as well as multiple breath tests for a possible food intolerance. They haven't found any other problems in my stomach and are trying to label my persistent stomach issues as IBS. In addition to this, I have terrible migraines once or twice a week that the doctor has left unexplained. I am concerned about this because I can sometimes pinpoint certain (gluten-free) foods that trigger the severe nausea I experience every day. For example, I get very nauseated after I eat my (former) daily breakfast of greek yogurt with honey. I also noticed an extreme feeling of sickness when I ate some baked kale chips I bought from the grocery store. It is obvious that these foods are causing me to be ill, but I cannot find a connection between them and Celiac. Does this sound familiar or common to any experiences anyone has come across? I don't feel confident in my doctor's diagnoses of IBS and want to know why I still feel sick after being gluten free for so long.
  8. Hi Everyone, I would like to move somewhere in Central/South America to study Spanish for a few months but am concerned about food availability, allergy awareness and ingredients used at restaurants. I get sick when I eat Gluten, Dairy, Corn, Soy, and a few others but those are the worst ones for me. I usually eat meat, rice (as my grain source), potatoes, and fruit/vegetables. I'm concerned about being able to eat out at restaurants and shopping for food. Even in the USA, gluten free can be a challenge if one cannot eat corn, which is the most common substitute. Does anyone know which Latin American country will be easiest to manage? Right now I'm thinking that learning Spanish in Spain might be my best bet but I really want to go to Latin America. There was a similar post in 2010 (only for gluten), but now it's 6-7 years later so I'm bringing the topic back again because times change fast in the allergy world. Thanks so much for your help, Ori
  9. Hey there just wanted to warn anyone that has other allergies- these crackers may not be a good choice! I'm mildly sensitive to MSG- I only react if there's a giant amount like in Chinese food or Ramen noodles, etc. I literally have a to eat TONS of a the offending food before reacting. Anyway, I was excited to try these Trader Joes pumpkin crackers, kept hearing about them on the radio .... and they're gluten free! (I have Hashi's). I ate about 3/4 of the box last night. Woke up this morning with a red itchy face and nasal congestion, headache, anxiety. Hallmark symptoms for me of high MSG intake. (It does say yeast extract on the side but it's pretty far down the list). So if you're sensitive.... stay away! Apparently these particular crackers are loaded with it.
  10. Celiac.com 02/11/2016 - Kansas is wheat country, and like the rest of America, Kansans are generally not gluten-free. That means the food in their charity food pantries are not usually gluten-free. That means that, however hard it might be to maintain a gluten-free diet in Kansas, or anywhere else in America, it's that much harder to maintain a gluten-free diet if you're poor, or simply can't afford the prices. However, things have gotten a bit easier in Kansas recently, where the efforts of two dedicated mothers of children with food allergies have led to the first free food pantry in the nation dedicated to food for people with food allergies. After meeting at a local support group and realizing their common problems, Amy Goode and Emily Brown joined forces to meet their challenges in finding and affording specialty foods required for their kids' diets. Both women faced high food bills for staple foods needed for their kids' food sensitivities. Brown's older daughter, for example, suffered multiple food allergies, and could only tolerate hemp milk, which is priced at $15 a gallon, and is not covered by the government's WIC program. Both women, Brown said, were "struggling to pay for our alternative milks, and it was just overwhelming." Allergy-friendly and gluten-free foods typically cost two to four times more than comparable regular items. In both cases, the women were struggling to keep their kids healthy, as the alternative is often lines and suffering in the kids. Goode said, " I think people miss that aspect of it. It's not just about the food, but it's about the health." Their efforts to offer an alternative have resulted in the launch of the ReNewed Health Free Food Pantry in Overland Park, located in the New Haven Seventh Day Adventist Church at 8714 Antioch Road. The church dedicated space for the pantry just across the hall from a regular food pantry stocked with non-gluten-free products. ReNewed Health offers only options for those with food allergies along with standard nutrient-dense foods, such as beans. Much of the food is donated by manufacturers, stores and a gluten-free bakery, and all that's needed to use the pantry is a doctor's note or lab results showing you or your child has a medical need for the foods. The pantry is open on Wednesdays from 9:30 a.m. to noon. Kudos to these Kansas moms for turning their challenge into a success for other people facing the same problem. And kudos to starting America's first free food pantry for people with food allergies and celiac disease. Source: fox4kc.com
