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Found 19 results

  1. Celiac.com 03/06/2018 - A number of clinicians and researchers have suspected that antibodies against transglutaminase 6 (anti-TG6) play a role in neurological issues in adult patients with genetic gluten intolerance, but it is not known if autoimmunity to TG6 develops after long-term consumption of gluten. A team of researchers recently set out to establish a correlation between these autoantibodies and the duration of gluten exposure by measuring the anti-TG6 in children with celiac disease at diagnosis. The team then investigated a correlation between anti-TG6 and the presence of neurological disorders. The research team included L De Leo, D Aeschlimann, M Hadjivassiliou, P Aeschlimann, N Salce, S Vatta, F Ziberna, G Cozzi, S Martelossi, A Ventura, and T Not. They are variously affiliated with the Institute for Maternal and Child Health-IRCCS "Burlo Garofolo" Trieste, Trieste, Italy; Matrix Biology and Tissue Repair Research Unit, School of Dentistry, and Arthritis Research UK Biomechanics and Bioengineering Centre of Excellence, College of Biomedical and Life Sciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff; the Department of Neurology at the Royal Hallmshire Hospital, Sheffield, UK; and with the University of Trieste in Trieste, Italy. The team used ELISA to measure anti-TG6 (IgA/IgG) in children with biopsy-proven celiac disease and of children experiencing gastrointestinal disorders. Celiac disease patients who tested positive for anti-TG6 were retested after 2 years of gluten-free diet. In all, the team analyzed test results for 274 children with celiac disease, along with 121 control subjects. They found anti-TG6 in 68 out of 274 celiac disease patients and in 19/121 control subjects, though the differences between the two groups was significant. None of the celiac patients or the controls who tested positive for anti-TG6 suffered from neurological disorders. Eleven of 18 celiac disease patients with other autoimmune diseases tested positive for anti-TG6. Among the celiac disease patients, the team found a significant correlation between the gluten exposure before the celiac disease diagnosis and anti-TG6 concentration. The gluten-free diet substantially reduced the anti-TG6 concentrations. The team found no significant correlation between anti-TG6 and anti-TG2 serum concentrations. Anti-TG6 is much more common in children with untreated celiac disease , but with no apparent neurological disorders. The synthesis of the anti-TG6 is associated with longer exposure to gluten prior to celiac diagnosis, while the autoimmunity against TG6 is gluten dependent and disappears with a gluten-free diet. Source: J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2018 Jan;66(1):64-68. doi: 10.1097/MPG.0000000000001642.
  2. I kept a gluten-free diet for a long time, but I think there were a lot of so-called "hidden" gluten (in chocolates, coffee, sauces). Then I kept an ideal diet for a 7 days. After that I passed tests for antibodies IgA and IgG for gluten, they were negative. Does this mean that there was no hidden gluten in my previous diet? Or antibodies had been already left my body in that 7 days?
