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Found 12 results

  1. Celiac.com 10/25/2018 - The surging demand for gluten-free, allergen-free, vegetarian and other food options is changing the way many companies do business. However, food and beverage manufacturers are not the only businesses working to keep up with plant-based and gluten-free demands from consumers. The latest effects of that demand are shaking up food offerings in the airline industry. Major airlines are among the numerous businesses that are shifting gears to cater to the growing demand for gluten-free, allergen-free, vegan, and other options from customers. Gone are the bagged peanuts of days past. The new kid on the block avoids gluten, and wants ample vegetarian and other options. To meet those changing demands, airlines are hiring celebrity chefs to devise new menus. According to Alaska airlines, their data show that about 50 percent of people want to eat gluten-free or vegetarian. Customers also want better, tastier, and more appealing choices. That means that the days of “chicken,” “beef,” or “pasta” are fast disappearing, as airlines jazz up or change those once ubiquitous pasta options. United Airlines has been developing dishes using quinoa, and chia seeds. Delta Airlines is now offering on-board gluten-free snack selections, and American Airlines has been trying out zucchini balls and stuffed mushrooms. Air New Zealand is kicking it up a notch for its business class passengers flying from Los Angeles to Auckland, who can now enjoy the increasingly popular "Impossible Burger." Travelers will likely see more gluten-free and plant-based options on airlines as they work to make flying less stressful, and more appetizing. Traveled by air lately? Tell us about your food experience in the comments section below.
  2. Celiac.com 12/10/2000 - As reported in Ann Whelans September/October issue of Gluten-Free Living, the American Dietetic Association (ADA) has released the 6th edition of its Manual of Clinical Dietetics, which offers revised guidelines for the treatment of celiac disease. This manual is currently used by hospitals and doctors all over North America, and represents the most up-to-date source of information with regard to the dietary treatment of various illnesses. The new standards set in this publication conform more closely with current international standards. Included on their safe list are items that have been on Celiac.coms safe list for over five years, including: amaranth, buckwheat, distilled vinegar (no matter what its source), distilled alcoholic beverages (including rum, gin, whiskey and vodka), millet, quinoa and teff. A team of American and Canadian dietitians wrote the new gluten-free guidelines, including: Shelley Case, RD, Mavis Molloy, RD, Marion Zarkadas, M.Sc.RD (all from Canada and all members of the Professional Advisory Board of the Canadian Celiac Association), and Cynthia Kupper, CRD, CDE (Executive Director of the Gluten Intolerance Group and celiac). Additional findings of this team regarding buckwheat and quinoa contradict what has been accepted as common knowledge for years by some US support groups, mainly that these two grains are more likely to be contaminated by wheat than other grains. In fact, according to the team, buckwheat and quinoa are far less likely to be contaminated than most other grains. At the most basic level the new guidelines mean that celiacs do not need to avoid foods containing unidentified vinegar or distilled alcohol, this alone will allow much more freedom when shopping or eating out. Further, celiacs who drink alcohol will have much more freedom and a far greater choice when they want to have a drink. Additionally, celiacs will be able to more easily maintain a well-rounded and nutritious diet because they will have access to a far greater number of highly nutritious and safe grains. The ADAs 6th edition of the Manual of Clinical Dietetics represents the first time that Canadian and United States dietary guidelines have come together to create a united North American gluten-free standard, and will hopefully lead to the adoption of a single standard by all US support groups so that hundreds of thousands of celiacs will not have to unnecessarily exclude more foods than necessary. These new guidelines go a long way towards an international standard, which should be the ultimate goal for all celiacs and celiac organizations in the world.