  11. Celiac.com 12/08/2015 - Is the rate of food sensitivity and allergy growing? Or are we just more concerned about it because children experience anaphylactic crisis, sometimes even dying from exposure to peanuts, strawberries, and all the other foods that most of us think of as harmless? Even if the rates are growing, what is the cause? And should we, in the gluten sensitive community, be concerned about developing such allergies? After all, celiac patients were often told that there was no greater risk of developing IgE food allergies among those with celiac disease than is experienced by the general population (1, 2). I was certainly told this, on more than one occasion, by apparently well qualified medical practitioners. Yet, more recent research is showing that those with any autoimmune disease, including celiac disease, have a much greater risk of developing such allergies (3). Unfortunately, we still have more questions than answers. Nonetheless, the issue really does warrant exploration, especially among those who are gluten sensitive. Further, since the numbers of those with non-celiac gluten sensitivity remain controversial, we can also look at the issue from another perspective. For instance, a study of childhood IgE allergy frequency, at a center in Texas devoted to treating allergies and similar ailments, the investigators looked at antibody reactions to cow's milk, eggs, fish, peanuts, sesame, shellfish, soy, tree nuts, and wheat. They reported that the rate of all of these allergies combined had almost tripled (from 3% to 8%) in only five years (4). That is a startling rate of increase. If this finding can be applied more broadly, it should be alarming. However, another research group at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, reported that childhood emergency department visits for food allergy reactions remained stable over a nine year period, while adult visits for food allergy reactions declined over this same time period (5). The central thrust of their report appears to be that we have an improving understanding of how to manage our own and our children's allergic reactions, so emergency room visits are becoming, relatively less frequent. This may simply signal that allergies are becoming so common that, as a culture, we are becoming better versed in how to avoid or manage mild allergic manifestations. Yet another group of investigators in Australia state that there has been a "dramatic rise in the prevalence of IgE-mediated food allergy over recent decades, particularly among infants and young children " (6). They go on to suggest that this increase may be due to "the composition, richness and balance of the microbiota that colonize the human gut during early infancy" (6). They further assert that IgE food allergies are connected to an impaired barrier function of epithelial cells that line the intestinal wall, in combination with immune dysregulation (6). Still others assert that the increase in allergies may be tied to climate change via several factors including "variability of aeroallergens, food allergens and insect-based allergic venoms" (7). Martin Blazer, M.D., in his book titled Missing Microbes argues that overuse of antibiotics may be at the root of both the increase in food allergies, as well as the increasing prevalence of celiac disease, through disrupting the gut microbiome and selection for antibiotic-resistant strains of microbes (8). Some or all of the foregoing theories may well have a legitimate influence on our growing rates of allergies. As I see it, however, the various theories postulated to explain these increasing rates have left out one powerful dietary trend that has also accompanied these increases in IgE food allergy prevalence. For instance, compromised intestinal barrier function is a well documented feature of gluten grain consumption, although it is greatest in the context of celiac disease. The increased release of zonulin, triggered by eating gluten grains, may also be a critical factor in the development and persistence of the disease process, especially in cases of celiac disease, type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, Crohn's disease, systemic lupus erythematosus, and about one quarter of cases of multiple sclerosis (9, 10). In the gut, gluten triggers increased release of zonulin, which weakens the junction between the epithelial cells that form the intestinal walls, and usually provide a protective barrier where these cells connect (11). The "gap" between these cells, caused by increased zonulin release, allows undigested proteins and peptides to bypass the cells that usually transport digested particles from the intestine to the bloodstream. Partly digested proteins, small peptides, also move through these epithelial cells, following the same path that fully digested food particles follow. However, according to Dr. Fasano, those