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  1. Updated list here new links, and composed in a more organized manner LOOK for * on links and you can order from them directly, at the bottom are some websites to purchase from Full Meal Options/Entrees, broad spectrum companies http://iansnaturalfoods.com/allergy-friendly-products/search-by-allergens/?tax_products_tags[]=gluten-free&wpas=1 ^Ians gluten-free options you will find sides, baked/fried snacks, onion rings, chicken strips, cheese sticks, fish sticks, pizza bread. etc from them that are good subs you can find where to buy them or even have your local grocer stock them on request. Best thing about Ians is you can go to their site and adjust the filter to find stuff free of other ingredients. http://udisglutenfree.com/product-catalog/ ^ Whole lot of food staples from this company (none safe for me) but all gluten-free alternative you can have, udi is like the cheap bargain gluten-free brand alot of there stuff seems lacking but they have a little bit of everything. From microwave dinners, pizzas, burritos, instant pasta dishes, granola's, and cookies. http://www.vansfoods.com/our-products ^ go to breakfast guys. Select Gluten free from dietary restrictions or other options you need, NOTE most products use oats. https://enjoylifefoods.com/our-foods/ ^All Free of the 8 top allergens, they have premade cookies, chips, and baking ingredients. http://www.namastefoods.com/products/cgi-bin/products.cgi?Category_Id=all ^ Free of top 8 allergens, they have everything from flours, mixes, and entrees, https://www.simplemills.com/collections/all ^Mixes, Crackers, and cookies, ALL GRAIN FREE https://knowfoods.com/collections/frontpage ^Low carb bread, muffins, waffles, cookies, etc. All low carb and keto friendly great for diabetics https://www.geefree.com/collections/all ^All gluten-free Pizza pouches, Meal bits, pastry puffs, Breads/Pizza Note some of the above spectrum companies also offer their own https://canyonglutenfree.com/buy-gluten-free-bread-products/ ^Raved by most people I talk to as some of the BEST gluten-free breads/bagels/buns available, several of my customers talk about using them with artisan nut butters all the time. https://julianbakery.com/shop/?fwp_product_categories=bread *^Grain Free Corn free low carb bread, The seed bread toast just like gluten breads, The almond and coconut each have their own niche. Bread is best used toasted, PS the coconut bread makes awesome french toast https://cappellos.com/collections/pizza *^Grain Free Pizza crust to make your own with using eggs, coconut and arrowroot for a base crust blend. The Naked pizza crust is dairy free. Order frozen by the case and they ship them to you. https://realgoodfoods.com/productpage/ *^Grain Free Pizza They use Dairy Cheese blended with chicken breast to form personal pizza crust. You can order them frozen and shipped to you. NEW PRODUCTS they do Enchiladas NOW https://www.califlourfoods.com/collections *^ This is the only one I buy, grain free, low carb crust, and the plant based one is great, NOTE these make a New york style flat crust, I use 15 min prebake before adding toppings to make them extra crispy http://glutenfreedelights.com/our-sandwiches/ ^Gluten free hot pockets? YES they make them for when you need the old instant hotpocket, odd craving but I know they hit sometimes. CRUST MIXES Grain free https://www.simplemills.com/collections/all/products/almond-flour-pizza-crust-mix https://julianbakery.com/product/paleo-pizza-crust-mix-gluten-grain-free/ Baking Mixes https://julianbakery.com/shop/?fwp_product_categories=mixes\ *^Grain Free low carb mixes have pancakes, bread, pizzia https://www.simplemills.com/collections/almond-flour-baking-mixes ^Grain Free Mixes http://www.bobsredmill.com/shop/gluten-free/gluten-free-mixes.html ^Major Staple provider of baking mixes and flours for the gluten free https://www.bettycrocker.com/products/gluten-free-baking-mix ^Your old Favorites, note these are loaded with starches and can cause some issues (Note a specialty gluten-free company) http://www.kingarthurflour.com/products/gluten-free-mixes/ ^More classic starchy mixes (Note a specialty Gluten Free company) Chocolate https://phikind.com/collections/all ^Gluten Free, Dairy Free, and Sugar Free Truffles! https://www.lakanto.com/collections/sales-title/products/box-of-lakanto-sugar-free-55-chocolate-bar ^Gluten Free, Sugar Free, Dairy Free, Soy Free bars OMG better then a Hershey bar https://www.lindtusa.com/gluten-free-chocolate--sc4?utm_source=eean&utm_medium=affiliate_loyalty&utm_campaign=lindtaffiliate#facet:&productBeginIndex:0&facetLimit:&orderBy:&pageView:grid&minPrice:&maxPrice:&pageSize:& ^Various gluten free truffles, and chocolate bars