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  1. Celiac.com 09/20/2017 - A half-time report on what we've learned about each other so far in the Relational Aspects of Food Sensitivities research. The study is geared toward gaining perspective on the perceived impact one adult's food restrictions cause in a household when cohabitating with other adults. It may ultimately yield strategies to address the social and emotional impact of living with food sensitivities. It aims to provide coping strategies, solidarity and empowerment to our community. If you haven't had a chance to take the survey, unfortunately it's not too late. If you have, thank you! More about the survey will appear in the next issue and the four lucky $25 Amazon gift card winners will be announced next month as well. Here's what we've learned so far: Ninety-six percent (96%) of those who took the survey have a diagnosis that leads them to be on a gluten-free diet. Fifty-one percent (51%) have been diagnosed for 8+ years; 28% have been diagnosed between 4-7 years, 13% between 1-3 years, 5% between 7 months and 1 year, and 3% between 0-6 months. Most began eating a gluten-free diet immediately after being diagnosed. Fifty-two percent feel that the way they were diagnosed affects how seriously the other adult(s) living in the household take their dietary requirements and 23% report that the way they were diagnosed doesn't affect the behavior of the other residential adults at all. When it comes to how diagnosed, 73% were diagnosed by an MD; 12% by themselves; 5% by a Practitioner, 5% by "Other;" 3% by a Naturopath and 2% by a Nutritionist. Forty-six percent (46%) report that they check in with a medical or health professional to monitor their health/diet once a year, and 21% get checkups several times a year. Most of us get our medical, health and dietary information we implement into our lifestyle from online sources (39%), books/magazines (21%) and from the MD (17%). The other 23% who took the survey get information from TV/Media, friends, and other sources. Because of the high-quality content available on websites such as Celiac.com, 87% report they are definitely not confused as to which foods are considered to be gluten-free. Sixty-percent (62%) of the respondents' report that other adults in the household are definitely not confused as to which foods are considered to be gluten-free. Ninety-two percent (92%) of us are not confused about what constitutes a "healthy diet." Thirty-eight percent (38%) feel they eat a healthy diet all the time, 48% eat a healthy diet most of the time, 11% eat a healthy diet sometimes, and 3% never eat a healthy diet. Our diet includes gluten-free grains 83% of the time, while 17% of us are grain-free. Adult cohabitants 'almost always' follow the same dietary requirements as we do in 56% of the households, 'sometimes' in 32% and 'rarely' in 12% of the households. Fifty-seven percent (57%) of us report that we eat different foods than the other adults living in the household 'sometimes,' while 22% of us do that 'rarely' and 21% almost always eat different foods. Adults with food sensitivities in 19% of the households enjoy meals prepared by another adult most of the time, 'sometimes' in 46% and never in 36% of the homes. Sixty-seven percent (67%) of those who eat meals prepared by another adult in their household trust that the meals are safe for them to eat. Fifty-one percent (51%) of those who took the survey report that someone else in the household prepares meals for them one to five times a week while 45% report they make all of their meals themselves. Most of us (95%) never cheat on the gluten-free diet. Demographics of the Respondents Eighty-five percent (85%) of the respondents are female and 15% are male. Ninety-two (92%) are white, most (65%) live with one other adult. Thirty-four point sixty two percent (34%) have a Bachelor's degree and 23% have a Masters degree. Household income was between $75-149K for 33% of the respondents. In-Depth Interview – Phase II For those of you who answered, "yes" to the Phase II interview (the longer-term portion of the research) and haven't heard from me yet, please be patient. I'm working with some time constraints now that fall quarter classes have begun and will be contacting some of you in the coming months to schedule a time to talk.
