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Found 39 results

  1. Celiac.com 02/06/2019 - People with celiac disease and gluten-sensitivities can have strong opinions on topics from testing and diagnosis to various aspects of the gluten-free diet. Combine that fact with an explosive rise in gluten-free dieting as a lifestyle choice, rather than medical necessity, and we’re just one celebrity Instagram from a three-alarm social media fire. The former model and Miss England, Danielle Lloyd is the latest celebrity to feel the fire from her social media audience. Lloyd’s offense, according to fans, was testing her seven-year old son Harry at home for food allergies, and putting him on a gluten-free diet based on the results. Lloyd’s Instagram posts touted the results of the home food allergen tests and her decision to make her son eat gluten-free. In the post, the former Lloyd said in one post that she’s "starting the new year feeling great after finding out what was causing me bloating and pain after eating food, with @Lifelabtests at-home intolerance and allergy testing kit." The test kits, from Lifelabtesting.com, measure sensitivity to more than 40 common allergens, such as grains, eggs and meat. In another post, Lloyd adds that “The results were so good that my son Harry did a test, too, and since changing his diet to gluten free, he hasn’t been in any pain." Fans on her Instagram feed warned her of the possible dangers of cutting out entire food groups for young children. Home Allergy Tests are Just a Starting Point As numerous commenters pointed out, home allergy tests, including tests meant to detect food allergens, are just a starting point. If you get a positive result, please consult a doctor before making a major dietary change. Switching to a gluten-free diet before seeing a doctor can cause confusion in diagnosis, and may be unnecessary. Another commenter agreed, writing: "A child should not be put on a gluten-free diet unless prescribed by a specialist." The proliferation of home allergy test kits can be useful as a guideline for understanding your health, but it’s important to double check the results with a physician before making major health or dietary changes, especially for children.
  2. Celiac.com 01/21/2019 - A population-based survey study of more than 40,000 adults in the United States shows that just over one in ten people had an allergy to at least one food at the time of the survey. However, the same study reveals that nearly 20% of adults believed themselves to have a food allergy. Half of the adults with food allergies reacted to at least one food, while nearly 40% reported at least one food allergy-related emergency room visit in their lifetime. According to the US FDA, the most common food allergens are milk, peanuts, eggs, fish, crustacean shellfish, soy, tree nuts and wheat. How common are food allergies among adults in the United States? How severe are the symptoms, on average? Researchers Seek Accurate Estimates of Adults with Food Allergies A team of researchers recently set out to provide accurate estimates of the national distribution, severity, and factors associated with adult food allergies. The research team included Ruchi S. Gupta, MD, MPH; Christopher M. Warren, BA; Bridget M. Smith, PhD; et al Jialing Jiang, BA; Jesse A. Blumenstock, BS; Matthew M. Davis, MD, MAPP; Robert P. Schleimer, PhD; and Kari C. Nadeau, MD, PhD There have been numerous studies on food allergies in children, but very little is known about food allergy in adults. Food Allergy Can Start in Adulthood The team’s results indicate that more than 10% of US adults, more than 26 million people in all, are allergic to at least one food. That means that food allergies are both common and severe among adults in the United States. Moreover, food allergies often begin in adulthood, rather than in childhood, as is commonly believed. The team calls for greater scrutiny of adults with suspected food allergies, including proper testing and consultation to make sure patients are avoiding the correct foods, and not unnecessarily avoiding foods that are okay for them to eat. Source: JAMA Netw Open. 2019;2(1):e185630. doi:10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2018.5630 The researchers are variously affiliated with the Institute for Public Health and Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois; the Department of Pediatrics, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois; Mary Ann & J. Milburn Smith Child Health Research, Outreach, and Advocacy Center, Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital, Chicago, Illinois; the Department of Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois; the Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles; the Center for Innovation for Complex Chronic Healthcare, Edward J. Hines Jr Veterans Affairs Hospital, Hines, Illinois; the Department of Medical Social Sciences, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois; the Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois; and the Sean N. Parker Center for Allergy and Asthma Research, Stanford University School of Medicine in Stanford, California.