  3. Celiac.com 08/20/2015 - Celiac disease is frequently mis-diagnosed. Even when patients received endoscopy, celiac disease is often missed or not detected. A team of researchers recently assessed the accuracy of finger prick-based point-of-care tests in the detection of celiac disease, and developed an algorithm for diagnosis. The research team included PD Mooney, SH Wong, AJ Johnston, M Kurien, A Avgerinos, and DS Sanders. They are variously affiliated with the Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield, United Kingdom and the University of Sheffield, Sheffield, United Kingdom. Their team conducted a prospective study of two groups of celiac disease patients evaluated at the Royal Hallamshire Hospital in Sheffield UK from March 2013 through February 2014. In group one, the team evaluated 55 patients at high risk for celiac disease, and who tested positive for endomysial antibody, using the Biocard test (BHR Pharmaceuticals, Nuneaton, UK) and the Celiac Quick Test (Biohit Healthcare UK, Ellesmere Port, UK), which measure antibodies to tissue transglutaminase (anti-tTG), and the Simtomax test (Tillotts Pharma, Rheinfelden, Switzerland), which measures deamidated gliadin peptide antibodies (DGP). Group 2 included 508 consecutive patients who received an endoscopy for any reason, received the DGP test, and also were evaluated using a diagnostic algorithm that incorporated results from the DGP test and data on symptoms. For both groups, point-of-care tests were administered at the time of endoscopy, and the results compared against results from histologic analyses of duodenal biopsy specimens from all patients. In group 1, the DGP test identified patients with celiac disease with 94.4% sensitivity, the Celiac Quick Test identified patients with 77.8% sensitivity (P = .03 vs the DGP test), while the Biocard test identified patients with 72.2% sensitivity (P = .008 vs the DGP test). In group 2, the DGP test identified patients with celiac disease with 92.7% sensitivity (95% confidence interval, 83.0-97.3), 85.2% specificity (95% confidence interval, 81.5-88.3), a positive predictive value of 49.2% (95% confidence interval, 40.3-58.2), and a negative predictive value of 98.7% (95% confidence interval, 96.8-99.5). Measurement of serum anti-tTG identified patients with celiac disease with 91.2% sensitivity (95% confidence interval, 81.1-96.4), 87.5% specificity (95% confidence interval, 84.0-90.4), a positive predictive value of 53.0% (95% confidence interval, 43.6-62.2), and a negative predictive value of 98.5% (95% confidence interval, 96.5-99.4). The algorithm identified patients with celiac disease with 98.5% sensitivity, and has the potential to reduce duodenal biopsies by 35%. In this prospective study, the test for DGP identified celiac patients with comparable sensitivity and specificity as standard serologic analysis of anti-tTG. Conducting the DGP test before endoscopy might increase the accuracy of the diagnosis of celiac disease. These results look promising, but further study is needed, in lower-prevalence populations, to more accurately determine the potential benefits of the DGP test in celiac screening. Source: Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2015 Jul;13(7):1278-1284.e1. doi: 10.1016/j.cgh.2015.01.010. Epub 2015 Jan 26.
  4. Hi all, I'm just starting the process of testing for celiac disease but recently switched jobs after I got the initial blood test and no longer have insurance to follow up with the results. My doctors won't even entertain a call from me to inquire. Can anyone help me understand my results and what I should do in the next three months before my new insurance kicks in? And there after? Celiac disease panel: Range 0-19 my value = 98(*) Tissue Transglutaminase IGA : Range 0-19 my value = 74(*) Gliadin Antibodies IGA: Range 0-19 my value = 9 Any insight would be greatly appreciated =)
  5. Does this make sense to anyone? I'm going to get the actual lab report tomorrow, but until then I'm going off of what the nurse told me. Negative for everything but weak positive for the edomysial antibody. From what I'm reading, this doesn't make any sense... i have hashimoto's and my 3 year old was just diagnosed Celiac, which is why I got tested. Any help would be appreciated!