  2. Celiac.com 11/24/2015 - Polyphenols are a group of compounds produced by plants, highly variable in strucure, physical, chemical and biological properties. Currently science knows of several thousand natural phenolic compounds. A common feature of polyphenols is their ability to enable redox reactions. With their ability to transport protons and electrons, phenolic compounds not only readily get oxidized, but also, through the compounds called quinones that result from their oxidation, may mediate oxidation of other compounds that do not directly react with oxygen. Anthocyanins Anthocyanins are a large group of plant dyes that are soluble in water and are found in flowers, fruits, leaves and stems. In the cell they are located in the vacuoles, in the form of granules of various sizes, however, the cell walls of the pulp and tissues do not contain anthocyanins. Anthocyanins give fruits and vegetables different colors like orange, red, pink, purple and dark blue. Anthocyanins belong to the polyphenol organic compounds. The name “anthocyanin” was first used in 1835 by Marquart to refer to the blue dye of the cornflower. The structure of anthocyanins can be very complex and diverse. Acid hydrolysis of anthocyanins leads to decay into sugars and anthocyanidins, called aglycones. The anthocyanins are natural products usually in the form of mono-, di- or tri-glycosides. Hundreds of natural anthocyanins are known, and over 100 could be produced synthetically. These dyes can be extracted from plants and are used as food additives to impart or reinforce the color of drinks, juices, candies and jellies. Anthocyanins determine the hue and color stability, for example, in strawberries the dominant dye is pelargonidin 3-glucoside. Anthocyanin synthesis is a photochemical process because the fruit which is directly irradiated by solar radiation has a more full coloration compared to fruit picked early and ripened in storage. Health Aspects The healing properties of anthocyanins have long been known in folk medicine, and now they are increasingly being used in the pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. Anthocyanin’s name was derived from the Latin name of the plant from which the particular compound was extracted: cyanine flowers or cornflower (Centaurea cyanus L.). Anthocyanins are unstable compounds and reside in an aqueous environment and depend on pH levels that trigger changes in the color of products from which they were isolated. In acidic conditions they have a red color, in nutral conditions violet, and in alkaline they are blue. The structure of anthocyanin molecules has a significant impact on the hue, intensity and color stability. Irreversible changes of anthocyanin pigments are mainly due to oxidative polymerization processes and cause changes in natural red color of fruits to red-brown which is characteristic of long storage. The rate of these changes depends mainly on the presence of factors in the raw material, temperature and time. Chokeberry - Aronia The addition of these compounds to food does not raise concerns of consumers, and they are accepted. An example of a source of anthocyanins is the chokeberry, which contains a lot of polyphenol (above 20 mg/g), including anthocyanins. With a considerable amount of polyphenols, the chokeberry has a significant level of antioxidant activity. Its distinctive tart flavor comes from the high content of tannins which reduces the possibility of direct consumption of the fruit and its products. Generally it is used in combination with other fruits, or in a diluted form. Chokeberry fruit is used for the manufacture of nectars, drinks, wines, jams, as well as food dyes and bioactive compounds. Anthocyanins isolated from chokeberry have antimutagenic and anticarcinogenic activity, and chokeberry juice has antioxidant properties. Chokeberry juice is more and more relevant in the food industry as a source of natural red color for products that are poor in stable color. Products made from chokeberries are mainly aronia juice that is mixed with other fruit juices. Other applications include food coloring additives teas and syrups. In Russia, aronia and apple juices are combined and fermented to produce red wine. In Lithuania, dessert wines are produced with the use of chokeberry or chokeberry juice, which is mixed with other fruit juices. Commercial juices are produced by pressing ripe berries, then fining and filtering the juice. To reduce the tannin content gelatin may be added prior to filtration. Tannins sometimes form complexes, which cause clouding of clear juice. Reducing the level of tannins also makes juice have a less tart taste. Clear juice can then be bottled and pasteurized or concentrated and used as a food ingredient. The whole fruit can be used for the production of a puree that is a highly colored product of uniform consistency once the seeds and skins are removed. The product can be frozen and used as a food ingredient in sauces. Antioxidant Effect In the scientific literature, we can find a number of studies on the antioxidant properties of chokeberry, chokeberry extracts or phenolic components. Fresh chokeberry fruits have the highest antioxidant capacity of the fruit measured by ORAC method. Literature reports that chokeberry juice has the highest antioxidant capacity of beverages rich in polyphenols—four times higher than other berry juice, cranberry juice, or red wine. Anthocyanidins and procyanidins containing o-dihydroxyphenyl group are excellent metal chelators and form complexes with, for example iron (III) and copper (II). The presence of free iron and copper in biological systems catalyzed free radical reactions, such as the Fenton reaction. The ability of the phenolic components to bind divalent metal effectively reduces the concentration of these cations, and therefore their oxidative properties. It should be noted that the in vitro data does not say a lot about the role they can play in in vivo systems for prevention of oxidative stress. The literature also describes the antioxidant effects in animals, where chokeberry anthocyanins reduce lipid peroxidation and increase the activity of enzymes that are involved in the antioxidant defense system. It was also observed that the fraction of the red dye from chokeberry, both in vitro and in vivo. is able to prevent damage to the gastric mucosa. Antioxidant effects observed in humans, with chokeberry juice supplementation reduces oxidative damage to red blood cells produced during exercise.
