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Found 41 results

  1. Celiac.com 10/27/2016 - Fall is upon us, but if you're reluctant to give up on salad just yet, here's a tasty salad that makes a perfect transition into fall. Ingredients: 2 tablespoons honey 2 tablespoons walnut oil or olive oil 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar 1 green apple, cored and thinly sliced 2 carrots, roasted, steamed, and cut into chunks 2 beets, cleaned and roasted ½ cup walnut pieces, toasted ½ feta cheese, crumbled salt and fresh pepper, to taste Directions: In large bowl, whisk honey, oil and vinegar, season to taste. Steam carrots and roast beets. When carrots and beets are done and cool, cut into chunks and toss with chopped apple and with dressing. Sprinkle with nuts and feta cheese. Serve.
  2. When I first tried SweetLeaf® Organics Organic Stevia Sweetener I was amazed. How could it be sugar- and gluten-free and not contain calories, carbohydrates, artificial ingredients, aspartame, sucralose, methanol, etc.? To me it tastes exactly like sugar, yet it won't trigger the same dreaded glycemic response. This sweetener is not just for diabetics, as my 11 year old daughter will soon find out, it is for anyone who wants to avoid the pitfalls of eating too much sugar—and the best thing of all, at least to me, is that it is also gluten-free. It is available in 35- or 70-packet boxes, or a shaker jar, and they even make a liquid stevia version which comes in a variety of flavors. For more information, visit www.SweetLeaf.com. Review written by Scott Adams.
  3. Celiac.com 04/14/2016 - Driven partly by a perception among consumers that gluten-free foods are healthier than their non-gluten-free counterparts, the global gluten-free packaged food market is projected to grow at a compound annual growth rate of approximately 6% between 2015 and 2019, according to a recent market report from Technavio. In addition to health and wellness, Technavio identifies demand from millennials and increased marketing activities as prime emerging trends driving the gluten-free market. Once seen as medical products for gluten intolerant people gluten-free products have evolved into "a lifestyle choice across all customer segments," says Brijesh Kumar Choubey, a lead food industry analyst at Technavio. Many consumers associate gluten-free foods with better energy energy levels, and with weight loss. Technavio cites a 2013 market survey conducted by Monash University that revealed nearly 80% people buying gluten-free products report perceived health benefits as the main reason. Just five to ten years ago, buyers of gluten-free foods were likely to be older. Today, younger consumers, specifically 32% of millennials, and 38% of Generation Z, said they would pay higher prices for gluten-free products. Bakery products, cookies and snacks are the top gluten-free foods among this consumer group, said Technavio. Driven by growing demand, and by new product development, the bakery segment leads the gluten-free packaged food market with 64% market share in 2014. Technavio predicts the segment will outpace the rest of the market through the end of 2019, growing at a rate of about 7%. Increased marketing activities from big and small manufacturers alike is the last key driver Technavio cites as a driver for gluten-free packaged food demand. An example is Heinz, which in 2014 launched a social media campaign for its gluten-free pasta and sauces, Technavio said. Source: Foodbusinessnews.net
  4. Celiac.com 01/01/2016 - Each year Celiac.com publishes hundreds of articles related to celiac disease and the gluten-free diet. Below are the most popular ones published in 2015. Some on this list, like our annual gluten-free Halloween candy list, are no surprise. Others, however, come as a complete surprise to our staff. Our own predictions often end up incorrect, and we are usually quite surprised to find out which of our articles end up being among the most popular ones that we publish. This year's surprises include articles on General Mills being sued over Cheerios, Panera testing out gluten-free options, the ultimate cause of celiac disease, and a pocket sensor that detects gluten. Our staff would like to take this opportunity to thank each one of you and wish you a Happy New Year and a fabulous 2016! Most Popular Celiac.com Articles of 2015 10) Ten Things to Try if You Accidentally Eat Gluten 9) Wait-List for Pocket Sensor that Detects Gluten in Food 8) Many People With Non-celiac Gluten Sensitivity Have Autoimmune Disease or Antinuclear Antibodies 7) Gluten-free Halloween Candy 2015 6) Lectins Are Toxins 5) Scientists Finally Know What Causes Celiac Disease! 4) Could Changing Gut Bacteria Prevent Celiac Disease? 3) General Mills Sued Over Recalled Gluten-free Cheerios 2) Panera Quietly Testing Gluten-Free Bread Options 1) How to Succeed At Reducing Oxalate on a Gluten-free Diet
  5. Celiac.com 12/29/2015 - Regular Girl is a gluten-free prebiotic fiber with a probiotic blend that is specifically designed "for the woman on the go." The beautiful and highly-functional packaging that it comes in makes this point clear—15 convenient serving sized packets are included in an athletic-style, non-breakable plastic bottle—which makes it very easy to take with you to the office, on vacation, or anywhere else you want to go (it is also available in 30-day supply bulk powder). Each Regular Girl serving packet contains 6 grams of the company's proprietary "Sunfiber," which is designed to eliminate any gas or bloating that can be caused by other dietary fiber supplements. This supplement is unique because it also contains 8 billion CFU of Bifidobacterium lactis to help normalize bacterial gut flora and improve calcium absorption. Regular Girl packets are very easy to use—just mix one with 6-8 ounces of water or any non-carbonated beverage. What I really liked about them is that they aren't flavored, so they don't contain any artificial flavors or colors, which makes them very easy to drink by themselves or with your favorite beverage or smoothie. Overall, this is the perfect dietary fiber supplement for anyone with celiac disease, and especially for women who appreciate well-designed packaging which allows you to take them with you wherever you want to go. For more info visit: www.regulargirl.com.