  3. Summer is upon us and that usually means lots of barbecues and fun social gatherings involving food. Being on a gluten-free diet doesn't mean you have to give up your favorite All-American foods. The following recipe is for All-American gluten-free hamburgers. The recipe is easy and the results are delicious. Try it for yourself! Gluten-Free Classic All American Hamburgers (makes 4 1/4 lb. Patties) Ingredients: 4 gluten-free hamburger buns 1 lb. lean ground beef or ground chuck (use grass-fed beef if available) 2 tbsp. gluten-free Worcestershire sauce 1 tbsp. potato starch 3/4 tsp. salt (or to taste) 1 tsp. black pepper (or to taste) Toppings: Leaf lettuce Sliced tomatoes Sliced red onion Pickles Cheddar cheese (or cheese substitute) Gluten-free Ketchup Gluten-free Mustard Gluten-Free Mayonnaise *Before you begin, you can also substitute beef with gluten-free ground turkey. Combine all hamburger ingredients in a mixing bowl, you can use your hands but make sure they are clean. Cover and let sit in refrigerator at least 30 minutes and up to four hours. When ready to cook, divide the meat into four equal parts and form into 1/2 inch thick patties. Grill over high heat (450°-500°), about 3-4 minutes on each side, rotating 45° halfway through. Place the cheese slices on the burgers when they have about 30 seconds left on the grill. Pull the burgers off the grill and let sit for about a minute. Build your hamburger with your favorite condiments and toppings and enjoy! For a complete meal, serve with a side salad, and gluten-free french fries.Gluten-free buns are everywhere, and there are some really good options available. Buying gluten-free buns is as easy as getting online and placing an order. Happy Eating!
  4. Celiac.com 3/14/2003 - After conducting an extensive review of the medical literature concerning the safety of oats for people with celiac disease, the American Dietetic Association recently concluded that even though oats are not yet endorsed as safe for people with celiac disease by doctors and support groups in the USA, they should, however, be safe for celiacs who choose to consume them if they limit their consumption to amounts found to be safe in several studies (approximately one-half cup of dry whole-grain rolled oats per day). Ideally, they also should be advised to consume only those products tested and found to be free of contamination. If this is not possible, patients should be counseled on steps they can take to help reduce their chances of consuming contaminated oat products (e.g., avoiding oats sold in bulk from bins, determining from manufacturers whether a dedicated line or facility is used for processing). In addition, patients should be advised to discuss any dietary changes with their physicians. The American Dietetic Associations conditional acceptance of oats as safe for people with celiac disease is another big step forward for celiacs in the USA. For more information see: Oats and the gluten-free diet Journal of the American Dietetic Association March 2003 - Volume 103 - Number 3
  5. Celiac.com 11/27/2015 - The results of the 2015 Great American Beer Festival are in and the big winner in the gluten-free category is Ghostfish Brewing of Seattle, which brought home the gold and the bronze in that category. Washington Breweries did very well overall, raking in 13 medals across all categories. The Gluten-Free Beer category had 24 submissions, with Ghostfish Brewery taking home the gold for their Watchstander Stout, and the bronze for Ghostfish Grapefruit IPA, while Portland’s Ground Breaker Brewing took home the silver for their IPA No. 5. See the Ghostfish website for a full list of Ghostfish Brewing’s award-winning gluten-free beers. A complete list of all GABF medal winners can be found at SeattlePI.com.
