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Found 10 results

  1. Celiac.com 10/02/2008 - Whole grains are good sources of B-Vitamins and minerals such as calcium, iron, magnesium, and selenium, but one of their most important nutritional benefits is the fiber they bring to our diets. Whole grains such as wheat, brown rice, and oats include both soluble and insoluble fiber. Soluble fiber is easy to remember – it is water soluble, and as such can be assimilated into the body, where it plays an important role in blood sugar regulation and cholesterol balance. Soluble fiber also helps provide a sense of fullness or satiety. Insoluble fiber is - you guessed it - insoluble in water, and is not assimilated into the body, but passes through the digestive tract and is eliminated. That does not mean insoluble fiber has a less important nutritional role to play. Insoluble fiber is very important in keeping our digestive and elimination systems regular. Fiber aids the transit of toxic substances out of the body, and in doing so, helps to reduce the incidence of colon and rectal cancers. In eliminating gluten grains from your diet, have you wondered what you are missing nutritionally? Are you able to get adequate replacements for the nutrients in wheat, barley, rye, and oats, from the other nutritional components of your diet? The answer is a qualified yes. We know this on several levels. For tens of thousands of years, entire cultures have thrived without growing or consuming any of the gluten grains. We also know, from looking at what nutrients gluten grains provide, that there are more than adequate sources of these nutrients in alternative grains, and from vegetable sources. Fiber is something we do need to be aware of, though. Studies have shown that standard gluten-free diets are low in fiber, especially when baking with the “white” alternative products like white or sweet rice flour, tapioca starch, and potato starch. We can remedy this by eating alternative grains in whole, unprocessed states, and by including nuts, seeds, and other sources of fiber such as dried coconut and legumes in our diets. Wheat is an excellent source of Vitamin E, so those on gluten-free diets might want to supplement with a good brand of Vitamin E. Some commercial gluten-free flour blends seek to duplicate white flour, and are made primarily of white rice flour, tapioca starch, and potato starch (see the nutrition comparisons on the next page). These products are nearly devoid of nutrition and contain almost no fiber. Using these types of products result in baked goods that are the nutritional equivalent of wonder-bread. If you didn’t eat wonder-bread before going gluten-free, why should you attempt to duplicate it now? When making your flour blends, coming up with new recipes, and altering traditional wheat-flour recipes, try to include alternative grain products (and sometimes nut flours) that contain substantial amounts of fiber, protein, calcium, and iron, all nutrients found in whole grains, but in much smaller amounts in highly processed grains. Quinoa, sorghum, teff, amaranth, brown rice and millet flour are all good products to try. See the chart attached to this article (the link to it is in the "Attachments" section below) for the nutrient content of the many gluten-free alternative grains, starches, and nut flours. The highest levels of nutrients in each category are noted, and you can see what nutritional powerhouses grains like teff, quinoa, sorghum, and amaranth are compared to white rice flour, tapioca starch, and potato starch.
  2. hi all! i was wondering if there were any super low gi grains like barley (which has a gi of 28 or something). I need to find something because i have problems with blood sugar, but obviously cant have barley with celiac. I know that there are vegetables with a low gi but i need something with comparable calories (~350/cup) and id have to eat a 5 kg of carrots to get that lol! any ideas?