  6. Now is the season for pumpkin bread and I want to share with you a product that I think you will love: Whole Note All Natural & Gluten-Free Pumpkin Bread and Muffin Mix. Whole Note Food Co. does not make your typical unhealthy gluten-free mixes—they go way out of their way to use healthy, whole grain flours that include brown rice, buckwheat, teff, flaxseed, millet, oats and sorghum. Their mixes are also a cinch to make, and for this mix I only had to add eggs, oil, and pumpkin. I opted for the pumpkin loaf over the muffins, and was very happy with my choice because it turned out great! The flavor and texture were excellent, and I really loved the balance of spices which reminded me of eating one of my favorites: pumpkin pie. I liked the pumpkin bread mix so much that I also decided to try their Whole Note All Natural & Gluten-Free Buttermilk Pancake Mix. I've been searching for healthier versions of gluten-free pancakes that also taste good, and I am happy to report that these pancakes succeed very well at both. I highly recommend both mixes for anyone on a gluten-free diet, and especially for those who are also trying to eat healthier gluten-free versions of their favorite foods. For more info visit: www.wholenotegf.com
  7. Just when I thought that nothing in the gluten-free realm of products could surprise me anymore, I was lucky enough to get in the mail a frozen Inspired by Happiness Gluten-Free Dreamin’ of Chocolate Black & White Chocolate Layer Cake, which led to one of the most wonderful gluten-free experiences that I've had in a long time! From the moment I laid eyes on this cake I was impressed. So much so that I decided to serve it for dessert at a friend's dinner party—even though I had never before tasted it. In the gluten-free world this can be a risky proposition—especially when most of the guests attending were not on a gluten-free diet. When dessert was finally served my friend was surprised to see a piece in front of me, because he assumed that it wasn't gluten-free (again, it just looked too good!). After he found out that it was gluten-free he seemed let down...but after one bite it was clear that this cake was beyond good—it was simply astonishing! As you can tell by the picture, this is a very rich chocolate cake. There are generous amounts of white and dark chocolate throughout, and the cake is incredibly moist and held together perfectly. It also wasn't too sweet tasting, which made the white and dark chocolate flavors really stand out. After this experience it is clear to me that Inspired by Happiness cakes are perfect for any special occasion, including dinner parties, birthdays and weddings. For more info visit: Inspired-By-Happiness.com
  8. For lunch today, I had gluten-free spaghetti pasta topped with Dave's Gourmet Hearty Marinara Gluten-Free & Organic Pasta Sauce—and the sauce was definitely hearty! I immediately noticed the large chunks of fresh tasting tomatoes and garlic in the sauce which was balanced perfectly with organic basil and onions. I love that this sauce uses only organic ingredients and real extra virgin olive oil as some pasta sauces use less expensive versions like canola oil. As you can probably guess, Dave's also doesn't use any artificial ingredients, colors, or flavorings. Another plus is that this marinara sauce doesn't taste too salty which is my pet peeve with many pasta sauces (if I want salt I'll add it or use Parmesan, thank you). In fact, this sauce has just the right amount of saltiness which means that the taste of the tomatoes, garlic and basil really come through in every bite. Overall, Dave's Hearty Marinara sauce is an authentic, full bodied, and very rich-flavored marinara sauce that is not only healthy, but tastes great. I would recommend it to anyone—and not just those who are on a gluten-free diet. For more info visit: davesgourmet.com. Review written by Scott Adams.
  9. The following are links to sites have of dermatitis herpetiformis. Some of the photos are biopsies as seen through a microscope, and some are regular photographs of people with dermatitis herpetiformis, some of which are quite graphic. Pictures and an excellent article on dermatitis herpetiformis by Harold T. Pruessner, M.D., University of Texas Medical School at Houston: http://www.aafp.org/afp/980301ap/pruessn.html The University of Iowa: http://hardinmd.lib.uiowa.edu/dermnet/dermatitisherpetiformis.html Dermis.New Web Page: http://www.dermis.net/dermisroot/en/29366/diagnose.htm Medline: https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/001480.htm The Dermatitis Herpetiformis Online Community: http://www.dermatitisherpetiformis.org.uk/
  10. Celiac.com 04/29/2014 - I love salmon, especially smoked salmon. I like to pair it with my favorite gluten-fee bread or crackers and my favorite cheese. Another way I like to enjoy smoked salmon is with a green salad. This is a versatile recipe that makes for a great lunch, when made with smoked salmon, and is also offers a good way to get rid of any salmon leftover from yesterday’s dinner. Feel free to substitute cold cooked salmon for smoked salmon as you like. Ingredients: Butter lettuce 1 pound thinly sliced smoked salmon 4 hard-boiled eggs 2 teaspoons prepared horseradish 2 teaspoons coarse-grain gluten-free mustard ¼ cup heavy cream ¼ cup whole milk greek-style yogurt ¼ cup fresh lemon juice 1 Persian cucumber, sliced thin 2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh dill ¼ red onion, sliced into half rings 1 lemon, cut into wedges 2 tomatoes, cut into wedges ¼ cup capers kosher salt and black pepper, to taste gluten-free crackers and/or toasted gluten-free bread Directions: Divide the butter lettuce and salmon among 6 plates. To each add ½ eggs, sliced lengthwise, onion slices, tomato wedges, capers In a small bowl, combine the horseradish, mustard, yogurt, sour cream, lemon juice, salt, and pepper, and set aside. Add the cucumber and up to half the dressing to the large bowl and toss. Divide among plates and sprinkle with the dill. Serve with gluten-free crackers and/or toasted gluten-free bread Serve with the dressing on the side, and lemon wedges, as desired.