are usually so degraded that they don't trigger antibody production (9). Thus, the leaky gut that has long been associated with celiac disease, and is often seen as a characteristic of, but not restricted to this ailment, is a critical stage in the development of this illness. This leakiness is, as most readers will know, reversed by a gluten-free diet. We are now seeing, in the peer reviewed medical literature, a wide range of ailments being identified as manifestations of undigested food proteins being "leaked" into the circulatory system. Further, there is a dose-dependent relationship between increasing gut permeability and increased gluten consumption, both in celiac disease and in other forms of autoimmunity (12). If this dose-dependent relationship also applies to many of those with other sensitivities, at admittedly lower levels of permeability (13), and if that is the dynamic that underlies much of the increasing trend of IgE food allergies, we should be seeing the rates of these allergies continue to rise in the general population. And, if we continue with our gluten gluttony, who can say how many ailments are associated with gluten consumption and increased zonulin release? It is also possible, perhaps even probable, that some of us experience increased zonulin release into the bloodstream, rather than into the intestinal lumen. If so, those peoples' epithelial linings of lungs, nasal passages, and blood brain barriers, may be more compromised than those individuals who primarily experience a leaky gut. By weakening these other barriers, they may invite other ailments that are less obviously triggered by gluten and other food proteins. Dr. Alessio Fasano has stated that new understandings of zonulin's role in autoimmunity, inflammation, and some cancers, "suggests that the autoimmune process can be arrested if the interplay between genes and environmental triggers is prevented by reestablishing [sic] the intestinal barrier function" (9). An animal study showed that AT1001, an experimental drug that blocks the action of zonulin, protected against autoimmune attack on pancreatic islet cells (9) which produce insulin. A human study of twenty-one subjects, reported similar findings (14). While it is true that intestinal infections have also been shown to induce zonulin release in the gut, the issue of microbes may not be as large a factor as it at first appears. When bacteria colonize our intestines, there are three possible outcomes: First, the infection may run rampant and kill us, thus solving the problem in a most undesirable manner. Second, and much more likely, we may take antibiotics and deplete or eliminate these infectious agents in our intestines. Third, and most likely, a combination of our immune systems, other microbes resident in our gut, antibiotics, and other, possibly unknown factors, may quickly or slowly bring the infectious agent under control. By reducing its numbers sufficiently that it won't pose a serious threat to our well being, and the harmful impact of these microbes has been muted. The second and third possibilities will be both the most common and most desirable. Also, as soon as the microbe in question is under control, zonulin release should be diminished to a point where it is either a minor factor in triggering continued zonulin release or, because it has been eradicated, the microbe will become irrelevant to zonulin release. On the other hand, for as long as we consume gluten, zonulin continues to be released, thus disrupting tight junctions in the intestinal, pulmonary, sinus, and other mucosal membranes, permitting allergens to reach our circulatory systems, ultimately giving rise to the growing prevalence of dangerous allergies that may sometimes manifest in anaphylactic reactions. The most important issue here seems to be the impact of gluten consumption on zonulin release, along with its impact on several protective barriers in the body, weakening them at the previously tight junctions between their cells. These include the blood brain barrier, which usually protects the brain from impurities and antibodies in the blood. It also includes the mucosa that line the lungs and nasal passages that protect us from airborne toxins and microbes. When that barrier is compromised, small particles from the air that we breathe will reach our circulation and trigger immune reactions...also known as allergies. Perhaps the most important barrier is in the digestive tract. It is made up of several variants of mucosa that protect the tissues of the gastrointestinal tract from toxins and the unwanted particles in our foods and beverages (well, most of them anyway). This, it seems to me, is the crux of our growing crisis with environmental allergies and the elevated zonulin levels that sometimes accompany them. And we can't even begin to combat this dynamic without first understanding it better. In the meantime, adding AT1001 to gluten-containing flours might be useful. Conversely, the media voices that are selling the idea that a gluten-free diet is an expensive fad might soon