  3. Celiac.com 05/22/2017 - After their seven-month-old baby died weighing less than 10 pounds, a mother and father in Beveren, Belgium, are standing trial on charges that they starved the child by negligently providing an alternative gluten-free diet, with no medical supervision. The couple, who ran a natural food store, put their son Lucas on an alternative gluten-free, lactose-free diet, which included quinoa milk, despite doctors describing it as unsuitable for developing infants. According to child gastroenterologist Elisabeth De Greef, from the University Hospital of Brussels, feeding quinoa milk and other such foods to infants is absolutely wrong. She says that "These kinds of milk, which you can buy in a supermarket, do not contain the necessary proteins, minerals and vitamins. They are not adjusted to infants and thus unsuitable." Lucas' mother said in a statement that "Lucas had an eating disorder. He got cramps when he was fed with a bottle and his parents tried out alternatives. Oat milk, rice milk, buckwheat milk, semolina milk, quinoa milk." These are all products the couple sold at their store. At the beginning of the trial, public prosecutors blamed the couple for their son's death. Prosecutors claim that the couple made their "own diagnosis that their child was gluten intolerant and had a lactose allergy," without any input from doctors. In fact, prosecutors allege that the couple kept the child away from doctors altogether. "Not a single doctor had a dossier about Lucas and child protection services did not know about them," said the public prosecutor. The infant's diet, said prosecutors, "led to him being less than half the expected weight for a boy his age," at the time of his death in June 6, 2014. An autopsy showed that Lucas' stomach was totally empty at the time of his death. Prosecutors say the parents did not seek medical attention, even when Lucas was gasping for air in the days before he died. When Lucas was in the final throes of starvation, and the parents finally did take action, prosecutors say that they compounded the child's medical crisis by driving to a homeopathic doctor on the other side of the country, instead of going to the nearest hospital. In their defense, Lucas's father, claimed the couple never took Lucas to a doctor "because we never noticed anything unusual." In fact, the parents believed Lucas had an eating problem, says the couple's lawyer. Under questioning, Lucas' tearful mother said that the couple never "wished for the death of our son." She also stated that Lucas ometimes…gained a little weight, sometimes he lost a little." Yet according the public prosecutor the actions by the couple amount to "intentionally denying food" to the boy. For now, the trial in this tragic case continues, with a verdict set for June 14. Read more: Metro.co.uk
  4. Celiac.com 03/17/2017 - Want a super healthy gluten-free alternative to grain flour that is packed with natural fiber and protein, and tastes great? There is power in coconut flour! The amazing benefits of coconut products are astonishing and coconut flour is so versatile. It can be used to cook or bake or even to thicken sauces and gravies! Coconut flour is naturally gluten-free and considered hypoallergenic. It contains the highest amount of dietary fiber found in any flour! According to the Livestrong article by Jane Jester Hebert, one quarter cup of coconut flour is equal to about 14g of fiber! An adequate amount of fiber is essential in a healthy diet to promote a healthy digestive tract. It also lowers your risk of heart disease and diabetes, and helps you to maintain a healthy weight. Coconut flour is rich in lauric acid which promotes good skin health and manganese which is an essential trace mineral used in the body for energy production. It is also low in carbohydrates and low on the glycemic index making it a great choice for diabetics and people wanting to maintain a healthy blood sugar level. Coconut flour is a good source of coconut oil which also has amazing benefits such as being antiviral, antifungal, antimicrobial, antibacterial and antiparasitic. Coconut products are so healing that according to a Natural News article by Megan Rostollan, the Pacific Islanders are calling coconut the "Tree of Life" and believe it can heal almost any illness. She goes on to say that, "In many traditional cultures around the world the coconut has been used to heal: abscesses, asthma, baldness, bronchitis, bruises, burns, colds, constipation, cough, dropsy, dysentery, earache, fever, flu, gingivitis, gonorrhea, irregular or painful menstruation, jaundice, kidney stones, lice, malnutrition, nausea, rash, scabies, scurvy, skin infections, sore throat, swelling, syphilis, toothache, tuberculosis, tumors, typhoid, ulcers, upset stomach, weakness, and wounds." (1) What is coconut flour, you may be wondering? Coconut flour is the natural byproduct in coconut milk production. The coconut meat left over is dried at a low temperature and then ground up to make soft powdery flour, similar to wheat flour in texture; however, it does require special techniques in order to yield success. For example, you cannot substitute the same amount of coconut flour for wheat flour. Coconut flour is super absorbent and can produce a very dry end result when not properly paired with the right amount of liquid or binder such as eggs. When starting out with coconut flour it is best to strictly follow a tried and true recipe to yield good results. Above is a favorite shared by Megan Rostollan! As you can see, with the vast and amazing benefits of coconut flour and coconut products, and being naturally gluten-free, you can definitely indulge and, "have your cake and eat it too!" Lemon-Coconut Pound Cake by Megan Rostollan Ingredients: 3/4 c. organic coconut flour 1 tsp aluminum free baking powder 3 tbsp xylitol, divided 1/2 tsp sea salt 6 pastured eggs 8-10 tbsp organic butter, softened 3 droppers full of liquid stevia 2 organic lemons (juice and zest) Directions: Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Grease an 8X4 loaf pan and set aside. Sift together dry ingredients (2 tbsp xylitol). Zest and juice lemons. Whisk together eggs, butter, lemon juice, stevia, and zest. Combine wet and dry ingredients, whisking until smooth (batter will become quite thick - if too thick to combine well, add a little water). Spread in pre-prepared pan with hands or spoon as needed, sprinkle with remaining xylitol and bake for 40 minutes. References: naturalnews.com livestrong.com