  11. Celiac.com 04/14/2014 - Exposure to stressful stimuli, such as inflammation, cause cells to up-regulate heat shock proteins (Hsp), which are highly conserved immunomodulatory molecules. Research points to Hsp involvement in numerous autoimmune diseases, including autoimmune bullous diseases and celiac disease. To better understand the role of Hsp in autoimmune bullous diseases, a research team conducted the first investigation of the humoral autoimmune response to Hsp40, Hsp60, Hsp70, and Hsp90 in patients with dermatitis herpetiformis (DH; n = 26), bullous pemphigoid (BP; n = 23), and pemphigus vulgaris (PV; n = 16), the first representing a cutaneous manifestation of celiac disease. The research team included Kasperkiewicz M1, Tukaj S, Gembicki AJ, Silló P, Görög A, Zillikens D, Kárpáti S. They are affiliated with the Department of Dermatology at the University of Lübeck in Lübeck, Germany. In patients with active BP and PV, serum levels of autoantibodies against these Hsp matched the healthy control subjects (n = 9-14), while circulating autoantibodies against Hsp60, Hsp70, and Hsp90 increased at the active disease stage of DH. Further analysis showed that in patients who adopt a gluten-free diet, these anti-Hsp autoantibodies decreased in relation to serum autoantibodies against epidermal and tissue transglutaminase during remission of skin lesions. Larger groups of patients must be studied to confirm these findings, but these results indicate that autoantibodies against Hsp60, Hsp70, and Hsp90 play a key role in the development and maintenance of DH, possibly also in the underlying celiac disease, and may be important in potentially undiscovered disease biomarkers. Source: Cell Stress Chaperones. 2014 Mar 19.
  12. You may have caught my enthusiastic review of Attune Foods Erewhon Buckwheat & Hemp cereal from last year. Well, it's time I inform you that they've done it again: Attune Foods Erewhon Quinoa & Chia gluten-free cereal is a great way to add two superfoods to your diet, and makes a tasty corn flakes alternative. Like all their cereals, Attune Foods has done a great job of maximizing health benefits and keeping the ingredients list rich with wholesome ingredients, while still delivering a tasty product that isn't a pain to eat. This cereal is similar to corn flakes, but not quite as flaky: it's a little tougher and chewier, and holds up to milk better. Health reasons aside, I actually prefer it to corn flakes, as it doesn't turn into a mushy mess in 5 minutes! Attune Foods Erewhon Quinoa & Chia cereal is great for you, and should make a welcome addition to any gluten-free household's breakfast reserves. You can find it (exclusively) at Whole Foods. For more information, visit their website. Note: Articles that appear in the "Gluten-Free Food Reviews" section of this site are paid advertisements. For more information about this see our Advertising Page.
  13. Celiac.com 01/01/2014 - By enabling researchers to link antibodies with certain diseases, a new method could help uncover and confirm environmental triggers for diseases such as celiac and autism. The researchers have two goals, according to professor Patrick Daugherty, a researcher with the department of chemical engineering and the Center for BioEngineering at University of California, Santa Barbara. First, they want to create diagnostic tests for diseases for which there are currently no blood tests. Next, they want to figure out what causes the diseases. The process works by mining an individual’s immunological memory—a veritable catalog of the pathogens and antigens encountered by his or her immune system Every time we encounter a pathogen, our bodies mounts an immune response in the form of antibodies that are specific for given antigens; molecular, microbial, chemical, etc. Each time our bodies mount this response, they form “memory cells” that are activated by subsequent encounters with that specific antigen. Responses can vary, from minor reactions to serious autoimmune diseases in which the body turns against its own tissues and its immune system responds by destroying them, such as in the case of Type 1 diabetes and celiac disease. People with celiac disease, for example, will have certain antibodies in their blood that bind to specific peptides—short chains of amino acids—present in wheat, barley, and rye. These peptides are the gluten that trigger adverse reactions in certain people. In the same way that a lock is meant to take only one key, these antibodies will only attach to specific sequences of amino acids that make up the peptides. The researchers want to figure out which antibodies are linked to specific diseases. “People with celiac disease have two particular antibody types in their blood, which have proved to be enormously useful for diagnosis,” says Daugherty. Source: UC Santa Barbara
  14. Ever since my husband diagnose with celiac disease, he was a littlebit depressed because he could not just simple go and grab something toeat. At the beginning, he tried to keep an open mind and went to storesthat sell gluten-free products. Most of the time, he was disappointedwith the taste of the products. One day, he came home from work andtold me how his co-workers teased him with a yummy looking chocolatechips cookie and he felt extremely depressed because he could not eatthem and he absolutely LOVES to snack. I found his co-workers' actionvery childish and decided that I would create a recipe the my husbandwould love and he could has plenty of supply at work so when the samesituation ever happen again, he would be prepared. Myhusband's favorite cookie is white chocolate chip with macadamias nut;hence, I decided to try making a gluten free version of the cookie forhim. After a few try with different flour mix and ingredients. I got arecipe that not only my husband enjoys but also his co-workers aftertrying them.This is my modified version of gluten-free cookie recipe.The cookies from this recipe has a nice soft texture. This recipe will makes about 2 - 21/2 dozen cookies. Preparation Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 12-15 minutes INGREDIENTS: 2 1/4 cup of Silka Flour Mix (2/3 cup of Brown Rice Flour, 1/2 cupeach of white rice flour, tapioca flour, 1/3 cup of corn starch, 1/4cup of potato starch) 1 stick of unsalted butter (melted) or 1/2 cup of oil 2/3 cup of light brown sugar 2/3 cup of sugar 2 eggs 1 teaspoon of gluten-free vanilla extract 1/4 teaspoon of salt 1 teaspoon of gluten-free baking powder 1 teaspoon of gluten-free baking soda 1 1/2 of teaspoon of xanthan gum 1 cup of white chocolate chip 1 tbsp of milk (optional) 1/2 cup of macadamias nut (optional) DIRECTIONS: Preheat oven to 375 degree and line 2 baking sheet with parchment pager or use nonstick spray to grease the baking sheet. Mix melted butter, brown sugar and sugar until incorporated, add eggs and vanilla extract until blended In a medium bowl, whisk Silka Flour Mix, baking powder, baking soda, xanthan gum and salt Stir the dry ingredients to the butter mix until incorporated. Stir in white chocolate chip and Macadamias nut (optional) into the cookie dough If the dough appears to be a little dry, add in milk but it's entirely optional Use a tablespoon to scoop the cookie dough onto prepared cooking sheet, space them about 2 inches apart Bake for 12-15 minutes or until cookies turn golden cool cookies for 5 minutes before transferring them into a wire rack
  15. This is the perfect dip for a holiday party, or to share with your favorite dinner guests. Ingredients: 12 oz. fresh cranberries 1/2 cup organic sugar 2 Tbsp. unsweetened coconut flakes 2 (8 oz.) containers of dairy-free/vegan cream cheese such as GO Veggie! Plain Cream Cheese, softened 1 Tbsp. cranberry juice Sliced Fresh Fruit on toothpicks, for serving Directions: Pulse the cranberries in a food processor until finely chopped; add sugar, coconut flakes and cranberry juice then add the cream cheese and blend until smooth. Serve chilled with fresh fruit on toothpicks for your holiday guests. Enjoy!