see research that reveals the gluten-free diet as an excellent prophylactic against developing IgE allergies, a variety of cancers, autoimmunity, some psychiatric illnesses, and many neurological diseases. In the interim, we can only use our own best judgement and decide for ourselves. Would the dietary products of gluten grains really be that great a loss to the palate? Is it a reasonable trade-off to risk falling prey to all of the potential consequences that come to us through elevated release of zonulin? More compellingly, perhaps, Professor Loren Cordain's assertion that humans have not had enough time to become fully adapted to eating cereal grains, especially as a dominant portion of our diet (15), appears to gain considerable support from the discovery and characterization of zonulin. Further, although some European, Asian, and northern African genes may have had as much as 15,000 years to adapt to this food source, most of the world's inhabitants have had a much shorter time to adapt. These are periods that are most appropriately measured in centuries and decades. The assumption that gluten grains can be safely consumed by all humans, because we have been eating them for "thousands of years" is unlikely to be true for most of the world's current population, and may represent a Eurocentric perspective. Sources: Csorba S, Jezerniczky J, Ilyés I, Nagy B, Dvorácsek E, Szabó B. Immunoglobulin E in the sera of infants and children. Acta Paediatr Acad Sci Hung. 1976;17(3):207-14. Greco L, De Seta L, D'Adamo G, Baldassarre C, Mayer M, Siani P, Lojodice D. Atopy and coeliac disease: bias or true relation? Acta Paediatr Scand. 1990 Jun-Jul;79(6-7):670-4. Fraser K, Robertson L. Chronic urticaria and autoimmunity. Skin Therapy Lett. 2013 Nov-Dec;18(7):5-9. Amin AJ, Davis CM. Changes in prevalence and characteristics of IgE-mediated food allergies in children referred to a tertiary care center in 2003 and 2008. Allergy Asthma Proc. 2012 Jan-Feb;33(1):95-101. Clark S, Espinola JA, Rudders SA, Banerji A, Camargo CA. Favorable trends in the frequency of U.S. emergency department visits for food allergy, 2001-2009. Allergy Asthma Proc. 2013 Sep-Oct;34(5):439-45. Molloy J, Allen K, Collier F, Tang ML, Ward AC, Vuillermin P. The potential link between gut microbiota and IgE-mediated food allergy in early life. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2013 Dec 16;10(12):7235-56. Bielory L(1), Lyons K, Goldberg R. Climate change and allergic disease. Curr Allergy Asthma Rep. 2012 Dec;12(6):485-94. Blazer M. Missing Microbes. Harper Collins, Toronto, Canada, 2014. Fasano A. Zonulin and its regulation of intestinal barrier function: the biological door to inflammation, autoimmunity, and cancer. Physiol Rev. 2011 Jan;91(1):151-75. Yacyshyn B, Meddings J, Sadowski D, Bowen-Yacyshyn MB. Multiple sclerosis patients have peripheral blood CD45RO+ B cells and increased intestinal permeability. Dig Dis Sci. 1996 Dec;41(12):2493-8. Tripathi A, Lammers KM, Goldblum S, Shea-Donohue T, Netzel-Arnett S, Buzza MS, Antalis TM, Vogel SN, Zhao A, Yang S, Arrietta MC, Meddings JB, Fasano A. Identification of human zonulin, a physiological modulator of tight junctions, as prehaptoglobin-2. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2009 Sep 29;106(39):16799-804. Fasano A. Leaky gut and autoimmune diseases. Clin Rev Allergy Immunol. 2012 Feb;42(1):71-8. Drago S, El Asmar R, Di Pierro M, Grazia Clemente M, Tripathi A, Sapone A,Thakar M, Iacono G, Carroccio A, D'Agate C, Not T, Zampini L, Catassi C, Fasano A. Gliadin, zonulin and gut permeability: Effects on celiac and non-celiac intestinal mucosa and intestinal cell lines. Scand J Gastroenterol. 2006 Apr;41(4):408-19. Paterson BM, Lammers KM, Arrieta MC, Fasano A, Meddings JB. The safety, tolerance, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic effects of single doses of AT-1001 in coeliac disease subjects: a proof of concept study. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2007 Sep 1;26(5):757-66. Cordain L. Cereal Grains: Humanity's Double-Edged Sword. in Simopoulos AP (ed): Evolutionary Aspects of Nutrition and Health. Diet, Exercise, Genetics and Chronic Disease. World Rev Nutr Diet. Basel, Karger, 1999, vol 84, pp 19–73
  12. I was diagnosed as Celiac at 53. I was asymptomatic or so I thought; i never smoked and was a teacher. I now realize I have had Celiac all of my life I have had severe asthma , seasonal allergies, and chronic lung inflation all my life. It seems when i read these boards many Celiacs have asthma but it is hard to get a handle on how many. I suspect my allergies, asthma and COPD are related to my Celiac. I have seen the same allergist/immunologist trained at National Jewish for decades. He missed it. I was the one that actually requested an endo when I had my over 50 colonoscopy. That is when it was found. I would like to see members just check in and say lungs clear or have had respiratory issues, allergies, asthma, bronchitis..... i suspect the correlation is higher than what is thought. I am thinking of this as a mini lab.