  6. Celiac.com 10/21/2015 - Celiac disease has been traditionally recognized among Caucasians, with an estimated prevalence of about 1%. Latin America features a the population with European ancestry, along with native communities sharing a diverse degree of mix with European colonizers. The population of native Toba people comprises more than 60,000 individuals living with a clusters of villages in a forest called 'The Impenetrable' in Northeastern Argentina. In recent years, as a consequence of governmental food aid programs aimed at improving nutritional conditions in the community, the Toba people have undergone a drastic change in dietary habits, with wheat replacing their ancestral food sources. In general celiac disease can only occur in individuals with certain class II human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules – namely, HLA DQ2 and/or DQ8, but little information exists about the prevalence of HLA DQ2 and DQ8, and of celiac disease in native South Americans. The research team included Horacio Vázquez MD, María de la Paz Temprano RD, Emilia Sugai MS, Stella M Scacchi MS, Cecilia Souza MD,Daniel Cisterna MS, Edgardo Smecuol MD, María Laura Moreno MD, Gabriela Longarini MD, Roberto Mazure MD, María A Bartellini MS, Elena F Verdú MD2, Andrea González RD, Eduardo Mauriño MD, and Julio C Bai MD. They are variously affiliated with the Small Bowel Section, Department of Medicine, Hospital de Gastroenterología C Bonorino Udaondo. Buenos Aires, Argentina and the Farncombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario. For their study, the research team set out to prospectively assess environmental, genetic and serological conditions associated with celiac disease among members of the Toba native population attending a multidisciplinary sanitary mission. Using an established questionnaire, an expert nutritionist determined daily gluten intake. The team then conducted gene typing for the human leuko-cyte antigen (HLA) class II alleles using DNA extracted from peripheral blood (HLA DQ2/DQ8 haplotype). The team then measured serum antibodies were immunoglobulin (Ig) A tissue transglutaminase (tTG) and the composite deamidated gliadin peptides/tTG Screen test. They tested positive cases for IgA endomysial antibodies. The team screened a total of 144 subjects, 55% of those female. Estimated average gluten consumption was 43 grams per day, ranging from 3 grams per day up to 185 grams per day. Genetic typing showed that 73 of 144 subjects had alleles associated with celiac disease; 69 of these subjects had alleles for HLA DQ8, while four had DQ2. Four and six subjects had antibody concentrations above the cut-off established by the authors' laboratory (>3 times the upper limit of normal) for IgA tTG and deamidated gliadin peptides/tTG screen, respectively. Four of these had concomitant positivity for both assays and endomysial anti-bodies were positive in three subjects who also presented a predispos-ing haplotype. The present study was the first to detect celiac disease in Native Americans. The native Toba ethnic population has very high daily gluten consumption, and a predisposing genetic background. This study found subjects with persistent celiac disease autoimmunity and, at least, three of them met serological criteria for celiac disease diagnosis. This study invites some questions about gluten and celiac disease in the tribe. For example, does the amount of gluten in the diet of people with genetic predisposition have an impact on the likelihood of celiac disease? Given that many of these people likely had DQ2/DQ8 positivity for many generations, did the introduction of wheat into their diets trigger their celiac disease? Much remains to be understood about celiac disease, and studies like this can be important and insightful. Source: Can J Gastroenterol Hepatol Vol 29 No X Month 2015 1
  7. Celiac.com 03/29/2006 - What started as a grassroots campaign urging Congress to require labeling of food allergens has become a broad based advocacy organization, American Celiac Disease Alliance, aimed at providing a uniform voice on behalf of persons with Celiac Disease. More than two years ago, an ad hoc group of 15 leaders in the celiac community, came together to help pass the Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act (FALCPA) in Congress. The bill became law on August 3, 2004, easing much of the guesswork in food shopping for some 11 million consumers with food allergies. With this achievement, the Task Force realized the need for a permanent, advocacy organization, and elected to become the American Celiac Disease Alliance,Inc. (ACDA). This step formalizes the role of the Alliance as the umbrella organization representing the needs of the celiac community for the advancement of education, research, and advocacy as recommended by the NIH consensus panel on celiac disease in June 2004. A not-for-profit organization, the mission of the ACDA is to provide a uniform voice on behalf of persons with Celiac Disease through education and advocacy initiatives. Some of the early goals of the organization that are being considered include assisting the FDA in determining a gluten-free standard for foods manufactured or imported into in the United