  6. Celiac.com 09/02/2008 - Thanks to a team of researchers based in Great Britain, doctors may soon have a powerful new diagnostic tool to help them in their efforts to combat the damage caused by celiac disease. Their new discovery concerns people with celiac disease who may also develop neurological disorders. The research team was made up of Marios Hadjivassiliou, MD, Pascale Aeschlimann, BSc, Alexander Strigun, MSc, David Sanders, MD, Nicola Woodroofe, PhD, and Daniel Aeschlimann, PhD. The team recently investigated the nature of gluten sensitivity by isolating a unique neuronal transglutaminase enzyme and examining whether it is the focus of the immune response in celiac patients with neurological dysfunction. About one in ten people with celiac disease also suffer from associated neurological disorders, mainly from a condition involving the cerebellum called gluten ataxia, and another involving the peripheral nerves called gluten neuropathy. For many people celiacs with gluten ataxia, their neurological problems are their sole symptom. Only about 1 out of 3 people with gluten ataxia and celiac disease will show classic intestinal damage when given a biopsy. This can make proper diagnosis difficult for them. Also, there’s presently no reliable way to predict which people with gluten intolerance might develop neurological problems. Most people familiar with celiac disease know that gastrointestinal discomfort is one of the most common symptoms. The antibody most commonly associated with such discomfort is called anti-transglutaminase 2 IgA. This is one of the main antibodies that doctors commonly look for when evaluating possible cases of celiac disease. Anti-TG2 antibodies are pretty much exclusive to people with celiac disease, and are associated with both untreated clinically symptomatic celiac disease, and with the latent form of the disease. This makes the presence of anti-TG2 antibodies an excellent diagnostic indicator of celiac disease. Anti-TG2, however, may not be the best indicator in every case of celiac disease. One example is in cases of dermatitis herpetiformis, which is an external skin reaction to gluten. Most people with dermatitis herpetiformis have a persistent itchy skin rash, and while the majority of cases show intestinal damage with a biopsy, patients rarely experience intestinal discomfort associated with classic celiac disease.1 There is also reliable data that point to a role that anti-TG3 plays in cases of dermatitis herpetiformis.2 This indicates that the nature of a given individual’s immune response may determine how celiac disease manifests itself within that individual. That hypothesis seems to be born out by the research team’s discovery that another antibody, called anti-transglutaminase 6 IgG and IgA response is widespread in gluten ataxia, completely outside of any intestinal symptoms. These antibodies are not found in healthy control patients or in patients with neurological conditions that had clear genetic causes. Both groups showed no anti-TG6 in their blood samples. The research team took blood samples from 20 patients with newly diagnosed celiac disease before the patients began a gluten-free diet. The team confirmed the presence of celiac disease with duodenal biopsy and made sure the patients had no patients had no evidence of neurological problems. The team then took blood samples from 34 patients with Gluten Ataxia, which they defined as otherwise sporadic idiopathic ataxia with positive IgG and/or IgA anti-gliadin antibodies. The also took samples from another17 patients with peripheral idiopathic neuropathy (PN) who tested positive for anti-gliadin antibodies. These 17 patients tested negative for anti-MAG and anti-GM1 and had no evidence of intestinal damage on biopsy. The team used three separate control groups. The first was a group with genetic ataxia, which included 18 patients with ataxia that was genetic in nature, or with a clear family history of autosomal dominant ataxia. The second control group of 14 patients included cases of diseases that were immune-mediated, but not tied to gluten-sensitivity (such as vasculitis, viral cerebellitis, paraneoplastic ataxia, GAD ataxia). Lastly, the team used blood samples from 19 healthy individuals as another control group. The research team used recombinant human transglutaminases to develop ELISA and inhibition assays with which they measured blood samples of patients with gluten sensitive gastrointestinal and neurological disorders, along with several control groups that included unrelated inherited or immune conditions, for the presence and specificity of autoantibodies. The team found that the blood samples of patients with celiac disease and gluten ataxia contain IgA and IgG class antibodies to TG6 that are not present in the healthy control patients or in patients with neurological conditions that had clear genetic causes. At present, doctors test for celiac disease by checking the HLA type, and looking for the presence of anti-gliadin and anti-transglutaminase 2 antibodies. The results of this study indicate that the presence of anti-transglutaminase 6 can help to pinpoint patients with gluten sensitivity that may be at risk of developing neurological disease. Forthcoming: Annals of Neurology Footnotes: 1. Marks J, Shuster S, Watson AJ. Small bowel changes in dermatitis herpetiformis. Lancet 1966; 2:1280-1282. 2. Sárdy M, Kárpáti S, Merkl B, Paulsson M, and Smyth N. Epidermal transglutaminase (TGase3) is the autoantigen of Dermatitis Herpetiformis. J Exp Med 2002; 195:747-757.