  13. I am normally a very shy person just wanting to blend in and willingly do what I am asked. However, when doctors told me that I needed to drink high fructose corn syrup, corn in my medications, and plastic (Mira lax) they had overstepped their power and I felt threatened. I swell up if I smell corn, so I knew I couldn't eat it. They dismissed my concern about this saying, "You can do it for the test." I set out to figure out a safe alternative for me to prep for my colonoscopy. This process took me over a month of most of my daily thoughts to figure out. I felt in above my head. I asked pharmacists that worked with my doctor for alternative products. They referred me back to the doctor. I told them that the doctor would not provide me with an alternative product. They said well the doctor must not be concerned about your allergy problems. I asked the pharmacist at the local drugstore who also referred me back to the doctor. Baffled I finally asked a friend that was a pharmacist who I should ask that could help me. She said that she could help. She also said that she would not have believed my allergy problem, but she had a relative having the same sorts of issues. Finally, I felt ready and the day for prep arrived. I woke up that morning and for the second day in a row had diarrhea. I mean BEFORE my prep even began! As the day went on I scolded myself about not just being able to do what the doctor said it do. Still, the product should work, all I have to do is be absolutely sure I get enough fluids. I also had made broth with meat and veggies and had this strained for meals. I remembered the product mostly would not be absorbed by my body, so even know I took a large quantity, it would pass through. I trusted my friend the pharmacist and she had used this very substance for her colonoscopy a few years back. Besides the doctor had prescribed this substance to use in prep, just not the brand and form which I had. Finally, I convinced myself and poured the capsules into a cup. I added water and stirred. I drank it down. IN the bottom of my cup was soggy powder, so I chewed and swallowed. My pharmacist friend had told me that when the treatment was finished with the job, the stool would come out yellow and clear. Mind did by the end of the first dose. That meant that I could stop, but I did the second dose anyway, because I knew I had to be sure. The doctor's prep had also a morning prep before the test, but for me that would have meant being up at 3 am. I hadn't known this when I signed up for their first appointment of the day. I did both parts the day before so that I didn't have to get up during the night or worry about driving to the office with diarrhea. I first talked with a nurse that asked which prep I did. I told her I prepped with magnesium citrate. She asked if it were the one prescribed and I said I ordered one I could tolerate without corn. Are you]allergic to corn, she asked? I can't eat corn I replied. What are your symptoms? My body swells up. "You could have done it for the test." Anyway, I felt angry with her. She left me to dress. Another nurse came in and started going over more info that my prep wasn't good enough. The doctor came in and announced that she heard I was rude to the nurse. Then she went into a lecture about how my prep wasn't good enough. Her nurse told her that I did my own prep and this was foolish behavior! I began to yell about them dismissing a person when they say they can't have corn and ordering only giving meds with corn. The doctor claimed she wished she would have known I couldn't have corn... I had told her I couldn't, but they kept saying, but you can have it. Only bloating. Ahhhhhhhhh, I thought! . The doctor said that it was dangerous of me to take the same dose of magnesium citrate which she called for in a part of her plan. It can tend to give kidney problems. I didn't take the same formula, because it had lemon juice which I cannot have either. Also, she mentioned my kidney had showed somewhat dehydrated a couple of days before. Everything had looked within normal limits to me. And she affirmed that it was just a little borderline. They reminded me the Miralax doesn't have corn, but I said it is plastic which isn't to eat! ) I asked them with my hands on the oxygen tube in my nose if they wanted me to leave?! Finally I said, 'You know I think we both have the same goal-to keep me safe. I know that I can't eat corn. Finally everyone seemed a bit disarmed. The doctor decided to start in without sedatives to see if the "prep" worked." I alerted them that I read up on the sedatives and thought we needed to keep the dosage low. . I enjoyed watching the bright red shiny pictures as the scope traveled through a twisting tunnel. Everything looked clean except for a tiny wisp of mucous. The doctor looked rather excited (in a good way) over what she saw as if she were marveling also. Suddenly she hit a twist and began to turn. I felt extreme pain as if someone took a credit card and scraped it against the side of an open sore. This brought a muffled cry as I never recall making except perhaps in childbirth. It sounds a little like a chicken cackling after laying an egg. " I am sorry I said, I can't." I couldn't lie still as it hurt too much. Then she said that the prep looked good enough, so I got the sedatives,. . When I woke up, I was in a bed facing a huge window with the light cheerily coming in. The doctor was standing nearby looking concerned. She said that she knew that I wanted less dose of sedative, but