  5. Celiac.com 11/01/2016 - Is flour made from mangoes the hot new gluten-free alternative to wheat flour? A Filipino pastry chain is hoping to woo health-conscious consumers with their gluten-free flour made from mangoes. You heard right. Flour from mangoes. Philippine-based bread and pastry chain, Magic Melt Foods Inc., is introducing a gluten-free product line they hope will appeal to people with celiac disease, and with growing numbers of nutritious-minded consumers. Magic Melt's "healthilicious" mango flour is milled from mango peel and mango seeds, instead of wheat. Based in Cebu, Philippines, Green Enviro Management Systems Inc., manufactures and holds the patent for mango flour. The company's product as gained attention from far and wide, and recently drew a visit from government officials of Johannesberg in South Africa, who sent workers to learn the process. Like many gluten-free flours, mango flour lack the stickiness common to gluten flours. To work around that, the company turned to egg whites and other "healthy" alternatives. The resulting mango flour is suitable for some muffins, bread, energy bars, and sandwiches. So, will mango flour be making an appearance in gluten-free products at your store? Stay tuned for more developments on this and other gluten-free stories. Source: freshplaza.com
  6. Karen Robertsons Amaranth Bread This article originally appeared in the Summer 2003 edition of Celiac.coms Scott-Free Newsletter. Gluten-free bread making the first few times is an incredibly frustrating experience that begs the question...is it really worth it? After my many trials I must say yes it is definitely worth it! We are now able to make an excellent bread that we can all enjoy. Being able to make bread allows my kids to take a sandwich to school, the fact that the bread is good (and looks good) is equally important to them. Since they cannot eat the hot lunch at school due to its "gluten in every bite" nature, it is important to have the option of sending a sandwich the children like (and will eat). Other kids taste the bread, they like it, and say hey this gluten-free diet is pretty good! The benefits to these exchanges are priceless. It took awhile to get to this point but one day I was lucky enough to meet Lee Tobin. He gave me a recipe (originally developed by Barbara Emch) and I had success! I then began to shape this recipe to accommodate the various alternative flours stocked in my pantry. The recipe is fool-proof and it tastes great...especially with teff, amaranth, or buckwheat flour. In this class you will learn how to make a perfect loaf of bread. I will review alternative flours and why I use them. You will learn the tricks for successful gluten-free bread making. And you will learn how to change the template recipe for your own specific needs. In an effort to provide you with a brief recipe for future use—all of the comments I would typically make during a cooking class will be found in the text that precedes the recipe. Why Use Alternative Flours? My experience has been that these flours simply make a superior gluten-free bread. Additionally, many celiacs struggle with weight gain after diagnosis and find their diet may lack important nutrients. As you adjust to the gluten-free diet it is a good time to understand how your body uses the food you eat. Simple carbohydrates are quickly digested and are broken down into simple sugar glucose. When the cells in your body need fuel they use this glucose. Extra glucose is converted into glycogen. If your body already has enough glycogen stored up, the glucose is turned into fat. The typical American diet is overloaded with simple carbs and the celiac diet is no exception. Complex carbohydrates not only take longer to digest but they provide slow consistent energy. You feel full longer and your body doesnt feel the wide fluctuations of blood sugar swings. Beans, whole grains, nut butters, oatmeal, soy, sweet potatoes, and vegetables are complex carbs. They provide needed vitamins, minerals, fiber, and consistent energy. Many celiacs lack B vitamins, calcium, iron, and other nutrients—why not get them from your baked goods and reap the benefits of complex carbs? We try to incorporate the alternative flours in most of our baking. When making sweet breads, cookies, bread, pizza crust, biscuits, and bread sticks I try to substitute about ½ of the flour called for in a recipe with a healthy alternative flour. Our favorites are teff, amaranth, brown rice, and buckwheat. Quinoa and millet flours can be substituted in the same fashion. Be sure you buy from manufacturers who provide pure, gluten-free flour—from the field all the way to the package. In our family we treat corn, carrots, potatoes, and white rice as if they were sweets (i.e. sugar = excess weight gain). They are all simple carbs as are most of the products made from them (chips, cereal, snacks). Here is a quick overview of the various healthy gluten-free flours and their attributes: Amaranth is a whole grain dating back to the time of the Aztecs. It is high in protein (15-18%), and contains more calcium, folic acid, Vitamin A, C, and E than most grains. The flavor is similar to that of graham crackers without the sweetness. Bean Flour is a light flour made from garbanzo and broad beans. When using this flour in your favorite recipes, replace the white sugar with brown or maple sugar (or combine with sorghum) to cut the bitter taste of the beans. Brown Rice Flour is milled from unpolished brown rice, and has a higher nutrient value than white rice flour. Since this flour contains bran, it has a shorter shelf life and should be refrigerated. As with white rice flour, it is best to combine brown rice flour with several other flours to avoid the grainy texture. Much higher than white rice in protein, fiber, zinc, folic acid, B vitamins, calcium and vitamin E (15 times the E in white rice). Buckwheat is the seed of a plant related to rhubarb. It is high in fiber, iron, and B vitamins. Great in many baked goods, pancakes & waffles too. Millet is a small round grain that is a major food source in Asia, North Africa, and India. A rich source of B vitamins. Nut Flours are high in protein and, used in small portions, enhance the taste of many baked goods. Finely ground nuts added to a recipe increases the protein content and allows for a better rise. It is a great substitute for non-fat dry milk powder in gluten-free recipes. We like it so much we always make the substitution. Keep refrigerated. Quinoa (keen-wah), a staple food of the Incas, is a complete protein containing all 8 amino acids as well as a fair amount of calcium and iron. High in some B vitamins and folic acid. Soy Flour has a nutty flavor, and is high in protein and fat. Best when used in small quantities in combination with other flours. Soy flour has a short shelf life. Teff is an ancient grain from Ethiopia, now grown in Idaho. It is always manufactured as a whole grain flour, since it is difficult to sift or separate. A good source of protein, calcium, iron, fiber, and B vitamins. Cross-contamination at the factory can cause diet compliance issues for the gluten intolerant. Call or write the manufacturers of your preferred flours to inquire about factory and field practices. Many people may wonder why I use just one recipe for bread. It is really a template that can be changed to suit your own tastes, preferences, or dietary needs. Changeable elements in the recipe: Eggs One of the most challenging substitutions, if you cannot tolerate eggs use Egg Replacer from Ener-G Foods (or try ground flax seeds as an egg replacement see recipe in flax seed section below) and be sure to use the almond flour instead of the non-fat, dry milk powder. The almond flour adds a great deal of flavor which could be helpful when you cant use eggs. If you read the nutritional label for almond flour it might scare you as the grams of fat are high, remember this is good fat and there is fiber-- both of which slow down sugar absorption in your body, which in turn helps control weight gain. The dry milk powder is high in sugar. Oil Vegetable oil is typically soybean oil and some people are sensitive to canola oil so safflower oil is a good alternative. Sugar I want to experiment with different forms of sugar to find a healthier alternative to the white refined sugar I use presently. Try turbinado sugar, a raw sugar that has been steam-cleaned. It has a delicate molasses flavor. Flour Four cups of flour are in the recipe. The proportions of flours used can be changed around until you find what is right for you. We use it in the way shown in the recipe but my goal is to experiment further and reduce the amount of tapioca flour and increase the healthier flours. Dry milk powder As seen above in the eggs section I now prefer to use almond flour instead of dry milk powder. The bread is much more flavorful and has a wonderful texture. Flax seed This seed has many health benefits such as high-quality protein, fiber, B and C vitamins, iron, and zinc, anti-cancer properties, omega-3 fatty acids, and many other benefits. To use as an egg substitute grind 2 tablespoons flaxseed and add 6 tablespoons boiling water, let set for 15 minutes then whisk with a fork-- this mixture will replace 2 eggs in a recipe. A clean coffee grinder works well to grind the small flaxseed. Cookware Its a good idea to have the proper cookware in your kitchen before attempting to make gluten-free bread. You must have a heavy-duty stand mixer like the Kitchenaid mixer. A heavy-duty mixer properly aerates the batter producing a lighter bread with a fine crumb and more height. You should also have a good quality loaf pan. It helps to know if your oven is running at the correct temperature (an inexpensive oven thermometer will tell you what adjustments you will need to make). Bread machines can be tricky with gluten-free bread, you can call the Celiac Hotline at Red Star Yeast for the most current bread machine recommendations 1.800.423.5422. Temperature In addition to knowing your oven temperature, realize that when the temperature of your home is warm, bread will rise quicker. The recipe includes some tricks to help your bread rise faster when your home is cool (as is generally the case in Seattle). Humidity Gluten-free flour absorbs moisture from the air so be sure to keep it sealed in its packaging and tightly cover any mixing bowls rather than allowing them to sit uncovered for any period of time. The moisture the flour absorbs from the air will affect your recipe. Amaranth Bread: Amaranth Bread makes one loaf. Feel free to substitute the amaranth flour with teff, buckwheat, or quinoa flour. Ingredients 3 large eggs (egg-free option see note