  7. Celiac.com 06/06/2014 - Celiac disease guidelines suggest that some patients with high anti-tTG ab levels might be diagnosed without biopsy. A team of Indian researchers recently reviewed their celiac disease database to determine if anti-tissue transglutaminase (tTG) antibody (ab) titers correlate with severity of villous abnormalities in Indian patients, and to find out a cutoff value of anti-tTG ab fold-rise that might best predict celiac disease. The researchers included P. Singh, L. Kurray, A. Agnihotri, P. Das, A.K. Verma, V. Sreenivas, S. Datta Gupta, and G.K. Makharia. The are affiliated with the Departments of Gastroenterology and Human Nutrition, Pathology, and Biostatistics at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences in New Delhi, India. The team reviewed data on 366 anti-tTG ab-positive individuals who received duodenal biopsies. The team conducted anti-tTG ab screens before patients began a gluten-free diet, and they expressed anti-tTG ab results in terms of fold-rise by calculating ratio of observed values with cutoff value. Celiac disease was diagnosed only in patients with positive serology, villous atrophy greater than Marsh grade 2, and clear response to gluten-free diet. Average anti-tTG fold-rise in groups with Marsh grade ≤2 was 2.6 (±2.5), grade 3a was 4.0 (±3.9), 3b was 5.7 (±5.1), and 3c was 11.8 (±8.0). Overall positive likelihood ratio for diagnosing celiac disease was 15.4 and 27.4 at 12- and 14-fold-rise of anti-tTG ab titer, respectively. The positive predictive value of diagnosis of celiac disease was 100% when anti-tTG ab titer was 14-fold higher over the cutoff value. Fifty-seven (43.9%) patients with anti-tTG titer rise less than 2-fold also had celiac disease. Levels of anti-tTG rise directly with severity of villous abnormality. High anti-tTG ab titers indicate likely villous atrophy. Contrary to emerging wisdom, even patients with anti-tTG ab levels less than 2-times baseline should receive mucosal biopsies, because many patients with celiac disease have such low levels. Source: J Clin Gastroenterol. 2014 Feb 27.
  8. Celiac.com 11/22/2009 - Celiac disease has been associated with numerous other auto-immune disorders. Recently, there appeared the case of a 40-yr-old competitive strongman with celiac disease, who responded to a gluten-free diet, but developed profound and generalized motor weakness with acetylcholine receptor antibody positive myasthenia gravis, a disorder reported to occur in about 1 in 5000 people. A team of researchers set out to further explore this possible relationship between myasthenia gravis and celiac disease via serological study. The research team was made up of Hugh J Freeman, Helen R Gillett, Peter M Gillett, Joel Oger of the Department of Medicine (Gastroenterology and Neurology) at Canada's University of British Columbia. The researchers performed celiac disease screens on frozen stored serum samples from 23 acetylcholine receptor antibody positive myasthenia gravis patients with no intestinal symptoms. They examined both endomysial and tissue transglutaminase antibodies. One in 23 samples (or, about 4.3%) tested positive for both IgA-endomysial and IgA tissue transglutaminase antibodies. Subsequent endoscopic study showed duodenal mucosal scalloping, while biopsies confirmed the histopathological changes of celiac disease. From this, they concluded that celiac disease and myasthenia gravis may occur together more often than is currently understood. Muscle weakness in celiac disease may be a sign of possible occult myasthenia gravis, even in the absence of intestinal symptoms. Source: World J Gastroenterol 2009 October 14; 15(38): 4741-4744
  9. Celiac.com 01/01/2014 - By enabling researchers to link antibodies with certain diseases, a new method could help uncover and confirm environmental triggers for diseases such as celiac and autism. The researchers have two goals, according to professor Patrick Daugherty, a researcher with the department of chemical engineering and the Center for BioEngineering at University of California, Santa Barbara. First, they want to create diagnostic tests for diseases for which there are currently no blood tests. Next, they want to figure out what causes the diseases. The process works by mining an individual’s immunological memory—a veritable catalog of the pathogens and antigens encountered by his or her immune system Every time we encounter a pathogen, our bodies mounts an immune response in the form of antibodies that are specific for given antigens; molecular, microbial, chemical, etc. Each time our bodies mount this response, they form “memory cells” that are activated by subsequent encounters with that specific antigen. Responses can vary, from minor reactions to serious autoimmune diseases in which the body turns against its own tissues and its immune system responds by destroying them, such as in the case of Type 1 diabetes and celiac disease. People with celiac disease, for example, will have certain antibodies in their blood that bind to specific peptides—short chains of amino acids—present in wheat, barley, and rye. These peptides are the gluten that trigger adverse reactions in certain people. In the same way that a lock is meant to take only one key, these antibodies will only attach to specific sequences of amino acids that make up the peptides. The researchers want to figure out which antibodies are linked to specific diseases. “People with celiac disease have two particular antibody types in their blood, which have proved to be enormously useful for diagnosis,” says Daugherty. Source: UC Santa Barbara
  10. I've been reading all about these test results and I don't understand what I have. There seems to be different wording for some of the tests and I don't understand my results. I know one is high, but does that mean I've got Celiac Disease, or just a gluten intolerance Do I need to get the biopsy done? I've been gluten-free for 3 months now, would I need to go back to eating gluten before I get the biopsy done? Here are my test results: Immunoglobulin A: 427 (normal range 68-378) Tissue Transglutaminase Antibody, lgA: 5 (normal range 0-19) Gliadin lgA Antibodies: 5 (normal range 0-19) thanks in advance for any assistance!