they ended up giving more than usual. The kinks they found were so sensitive. Then she said that we could do the same prep again if we ever needed to. She mentioned fodmaps diet for me. I looked into it and it is similar in many respects to what I am doing. Fruit variety is limited, but my recent favorites strawberries and bananas are allowed. Many of the ones I can't eat are on the bad list that seemed interesting. It is also gluten free. The doc also said that the endoscopy looked great. Everything looked healed up. I apologized to the nurse and the doctor, for indeed I had been rude to them. I know a person who, "though He was reviled, He reviled not again" and would like to do likewise regardless of circumstances. I felt somewhat dizzy from the sedative. We walked to the lab to get my blood work. We got in the car. I gulped down two thermoses of home tap well water as I felt so thirsty. We drove for a while and then I started searching for a plastic bag if you get my drift. There were holes in the bag I found. oops, I had planned to put a bucket or something in. Anyway, I felt better when the water was gone and decided to wait til I got home to drink more and have some food. I came home and put on my robe and collapsed on the couch with my pillow. The children were duly impressed when they came home later. Actually they were a little worried. I had heard of the robe tactic when you need to rest and it truly worked. I really didn't feel too bad, but was told to lay low. I looked up kinks in the intestine. It can be cancer. my dad said that no one in the family has had cancer. He has a nice point. BUT "nobody" has had celiac either and that didn't stop me from getting it and or the genes Okay, but the doctor said that they found one polyp that looked benign She brought up cancer for that. She mentioned the kinks, but didn't mention cancer as an option. She took biopsy's, though, so we're bound to find out. Kinks can also be linked to celiac or chrohns, or pelvic inflammatory disease. I took from the Fodmap diet option that she is thinking food problems and that stands good for my side. My side of defending my right to not eat corn. Since, the doctor offered me a fruit intolerance test. But she mentioned you just drink some stuff and blow into something. I probably will stall out, because what do you think that the stuff will be? It is probably high fructose corn syrup. The results of my tests showed no cancer or significant ungoing damage to my digestive track. Thanks to my friend the pharmacist I knew to have the doctor check for electrolyte balance after that test. This test came out well. My prep didn't damage as was feared. Also the doctor said that if we needed to ever, we could use that same prep again, except perhaps would need to do the last coarse the morning of the exam. Personally, I hope there never is a reason, but am glad that if there is ever was I know where to go for help!
  14. Things Are Going Well - Mostly. :d

    Well, since my last post things have really turned around in a good way. My mom is now on my side fully with going gluten-free. I feel so much better, though I am now having huge flare-ups of new and typical allergies, and also now having loose stool and gastro pain. I think it's my daily pills... I'm having issues with lactose still, gluten (of course), my tea tree organic castile soap (Dr. Bronner's Tea Tree Bar Soap), any shampoo (currently am using Mane and Tail), an organic body wash called 100% Pure White Peach Hydrating Body Wash which I used to be able to use to wash my face and now it causes an awful full-faced itchy, burning rash, and I'm sure other things which I can't think of at the moment. I take 40mg Lexapro daily for depression and anxiety. I have for about 10 years. Well all of a sudden on Thursday when I took all my pills in the afternoon I began having this awful panic attack - but it wasn't the kind where my brain is panicking - like "THE SKY IS FALLING" no, it's a body-only thing where my body gets super hot in the core and upper arms/legs and my hands and feet get freezing cold! and It's like there is a fire burning inside my torso. It's freaky and awful and I hate it! I eventually got over it mostly Thursday night and was finally able to fall asleep at about 4am. Then Friday afternoon I took only 2 Lexapro and no other medications. Same reaction, though not as severe. So I googled it and it seems it may be seretonin toxicity. Hmm. My gut may be healing - so it's absorbing more of the Lexapro - which makes my brain more saturated or whatever. So today I will only take 1 Lexapro (20mg) which is half dose. I'll see how I do tonight. I think I will take my blood pressure pill though. I do need that one. So, yeah, my body is freaking out severely and I have no idea why. Allergies, pain, rashes, panic attacks. I'm a walking mystery at this point. But hopefully I can get over these problems. *shrugs* I do see my allergist March 21st - this coming Friday. I will tell him everything that is going on and hopefully he can help me figure this out.
  15. Hi all! I saw a really OLD post here about the Emergen-C Supplement. I think we need a more "modern" update on this product. I have bad allergies and that stuff really helps. I know they don't guarantee it to be gluten free on their web site, and I've called them and they said ... they cannot guarantee the "ingredients" in their product to be gluten free. So, what I'm wondering ... does anybody take this product WITHOUT problems of gluten reaction from it? Thanks!