  16. Celiac.com 09/12/2013 - The most recent industry report by Research and Markets offers a comprehensive analysis of key players in the gluten-free product industry, major gluten-free product types and their sales channels, with commentary on developments and trends. The report also provides a detailed analysis on various phases of numerous aspects of the gluten-free products industry, along with the competitive strategies favored by major industry players. Among the reports insights: As large supermarkets and mass retailers offer more gluten-free products, gluten-free sales by health and natural food stores are declining. Over the last ten years, as millions of Americans have stopped consuming products containing gluten from wheat, barley, or rye, the market for gluten-free foods and other products has shifted, and many products once regarded as specialty or niche products are now regarded as regular grocery items. The report projects global gluten-free product market to reach $6.2 billion at a CAGR of 10.2% by 2018. The report also provides market details and analysis for North America, now the largest market for gluten-free products, and for Europe, which is expected to show significant growth in the market in the near future. Some of that growth is attributed to a steady stream of new gluten-free products in the market, offering additional nutrition, new ingredients or flavors. The also report projects increased demand countries such as U.K., Italy, U.S., Spain, Germany, Australia, Brazil, Canada, and India, among others. The full report is available for purchase at: Gluten-Free Products Market By Type (Bakery & Confectionery, Snacks, Breakfast Cereals, Baking Mixes & Flour, Meat & Poultry Products), Sales Channel (Natural & Conventional) & Geography — Global Trends & Forecasts To 2018
  17. Celiac.com 07/02/2013 - This wonderful stuffed mushroom recipe makes a perfect appetizer for that perfect dinner experience! Makes 16 Mushrooms Ingredients: 1/4 cup uncooked quinoa 16 large button mushrooms 2 tablespoons olive oil 2 cloves garlic, minced 2 tablespoons finely chopped pecans 1 cup salsa 1 cup Go Veggie! Vegan Cheddar Cheese Shreds 2 Tbsp. Go Veggie! Vegan Parmesan, plus more for topping 1 teaspoon sea salt 2 Tbsp. finely chopped flat leaf fresh parsley Directions: Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Cook quinoa according to package directions. Remove stems from mushrooms and set aside. Place mushrooms on a nonstick baking sheet. Bake for 15 minutes. Meanwhile, chop mushroom stems into small pieces. In a large skillet, heat oil and garlic with chopped mushroom stems over medium heat for 4 minutes or until garlic starts to brown. Add pecans, salsa, Go Veggie Cheddar Cheese Shreds, Go Veggie Parmesan and sea salt; cook for 3 more minutes. Add cooked quinoa and continue to cook, gently stirring for another 3 minutes. Remove from heat; transfer mixture to empty mushroom caps. Top with parsley and bake for 10 minutes. Remove from oven; transfer to a serving plate. Serve warm with additional Parmesan cheese. Enjoy!
  18. Celiac.com 03/11/2009 - I recently had an unfortunate health experience related to celiac disease. I learned long ago that it’s my responsibility to manage my own health, so I came up with a strategy that was successful. Along the way, I also learned some important information that really helped me understand the problem and the eventual solution. Perhaps this information will help you avoid a similar health crisis. I’ve included links that can give you additional information. Disclaimer: I’m not a medical doctor. This is information that I have gathered based on my own experiences and research. Celiac Disease I have celiac disease. I manage it quite well through my diet. However, if I ingest anything with gluten, for instance a wayward crouton in a restaurant salad, I have a severe reaction that starts within five minutes. All or some of the following will occur: hives from head to toe, stomach cramps, uncontrollable diarrhea, vomiting, asthma, severe lethargy. I fall into an uncontrollable sleep that takes about four hours to run its course. Needless to say, I avoid gluten at all costs. A Bit of History Although I am a remarkable person (like all of us), my health history has been quite unremarkable. Nothing was ever wrong with me and I wasn’t allergic to anything. I can count on one hand how many times I’ve taken antibiotics in my entire life. In the past 30+ years, I never went to the doctor for an illness. I’ve had colds, various and sundry viruses and infections, but they ran their course with slowing down, plenty of rest and fluids. I believe that the primary strategy should be to give your body the time to heal itself first, and if that fails look for an alternative strategy from your doctor. Imagine my surprise when about six years ago the symptoms of celiac disease manifested themselves. (Note: I was going through an acute stressful time in my life when this occurred.) Along the way, other unexpected food allergies have presented themselves as well. One of my favorite foods was peanut butter. Since I was a little girl, I loved feasting on “peanut butter on spoon”. Out of the blue one day, a typical teaspoon of one of my favorite foods sent me into an anaphylactic reaction. And then a few months after that incident, a bite of a granola bar with cashews sent me on my first ambulance ride with a rapidly constricting throat to the emergency ward. My favorite food is now a deadly poison. I’ve had mild intestinal reactions to all vinegars and vinegar products (a little balsamic is OK), more than three glasses of red wine (not white wine or champagne), milk and cream (not cheese, thank the Universe!). I’ve also realized that I’m thirsty all the time. It seems that no matter how much water I drink, I can’t seem to quench my thirst. I even sleep with water next to my bed and drink