http://lilyssweets.com/ ^Chocolate Bars, Baking Chips etc. all gluten, dairy, and sugar free. Might contain Dairy in some and soy Bars https://julianbakery.com/shop/?fwp_product_categories=protein-bar&fwp_per_page=100 ^High protein low carb, meal bars, take some getting used to with the texture but great for diabetics and those sensitive to sugars. https://www.kindsnacks.com/products/kind-nut-bars ^Good nut bars and snacks they also make granola https://theglutenfreebar.com/ ^Gluten free food bars, contain oats in many. https://enjoylifefoods.com/our-foods/grain-seed-bars/ ^Allergen Free Bars Snacks/Chips/Crackers/Wraps https://www.mygerbs.com/ *^They have pumpkin seeds, hemp seeds, sunflower seeds, granola, etc. all free of the top 8 allergens, Also they offer various spices, etc. https://eatprotes.com/products/protes-protein-chips?variant=24971155656 *^Grain free low carb, vegan protein chips, bit of a acquired taste http://beanitos.com/#snacks ^Corn free tortilla chips, taste like a high end restaurant chips, they also make corn free puff snacks. http://www.beanfieldssnacks.com/ ^More Corn free tortilla chips note these also have vegan options, they are a bit lighter and crispier. http://www.lundberg.com/products/snacks/ ^Rice and Quinoa Chips, crackers, etc. https://sietefoods.com/collections/tortilla-chips *^Cassava based chips grain free bit high in starch but light and crisp https://sietefoods.com/collections/tortillas *^Cassava based grain free tortillas http://www.nucoconut.com/coconut-wraps/ *^Coconut wraps, I love to use these, you have to warm them up a bit to make them pliable. https://www.bluediamond.com/brand/nut-thins ^Almond based crackers https://bakeryonmain.com/shop/ ^Oat based granola snacks, bars, etc. https://www.wildwayoflife.com/ ^Gluten free, Grain Free, Hot Cereal, granola and smoothie bases https://www.goraw.com/shop/sprouted-flax-snax/ ^These flax crackers are great...the pizza is addicting Fries/Hashbrowns/Tatertots http://www.oreida.com/en/Products/Categories/French-Fries http://www.oreida.com/en/Products/Categories/Hash-Browns http://www.oreida.com/en/Products/Categories/Tater-Tots ^Go to company for most of is with this disease, NOTE most other companies will use wheat flour in fries/tots/hashbrowns http://iansnaturalfoods.com/products/organic-crispy-potato-puffs/ Cooking Ingredients/Rice/Flours/Condiments https://www.pacificfoods.com/broths-and-stocks ^Many of use this brand in our cooking https://www.spicely.com/collections/organic-spices-seasoning *^Gluten free, Organic, Non GMO spices #1 go to for safe spices for many of us http://www.lundberg.com/products/ ^Great and safe Gluten Free Rice company, they make many instant rice entrees, rice crackers, and rice cakes http://www.lotusfoods.com/#products ^Another option for various rice products https://cappellos.com/collections/pasta ^Grain Free FRESH soft pasta options EXPENSIVE but some of the highest end stuff you can get http://www.glutenfreeoats.com/ *^ONLY true Gluten free oat company that I would trust, it is owned by a celiac family https://miraclenoodle.com/collections/miracle-noodle-rice-products *^Carb Free/Low Carb, Grain free noodles, rice, and instant meal kits. https://www.waldenfarms.com/ ^Gluten Free, Sugar Free, Carb Free. Dairy Free, Soy Free for cravings when you can't have them, bit overly processed but helps out when your limited They have coffee creamers, topping syrups, dessert dips, savory dips, salad dressings, condiments etc. CAREFUL if you have issues with highly processed foods and xantham gum http://natureshollow.com/index.html ^Sugar Free jams, honey, and maple syrup using xylitol for a sweetener instead of of a bunch of crud. Stuff takes awhile for your gut to adjust to but honestly They have the only Honey I can use http://www.polanerspreads.com/polaner-products/ ^ All their products are gluten-free and their jams are good I love using their sugar free products with fiber, I also use some of smuckers SF products https://www.coconutsecret.com/products2.html ^gluten-free and soy free teriyaki sauces, soy sauce subs, garlic sauce, cooking sauces, and they make knock off granola bars without oats http://sirkensingtons.com/products ^Great source for mayo, vegan mayo, mustard, ketchup, and SECRET SAUCE. all gluten and corn free with NO artificial preservatives, My main condiment when cooking for others, as a chef I trust it quite a bit. http://www.nucoconut.com/products/coconut-vinegar/ ^These are vinegar made from coconut, great for cooking with and over salads http://www.eatparma.com/store ^Awesome Vegan Parmesan options the bacon one is a GOD SEND https://www.nutilight.com/ ^OMG You need to try this, dairy free, and sugar free Nutella substitute Meat/Meat Alternatives