below)* ¼ cup vegetable oil 1 teaspoon lemon juice 1½ cups amaranth flour 1½ cups tapioca starch flour 1 cup fine brown rice flour 2/3 cup instant non-fat dry milk powder (dairy-free: substitute with finely ground nuts or almond flour) 2 teaspoons xanthan gum 1 teaspoon salt 2 tablespoons ground flax seed (optional) 1½ tablespoons active dry yeast 4 tablespoons sugar 1¼ cups warm water (105F-115F.) Bring all refrigerated ingredients to room temperature. Grease a 5 x 9-inch loaf pan. In the bowl of a stand mixer, combine eggs, oil, and lemon juice. In a separate medium bowl, combine flours, dry milk powder, xanthan gum, salt, flax seed, yeast and sugar. Pour ½ of the warm water into stand mixer and blend with egg mixture. Slowly add dry ingredients a little at a time until completely incorporated. Add remaining water, reserving some water if necessary. See note on humidity below. Mix batter on high speed for 3½ minutes, then pour into prepared pan. Batter will be thicker than a cake batter and nothing like the consistency of regular bread dough. Cover bread with foil and place in a cold oven. Set a pan of hot water on a lower shelf underneath the bread. Leave for 10 minutes with oven door closed. (This will cause the bread to rise quickly.) Remove bread from oven (do not uncover) and place in a warm place in the kitchen. Preheat oven to 400F. Bread will continue to rise as oven preheats. Uncover bread and bake for 10 minutes to brown the top. Cover bread with foil and continue to bake bread for 35-40 minutes. Turn bread out onto a cooling rack. When completely cooled, wrap tightly to maintain freshness for as long as possible. Tips: If humidity is high, reduce the amount of water in the recipe to avoid over rising. Many gluten-free bakers experience the frustrating situation in which a beautiful loaf of bread deflates once removed from the oven. You will need to experiment a little to get just the right amount of water in your bread depending on the humidity in the air. If in question, use less water than the recipe calls for. You may use rapid rise yeast instead of regular yeast. If doing so, eliminate the cold oven rise method with a pan of hot water, follow yeast package directions instead for rise time. Hamburger Buns Pour batter into English muffin rings, follow directions above. Bake for just 15 minutes. Once completely cooled these buns freeze well. Serve buns warmed, otherwise they will be crumbly. *Egg Substitution: grind 3 tablespoons flaxseed and add ½ cup + 1 tablespoon boiling water, let set for 15 minutes then whisk with a fork. Recipes from: Cooking Gluten-Free! A Food Lovers Collection of Chef and Family Recipes Without Gluten or Wheat Karen Robertson (Celiac Publishing, 2002)
  7. Celiac.com 02/12/2007 - Before they are diagnosed, people with celiac disease often find themselves in an unenviable position. They may go out of their way to eat a wholesome, balanced diet including plenty of fruits and vegetables, a good variety of whole-grain foods, and a modest amount of meat and dairy, yet still find themselves suffering a whole range of bothersome stomach and digestive complaints including indigestion, gas, stomach cramps and diarrhea, alternating with constipation. Thats because people with celiac disease are intolerant of the protein gluten. Gluten is found in wheat, rye, and barley (oats contain a type of gluten that may be safe for most celiacs), and is found in the soft, white inside of the grain, its what makes dough, and flour and water paste, sticky and gooey. When people with celiac disease eat food made from these grains, even in small amounts, their immune systems seem to treat the gluten as foreign invader, and basically create a massive defensive action against what might be, for most people, part of a good healthy diet. The immune reaction that is triggered by gluten causes inflammation of the intestines, which leads to many problems that are associated with malabsorption, and ultimately to the general gastrointestinal malaise associated with undiagnosed celiac disease, or with gluten contamination in otherwise mindful celiac patients on a gluten-free diet. Diagnosis and Treatment of Celiac Disease are Important Unless celiac is treated, it becomes difficult for the digestive system to absorb enough nutrients from food to carry on proper body functions, and resulting vitamin deficiencies can cause a wide range of symptoms, including a condition known as malabsorption. Weight-loss, listlessness, feeling or looking malnourished, are all signs of the nutritional malabsorption associated with untreated celiac disease. Left untreated, celiac disease can become life-threatening. People can waste away. More likely though are higher instances of certain cancers, particularly of the intestines, and other diseases associated with untreated celiac disease. Thats why its advisable for people with any of these symptoms to check with their doctor to ensure a proper diagnosis, and to have follow up wellness checks. Even a negative blood test for celiac disease doesnt mean youre fully out of the woods. For a long time, research put the number of celiac patients at around 0.5% of the worlds population, or around 1 in 200 people. Recent studies however, have shown that to be a low estimate, and incidence is more likely around 1% of the population, or 1 in 133 people. Celiac Disease, however, is looking more and more like a very small part of the much larger Gluten sensitive picture. More ominous still, new evidence shows Non-Celiac Gluten intolerance to be around 30 times more prevalent than celiac disease, and if could affect up to 15% of people worldwide. 