several glasses throughout the night and still wake up thirsty. The water goes right through me and doesn’t seem to be absorbed. (I have recently been prodded, poked, examined and tested by a battery of doctors as a result of my once in 50-year checkup and they all agree that I’m the picture of health.) Both my mom and my grandmother suffered from asthma; my grandmother dealt with it her whole life. When I have an asthmatic reaction, my wheezing and coughing sound just like theirs! I remembered them being armed with their inhalers and their steroids at all times. I also remembered that these medical weapons didn’t stop the asthma attacks or the wheezing or uncontrollable coughing. They only dealt with the symptoms, not the underlying problem. Mom’s asthma went away when she started eating a gluten free diet. The Incident So I’ve come to enjoy cooking. Regardless of the disastrous results of my past cooking experiences well documented by my children, close friends and family, this new hobby relaxes me at the end of the day, is creative, saves money and insures a truly gluten and allergy free diet. I recently made a delicious French Onion and Ham Cream Soup. It was inspired by some wonderful French spices I bought from Penzey Spices. I made a big pot of the soup and had it for different meals throughout the week. I didn’t notice at the time an increased feeling of lethargy, intestinal rumblings and increased thirst that got progressively worse through the week. And then it happened. About five minutes after devouring the last of my delectable French Onion and Ham Cream Soup, the tell-tale signs of an oncoming asthma attack occurred: mucous pouring into my lungs, wheezing, airways closing up, unrelenting coughing. In addition, I had horrible abdominal cramping. I was tremendously thirsty, but the water just seemed to go through me and make me even thirstier. At about 4:00 am just as I was about to get myself to the hospital, I started to slowly stabilize, meaning I wasn’t getting worse. I slept for a little bit, then woke up coughing uncontrollably. My throat was so parched it felt like sandpaper. I dragged myself through a day of work exhausted, not being able to really get a good breath and feeling so very thirsty. That night I literally coughed all night long sitting straight up in a chair; I couldn’t lie down because of the coughing. I couldn’t go to work the next day. I needed to discover why this happened, how I can prevent it from happening again and implement an immediate strategy for managing this health crisis. Hypothesis I realized there was a relationship between several factors: celiac disease, since I had no allergies until it manifested itself; cow’s milk, which I knew was a highly allergic food; asthma, as the allergic reaction, and dehydration, because of the incessant thirst. By understanding how all of these factors related to each other, I thought I could figure out a strategy to 1) get myself into a healthy state quickly and 2) prevent this health crisis from happening again. (Even thought I knew this was an asthma attack, I wanted to make doubly sure it wasn’t pneumonia or something similar. I had no fever, chills, aches or pains, headache, or upper respiratory infection. I was fine one minute and not fine the next.) Research Asthma is a disease in which inflammation of the airways causes airflow into and out of the lungs to be restricted. When an asthma attack occurs, mucus production is increased, muscles of the bronchial tree become tight, and the lining of the air passages swells, reducing airflow and producing the characteristic wheezing and coughing. Asthma symptoms are usually worse at night. There is high correlation between people who have celiac disease and people who have sensitivities to proteins found in cow's milk. Milk is one of the most common food allergens in the American diet. And most cows eat a lot of grain and perhaps there’s a link here. Milk allergy symptoms can occur within minutes or hours after consuming the dairy product. They can be triggered by a very small amount of milk protein in the system. There is also a relationship between celiac disease, asthma and dehydration. People with celiac disease are often very thirsty even after drinking lots of water. And so are people with asthma. If fact, many doctors now think that asthma is a symptom of the body managing its water supply. This is how it works… Water is needed for every function of the body. Our bodies are 75% water and our brains are 85% water. Because of the water used in breathing, digestion, enzyme and hormone production, immune function, toxin removal and so on, we need to replace that water frequently throughout the day or our health will suffer. When we start to dehydrate, histamine production increases to conserve water in our bodies. This is vital since our lungs must remain moist to work properly. Excess histamine, a defense against losing more water, makes it difficult to breath and triggers an asthma attack. Histamine also stimulates mucous production to help seal in moisture, but that also leads to increased breathing difficulties. Histamines are also important for immune function, but during dehydration they are mostly used to look for water. If dehydration becomes chronic, the immune system will suffer; allergies, both inhalant and food allergies, will result because histamine is important for the proper balance of Tcells, antibodies and so on. Elevated histamine in the lungs causes the spasm of the bronchioles. This conserves moisture that would normally be lost during breathing. The mucus that clogs up the airways is the body’s attempt to keep the airways from completely drying out. Inflammation in the airways is the result of the body bringing more “micro-circulation” to the lungs as a result of dehydration. Common problem foods for people with asthma are dairy and gluten. Both are very hard to digest