http://beyondmeat.com/products ^ Meat alternative using Pea Protein, I love the beefy crumbles as they have the texture and flavor of ground beef. Low carb and good for ketogenic diets. MUCH easier to digest then actual beef while having the same amount of protein and less fat. https://www.jennieo.com/products ^look for the gluten-free label, you can get all kinds of sausage, bacon, burger patties etc from them all from turkey. I like using the bacon and sausages for soup stocks, and seasoning myself https://skinnygirllunchmeat.com/ ^Love the deli meats from this company I use them in my catering sometimes https://www.mccormick.com/thai-kitchen/products ^I love using the curry paste from the Thai Kitchen, Noodle kits, Soup kits, stir fry kits, even Chinese take out kits. some even instant microwaveable. All gluten-free from what I have found gluten-free Thai/Chinese food. http://new.organicvillefoods.com/category/products/ *^gluten-free sauces like sriracha, BBQ, mustard, ketchup, ect. Good line up of products. http://www.authenticfoods.com/ *^Great source for flours, baking ingredients etc. all you basics https://store.nutiva.com/coconut-flour/ ^Coconut flour, I use this brand in my baking alot Dairy Free Alternatives to Dairy Foods https://www.bluediamond.com/brand/almond-breeze ^ Almond, cashew, coconut, blends etc. https://silk.com/products ^ More Almond, cashew, coconut, blends, they also offer yogurt and icecream alternatives. http://sodeliciousdairyfree.com/products ^ They offer many coconut options, Yogurt, cheese, milks, icecream pints, icecream bars. http://malkorganics.com/products/ ^VERY high end minimally processed almond milk, one the the best https://www.ripplefoods.com/products/ ^ NUT FREE, Dairy Free options of a rich milk alternative from yellow peas (legumes) http://goodkarmafoods.com/products/ ^Flax Based milk alternatives http://www.leafcuisine.com/raw-vegan-food-dairy-free-probiotic-cashew-spreads/ ^ BEST and least processed cheese spreads, cream cheese etc. I can eat these without any issues https://daiyafoods.com/ ^Offers Vegan cheese slices, cheese blocks, cheese shreds, pizza, CHEESE CAKES!, yogurt, s https://followyourheart.com/products/ ^ Diary free and vegan, cheese, spreads, dips, dressings, condiments https://winkfrozendesserts.com/collections/wink-frozen-desserts-pints *^ICE CREAM by the pint AND THEY SHIP IT TO YOU, Dairy free, soy free, sugar free, PERFECT bliss I suggest getting the gluten free pastry pack Flavors/Extracts https://www.capellaflavors.com/13ml ^Great flavors for any dessert you might desire, you add 1 drop to each oz of liquid base in smoothies, icecream, and drinks....great way to kick cravings, Needs Sweeteners http://www.lorannoils.com/1-ounce-larger-sizes ^Baking Extracts Coffee/Tea https://www.christopherbean.com/collections/flavored-coffee *^ DESERT Flavored Coffee all gluten-free and safe, I called the company and even tested most of the coffee flavors myself using testing kits. Sounded too good to be true but most of these taste dead on like the deserts they are supposed to , just add sweetener. Also try their plain coffee http://www.republicoftea.com/ *^Great tea company, all gluten-free certified teas, both bulk and bags. Hard Ciders/Liqours While Most Hard Liqours are gluten free due to the distilling process these are ones I have contacted the company on. https://austineastciders.com/ ^Local cider here in Texas, I keep these for guest, good alternative to the "Beer Can Chicken" http://www.acecider.com/ ^Suggested by someone else I was talking to https://www.captainmorgan.com/ ^Old Staple for many and company says they are gluten free http://admiralnelsonsrum.com/ ^I use this in cooking, goes great finishing off veggie saute http://www.titosvodka.com/ ^Corn Based Vodka https://www.ciroc.com/ ^Grape Based Vodka EMERGENCY MEAL Supplies for long term survival http://www.glutenfreeemergencykits.com/gluten-free-emergency-kits-1/ ^All gluten free meal options dedicated company https://www.wisefoodstorage.com/emergency-food-kits-supplies/gluten-free-food-storage.html ^Gluten Free Options from a Wise company http://www.thrivelife.com/all-products/thrive-foods-161/gluten-free.html ^Various Freeze Dried foods, great for not just emergency foods but the dehydrated veggies give options for soups and always having veggies in stock without refrigeration. Places to order From Check these for most the the above products, these are the best pricing options, Always cross check and look for sells. https://www.luckyvitamin.com ^Really good place for supplements, protein powders, and some gluten-free foods and snacks, Cross check with amazon for best pricing and sometimes Luckys will price match. http://thrv.me/gf25 ^Thrive Market, like a online grocery store that ship to you so you do not need to go out and buy stuff, has alot of brands just search under Gluten Free. https://www.amazon.com/ ^The go to everything store. Found a UPC list from Several Grocery stores, you can takes these to your local grocery store manager and have items ordered. https://www.heb.com/static/pdfs/Gluten-Free-List.pdf ^HEB/Central Market http://www.wholefoodsmarket.com/service/gluten-free-products-list ^Whole Foods select location and store and you can even see what they have in stock. https://www.kroger.com/asset/541b1c6a84ae4e0350fcace0?data=1 ^ Kroger http://www.traderjoes.com/PDF/tjs-gluten-free-dietary-list.pdf ^Trader Joes