States. The FDA is required to create such a standard by August 2008. Disaster preparedness and improving insurance reimbursement for dietitians who provide nutritional counseling to persons diagnosed with Celiac Disease are also on the top of the Alliances project list. Dietitians are a critical resource for newly diagnosed celiac patients and consultations with them are currently not reimbursed under many insurance plans. The group will be working with major health insurance providers to have dieticians paid for the services they provide to celiac patients. ACDA is contacting key disaster preparedness groups such as the Red Cross and FEMA to help them develop protocol for meeting gluten-free diet needs during natural disasters. The group is also preparing a checklist of items that individuals should stock in case of emergency. The ACDA is a volunteer organization headed by Executive Director, Andrea Levario, JD. For Further Information Contact: Andrea Levario, Exec. Director info@Americanceliac.org
  8. Celiac.com 11/08/2013 - For spectators and competitors alike, the American Pizza Championship is an exciting event displaying some of America’s premier pizzaioli, or pizza makers. In the interest of full disclosure, I served as one of the five judges for this event. Among the pizzaioli to compete in the American Pizza Championship at the International Baking Industry Expo in Las Vegas, was Heather Zook, of Ohio. Baking in her first-ever pizza competition, Zook surprised herself by emerging victorious, as the first-place winner in the gluten-free pizza category. Zook took first place with her three meat pizza with a crust made from a white rice-millet flour blend. Her victory earned Zook a slot on the U.S. Pizza Team, and an all-expense-paid trip to Parma, Italy to compete in the World Pizza Championships as a member of that team in the spring of 2014. Second place in the gluten-free pizza category went to Mike Anheiser of Pizza Dock in Fredericktown, Ohio. Jason Samosky of Samosky's Homestyle Pizzaria in Valley City, Ohio took home the third place honors in the gluten-free pizza category. Anyone noticing a theme here? For great gluten-free pizza, Ohio looks like a good place to be. First Place Winner -- Gluten-free Pizza Heather Zook Sinfully Gluten-Free 9146 Dayton-Lebanon Pike Centerville, OH http://www.sinfullygf.com/ Second Place Winner -- Gluten-free Pizza Mike Anheiser Pizza Dock Fredericktown, Ohio Third Place Winner -- Gluten-free Pizza Jason Samosky Samosky's Homestyle Pizzeria Valley City Ohio For a complete account of competition results, video of the competition can be found online in the October 2013 issue of PMQ Pizza Magazine.
  9. Celiac.com 04/29/2013 - In an effort to determine the accuracy of claims that rates of celiac disease are on the rise, a team of researchers recently examined rates of celiac disease in a well-defined US county. The research team included Jonas F. Ludvigsson, Alberto Rubio-Tapia, Carol T. van Dyke, L. Joseph Melton, Alan R. Zinsmeister, Brian D. Lahr and Joseph A. Murray. They are variously affiliated with the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology in the Departments of Medicine and Immunology at the College of Medicine of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, USA, and the Department of Pediatrics of Örebro University Hospital in Örebro, Sweden. For their population-based study, the team used medical, histopathology, and celiac disease serology records from the Rochester Epidemiology Project to identify all new cases of celiac disease in Olmsted County, Minnesota, USA since 2000. They then calculated age- and sex-specific incidence rates for celiac disease and adjusted those rates to the US white 2000 population. The team also assessed clinical presentation of celiac disease upon diagnosis. Overall, they found 249 cases of celiac disease, 92 cases in men and 157 cases in women, in Olmsted County, between 2000 and 2010. Average patient age was 37.9 years. Once adjusted for age and sex, the overall rate of celiac disease within the time studied was 17.4 (95% confidence interval (CI)=15.2–19.6) per 100,000 person-years. That means an increase of over six percent; from 11.1 per 100,000 person-years (95% CI=6.8–15.5) in 2000–2001. The data show the increase leveling off after 2004. The data also show that cases of celiac disease with classical symptoms of diarrhea and weight loss decreased over time between 2000 and 2010 (P=0.044). Overall, rates of celiac disease have continued to rise over the last decade in this North-American population. This study supports the observation that celiac disease rates in America are, in fact, going up. Source: The American Journal of Gastroenterology, 19 March 2013. doi:10.1038/ajg.2013.60