  16. Hi everyone, I am a newbie on this site but really needing some advice. I have had 'IBS' since my early childhood and have suffered with many days and nights lying on my bathroom floor or passing out on it with terrible cramping and diarrhea. Last week a doctor looked over my history and asked me if I had celiac disease as I seem to gain weight even when I can only sip chicken soup and have diarrhea for days, I have chronic sinusitis, sore throat, ear infections, Acid reflux, had my gallbladder removed and recurrent mouth ulcers. He aske about my family history and as my mum is the same as me and my nan had hypothyroidism and passed away from Lymphoma he seemed pretty convinced. However he sent me home with some antibiotic ear spray for my sore ear....I decided to go gluten free and see if this sorted out my cramping and diarrhea too. this is the story of my life. I go to the doctors and they never give me any answers. So I discovered that once giving up gluten for a day or two my cramping stopped but still had diarrhea. I quit dairy and all of a sudden I am pain and diarrhea free! Happy days. Then today my lovely husband went to costa and got me a soy latte and I ended up in hospital with an allergic reaction! I felt like I had the flu run up behind me and jump on me! I almost blacked out both at home and the hospital but felt much better with piriton and hydra cortizone injections. Now I have been told I need allergy tests to sort out what I can have and what I cant. So now I am afraid to eat or drink anything and I feel that I dont know what to say to my doctor because I dont know what tests to ask for here in the UK. I am also worried for my kids as going gluten free seems to have helped my 4 year olld daughter with her witholding poo that has been going on for 1 1/2 years (told it was due to stress as her dad has been very ill with cancer) and my 6 yr old son is being tested for adhd and aspergers which can also be related to celiac can't it? I am not sure I am looking at the right websites so unsure. I am pretty sure the doctors are not taking me seriously because they assume I am suffering from anxiety from my husband's illnesses but I have been sick for over 40 years and he has only been sick for 2! Anyhow, could someone please tell me if there is a list of allergy free foods I can be safe to eat until tested and if celiac will turn up on an allergy test?? I just don't know and I am afraid to look at too many websites as some of them are written by complete nutters. thank you for your time Bunny
  17. Hives?

    Have any of you experienced hives that don't seem to be related to gluten? I've had environmental allergies all of my life- so I'm well versed in hives. For the past few months, they have been popping up in the same place (the sides of my face and/or neck- yesterday underneath my bottom lip) and I can't seem to find one singular reason. It is definitely not gluten as I have not been bloated at the times when this happens. I have also recently removed large amounts of corn and dairy when I realized they contributed to my bloating and digestive misery, but can handle small amounts. The hives have popped up when all I was drinking for hours was wine and then not appeared when I had wine (both times it was white). The same goes for other foods- they show up and then they don't. They have reared their ugly heads when I haven't eaten for hours. I'm guessing it is more connected to stress, but was interested in what the experience of others have been. Sometimes I don't feel particularly stressed when they appear, so I'm at a loss. Has anyone experiences stress hives???
  18. I had allergy testing done which you can see my results here. I actually need help looking at them by the way, if anyone knows how to read these results. My Allergist told me to take some Zrytec and if I didn't see any improvement, go back and see him. Well, the last thing I thought of was allergies. I moved from Indiana to AZ about 2 or so years ago, and I don't know how allergic I am to my new environment. He told me I was allergic to "basically everything" in a joking manner (he's that type of doctor...). I'm wondering if I have severe Hayfever as well...Severe Hayfever can induce colitis, as I have recently read. That is rare, however. Anyone else have major allergy issues related to Crohn's/Celiac/UC? I have UC and Celiac, but I am thinking allergies are playing a bigger role than I previously thought. What do you all think?
  19. Hi! I have a rant/question. Do you guys avoid ALL food you're allergic to no matter how strong the allergy? I really need to do the IGG food test, where they check some hundred or so foods, but as of now, in addition to Celiac I'm definitely allergic to the list below. (Confirmed with blood work and prick test.) Chicken Wheat Oats Strawberries Apples Tomatoes Shellfish Peanuts Treenuts Sesame Seeds And I also seem to be intolerant to dairy and lately I'm having big problems when I eat quinoa and rice- I don't seem to digest it, and get really bad stomach aches after eating it. On top of all that, I've gone vegan- I don't really like the taste of meat and since I'm not having dairy I figured why not try it out. I'm definitely feeling WAY better dairy-free and vegan, but I still have some lingering stomach issues and hives and such that I can't quite pinpoint. I'm definitely not strict about some of those allergies, particularly tomato, but maybe I should be? Most of them are in the 'strong' category. With tomato I've read you can eat it cooked? Anyone else in a similar boat? I'm wondering if maybe I should go grain-free too, but my diet is already so restricted that I'm not sure that makes sense... Thank you!!!