  11. Celiac.com 03/08/2012 - Eating gluten-free for an entire lifetime is no easy task. Many people with celiac disease and gluten-sensitivities would love an alternative to a gluten-free diet, and a number of companies are looking to develop alternative therapies that would enable people to consume gluten without suffering damage. Even though nearly all drug-development programs include gluten challenges, very little is known about the duration of gluten challenge and gluten dosage. That is, how quickly does gluten cause damage, and at what dosages? A team of researchers recently studied the ways in which antibodies respond and mucosa change when the small bowel is exposed to gluten in people with celiac disease. The study team included Marja-Leena Lähdeaho, Markku Mäki, Kaija Laurila, Heini Huhtala, and Katri Kaukinen. To assess the amount of gluten-exposure needed to cause some small-bowel mucosal deterioration, the team conducted a gluten-challenge on twenty-five adult celiac patients. Each patient received either a low (1-3 g) or moderate (3-5g) doses of gluten daily for 12 weeks. The team assessed patient symptoms, including small-bowel morphology, densities of CD3+ intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) and celiac serology. Their results showed that both moderate and low amounts of gluten induced small-bowel damage in 67% of celiac patients. However, moderate gluten doses also caused mucosal inflammation and gastrointestinal symptoms in seven patients that lead to their premature withdrawal from the study. Interestingly, 22% of patients who developed significant small-intestinal damage showed no symptoms. The team concludes that, for most people with celiac disease, even low amounts of gluten can cause significant mucosal changes. However, since many people with celiac disease show no such response, sample sizes must be large enough to be statistically significant. Source: BMC Gastroenterology. 2011;11(129).
  12. Please note that this study has no biopsy confirmation, so it can only be called gluten intolerance statistics. Its findings indicate that gluten intolerance may be relatively common in the general population. AU - Arnason JA ; Gudjonsson H ; Freysdottir J ; Jonsdottir I ; Valdimarsson H TI - Do Adults with High Gliadin Antibody Concentrations have Subclinical Gluten Intolerance? LA - Eng AD - Department of Immunology, National University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland. SO - Gut 1992 Feb;33(2):194-7 AB - Gliadin antibodies of the IgG and IgA isotopes and IgG subclasses were measured in 200 adults who were randomly selected from the Icelandic National Register. Those with the highest gliadin antibody concentrations were invited with negative controls to participate in a clinical evaluation. Neither the study subjects nor the physicians who recorded and evaluated the clinical findings were aware of the antibody levels. Significantly higher proportion of the gliadin antibody positive individuals reported unexplained attacks of diarrhea (p = 0.03), and IgA gliadin antibodies were associated with increased prevalence of chronic fatigue (p = 0.0037). The gliadin antibody positive group also showed significantly decreased transferrin saturation, mean corpuscular volume and mean corpuscular hemoglobin compared with the gliadin antibody negative controls. Serum folic acid concentrations were significantly lower in the IgA gliadin antibody positive individuals. On blind global assessment, 15 of the 48 participants were thought to have clinical and laboratory features that are compatible with gluten sensitive enteropathy, and 14 of these were in the gliadin antibody positive group (p = 0.013). Complaints that have not been associated with gluten intolerance had similar prevalence in both groups with the exception of persistent or recurrent headaches that were more common in the gliadin antibody positive group. These findings raise the possibility that a sub-clinical form of gluten intolerance may be relatively common. The following chart summarizes the study: No. Randomly Selected for Study No. Selected w/ High Gliadin No. w/ Gluten Sensitive Enteropathy No. w/ GSE & High Gliadin 200 ( = 100%) 48 ( = 24%) 15 ( = 7.5%) 14 ( = 7%)