and require a lot of water to break down. If there is not enough water in the digestive tract when food is taken in, water will be pulled from other parts of the body and localized dehydration will result. This can lead to asthma, among other problems. Allergy symptoms of any kind are a sign that we need to drink more water. Antihistamines and most medicines, either directly or indirectly, actually are counterproductive for the body because they further dehydrate the body and shut off the body’s search for water. Pain, inflammation and digestive problems are also typically signs of dehydration. Dehydration is a common cause of migraines, for example. And then I unexpectedly learned about salt… Salt is the other half of the hydration equation. Salt is vital for the generation of hydroelectric energy and transmission of nerve impulses in all the cells. Salt acts as a natural antihistamine through salt-sensing nerves on the tongue and plays a major role in regulating water. Without enough salt, water is not absorbed. My Strategy The first step was to get myself in a healthy state. My re-hydration plans included continually drinking filtered water even through the night, teaspoons of honey to soothe my raw throat when needed and pinches of pink Australian sea salt (a Christmas gift from my wonderful mom) on my tongue throughout the day and night when I felt I needed it, although any sea salt would do. I also had vegetable juice and fruit juice for additional fluids. I noticed the salt working in a couple of hours. I was beginning to absorb the water (I didn’t have to pee every time I drank some water). It took about two days before the thirst went away. It was great waking up without a parched throat. The coughing was still uncontrollable, especially at night, but instead of a constant, non-productive coughing and horrible wheezing, the mucus was beginning to become looser. It took another three nights before I could sleep lying down, but the mucus had really broken up. The coughing was actually allowing the mucus to get out of my lungs. It took about six days to feel like myself again. I did gain about five pounds. But I lost it quickly and it was fat lost, not precious water. Besides, there’s nothing glamorous about walking around in a dehydrated, sickly state. The second step is to not let this happen again. I’m now drinking no less than 10 eight-ounce glasses of water every day with a pinch of salt on my tongue if I feel I need it. I need about ¼ teaspoon of salt for every quart of water I drink. After a lifetime of poor medical advice, I now know that salt is my friend. If I drink coffee or wine or if I get the nutty idea to exercise, I have to drink more water. And no more milk and cream - at least until I’m stabilized for awhile. If I feel an asthma attack coming on, the best treatment is to drink 2-3 cups of water and put a pinch of sea salt on my tongue. This will provide my body with the water it needs and the salt will send a signal to my brain to relax the bronchioles by letting it know relief is coming. Conclusion As difficult as this last health adventure was, I learned something that has changed the way I feel and has optimized my health. I found the root of the problem and fixed it instead of following mainstream medical thinking and putting a band aid on the symptoms. It’s really scary when it feels like your body is turning on you, and very empowering when you use science and knowledge to get yourself back. I’ve always said when it comes to business, “the market speaks, just listen.” I now need to take that advice for myself. My body speaks; I just have to listen!
  19. This recipe is great for kids who are on a gluten-free diet. Vegan, Gluten-Free and Dairy-Free Ingredients: 1 bag gluten-free corn tortilla chips 1 bag GO Veggie! Vegan Mexican Cheese Shreds 1/3 cup fresh cilantro, finely chopped 1 ripe avocado, peeled, pitted and diced 10 cherry tomatoes, halved 1/2 cup fresh salsa 1/4 tsp. sea salt 1/4 tsp. pepper Directions: Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Place corn tortillas in a large baking dish; top with remaining ingredients. Bake for 15 minutes or until cheese is completely melted. Remove from oven; serve warm. Enjoy!
  20. This just in on the gluten-free beer front: Omission Beer took the top two slots to win the honors for best gluten free beer at the 2012 Great International Beer & Cider Competition in Providence, R.I. A total of four hundred seventy (470) beers and ciders from breweries from around the globe competed for top honors. Judges in the blind tasting competition presented first, second and third place awards in 44 categories of ales, lagers and ciders. The judges included eighty-three professional brew meisters, beer industry professionals, and beer journalists, who were given only the style and subcategory of each beer and cider they judged. Omission Lager received the gold medal, and Omission Pale Ale earned silver in the gluten free beer category. Third place went to St. Peters Brewery in Bungay, Suffolk, UK, for their St. Peter’s Dark Sorghum beer. Omission beers use traditional ingredients, including malted barley, that are specially crafted to remove gluten. Omission tests gluten levels in every batch both at the brewery, and at an independent lab, using the R5 Competitive ELISA gluten test to ensure that the beer measures well below the Codex gluten-free standard of 20 ppm or less. The R5 Competitive ELISA is currently the best test for measuring gluten levels in fermented beverages. Omission posts test results for each batch of beer on their website: www.omissiontests.com. In the cider competition, Crispin Cider's Browns Lane took top honors in the English Cider category. Meantime, if all this talk of tasty gluten-free beer and cider is making you hungry, then check out our recent article Gluten-Free Beers and Ciders For the Holiday Season and Beyond.