  3. Celiac.com 09/06/2018 - What are the most common foods that can trigger allergic reactions in people? First, and it's important to be clear about this, a food allergy is not to be confused with a food sensitivity. Food sensitivities are common and usually harmless, if sometimes uncomfortable. Food sensitivity can cause symptoms like gas, bloating, stomach upset, indigestion, and the like when some people eat certain foods. A food allergy, on the other hand, is an immune reaction that happens when the body mistakes harmless food, a peanut for example, for something that could make you sick. When you eat a food you're allergic to, your immune system thinks you’re body is being harmed, and reacts to protect you from that harm. This reaction can be as mild as a light skin rash or red, itchy eyes, or it could be serious enough to cause difficulty breathing, swelling, pain, shock and even death. An allergic reaction can happen very soon after eating an allergenic food, or it can happen many hours later. Either way, food allergies are potentially serious, and should be treated as such. According to WebMD, these nine foods account for about 90% of all food allergies: Peanuts Tree nuts, such as walnuts, almonds, pine nuts, brazil nuts, and pecans Soy Milk Eggs Wheat, barley, and rye—Celiac disease Oats Fish Shellfish Mild symptoms of a food allergy reaction include: Red, swollen, dry, or itchy skin and rash (hives or eczema) Runny or stuffy nose, sneezing, or a slight, dry cough Itchy, watery, red eyes Itchy mouth or inside your ear Funny taste in your mouth Upset stomach, cramps, vomiting, or diarrhea Though any of these foods can cause an allergic reaction, peanuts, nuts, fish, and shellfish are well known for causing severe allergic reactions. Symptoms of a sever allergic reaction to food include: Trouble breathing or swallowing Swollen lips, tongue, or throat Feeling weak, confused, or light-headed, or passing out Chest pain or a weak, uneven heartbeat If you suspect that you or someone you know is having an allergic reaction to food, especially a severe reaction, definitely seek medical attention immediately.
  4. Hello! I am a 59-year-old, newly diagnosed with allergies (I also suspect that i have some form of celiac or gluten intolerance). I haven't done the food allergy tests or challenges yet - but from what i've read, i may have OAS when it comes to certain foods, but i'm not sure. I'm not sure I would do a celiac test at this point, because that would require me eating mostly gluten - i've been eating mostly gluten-free - i don't know what else to do and i need some tips - HELP!
  5. So my 7 month daughter is having issues with corn. I have Celiac and am nursing so she has never even been in contact with gluten. I read today during some research that corn can sometimes cause the same symptoms as gluten in a Celiac patient. If you have experienced with this please leave a comment with your symptoms. Diarrhea, upset stomach, rashes, vomiting? I want to see if there could be a possible correlation as I feel like my daughter is immunosuppressed but the allergist claims it is not an immune response to the corn. Anyone that has experience with their own children I would love to hear from you.
  6. I was recently diagnosed as gluten intolerant or with non-celiac gluten sensitivity. The doctors told me I could try eating gluten to the point where I could tolerate it. I have noticed that, at first, I definitely didn't feel good but that it wasn't bad enough to keep me from cheating every once in a while. Over the last week however, I was on the road for work (I'm an admissions counselor) and I couldn't find anything gluten free on the run and so I grabbed something quick and I immediately felt ill. Then I ate something that they told me had breadcrumbs in it not thinking that a few crumbs would bother me and immediately felt like I was going to loose my cookies and now, a few hours later, I feel itchy all over. Is there a chance that I could be developing Celiac's by constantly exposing my body to it? Has anyone else noticed their symptoms coming on faster and getting worse over time? I can't find anything online that says if this is possible or not.
  7. I have had lupus fibromyalgia ibs or spastic colon since 1998. Now i had allergy testing labs on blood. Im allergic to gluten, almonds, oats, barley, cadida yeast, aspiragillys(molds), broccoli, cabbage, clams goats milk, kidney pinto navy and soybeans, pork, sesame, spinach and canola oil. I don't know what to eat now. I've always eaten say at olive garden or anything and had terrible stomach pains like labor. Then run to the bathroom. Or constipation i cant go for a week or so. I tried spark vitamin drink had gluten, soy powder allergic. Health bars larabars gluten. My weight can be 129 one week 120 next or go to 104 fast. Not sure what to do now. How can regain my life back? Could i have celiac not ibs? I have 3 other auto immune system diseases. Any food resources would be great and vitamins with no soy or gluten. Plus beverages. Ive had hives a month now from my almond butter gluten and vitamin drinks lol steroids and epi pen. Oh and high cholesterol. So everything i ate to lower that im allergic to. Plus a list of secondary allergy foods a mile long.