1 in 7 people are gluten-sensitive or gluten-intolerant. These people test negative or inconclusive for Celiac Disease, but suffer most of the same symptoms and long-term problems associated with celiac disease when they ingest wheat. This group of people are sometimes referred to as Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitive. Because the symptoms overlap with many other ailments, Gluten intolerance can easily be missed or misdiagnosed; especially in light of negative blood or biopsy tests--and this may lead many to miss out on discovering the simple and drug-free remedy of a Gluten-free diet for a dramatic recovery. If classic screening techniques for celiac disease do not identify the disease in someone who is in the Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitive category, or if the test results are borderline or inconclusive, often the only other approach to discover the problem is via the Elimination Diet. Once the cause is understood, and the necessary adjustments are made to the diet, celiac disease and gluten sensitivity are easily treated. A diet free of gluten usually brings both short and long-term improvement. This isnt always quite as easy as it sounds, as so many processed foods contain hidden forms of wheat that are used as binding or flavoring agents. Once you become aware of damaging foods and avoid them, a gluten-free diet can restore small intestine function within a few weeks to a few months. Once the mucosa of the intestine is no longer inflamed, most absorption issues will usually subside. The inflammation in the intestine will subside as gluten is eliminated. Echinacea and goldenseal may help to speed this process along. These two immune system boosters are often packaged together in capsule form. You may also find Echinacea and goldenseal in combination with slippery elm, marshmallow, geranium, and other herbs. This combination goes by the generic name of Roberts Formula, and is made by a number of manufacturers. Roberts formula treats the digestive tract by creating a beneficial layer of slime that is healing to digestive tissues. Check your local health food store. Echinacea and goldenseal are important healers because they have anti-inflammatory and antibacterial properties. One cautionary note, however: Dont take these herbs continuously. Generally, two weeks on and two weeks off for a period of up to two months. How to Replace Lost Nutrients Caused by Untreated Celiac Disease At the very least, most celiacs will benefit from a daily multivitamin/mineral supplement that includes calcium, 1,000 milligrams, along with 400 milligrams of magnesium (note that too much magnesium can cause diarrhea). Lack of vitamin B6 is partly to blame for symptoms of celiac disease, Pyridoxal-5-Phosphate (P-5-P) is often a good choice, as it requires no conversion to make vitamin B6, and can be easier on the stomach. Vitamins can also speed healing. Because the absorption of fats is particularly poor in celiacs, many celiac patients commonly suffer deficiencies of vitamins A, C, D, E, and benefit from taking these in supplemental form, along with a chelated form of zinc supplement. As with any supplement, read the directions and keep your doctor fully informed about what you are taking and how much. A typical dose, for example, is 1,000 to 2,000 international units (IU) of vitamin A in the form of fish oil (too much can have toxic effects so discuss this with your doctor), 100 to 200 IU of vitamin D also in fish oil, 500 to 1000 milligrams of vitamin C, 100 to 400 IU of vitamin E, and 15 to 30 milligrams of chelated zinc. Check with your doctor before taking more than 20 milligrams of zinc. Beta-carotene, 10,000 I.U. daily, can also be helpful, as can Iron, 60 mg. daily, if a blood test indicates iron deficiency. In addition to a good multivitamin/mineral for support, and other vitamins, digestive enzymes, which digest gluten, may also be helpful. To improve nutrient absorption and assimilation, these should be supplemented. Celiac patients also often suffer a deficiency of vitamin K., which can be supplemented through green foods, especially alfalfa. Green food supplements contain many essential nutrients, including trace minerals. Evening primrose oil is a good source of the omega-6 essential fatty acids that celiac patients often lack. Silica soothes inflammations in the gastrointestinal tract. It is available in both capsules and gel form. Medicinal clay is excellent in promoting healing of the walls of the colon and protecting it from irritation by toxins and dry, abrasive matter. Daily Dosages of Supplements for Celiacs: Green food supplements, 1 tbsp. Evening primrose oil, two 500 mg capsules three times daily Multivitamin supplement, as directed on the label Medicinal clay, dissolve 1 tsp. of clay in ½cup of water at room temperature and drink twice daily. Papain, 500 mg three times daily Pyridoxal-5-Phosphate, 50 mg daily Silica, 3-6 capsules; in the gel form, follow the directions on the label Vitamin B complex, 50 mg twice daily Vitamin B12, 100 mcg Vitamin C, with bioflavonoids, 5,000 mg one to three times daily Herbal Remedies in the Treatment of Celiac Disease Herbal remedies can help soothe intestinal irritation and inflammation and heal damaged mucous membranes. Roberts Formula Take 4 drops of agrimony tincture in water, three times daily. Sufficient silica in the intestines will reduce inflammation, and strengthen and rebuild connective tissue. Take 3 cups of silica-rich horsetail tea or 15 drops of tincture in liquid three times daily. A combination of burdock, slippery elm, sheep sorrel and Turkish rhubarb tea helps different types of inflammations in the gastrointestinal tract. Use dandelion, saffron and yellow dock herbal teas to that purify and nourish the blood. Pickled ginger can be eaten for anti-inflammation properties.