  20. Ok, so after trying some certified gluten-free pistachios, at the suggestion of some posters here, I can reliably say I have some sort of sensitivity to pistachios - they upset my stomach and give me some mild D the next day. What I'm not sure I understand is does this reaction, which is so similar to the reaction I have from gluten, mean that my villi are getting re-damaged when I eat pistachios? If I'm willing to live with the reaction, can I continue to eat them (something I would never do with gluten)? Thanks so much, Nikki
  21. This is the second year that something like this has happened. I had one glutening about a month ago, but quickly got over it after discovering the culprit. That was mid-late April. Fast forward to mid-May and like clockwork, my seasonal allergies began about 2 weeks later. Last year my allergies weren't too horrible, because of the messed up Spring we had (I live in Michigan and it hit 90 in March, which really messed the plant life up around here). I had sporadic gluten symptoms, despite eating what had all winter given me no issues. Much like my allergies last year though, they weren't too terrible and went away quickly. This year, I'm back to eating the same old trusted items in the wake of my glutening in April. My birthday is next week, so I'm being SUPER cautious so I don't have to deal with being sick that day. Like I said, my seasonal allergies flare up in early-mid May, which they did this year, only FAR worse than last year since tree pollen counts are insanely high around here. Much like last year, I'm having gluten symptoms despite eating clean, and this year they're much worse than when it happened last year, which seems to coincide with my seasonal allergies being more intense. Am I insane for thinking there's a connection between one autoimmune response and my gluten issues? Has anyone else dealt with this?
  22. So, I've been gluten sensitive since 2009, though showing symptoms as early as 2008. I went for a blood test at my doctor's to pick up allergies in '08, to no avail, though it was very evident that I was gluten intolerent (bloated, symptoms similar to IBS, lack of energy, rashes etc). I went to a Naturopath in 2011, and she picked it up immediate through the symptoms I shared with her. I don't think I've been "officially diagnosed" through blood tests or anything of that nature, but she urged me to steer clear of gluten and processed foods, and gave me a powder to put in juice every morning to repair my insides - I felt the best I had in years from heeding her advice. However, recently, I've been patchy with sticking with that advice. Gluten seems to be in everything, and I felt pretty alone with the battle. I was the only one gluten intolerent in my family, so it was a hassle making myself separate dinners etc (I know, I had to get over this inconvenience!) Thankfully, I found this forum a couple of months back and have been ghosting around it for some time. Anyway, I recently moved to the US (I'm Australian, married my groom a month ago who is Michigan born), and have since picked up on gluten free living, once more, with the support of my husband (he's a champ). I've been eating Udi's gluten free bread, found in the frozen section of Meijer supermarkets. Still, my gluten eating symptoms have been lingering, and have progressed to such a stage that there's been blood in my waste (TMI, I know. I'm just eager for help). I know whatever I'm eating is damaging my insides to such a degree that I'm getting bruised internally, ruining the lining of my intestines. My question is, has anyone experience similar with other gluten free products? Is there something else I'm intolerant to, and I'm just not picking up on it? I would say my body has a worse reaction to eating these gluten free breads than to eating gluten in general (gluten free foods tend to have an instant reaction, whereas gluten products build over a few hours). I know I'm not allergic to lactose. In fact, I usually feel great after a bit of cheese or a glass of milk. Could this be soy? Or another grain used in the breads? This has probably been covered a multitude of times, but I thought a new post couldn't hurt. Thanks, guys.
  23. I am having a devil of a time trying to find out if Zyrtec is gluten free. Does anyone know? What about other gluten-free allergy medicines? Thanks!
  24. Hi - still relatively newly diagnosed (about two months). For the last couple of years, about the same length of time I've had celiac symptoms, I've noticed that eating lots of pistachios gives me mild D. However, I do still love them and hope to be able to keep having them -- am I doing similar type of damage to my villi or anything else by eating them occasionally? I have no reason to think they're gluten cross contaminated (though I admit, I don't think I've read the packaging). Usually Costco/Kirkland brand, if that helps. Thanks.
  25. Well I'm sure I'm not the only one. But its so awkward when someone reacts to my gluten free status by purchasing food for me. And most of the time its not even gluten free (they thought it was). Or its got a ton of other crap that would give me indigestion. Then I feel kinda bad and offer to pay them back, and remind them that gluten is just one of many foods I avoid. Did anyone else go thru this situation??