  8. Vibrant Health Products Issues Allergy Alert On Undeclared Egg In LiveGfree Gluten Free Classic Soft White Hamburger Buns https://www.fda.gov/Safety/Recalls/ucm569131.htm?source=govdelivery&utm_medium=email&utm_source=govdelivery
  9. Yvonne Vissing Ph.D.

    Celiac Kids in Canadian Schools

    Celiac.com 07/20/2017 - It is common for school teachers in the United States not to know what student has celiac disease, or allergies of any sort. Most schools don't have formal systems so that the principal, school nurse, teacher, or cafeteria workers know when a child has celiac disease or food allergies. An informal game of roulette is played, where everyone assumes that everything is fine – that is, until a child has a heath reaction. In Montreal, Canada, the Lester B Pearson School Board has taken a different approach to dealing with food allergies and conditions such as celiac disease that their students might have. They regard these health conditions to be so important that how to handle them is present in their official Policy on Safe and Caring Schools. To summarize what they do, at the beginning of each school year parents are sent a form requesting them to inform the principal, homeroom teacher, and other relevant school personnel about health conditions and allergies. This includes children who have celiac disease and gluten issues. If a child changes schools, or if a student in an existing school gets a new health diagnosis or has newly identified health needs, this information should be made known to school personnel. A photograph of the student is taken and put on a card with the health condition so that others in charge may know that a particular child has gluten issues. In the cafeteria, workers have the photos of the children posted in the kitchen where they can see them so that they can know that brown-haired Lucinda in fifth-grade has celiac disease and should be served only foods that are safe for her. Children may not know what foods have gluten in them and which do not, so they may not always be the best informants for identifying which foods being served are safe for them and which are not. Given that additives may vary according who is doing the cooking or what ingredients are used, a food like macaroni and cheese may be made with wheat pasta, making it unsafe, or corn, rice or quinoa pasta, rendering it acceptable. Both may look identical to the naked eye, but they aren't so it is a food service worker's obligation to know whether Lucinda can have the dish or not. Likewise, teachers may be given the photograph and health card so that they remember when Billy brings in cupcakes for his birthday celebration, that there are gluten-free ones available (hopefully!) in the cafeteria freezer that can be pulled out and given to Lucinda so she is not left out. The photograph technique is especially helpful when there are new cafeteria workers or substitute teachers or other personnel who may not know a child's food allergy situation like someone who interacts with the child every day might. The Lester B Pearson schools' Food and Nutrition Policy is based in Canada's Food Guide and Policy on Health Eating and Active Living. All schools in Canada are to adhere to the same set of standards. This means that a celiac child living in Vancouver should be just as safe eating at school as one in Ottawa or one in Halifax. Having national standards that are uniformly enforced helps to make all children safe. Making sure that children's food consumption is safe for all of them, especially in public institutions like schools, is part of their human rights according to the Convention on the Rights of the Child. It is the responsibility of adults who are in local parent organizations to be in charge of the oversight and safety of all children and to think through food risk and safety policies.
  10. ok today is officially one week i've been gluten free and i haven't made any noticeable differences in feeling better. my first question is: how long should i wait to expect changes to occur? am i not giving it enough time? prior to going gluten free one of my issues was constipstion, as well as other health issues usually involving an upset stomach, nausea or an uneasy feeling in my stomach. but since going gluten free i have had a bowel movement different from usual. and today it was more loose and diarrhea like and it is very rarely like that. oh and about half way through the week i got a random rash pop up on one ankle???? advice or suggestions??
  11. are there any gluten free AND corn free places in lexington ky that i could get baked goods like cupcakes and stuff like that. (the place doesn't have to be completely be corn/gluten free, just somewhere that have some products) i would like to get something for my mom but she has a corn and gluten allergy.
  12. So, I have full blown Celiac's disease, and after I had gotten all gluten out of my system, I adopted new allergies. I am suddenly allergic to both latex, and bandage adhesive. I'm allergic to my dog suddenly. And I am allergic to almonds all the sudden too. My friend who also has Celiac's noticed similarities with this, for she got random new allergies as well when she went gluten free. I have "Silent Celiac's" and have absolutely no symptoms when I eat gluten except mild nausea and body aches, and I'm starting to wonder if going gluten free is worth it, because I didn't improve most of my health issues I have from other diseases. And my celiacs wasn't burdensome to begin with.