  13. Celiac.com 06/24/2010 - Scientists have previously seen a nuclear fluorescence reactivity (NFR) pattern on monkey esophagus in sections which were exposed to celiac disease patients that were sera positive for anti-endomysium antibodies (EMA). Because of this prior knowledge, scientists created a new study to illustrate the NFR, to study NFR positive results in connection with gluten withdrawal, and also to assess the possible role of NFR in celiac disease follow-up's. For twelve months, scientists closely evaluated twenty untreated celiac patients, eighty-seven treated celiac patients, and fifteen healthy control subjects. Scientists incubated the sera of all 122 patients on monkey esophagus sections. The goal was to evaluate the existence of NFR by indirect immunofluorescence analysis. To asses the rate of NFR in culture supernatants, duodenal mucosa samples from treated celiac patients were challenged with gliadin peptides. Scientists evaluated the reactivity of NFR immunoglobulins (Igs) response to the nuclear extract of human intestinal cells. What they found was that serum NFR was visible in all untreated celiac patients and it persisted for up to 151 +/-37 days from gluten withdrawal. It reappeared in treated celiac patents when they did not stick to their dietary restrictions. Serum NFR was also present in two of the healthy control subjects. NFR presented itself before EMA, in culture supernatants of celiac intestinal mucosa that was challenged with gliadin peptides. The Igs responsible for NFR were labeled as, “IgA2 Subclass”. The NFR had different results than the EMA and anti-nuclear antibodies, although they reacted with two nuclear antigens of 65 and 49 kDa. Thus, a new auto-antibody named NFR, which is related to celiac disease, was depicted. In conclusion, the studies of NFR have demonstrated that NFR detection has potential to be used as a beneficial tool in monitoring compliance of a gluten-free diet, as it has the ability to diagnose slight dietary shifts pertaining to gluten. Source: Clinical and Experimental Immunology
  14. Celiac.com 03/25/2010 - A team of researchers recently set out to compare the diagnostic performance of IgG anti-deamidated gliadin peptide antibody assays against IgA anti-tTG in celiac disease. The team included P. Vermeersch, K. Geboes, G. Mariën, I. Hoffman, M. Hiele, X. Bossuyt, all associated with the department of Laboratory Medicine, Immunology of University Hospitals at the Catholic University of Leuven, Belgium. Using IgG anti-deamidated gliadin peptide antibody assays to test for celiac disease is more sensitive and more specific for celiac disease than detection of IgG antibodies against native gliadin. The team compared assessed the technical performance and accuracy (sensitivity and specificity) of commercial IgG anti-DGP assays from Euroimmun, Inova, Phadia and The Binding Site against other serologic assays for celiac disease, such as 3IgA and 2IgG anti-tTG assays, 1IgA and 1IgG anti-gliadin assay, 1IgA anti-DGP assay. For the study, they tested 86 patients with clinically proven celiac disease and 741 healthy control subjects. Technical performance of IgG anti-DGP assays as gauged by linearity, interference and imprecision, was within acceptable levels. IgG anti-DGP assay sensitivity ranged between 76.7% and 83.7% at the manufacturer's recommended cut-off, and between 74.4% and 84.9% at a cut-off that corresponded to a 98% specificity level. Specificity ranged between 97.3% and 99.3%. The diagnostic accuracy of the IgG anti-DGP assays was comparable to the diagnostic accuracy of the IgA anti-tTG assays. IgG anti-DGP assays showed significantly better than sensitivity than the IgG anti-tTG assays (p<0.05) and and significantly better specificity than IgA and IgG anti-gliadin assays (p<0.05). The four IgG anti-DGP assays all performed within acceptable limits, and diagnosed celiac disease with comparable accuracy as did the three IgA anti-tTG assays. Source: Clin Chim Acta. 2010 Feb 19.
