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Found 6 results

  1. Celiac.com 03/11/2019 - Many researchers believe that intestinal microbiota play a key role in the development of celiac disease. Since gut microbiota are strongly influenced by systemic antibiotics, especially in early life, the role of antibiotics in the development of celiac disease comes into question. Do antibiotics in infancy influence celiac disease rates later on? The team’s observational nationwide register-based cohort study included all children born in Denmark from 1995 through 2012, and Norway from 2004 through 2012. They followed the children born in Denmark until May 8, 2015 and the children born in Norway until December 31, 2013. In all, they gathered medical data on more than 1.7 million children, including 3,346 with a diagnosis of celiac disease. Any patient who received a dispensed systemic antibiotic in the first year of life was defined as having been exposed to systemic antibiotics. In both the Danish and in the Norwegian groups, infants exposed to systemic antibiotics in the first year of life had higher rates of celiac disease than those with no exposure. The team found that the relationship between an increasing number of dispensed antibiotics and the risk of celiac disease was dose-dependent. That is, more antibiotics correlated to higher celiac rates of celiac disease, and vice versa. The data did not single out any one antibiotic, or narrow the age window within the first year of life. Rates were similar for infants who had been hospitalized versus those who had not. This study was both large and comprehensive. The findings provide more evidence that childhood exposure to systemic antibiotics in the first year of life may be a risk factor for later celiac disease. Read more at Gastroenterology The research team included Stine Dydensborg Sander, MD, PhD, Anne-Marie Nybo Andersen, MD, PhD, Joseph A. Murray, MD, Øystein Karlstad, MSci, PhD, Steffen Husby, MD, DMSci, and Ketil Størdal, MD, PhD. They are variously affiliated with the Hans Christian Andersen Children’s Hospital, Odense University Hospital, Denmark, the Department of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark, the Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Denmark, the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, USA, the Department of Non-Communicable Diseases, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Norway, and the Department of Pediatrics, Ostfold Hospital Trust, Norway.
  2. Celiac.com 07/22/2013 - Celiac disease is known to be caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. The genetic markers are fairly well established by now, but the environmental factors that are associated with celiac disease are still pretty foggy. A recent study suggests that antibiotic use might be one such factor. In a population-based case-control study analyzing Swedish population data, antibiotic use was compared against diagnosis of celiac disease. 2,933 people with celiac disease diagnoses were linked to the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register, in order to provide a history of antibiotic use. 2,118 people with inflammation (early celiac disease) and 620 people with normal mucosa but positive celiac disease blood test results were also compared. The control group consisted of 28,262 individuals matched for age and sex from the general population. The results of the study significantly suggest that antibiotic use is associated with celiac disease, at an odds ratio of 1.4 (1.27-1.53 confidence interval). Early celiac disease was also connected, with an odds ratio of 1.90 (1.72-2.10 confidence ratio), as well as positive celiac disease blood tests, at 1.58 odds ratio (1.30-1.92 confidence interval). Even when antibiotic use in the last year was ruled out, the results were very similar at 1.30 odds ratio (1.08-1.56 confidence interval). When ruling out patients with additional diseases, which could potentially be factors, the results were also very similar at 1.30 odds ratio (1.16-1.46 confidence interval). What does all that mean? A 1.4 odds ratio basically means that people who had a history of antibiotic use were 1.4 times as likely as those who had not taken antibiotics to develop celiac disease. The fact that inflammation associated with early celiac disease was also highly connected suggests that antibiotics' role in disrupting the biology of the GI tract could in some way cause celiac disease. There is still some question of causality, but it would seem that antibiotics could very likely be a culprit in the development of celiac disease, and should be avoided when possible. Source: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-230X/13/109/abstract
  3. So after being strict paleo for almost 6 months after my celiac diagnosis with no relief, I finally found my answer I took a breath test for small intestinal bacterial overgrowth today and it cmd out very, very positive. The doctor was able to tell me it was positive not even half way through the test! There's a very large amount of methane, which explains my severe bloating, gas, and constipation that's been worsening every day since going gluten free. I was so happy to have an answer I burst into tears, while simultaneously cracking up and hugging the nurse who told me it was positive (whom I'd just met that hour…) Needless to say, this was the best news I've ever heard. I finally get to have a life again! I'll get to go out, eat normal amounts of food, wear tighter clothes again without having to worry about my swollen gut showing lol. I'm pretty much ecstatic!!!(: Now my questions are….well, what do I do now? Is there anyone else who experienced this? Not getting better after going gluten free then finding out SIBO's the culprit? My doctor prescribed me Rifaximin twice a day for 10 days and then Neomycin twice a day for another 10 days afterwards. But she also mentioned that a large amount of methane as opposed to hydrogen in the intestine is harder to treat and less common /: (with my luck) This scares me and makes me feel like I should be extra careful. Is there anything else to do to kill off the bacteria? What probiotics would be good for helping to treat sibo? I already take Acidophilus but is there one that would work better? WHat about diet? I know the bacteria feeds of sugar and carbs? What sort of diet it recommended when treating SIBO, if there is any? And most importantly.. did this simple fix, the antibiotic, cure your ongoing symptoms? I feel like in a way it's too good to be true. I've been living in unbearable constant pain from the time I wake up till I go to bed for so long I feel like I've grown accustomed to it! Could this really be the end? Support is desperately needed here. Thanks everyone!