  21. Betty Wedman-St Louis, PhD, RD

    Living With Celiac Disease & Diabetes

    This article originally appeared in the Autumn 2010 edition of Celiac.com's Journal of Gluten-Sensitivity. Celiac.com 05/09/2011 - Living with celiac disease and diabetes can be a challenge, but it is not impossible. You can travel the world, eat out and enjoy life but assertiveness is important to maintaining good blood glucose management and digestive health. Individuals with diabetes may notice an elevation of their blood glucose after overeating gluten-containing foods at a party, sleep-over, or birthday celebration. The usual rationalization is that too many calories and/or carbohydrates were consumed. However, it may be a wake-up call for you to try and control blood glucose levels by reducing or excluding gluten-containing foods. When eliminating wheat is first proposed as an alternative for controlling blood glucose, a frequent response is to express how “nutritious” wheat is. As the nutritional comparison of flours in my book Living Gluten-Free (Charles C. Thomas, Publisher, 2008) illustrates, rice flour is comparable to wheat flour, and superior in Vitamin B6, Pantethenic Acid, Zinc, Copper, Manganese and many other vitamins and minerals. Gluten sensitivity may affect as many as 1 in 25 Americans. It is also becoming better recognized as a primary cause of inflammation. Celiac disease or gluten intolerance can masquerade as many other diseases, including diabetes. Many people given steroid medications for bowel inflammation can also develop diabetes as a side-effect of the steroid medication. Once a gluten-free diet has been started, it is not necessary to “go back on wheat” to get a diagnosis of celiac disease. A simple blood test can reveal whether one has the predisposing genes for gluten enteropathy, and therefore whether it is a cause of blood glucose problems. Far too many people are told by gastroenterologists that a small intestinal biopsy is the “gold standard” for diagnosis. A HLA-DQ2/DQ8 blood test is less invasive, more precise and more cost-effective than the “gold standard”. Genetic predisposition for celiac disease has been described by Alessio Fasano, MD and illustrates how celiac disease is not one disease. In addition, genetic sequencing has reported that both celiac disease and diabetes are located on Chromosome 6, along with Crohn’s Disease. For managing diabetes, a gluten-free, carbohydrate-controlled diet can be a healthier alternative than eating whole wheat. Ten years ago gluten-free products such as prepared muffins, cookies, pizza crust, etc. were not available. Rice cakes were the norm and homemade bakery products added variety to the diet. Today, there are aisles of gluten-free products in the supermarket and health food stores. Even major convenience bakery mix producers like General Mills, Minneapolis, MN offer gluten-free cookie brownies and cake mixes. The advantage of choosing recipes in Living Gluten-Free is that sugar and carbohydrate levels are reduced compared to the mixes and prepared frozen bakery products available. This is important for individuals with diabetes who must limit carbohydrates. If prepared products are used in the diet, remember to divide the sugars total on the nutrition label by 4 to calculate how many teaspoons of sugar are in a serving (Example: chocolate chip cookie 1= sugars 13g divided by 4g = 3 teaspoons sugar per cookie). The only therapy currently available to treat gluten intolerance is removal of gluten from the diet. Since gluten is a component of many common foods and widely available in so many convenience foods, avoidance can be challenging. Here are two menu ideas for a gluten-free diabetic diet. More menus are available in Living Gluten-Free. Day 1 Breakfast: Grits, Scrambled Eggs, Orange Juice Lunch: Taco Salad & Corn Chips Dinner: Rib-eye Steak, Baked Potato, Spinach, Tomato Salad Snack: Grapes Day 2 Breakfast: Turkey Sausage, Blueberry Muffin*, Apple Lunch: Sliced Ham on Rice Bread, Fresh Fruit Dinner: Baked Chicken, Sweet Potato, Roasted Cauliflower, Carrot Raisin Salad Snack: Rice Flour Brownie
  22. I love pizza, but I am not on a gluten-free or dairy-free diet, so I am admittedly a bit skeptical of gluten-free or dairy-free pizzas. This pizza is both, and surprisingly, I was into it. The crust didn't taste like what I'm used to, but it was good. I've tried dairy-free pizzas with “cheese” that didn't melt properly and felt weird in my mouth. This cheese melts very well and gets pretty close to the real thing (just be sure to follow the final instruction and broil it for two minutes). The pizza tasted great, I just wish it had a bit more "cheese". For more information, visit their site. Note: Articles that appear in the "Gluten-Free Food & Specialty Product Companies" section of this site are paid advertisements. For more information about this see our Advertising Page.
  23. Great news for anyone who is not only on a gluten-free diet: Bold Organics Veggie Lovers Pizza is also dairy-free and vegan. This pizza is topped generously with organic roasted peppers, onions, shiitake mushrooms and Follow Your Heart's vegan mozzarella cheese. My kids didn't even question the dairy-free cheese and just dug right in. This thin crust pizza baked up beautifully, and we all loved the flavor and the texture! Not to mention that this is a wonderful treat for those with additional food allergies for it is also free from peanuts, tree nuts and eggs. For more information visit their site. Note: Articles that appear in the "Gluten-Free Food Reviews" section of this site are paid advertisements. For more information about this see our Advertising Page.
  24. Celiac.com 03/29/2010 - For many cultures, Easter represents the most important religious feast of the year. In biblical terms, it represents a celebration of Christ being resurrected. Yet, for those of us unable to digest gluten, it is yet another holiday reminding us of all the foods we can't eat. Many of us that are gluten sensitive, myself included, spend so much time focused on the foods we can't eat, that it's easy to lose sight of all the wonderful foods still available to us. The fact is, most of our favorite foods are still safe to eat with a little modification of course. Being gluten-free doesn't mean that you can't enjoy a holiday meal with your family and friends. If you are going to be a guest for the holiday, make sure your host knows about your food sensitivities, and understands how to accommodate your needs. If they can accommodate you-great! If not, make sure to bring your own gluten-free foods to be sure that you don't go hungry, and to avoid the temptation of eating something you might regret later. You may want to consider hosting Easter brunch at your house this year. Cooking the meal yourself assures that your meal will be gluten-free and eliminates the possibility of cross contamination. Whether you are making Easter brunch or Passover dinner, it's all supposed to be fun. That's why I put together a list of links that are all geared toward making it the best gluten-free Easter ever! The following links are a compilation of gluten-free recipes and prepared foods designed to make your holiday easy and fun. Some of the following links will take you out of Celiac.com and into another site. You may want to bookmark this list so you can reference it easily as needed. Dig in and enjoy! Passover wouldn't be complete without matzoh. That's why the first recipe