  15. Celiac.com 10/23/2009 - Current estimates put the number of celiac disease sufferers at about 1% of the general population. However, some celiac disease experts, like Dr. Andrew Fassano, predict that up to 10% of the general population may prove to suffer from gluten intolerance. Easier, more reliable testing methods, such as blood antibody screening, have helped promote early detection of celiac disease, thus preventing serious complications of the disorder. Such tests also move researchers closer to knowing if Dr. Fassano’s prediction will hold true. In addition to classic complaints such as indigestion, diarrhea, poor nutritional uptake, among others, people with both celiac disease and gluten intolerance often present with a wide variety of generalized symptoms, and many increasingly show no clinical symptoms at all. A team of researchers recently set out to develop specific and sensitive immunoassays that can reliably detect celiac disease. In this case, they developed immunoassays for the detection of IgG and IgA antibodies to gliadin using synthetic peptides. The research team was made up of Anil K. Bansal, Matthew J. Lindemann, Vince Ramsperger, and Vijay Kumar. The team looked serum results for endomysial (EMA) and tissue transglutaminase (tTG) antibody screens from 200 blood individuals with celiac disease, as well as from celiac disease control subjects, and healthy normal subjects. In order to assess reliability of the Celiac G+ antibody test against EMA, which offers higher sensitivity and higher specificity, the team included samples with both high and low EMA titers. The team compared the Celiac G+ antibody assay against EMA and another commercially available gliadin peptide assays, together with tTG antibody assays. The data show that as the EMA levels increased the sensitivity of detection of antibodies to synthetic peptides on both systems increased, reaching 100% at EMA titers greater than 160. Celiac G+ synthetic gliadin peptide assay provides markedly superior diagnostic performance compared with other gliadin peptide immunoassays. Overall, the diagnostic performance of the Celiac G+ assay for IgA and IgG showed a sensitivity of 80% and 90% respectively in comparison with EMA. Compared to the other available synthetic peptide immunoassays, EMA positivity yielded sensitivities of 59% (IgA) and 75% (IgG). Specificity for celiac G+ antibody assay was 90–95% for IgA and IgG compared to 88–90% specificity for other similar assays. The results show that Celiac G+ ELISA provides better sensitivity and better specificity compared with other available synthetic gliadin peptide immunoassays. Moreover, when used in combination with the IgA tTG antibody test, the IgG Celiac G+ antibody test offers an excellent screening algorithm for suspected cases of celiac disease. As tests for celiac disease and gluten intolerance become better, easier, more reliable, as they become more sensitive and more specific and available to more people, more and more people will come to understand that they suffer from celiac disease and/or gluten intolerance. Every one of those discoveries offers someone a chance to improve their well-being and live a long, healthy life. For now, stay tuned... Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. 2009 Sep; 1173:36-40.
  16. Pediatrics 2005;115:1341-1346. Celiac.com 05/31/2005 – According to Canadian researchers, the use of Tissue Transglutaminase Antibody (tTG) Screening may soon replace the use of the small bowel biopsy to diagnose celiac disease in children. The researchers reviewed the charts of 103 children who were screened for celiac disease using both small bowel biopsy and tTG. Fifty-eight of the children were found to have positive biopsy results, and out of these, 48 had very high tTG levels (over 100 U), 7 had middle tTG levels (20-100 U), and 3 had low levels (less than 20 U). Out of the 49 children with the highest tTG levels, all but one of them had a positive biopsy result. There were 3 biopsy-positive children who had low tTG levels, two who were found to be IgA negative, and one who had a duodenal ulcer. According to the researchers, using tTG values of greater than 100 U and less than 20 U, and knowing the patients IgA status, tTG testing was "98% sensitive and 97% specific in detecting celiac disease." The researchers also point out that the cost of diagnosis could be cut by 30% by utilizing tTG screening. The researchers conclude that children with high tTG titers can proceed straight to a gluten-free diet--if they respond well then their diagnosis is confirmed—if not they can proceed to a biopsy. Although the authors dont address this issue specifically, this method would likely lead to an increase in the diagnosis rate of celiac disease, as many people are unwilling to undergo a biopsy--or have their children undergo one.