  8. http://www.sunfood.com/carob-powder-16oz-organic-truly-raw.html Sunfood has Certified Gluten Free Carob Powder. Their packaging is 6 years old, so it says otherwise. I called, they confirmed it is a certified (tested) gluten free and packaged in a gluten free facility. It has not given me a problem at all. I have been searching for something that is an alternative to chocolate, being I am allergic to caffeine. So here it is! Sunfood carob powder! It works as a 1:1 ratio replacing chocolate powder. I've made pudding, syrup, and it can go into cookies, muffins, cake mixes, etc.
  9. I am allergic to caffeine. I only have a few but they are clearly too irritating for me to consume caffeine and enjoy caffeine. The only ones that I don't experience are the flu like symptoms, the swollen eyes, my tongue doesn't swell and no cold sweats. The rest bugs me for the rest of the day, and the next morning I feel hung over! Big time hate caffeine. Found this out after quitting caffeine for months then sipped it daily and increased it. Symptoms increased and before long I hated what I was drinking. Here are all symptoms possible for people with caffeine allergy. Skin problems such as hives, eczema, rashes, acne, severe itching Headaches/ migraines Anxiety and panic attacks Can’t focus or concentrate Tongue, glands, or throat swelling Heart racing/ palpitations Angry, irritable, bad mood Fatigue Dizziness Extreme jitters Chest Pain Depression Numbness in face, hands, or feet Muscle pain Shortness of breath/ tightness of chest Delusions/ hallucinations Flu/ cold like symptoms Vision problems Cold sweats Eyes swollen shut So...now I want chocolate.....it's that time of the month again. But...the caffeine!!! lol Noooooo! So I'm looking for a certified gluten free carob instead. Or I'll have to encourage my liver to produce the caffeine enzymes that it isn't. There's a whole new study.
  10. Celiac.com 10/16/2008 - Having gone gluten-free I, like many of you,have been struggling with gluten-free baking challenges. I began withpancakes. My first pancakes, made with a popular mix, were not thelight, fluffy things that I remembered. My son compared them to hockeypucks. They got eaten, but were not a favorite. The next time I tried apopular author's gluten-free pancake recipe. These were a hit, and didnot have the sourness of the popular mix (which were bean-based)! Theauthor's recipe was also based on sorghum flour, so I have becomeconvinced that sorghum holds the greatest potential for gluten-freebaking. I also tried the author's recipe for bread, which is based onher same sorghum flour mix as her pancakes. The bread, however, was adisaster, and it collapsed as soon as it was taken from the pan. Ithink possibly that the problem was that by the time you take hersorghum flour mix, and add the additional potato starch called for inmaking the bread mix, you end up with a mix that is overwhelminglystarch rather than flour. There is actually very little sorghum flourin it by that point. I repeated these problems when trying to use yetanother popular sorghum-based gluten-free bread mix. Meanwhile,in my search for a good sorghum bread recipe I kept coming across ablurb by the Agricultural Research Service to the effect that they haddiscovered that sour dough fermentation improved the quality of sorghumbread. Well, I have never been fond of the sourness of sourdough bread,but I was interested to know that the ARS was trying to find goodrecipes for sorghum bread. Apparently they are convinced, as I am, thatit holds the highest promise for good gluten-free bread. Well,heck, the Agricultural Research Service was my old stomping ground! Fora couple summers during college I worked at the ARS in Beltsville,Maryland, and at least one of them was spent in the Human NuitritionResearch Division. I worked as a biochemical technician. While I wasworking with test tubes and distillation apparatus, the wonderfularomas from the nearby test kitchens would waft by me and I would envythe taste testers. I decided to contact those sorghum researchers whohave been involved in the search for a good gluten-free bread recipe. Iemailed them requesting to know if they had developed any goodnon-sourdough recipes, and I received the following replies (the replyfrom Tilman Schober was particularly valuable): Dear Hallie Davis, Thereare a couple of