  2. Gluten-Free Flours Celiac.com 01/11/2005 - Gluten-free flours are generally used in combination with one another. There is not one stand alone gluten-free flour that you can use successfully in baked goods. Be sure to know the procedures your flour manufacturers use, cross contamination at the factory can cause diet compliance issues for the gluten intolerant. Arrowroot Flour can be used cup for cup in place of cornstarch if you are allergic to corn. Bean Flour is a light flour made from garbanzo and broad beans. To cut the bitter taste of beans, replace white sugar with brown or maple sugar in the recipe(or replace some of the bean flour with sorghum). Brown Rice Flour is milled from unpolished brown rice and has a higher nutrient value than white rice flour. Since this flour contains bran it has a shorter shelf life and should be refrigerated. As with white rice flour, it is best to combine brown rice flour with several other flours to avoid the grainy texture. Ener-G Foods and Bobs Red Mill produce a finer, lighter brown rice flour that works well with dense cakes such as pound cake. Cornstarch is similar in usage to sweet rice flour for thickening sauces. Best when used in combination with other flours. Guar Gum, a binding agent, can be used in place of xanthan gum for corn sensitive individuals. Use half as much guar gum to replace xanthan gum. Guar gum contains fiber and can irritate very sensitive intestines. Nut Flours are high in protein and, used in small portions, enhances the taste of homemade pasta, puddings, pizza crust, bread, and cookies. Finely ground nut meal added to a recipe also increases the protein content and allows for a better rise. Ground almond meal can replace dry milk powder in most recipes as a dairy-free alternative. Potato Flour has a strong potato taste and is rarely used in gluten-free cooking. Potato Starch Flour is used in combination with other flours, rarely used by itself. Sorghum Flour a relatively new flour that cuts the bitterness of bean flour and is excellent in bean flour mixes. Soy Flour is high in protein and fat with a nutty flavor. Best when used in small quantities in combination with other flours. Soy flour has a short shelf life. Sweet Rice Flour is made from glutinous rice (it does not contain the gluten fraction that is prohibited to the gluten intolerant). Often used as a thickening agent. Sweet rice flour is becoming more common in gluten-free baking for tender pies and cakes. It has the ability to smooth the gritty taste (that is common in gluten-free baked goods) when combined with other flours, see Multi Blend recipe. Tapicoa Starch Flour is a light, velvety flour from the cassava root. It lightens gluten-free baked goods and gives them a texture more like that of wheat flour baked goods. It is especially good in pizza crusts where it is used in equal parts with either white rice flour or brown rice flour. White Rice Flour is milled from polished white rice, best to combine with several other flours to avoid the grainy texture rice flour alone imparts. Try to buy the finest texture of white rice flour possible. Xanthan Gum is our substitute for gluten, it holds things together. See usage information on Multi Blend recipe page. Xanthan gum is derived from bacteria in corn sugar, the corn sensitive person should use guar gum (using half as much guar gum to replace xanthan gum). Alternative Flours The national patient support groups agree that the following flours are fine for the gluten intolerant providing you can find a pure source (grown in dedicated fields and processed on dedicated equipment). These flours greatly improve the taste of gluten-free baked goods. To incorporate into your favorite recipe, replace up to 50% of the flour in a recipe with an alternative flour and use the Multi Blend mix for the balance. Pizza crust and bread proportions dont follow this rule. Amaranth a whole grain from the time of the Aztecs- it is high in protein and contains more calcium, fiber, magnesium, Vitamin A and Vitamin C than most grains. Amaranth has a flavor similar to graham crackers without the sweetness. Buckwheat is the seed of a plant related to rhubarb, it is high in fiber, protein, magnesium and B vitamins. Dark buckwheat flour turns baked goods purple, I only use light buckwheat flour. Millet a small, round grain that is a major food source in Asia, North Africa and India. I havent used millet and dont know much about the grain. Quinoa (keen-wah) A staple food of the Incas. Quinoa is a complete protein with all 8 amino acids, quinoa contains a fair amount of calcium and iron. Teff an ancient grain from Ethiopia, now grown in Idaho. Teff is always a whole grain flour since it is difficult to sift or separate. High in protein, B vitamins, calcium, and iron.