I've included is for gluten-free matzoh. The nice thing about the following matzoh recipe is that it's not only Kosher, it's also gluten, corn, sugar, dairy, and egg free! So even if you have many food restrictions, this is one recipe that is safe for almost everyone. Just add the matzoh to your favorite soup recipe, chicken or mock-chicken and you are ready to celebrate! Gluten-Free Matzoh Of course no Rosh Hashanah is complete without Challah. The following recipe is gluten-free and has an option to be dairy-free as well. Gluten-Free Challah with a Dairy-Free Option Most meat in its pure form is gluten-free. However, during processing many meats are injected with gluten ingredients. The following links will help you determine which meats are gluten-free. Although, it is always a good idea to contact the manufacturer to verify that their meat is indeed gluten-free. Gluten-Free Turkeys Gluten-Free Hams The following are some links that will take you to easy and/or already prepared foods for Easter and Passover. Gluten-Free Breads: Gluten-Free Breads Gluten-Free Frozen Bread & Rolls Gluten-Free Baking Ingredients Gluten-Free Gravy: Easy Gluten-free Gravy Mixes Gluten-Free Desserts: Linzertorte Frozen Desserts Frozen Pies Easter Candy: It is so tempting to sample all of the yummy Easter candy out there, but don't forget that many Easter Candies are NOT gluten-free. During Passover and Easter, there are so many opportunities to go to parties with friends and family where there is a plethora of Easter snacks and candy; even office events will put your sweet tooth to the test. I recommend avoiding the temptation to sample Easter candy that may contain gluten, by bringing your own gluten-free candy to social events. Bringing gluten-free Easter candy to share with others will make it easier on you when it comes to sampling, because you can sample the candy you brought while also sharing with others. Informing your friends of your gluten-free candy requirements is also an option, it might even make a good conversation topic. The following is a list of gluten-free Easter candy. Please remember to check with the manufacturer if you have any questions. Gluten-free Candy Easter Candy Safe/Unsafe List As a newbie to the gluten-free community, I also have many other dietary restrictions. That's why finding gluten-free food is only half the battle for me. I also need to find food that fits all my other dietary requirements. Here is a site that I came across while looking for gluten-free, vegan recipes. These recipes all sound really amazing and I can't wait to try as many as possible! I must emphasize however, that I could not possibly try all of these recipes. So it is up to you to try the recipes that sound good to you and decide for yourself if you like them or not. I know first-hand how frustrating it is to spend time and money trying out a new, yummy sounding recipe, only to follow the recipe exactly as it is written, and discover that it tastes so bad I end up going to bed hungry. Rather than going to bed hungry, I recommend trying a few recipes before your holiday meal as a trial run. If you try a recipe before your holiday event, you will have an opportunity to decide if you like the recipe and to modify the recipe to fit your taste buds if necessary. Destiny's Gluten-Free/Vegetarian/Vegan/Other Dietary Alternatives Gluten-Free Easter Eggs: The following recipe is great for those with dye sensitivities or anyone looking for a natural, healthy alternative to Easter egg dyes. Most Easter coloring kits require vinegar. Be sure to use gluten-free vinegar. Gluten-Free Vinegar Natural/Food Based Dyes: Red and Pink- pomegranate juice, raspberries, cherries, cranberries, red grape juice, and beets, red onions. (less boiling or dying produces a pink color) Orange – carrots, chili powder or paprika Yellow – turmeric, orange or lemon peels, chamomile tea, celery seed (turmeric does not need to be boiled.) Brown – coffee, black tea or black walnut shells Green – spinach or liquid chlorophyll Blue – blueberries, purple grape juice Purple – grape juice or blackberries, concentrated grape juice, violet blossoms, and hibiscus tea Gold - curry powder, yellow delicious apple peels, dill seeds Deep yellow- soak eggs in turmeric for a long time Teal- Soak eggs in turmeric solution for 30 minutes and then cabbage soak for 5 seconds. Bright Blue- Soak eggs in cabbage solution overnight (or just for a long time) Red/Pink-less boiling or dying produces a pink color Instructions: To begin, boil your eggs and when they are cool, store them in your refrigerator until you are ready to dye them. Alternatively, you can boil eggs with dye or cold dip, for 5 seconds up to overnight, and dry on wire wrap. To make each dye, bring water, vinegar, and color element to a boil, lower the heat, simmer 30 min and strain dye. Please note, you will need a separate base for each primary dye color you make. The rule of thumb for the dye is to use four cups of chopped fruit, vegetable or plant material to four cups of water. Add two tablespoons of vinegar. Bring to a boil and then simmer for 15 to 30 minutes (depending on how intense you want the colors). Eggs colored in natural dyes generally have a dull finish and are not glossy. If you want your eggs to look glossy, rub them with cooking or mineral oil after they dry. Keep your eggs refrigerated until it's time to hide them or eat them. Caution: Food safety experts recommend not eating eggs that have been sitting at room temperature for more than two hours. Gluten-Free Quick-Check: Watch out for hidden gluten-ingredients,(caramel color, natural and artificial flavors or colors, etc) Keep your hands clean Host Easter brunch Make sure all of your kitchen equipment is clean and free of gluten contaminates Bring gluten-free Easter candy & snacks to share If you buy prepared meats, check with the manufacturer to make sure they are gluten-free Trust yourself. If you think something might make you sick, don't take any chances Above all else, have fun!
  25. Who said gluten-free frozen foods never taste good and fresh? When I had my first bite of Amy's Broccoli and Cheddar Bake I could not believe that it was a frozen product. The tender rice pasta was coated with a creamy, aged English cheddar sauce, and the green organic broccoli tasted very fresh and crisp, and it was a very healthy addition. This product is not only gluten-free, but is also high in protein, vitamin A, C, calcium, and good source of iron, so it's very nutritious. This bowl is simply a convenient food for me, as I am a working mom, and it allows for a quick meal when I have no time to cook. I would defiantly feel good serving it to my whole family at any meal time. It is very easy to prepare—I simply just remove the over-wrap and put the bowl into the oven, wait a few minutes and our meal is ready! I would recommend cooking these in a conventional oven for an even better taste. I'll keep these on hand for my family. I would say that this is a five star gluten-free frozen food, and the best broccoli and cheddar bake I have tasted. I would like to say thank you to Amy's for creating this gluten-free meal with all the flavor and goodness of homemade cooking. Visit their site for more info: www.amys.com. Note: Articles that appear in the "Gluten-Free Food Reviews" section of this site are paid advertisements. For more information about this see our Advertising Page.
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