  13. until
    The GFAF Expos are the greatest events on earth for those living a gluten-free or allergen-friendly lifestyle! Sample and purchase hundreds of products, meet with local and national brands, receive coupons, and attend informative presentations by top-notch speakers. While all products at the Expo are gluten free, many are also free from the top 8 allergens. There is also a dedicated nut-free section. The Expos are a fun, family-friendly, educational and safe place made just for you! What do you get with your Expo Ticket? Entry into the 100+ booth vendor fair Valuable coupons at the vendor booths Samples from the vendors Discounted products available for purchase Informative classes related to the gluten and allergen-free lifestyle Free reusable bag to carry your goodies The chance to meet your favorite vendors, authors and bloggers For more information, visit www.gfafexpo.com
  14. I've had a range of symptoms in the last 2 months and in the past few weeks I have discovered that my TTG abs (igA) levels were 41 (my igA tests were fine). The doctor said that he is pretty much certain that it is celiac disease and I am awaiting an endoscopy to confirm it. Before I found out that my TTG abs (igA) levels were high, I noticed that my body was reacting really badly to dairy products. I went on an elimination diet and stopped all gluten and dairy products and felt much better. I carried this on after my results and thought that I must have developed a dairy intolerance due to my celiac. 2 days ago I accidentally consumed a glass of wine which I thought was dairy free but it contained Milk. I have not had any gluten. I am currently in the middle of a flare up. All of a sudden rashes have started to appear on my hands and my anxiety has returned (usually not a anxious person). No diarhhoea, vomiting or digestive issues. I am currently suffering from muscle twitching, rashes predominantly on hands and feet, brain fog, pins and needles/numbness on hands, feet and arms. However, I have been tested for milk allergy and this came back negative. Is it possible that it is dairy that is causing my symptoms/autoimmune reaction and could this be a reason for elevetated TTG abs (igA) levels. Or has the doctor only picked up my celiac and missing something else. If it was dairy intolerance then I would have digestive issues but I don't seem to have any. Could it be the casein protein? Anyone been in a similar situation or can anyone provide some insight?
  15. Hi I've got a severe allergy to Barley and cannot eat anything that contains it i live in Spain and find it very difficult to check all the ingredients breakfast cereals are the most difficult as everyone I found always contains barley if I consume anything with barley even a minute amount from a few minutes to hours later I get an uncontrollable cough and severe breathing problems I was misdiagnosed with asthma due to the symptoms but after much research I now know barley is the culprit i would like to know if anyone has the same illness or symptoms thank you
  16. Celiacandme

    Sulfites

    For those of you that have determined you can't handle sulfites - how did you determine? What kind of symptoms did sulphites cause you? Was this during the healing process for you and were you able to add them back in?
  17. I ate a Popsicle Brand Grape popsicle last night and at about 1 AM this morning I felt like a mack truck had hit me, hard. I see on the Popsicle website that only 5 of the Sugar Free ones are considered Gluten Free but when I reviewed ALL of the ingredients on the box for the Grape, everything seems to be "safe". Can anyone enlighten me to what I am missing? I have contacted Popsicle for information as well. I was recently diagnosed approximately 2 months ago and am really feeling much better but can tell when I have eaten something that has gluten in it. Just can't tell if this is a residual effect from accidentally eating gluten a few days ago, as I felt great yesterday, or did the grape popsicle do this to me.
  18. Celiac.com 02/08/2013 - In an article for Fox News, Hans von Spakovsky, a senior fellow at the right-wing Heritage Foundation, ridicules the idea that the Department of Justice (DoJ) should use its weight to force colleges and universities to accommodate students with food allergies under the Americans with Disabilities Act. At issue is a settlement the DoJ obtained with Lesley University in Massachusetts, which had allegedly violated the Americans with Disabilities Act by not adequately accommodating students with food allergies. Under the settlement agreement with the DoJ, Lesley University will pay $50,000, offer meals that do not contain “egg, wheat, shellfish, fish, soy, peanut, tree-nut products, and other potential allergens," prepare the food in a dedicated area, and to allow students to pre-order their special meals, among other requirements. In the view of von Spakovsky, the agreement amounts to "extortion" by the the DoJ. He calls the "idea that this is a federal issue, or that the Justice Department should burn its resources investigating food preparation in university dining halls…a complete absurdity." He goes onto call the DOJ's efforts at Lesley a "dish-hunt [which] exemplifies mindless mission creep and the bloated expansion of the federal nanny state." What do you think? Do you have children or loved ones with celiac disease, especially of college age? Should celiac disease be considered a disability? Do they deserve gluten-free food options at school? Should the government pressure schools that either can't or won't act on their own? Let us know your thoughts by commenting below. Click here to read Hans von Spakovsky's full article, ridiculing efforts by the federal government to use the Americans with Disabilities Act to pressure colleges to accommodate students with food allergies.