  3. Hi, I am on a mission to make my mum a wheat bag for her birthday and she is Celiac. She has always wanted a wheat bag and I reallly want to make her one that she can use, since she cannot use the 'wheat' bag. Does anyone have a alternative filling I could use to make for her one?
  4. This article appeared in the Spring 2007 edition of Celiac.coms Scott-Free Newsletter. Celiac.com 08/29/2007 - The XII International Celiac Disease Symposium, proudly hosted by the Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University, featured presentations from researchers from all over the globe. The last session of the scientific portion of the symposium, entitled “Non-Dietary Therapies”, was full of controversy and fireworks. Talks given by Drs. Khosla, Gray, Paterson, Anderson and Mitea all revealed that potential alternatives to the gluten free diet are now being aggressively pursued. Several groups have even spun off from pharmaceutical companies to raise funds to test these alternatives in patient trials. However, several questions remain. How close are we to a “pill” or “vaccine” to treat or prevent celiac disease? And do we even need, or more importantly, WANT them, given that the diet is safe and effective? Any alternative therapy for celiac disease must be at least as safe as the gluten-free diet, which, if done correctly, has NO side-effects. So the bar is raised very high. An alternative must offer great medical benefit to celiac patients without causing any medical harm. It is also unclear how, exactly, these new therapies will be implemented. Can they treat existing celiac disease? Will they prevent those at increased risk for the disease (such as siblings) from having symptoms? Will these medications allow celiac patients to ingest as much gluten as they want, or will they just take away the fear of contamination when eating questionable foods? What follows is a summary of several important points raised by some of these speakers in regard to the research that their center is doing in this area of “alternative therapies for celiac disease. Two groups discussed their research on what has commonly become known as “the celiac pill”. The idea behind the “pill” is somewhat similar to the idea of taking a lactase enzyme supplement to digest the milk sugar lactose (if you are lactose intolerant). However, digesting the proteins that trigger the immune reaction in celiac disease is much more complex than digesting the simple sugar found in dairy products. The small fragments of the gluten proteins from wheat, rye and barley, which stimulate the immune system in someone with celiac disease, contain a large quantity of an amino acid called proline. The stomach and pancreatic enzymes in humans have difficulty digesting the fractions where these prolines are located, making the gluten highly resistant to complete digestion. The idea behind the “celiac pill” is to provide enzymes to break down the gluten into smaller fragments which will not be recognized by a celiac patient’s immune system. Therefore, theoretically, gluten would not cause an immune reaction and could be safely eaten. Dr. Gary Gray, an adult gastroenterologist working at Stanford University in California, addressed this issue in his presentation “Oral Enzyme Therapy”. Their study looked at 20 biopsy-proven celiacs in remission (without symptoms) who received orange juice with either gluten or gluten pre-treated with a special enzyme (abbreviated PEP, for prolyl endopeptidase). Each patient consumed a low dose of gluten daily, 5 grams, which is equivalent to one slice of bread. The patients completed a daily symptom questionnaire, and had urine and stool tests of to measure intestinal damage. The researchers concluded that pretreatment of gluten with PEP avoided the development of fat or carbohydrate malabsorption in the majority of those patients who, after a 2-week gluten challenge, developed fat or carbohydrate malabsorption. The PEP enzyme needs to be investigated further in larger trials of celiac patients. Cristina Mitea, working with Dr. Fritz