  17. Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol 2006;18:503-506. Celiac.com 08/14/2006 – A team of German researchers led by Dr. Martin W. Laass of the Childrens Hospital in Dresden have determined that antigliadin antibody (AGA) positivity disappears in over 50% of cases, and is therefore a poor marker for celiac disease. The researchers did follow up AGA testing on 69 adults and 47 children who participated in a much larger study conducted four years ago and found that only 26 of the adults and 21 of the children still had detectable levels of AGA in their blood samples, and none of them were positive for IgA-class anti-endomysial antibodies. Additionally no correlation was found in the subjects between their serum and fecal AGA. The researchers conclude that the appearance of AGA should be interpreted as a non-specific “immunomodulation phenomenon” that has low specificity as a diagnostic marker for celiac disease. The researchers emphasize that it is still unknown why the AGA markers are transient, but various conditions might account for it, including a change in the sensitivity of the test that was used in the original study conducted four years ago versus the one used in this study.
  18. Celiac.com 02/09/2005 – The following abstract supports the use of fecal scIgA AGA combined with fecal IgA AGA, IgG AGA and IgM AGA to diagnose celiac disease, as they may be detected there even before they can be in the blood of celiac patients. This research adds support for the use of fecal testing as an early diagnostic tool, and perhaps also supports the work that has been done in this area by doctors like Kenneth Fine. Clin Lab. 2004;50(9-10):551-7. Comparison of different salivary and fecal antibodies for the diagnosis of celiac disease. Halblaub JM, Renno J, Kempf A, Bartel J, Schmidt-Gayk H. Clin Lab. 2004;50(9-10):551-7. ABSTRACT: To investigate the detectability and expressiveness of salivary and fecal anti-gliadin (AGA), anti-endomysium (EMA) and anti-tissue-transglutaminase (ATA) antibodies, 127 salivary and 160 fecal samples of healthy volunteers and salivary and fecal samples of 17 patients with histologically proven and 9 patients with suggested celiac disease were investigated in this study. With all salivary parameters and fecal IgA AGA, IgM AGA, IgA EMA and IgG EMA, healthy volunteers and patients showed partially overlapping results. The most promising results in our study with higher concentrations in patients with celiac disease were obtained by fecal scIgA AGA and a combined determination of fecal IgA AGA, IgG AGA and IgM AGA. Further investigations should be performed with fecal IgA EMA and scIgA ATA based on human recombinant tissue-transglutaminase. One patient with histologically proven celiac disease had normal serological but high fecal scIgA AGA and scIgA ATA values. This patient emphasizes the importance of fecal antibody determination for the diagnosis of celiac disease, at least in patients with suggested celiac disease and negative serum antibodies.
  19. Lancet 2002;359:945-946. Celiac.com 04/12/2002 - According to a report published in the March 16th issue of The Lancet, a new anti-transglutaminase antibody test developed by Dr. Luis Sorell and colleagues from the Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology in Havana, Cuba can accurately diagnose people with celiac disease in less than 10 minutes. The assay consists of a nitrocellulose strip that is placed in serum or plasma specimens, and it detects both IgA and IgG antibodies to transglutaminase, which prevents misdiagnosis of patients who have IgA deficiency, a trait that is frequently seen in people with celiac disease. If two dots appear it indicates a positive result. To determine the assays accuracy Dr. Sorell and colleagues evaluated 50 patients with untreated celiac disease along with 40 patients who had other gastrointestinal disorders. The results showed that the assay was 100% accurate, all of the patients with diagnosed celiac disease tested positive, and all of the patients with other disorders tested negative. Ultimately the assay could be used for an inexpensive mass-screening program for celiac disease.
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