things which could help you to get the desiredgluten-free sorghum bread. Sourdough is not imperative, it justadditionally helps to stabilize the bread structure. But we know thatmany people object to the flavor. So, besides sourdough, the followingthings may help: 1) Add the hydrocolloid HPMC (hydroxypropyl methylcellulose).It tremendously helps to get a good crumb. It is a food additive, andsome people object to it because they regard it as not natural.However, it is available in a food grade version designed for humanconsumption, and we simply know nothing that works better. Xanthan gum,probably the second best hydrocolloid, is much inferior in gluten-freebread making. There are various slightly different versions of HPMCcommercially available. As US government employees, we cannot endorse aspecific product. However, I would like to let you know that we hadgood success with Methocel K4M, food grade, which is available fromretailers like Ener-G Foods. The larger your bread pan the more likely the bread willcollapse. Try to use small pans, and just bake more loaves. This alsohelps to keep them fresh (just freeze the loaves which you do not eatfresh immediately after cooling). A good pan size might be e.g. 6inches by 2-3 inches and 2-3 inches high. Mix sorghum flour with starch. A recipe that has worked for usis described in the attached article (wHPMC, p. 5138). It is as follows: 105g water, 70 g sorghum flour, 30 g potato starch, 1.75 g salt, 1 gsugar, 2 g dry yeast, and 2 g HPMC. Highest accuracy in weighing theseingredients is not required, but I would prepare a larger amount ofdough (e.g. all ingredients multiplied by 10), so that it is easier toweigh. Mix all dry ingredients first in a large bowl (make sure thatthe HPMC is well mixed with the rest, it tends to form lumps withwater). Then add the water, mix (electric mixer) until a smooth batterresults, and pour (or spoon) the batter in the greased bread pans. Letthe dough rise for about 30-45 min (depends on temperature, observe howit increases in volume) and bake at 355 oF for about 30 min (depends onpan size, you will need to find out for your pan size and oven type). Another source for sorghum recipes you can find here: http://www.twinvalleymills.com/ They sell a celiac disease with recipes (it is copyrighted, so I cannot send it to you). If you have success, we would love to hear about it. If you need further assistance, please let us know. Kind regards Tilman Tilmanthen wrote again, enclosing a copy of the referenced article, andasking that I cite it. The article was published in the "Journal ofAgricultural and Food Chemistry", 2007, 55, 5137-5146, and is entitled,"Gluten-Free Sorghum Bread Improved by Sourdough Fermentation:Biochemical, Rheological, and Microstructural Background." The Authorswere Tilman J. Schober, Scott R. Bean, and Daniel L. Boyle. They areworking in the Manhattan, Kansas Grain Marketing and ProductionResearch Center of the Agricultural Research Center. The otherperson who responded to my inquiry was Scott R. Bean. He sent me anearlier but related article, entitled, "Use of Sorghum Flour in BakeryProducts." This article was published in the "AIB InternationalTechnical Bulletin" in Volume XXVIII, issue 3, May/June 2006. Theauthors here were: T.J. Schober and S.R. Bean, USDA-ARS, GMPRC, Manhattan, KS 66502 E.K. Arendt, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland C. Fenster, Savory Palate Inc., Centennial, CO 80122 This article had the formulas for two sorghum flour blends:Sorghum-Corn Flour Blend and Sorghum-Bean Flour Blend. Furtherreferences for the mixes and also a brownie recipe is given as: Fenster, C. 2004. Wheat-Free Recipes & Menus: Delicious, Healthful Eating for People with Food Sensitivities. New York: Avery (Penguin Group). Arecipe for Sorghum Waffles was also given with a citation, "Recipe byAmy Perry and Meredith Wiking, used with permission fromwww.twinvalleymills.com." So, the ARS, like me, is using recipesby popular authors and Twin Valley Mills as a starting point, and areexperimenting from there.I don't know about you, but I, forone, intend to get the Methocel K4M, food grade, and try using itinstead of guar gum or xanthan gum! I also plan to try the 70-30sorghum mix described today by Dr. Schober. I am TIRED of gummy bread,and collapses!
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