Koning at Leiden University in The Netherlands, also presented some data using similar technology, entitled “Enzymatic degradation of gluten in a GI-tract model”. This group published in 2006 that the above described PEP enzyme may not work optimally in the celiac patient, since it is not active at low stomach pH. The PEP enzyme may also be broken down by pepsin, a digestive enzyme in the stomach, before it reaches the small bowel where gluten causes the most damage. Given these facts, this group of researchers characterized a prolyl endoprotease enzyme, derived from the fungus Aspergillus niger, abbreviated AN-PEP. The AN-PEP enzyme, according to some publications, has been shown to work at stomach pH while resisting pepsin digestion. In the lab, the AN-PEP was able to degrade intact gluten as well as small fragments of gluten, including those that stimulate the immune system in patients with celiac disease. It also appeared to act within minutes, which is 60 times faster than PEP. This is particularly important, as ingested gluten will leave the stomach to enter the small bowel within 1 to 4 hours after being eaten. These researchers state that this enzyme is very stable, and could be produced at low cost at food-grade quality in an industrial setting. However, it has not yet been tested in human clinical studies. In summary, some of these future potential treatments include: The development of genetically detoxified grains Oral or intranasal celiac vaccines to induce tolerance Inhibitors to the effects of zonulin on intestinal permeability Detoxification of immunogenic gliadin peptides (or gluten proteolysis) via oral peptidase supplementation Inhibitors of tissue transglutaminase Dr. Michelle Pietzak, “The Gluten Free MD” is an Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics at the University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine. She sees patients at Childrens Hospital Los Angeles and Los Angeles County Women’s and Children’s Hospital. With New Era Productions, she has recently released an audio celiac disease set as well as a 2 disc DVD set about celiac disease and the gluten free diet, available at www.glutenfreemd.com.
  5. This approach has great promise for improving the quality of future gluten-free products--here is a related article. Celiac.com 10/11/2005 - Arcadia Biosciences, an agricultural biotechnology company focused on products that benefit the environment and human health, today announced that it has received a Small Business Technology Transfer Program (STTR) grant from the National Institutes of Health in partnership with Washington State University (WSU) to research novel lines of wheat with reduced celiac disease-causing proteins. The grant will be split equally between Arcadia and its academic collaborator at WSU, Dr. Diter von Wettstein, the R.A. Nilan Distinguished Professor in the Department of Crop and Soil Science. Nearly 1 percent of American people and 4 percent of European people are estimated to suffer from celiac disease, or gluten intolerance. This genetic disorder can create symptoms that range from chronic diarrhea to malnutrition. Studies also indicate that celiac disease sufferers who continue to eat gluten are between 40 and 100 times more likely to develop gastrointestinal cancer than non-celiac disease sufferers. The only known treatment for celiac disease is adherence to a gluten-free diet, which includes complete abstinence from wheat, rye, barley, and their derivatives. "New diagnostic tests continue to identify people who suffer from celiac disease and who need to make extreme dietary adjustments," said Eric Rey, president of Arcadia Biosciences. "This grant is the first step in our effort to identify and develop wheat varieties that can significantly expand the dietary options for people on gluten-free diets. Our goal is to help enable people who suffer from celiac disease to enjoy wheat-based products, like bread and cookies, and not experience an adverse reaction." Working with Dr. von Wettstein and his colleagues at WSU, Arcadia will use its proprietary TILLING® technology to identify wheat plants in which harmful gluten proteins are minimized. Arcadias current product pipeline includes six technologies that either protect the environment or improve human health. The company expects to launch its first product, GLA-enriched safflower oil, to the nutritional supplement market in 2008. Other technologies include higher-yielding plants that use less nitrogen fertilizer, salt-tolerant plants, and fresh produce with high levels of antioxidants such as lycopene. These products are being developed using both genetic engineering and advanced breeding technologies.
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