  10. Celiac.com 02/15/2012 - At the American College of Gastroenterology (ACG) 2011 Annual Scientific Meeting held in Washington, DC, Caris Diagnostics, a leader in anatomic pathology services, presented 15 abstracts highlighting new findings that reflect and expand Caris' commitment to gastrointestinal disease research. Highlights from the presentation include two studies, in particular. The first study, "High Prevalence of Celiac Disease in Women With Young Onset Collagenous Colitis," found that young women with collagenous colitis are eight times more likely than the general population to have celiac disease. That study was authored by Ahmed Bedeir, MD, Bhaskar Ganguly, and Mukunda Ray, MD, PhD. As Dr. Bedeir's finding is gleaned from the largest series of young patients with collagenous colitis ever reported, the study team recommends that women age 40 or younger who have a diagnosis of collagenous colitis also undergo an EGD with duodenal biopsies to exclude concurrent celiac disease. The second study, "Seasonal Patterns in Eosinophilic Esophagitis: An Analysis by Month of Diagnosis and Month of Birth," showed that, contrary to previous suggestions derived from smaller series, there was no evidence of monthly or seasonal variation even within known regions with diverse climates among our 10,000 patients with eosinophilic esophagitis. That study was authored by Jennifer M. Hurrell, DO, Amnon Sonnenberg, MD, and Robert M. Genta, MD, FACG. Regarding Caris' commitment to gastrointestinal disease research, Richard H. Lash, MD, Chief Medical Officer for Caris says that the "establishment of the Caris Research Institute as a structure for promoting and carrying out research has again generated a strong presence at the annual ACG meeting in Washington, D.C," adding that Caris remains "committed to leveraging our tremendous database and academic talent to answer important questions in the field of gastroenterology and are honored to have the opportunity to present our findings at ACG 2011." Source: http://www.carislifesciences.com/news/caris-diagnostics-presents-research-at-2011-annual-meeting-of-the-american-college-of-gastroenterology/
  11. Those patients for whom there is a high suspicion for celiac disease should have a small bowel biopsy which can be obtained by an experienced endoscopist in the distal duodendum. The best noninvasive tests available for screening for asymptomatic celiac disease are the specific serological tests. These are of several varieties: the anti-gliadin, anti-endomysial, or anti-reticulin antibodies. Our experience and the literature support the use as of endomysial antibody test as the single most specific and probably most sensitive for celiac disease. This test has now become available in specialty laboratories as well as in a small number of academic institutions. All of the tests should be done with the subjects on a normal gluten containing diet. A combination of endomysial and gliadin testing would seem to be the most sensitive as a screening method. A positive test is not, however, considered to be diagnostic and would usually require a small bowel biopsy for confirmation. A trial of dietary exclusion of gluten is *not* recommended as a diagnostic test without a prior abnormal biopsy. Because the body will recover when one goes gluten-free, the tests will then come up negative. Without a definitive test one may then stray from the diet, as one will feel well and was never sure that they had it in the first place. As for the two tests: The biopsy will look for flattened villi on the intestinal wall. After one goes gluten-free they will grow back. The blood antibodies are formed as a bodys reaction to the presence of the gluten. If no gluten, then no antibodies are present.
  12. Celiac.com 12/28/2006 - The American Diabetes Associations (ADA) Clinical Practice Recommendations have been updated to include new information about treatment and prevention that reflects the latest research. Changes have been made in numerous areas, including the management of hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes; nutrition recommendations; and screening and treatment for children who have both type 1 diabetes and celiac disease. In 2006, the ADA published Medical Nutrition Therapy (MNT) guidelines for people with diabetes, specific to individual populations, such as those who are obese or pregnant. The Clinical Practice Recommendations have been updated to reflect these guidelines and to encourage people with diabetes or pre- diabetes to seek individualized MNT to help them achieve their treatment goals. Information about how to treat children who are diagnosed with both type 1 diabetes and celiac disease was also added to the Clinical Practice Recommendations this year. Up to 16 percent of children with type 1 diabetes are also diagnosed with celiac disease, an immune disorder that affects the digestive system, damages the small intestine and interferes with the absorption of nutrients from food. The recommendations call for more aggressive screening for celiac disease in children with type 1 diabetes who present symptoms such as weight loss, growth failure, abdominal pain and chronic fatigue. A gluten-free diet is recommended for those who test positive for celiac. Diabetes Care, published by the American Diabetes Association, is the leading peer-reviewed journal of clinical research into the nations fifth leading cause of death by disease. Diabetes also is a leading cause of heart disease and stroke, as well as the leading cause of adult blindness, kidney failure, and non-traumatic amputations. For more information about diabetes call 1-800-DIABETES (1-800-342-2383).
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