  4. Hi there, I haven't been on in a while. Back in November my 9-year-old daughter was diagnosed with celiac. We cut out all gluten, though it took another month or so to cut out everything as she was still eating a few things with gluten that I didn't realize. I am confident that she is gluten free now (though I worry about vinegar, caramel color, etc., so don't let her eat those often). Things seemed to be improving some after we started seeing a naturopath in about March. She prescribed a bunch of supplements including glutamine, pancreatin ox bile enzyme, high dose probiotics, Cortine, fish oil, and Vit. D drops. Then, about a month ago my daughter got a sinus infection and took a 10 day course of augmentin. She is much more nauseated again now (her main symptom since the tummy aches have gone away). We doubled up on the probiotics but, two weeks after finishing the augmentin, she's still no better. Her nausea seems to be worse at night as she goes to bed. This is not a stall tactic. I can definitely see that she's queasy. Anyone have insight for me? I feel so sorry for her and don't know what else to do. Thanks for any feedback you can give.
  5. Celiac.com 11/28/2012 - A team of researchers recently set out to determine whether childhood antianaerobic antibiotic exposure is associated with the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Their findings show that children who are treated with antianaerobic antibiotics face a significantly higher risk of developing IBD. The team included Matthew P. Kronman, MD, MSCE, Theoklis E. Zaoutis, MD, MSCE, Kevin Haynes, PharmD, MSCE, Rui Feng, PhD, and Susan E. Coffin, MD, MPH.They are affiliated variously with the Division of Infectious Diseases, Seattle Children’s Hospital at the University of Washington in Seattle, Washington, the Division of Infectious Diseases at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, and the Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, the Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The team's findings appear in the 24 September issue of Pediatrics. To get a better picture regarding use of antibiotics on children and a possible connection to IBD, the team conducted a retrospective cohort study using data from 464 UK ambulatory practices in The Health Improvement Network. The study looked at all children in the network with 2 or more years of follow-up from 1994 to 2009. The team screened and excluded anyone with previous IBD. They then cataloged all antibiotic prescriptions used by all children in the study. Finally, they tracked the children's data from practice enrollment and IBD development, practice de-registration, 19 years of age, or death. Their defined study parameters included the following antianaerobic antibiotics: penicillin, amoxicillin, ampicillin, penicillin/β-lactamase inhibitor combinations, tetracyclines, clindamycin, metronidazole, cefoxitin, carbapenems, and oral vancomycin. Their study looked at 1,072,426 children for a total of 6.6 million person-years of follow-up. Of those children, 748 developed IBD. Children treated with antianaerobic antibiotics had nearly 1.52 cases of IBD per ten-thousand person years, while those who were not given antibiotics saw just 0.83 cases per ten-thousand person-years; for an 84% relative risk differential. Antibiotic exposure throughout childhood was associated with the development of IBD, but this relationship decreased with increasing age at exposure. That is, the longer doctors waited to give children antibiotics, the more the risk of iBD went down. Children treated with antibiotics before 1 year of age showed an adjusted hazard ratio of 5.51 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.66–18.28), while that decreased to 2.62 (95% CI: 1.61–4.25) for children first treated at 5 years old, and to 1.57 (95% CI: 1.35–1.84) for those first treated at 15 years of age. Overall, each course of antibiotics increased the IBD hazard by 6% (4%–8%). The study showed that children who received two or more antibiotic courses were more highly likely to develop IBD than those who received 1 to 2 courses, with adjusted hazard ratios of 4.77 (95% CI: 2.13–10.68) versus 3.33 (95% CI: 1.69–6.58). So, based on this study, treating children with antianaerobic antibiotics puts them at risk for developing IBD. It will be interesting to see how the medical community responds to this study, and whether there is greater effort made to avoid giving these powerful antibiotics to children. What do you think? Do you have IBD? Did you receive these antibiotics as a kid? Let us know your thoughts by commenting below. Source: Pediatrics; 24 September 2012
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