  19. There was a documentary on netflix I watch I believe it was called "corn nation" something about corn. The guy showed how they have added the wheat gean to the corn as a way to make bugs not want to eat the corn.. He goes on to show an underground bunker where government has 1000's of varieties of corn stored in jars.. He asked the one in charge she said they new they (GMO companies) were modifying the gean or gen ( can't spell today) and they were protecting the original in case it made it uneatable and might pollinate other crops killing off corn.. He then went on talking about how even corn is feed to cattle because so many farmers started growing it.. That explains the dairy reactions too
  20. Hi there...I've been gluten free since my biopsy so about 10 months...still having random neckrash and hives on my eyelids and recently was tested for food allergies. The IgE results were all negative but the IgG came back positive for casein, wheat, corn, beef, apples, banana's, potatoes and tomatoes. It only tested 10 different things (ok for chicken and soy)...I've been trying to find information on this while waiting to see a nutritionist but my dr just said for now stay away from the highest offenders...the levels were supposed to be under 2.0 and corn was 11, bananas 9, beef 7.4, casein 5.5 etc..while tomatoes were 2.5 and potatoes were 2.0 which they marked as high... I was told at my endoscopy 10 months ago that I had a lot of visual inflammation of the esophagus, stomach and intestines and the results were celiac disease gerd and inflammation of stomach.... Many places I read that if you had low positives to ignore those and I'm thinking no I should notice all positives....?? and I can't find any reference to what is considered "low positive"...is the 11 a low positive that I had for the corn or is it like a WHOA off the charts....I can't even find a reference for it...Any insight anyone???
  21. I am allergic to caffeine. I only have a few but they are clearly too irritating for me to consume caffeine and enjoy caffeine. The only ones that I don't experience are the flu like symptoms, the swollen eyes, my tongue doesn't swell and no cold sweats. The rest bugs me for the rest of the day, and the next morning I feel hung over! Big time hate caffeine. Found this out after quitting caffeine for months then sipped it daily and increased it. Symptoms increased and before long I hated what I was drinking. Here are all symptoms possible for people with caffeine allergy. Skin problems such as hives, eczema, rashes, acne, severe itching Headaches/ migraines Anxiety and panic attacks Can’t focus or concentrate Tongue, glands, or throat swelling Heart racing/ palpitations Angry, irritable, bad mood Fatigue Dizziness Extreme jitters Chest Pain Depression Numbness in face, hands, or feet Muscle pain Shortness of breath/ tightness of chest Delusions/ hallucinations Flu/ cold like symptoms Vision problems Cold sweats Eyes swollen shut So...now I want chocolate.....it's that time of the month again. But...the caffeine!!! lol Noooooo! So I'm looking for a certified gluten free carob instead. Or I'll have to encourage my liver to produce the caffeine enzymes that it isn't. There's a whole new study.
  22. Hello everyone, I hope its ok to post this here, and I apologise in advance for the length of this, I hope someone takes the time to read it all and help me or give me some advice! My name is Ben, and I have just turned 22, for the past year and a half I have had a constant pain in my stomach/belly, it never goes away or eases up, it stays there all day, all night, not a minute of relief. I went to the doctors and had urine/blood tests done, I'm not diabetic, I then spent 8 months on medication for stomach ulcers, they did nothing so I had the test where a camera is inserted down your throat, I am all clear of ulcers. my doctor then sent me on my way with the words "There is nothing left it could be" I later returned and was told it could be IBS, however I don't have any of the symptoms apart from stomach pain, however the doctor said with IBS the pain is only present for a short amount of time, but mine never goes. They don't seem to understand that my life has come to a stand still, I have done nothing for the last year as I am just in pain all the time, and it makes you feel very fatigued. I Recently switched to a gluten free diet in hopes that this could be the cause, I felt no difference, 2 weeks on the diet go by and I eat some bread that is not gluten free, and I suddenly notice the pain has increased, so I think the pain is slowly going, but its so slow i don't notice until i eat something that sets it off. I have been gluten free for 5 weeks now, however I have had the odd gluten meal when I have been stuck out etc... I still have discomfort in my belly while on the gluten free diet, but its no longer a huge pain, but its not 100% gone.. So basically i wanted to know if anyone has had a similer expericance to this?, am I on the right track? how long did it take for your pain to clear after starting a gluten free diet? what steps can I take to solving this? I hope someone can help me, im sorry if this is posted in the wrong place <3
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