  3. Celiac.com 07/22/2011 - Many reports indicate a hypercoagulative state in diabetes mellitus as result of endothelial damage. Numerous researchers have reported a strong association between type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1) and celiac disease. Clinical data indicate that vascular dysfunction can result from a cascade of biochemical events triggered by a metabolic malfunction. The net result changes the cells that line the interior surface of the blood vessels; from a surface called a thrombo-resistant surface to one called a thrombo-genic surface. A research team recently set out to determine whether celiac disease in a group of DM1 patients is connected with a different expression of certain hemostatic factors, and with a different manifestation and/or progression of microvascular complications of DM1, as compared to patients with diabetes alone. For the study, the team enrolled ninety-four adult patients with DM1, who they then screened for celiac disease. They found anti-endomysial antibodies (EMA) in 13 of 94 DM1 patients (13.8%). The team then confirmed celiac disease diagnosis by histology and organ culture. The mean age and duration of DM1 of patients also affected by celiac disease were similar to those patients with diabetes alone, but the groups showed very different parameters for metabolic control and hemo-coagulation. In DM1 patients with celiac disease those parameters include: Signiï¬cantly lower concentrations of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) (P.05), cholesterol (P.001), triglycerides (P.001), factor VII antigen (FVII:ag) (P.005), factor VII coagulant activity (FVII:c) (P.05), and prothrombin degradation fragments (F1+2) (P.001). Higher values of activated C protein (APC) (.001). DM1 patients with celiac disease showed no retinal abnormalities and no signs of renal damage.The results suggest a potential protective role of celiac disease in the pro-thrombotic state of DM1. Source: Acta Diabetol. DOI 10.1007/s00592-011-0301-1
  4. The following report comes to us from The Sprue-Nik Press, which is published by the Tri-County Celiac Sprue Support Group, a chapter of CSA/USA, Inc. serving southeastern Michigan (Volume 7, Number 6, September 1998). The degree of mucosal damage varies from one celiac patient to another. Also, the amount of the small intestine that is affected also varies, with the damage usually progressing from the beginning of the small intestine and then moving downward toward the end of the small intestine. This may explain the variable symptoms in different patients. For example, when a significant portion of the small intestine is involved, diarrhea, malabsorption, and weight loss result. When damage is isolated to only the top portion of the small intestine, the only affect may be iron deficiency. (Incidentally, when iron deficiency is not corrected by iron supplements, it is highly likely that celiac disease is the cause of the deficiency.) Gluten in a celiacs diet causes the immune system to produce gliadin antibodies in the intestine. Some of these leak into the bloodstream where they can be detected in blood tests. These blood tests are useful for screening for celiac disease, though a small intestinal biopsy remains the gold standard for diagnosing celiac disease (celiac disease). There are few diseases for which diet and nutritional issues are more important than for celiac disease. At this time, the only known treatment of celiac disease is the removal of wheat, barley, rye, and oats from the celiacs diet. On the surface this sounds simple, but complete removal of dietary gluten can be very difficult. Gluten-containing grains are ubiquitous in the Western diet. Also, grain-derived food additives such as partially hydrolyzed vegetable protein [and modified food starch] are widely used in processed foods and oral medications. Content labels are often vague or incomplete regarding these additives. What further complicates matters is a lack of significant experience on the part of physicians and dietitians in the dietary treatment of celiac disease. This is mainly because there are so few celiac patients for anyone practitioner. Therefore the best sources of dietary information for a new patient are other knowledgeable, more experienced celiacs. It is very important that the diet be followed with full and strict compliance. Celiacs, especially if theyve had active celiac disease for a longtime, are at higher than normal risk for GI malignancies.(Fortunately, compliance to a good gluten-free diet returns the risk of malignancy and life expectancy to that of the general population.)Another complication of long-term untreated celiac disease is bone loss, which maybe irreversible in older patients. When a large portion of the small intestine is affected by active celiac disease, the result can be a generalized malabsorption problem, resulting in deficiencies of water- and fat-soluble vitamins and minerals. Folic acid deficiency is particularly common in celiac disease because, like iron, it is absorbed in the upper small intestine [where the highest concentration of celiac-related damage generally occurs]. Folic acid is necessary for DNA replication, which occurs in cell turnover. So a deficiency of folic acid can impair the regenerative ability of the small intestine. Vitamin B12, also essential to DNA synthesis, is not malabsorbed as commonly as folic acid. Magnesium and calcium deficiency are also common in active celiac disease, because of decreased intestinal absorption AND because these minerals tend to bind with malabsorbed fat which passes through the system. It is particularly important for doctors to assess the magnesium status of celiacs, because without correction of a magnesium deficiency, low levels of calcium and potassium in the blood cannot usually be corrected with supplements. In severe cases, magnesium supplementation should be done intravenously because of the tendency of oral magnesium to cause diarrhea. Supplemental calcium generally should be provided to celiacs, possibly with vitamin D, to help restore tissue and bone calcium levels to normal. The exact dose of calcium is not known. Dr. Fine usually recommends 1500-2000 mg of elemental calcium per day, divided into two doses, for several years and sometimes indefinitely. [4], [5], [6] Zinc is another mineral that often becomes depleted in patients with chronic malabsorption. Zinc supplementation (usually the RDA via multi-vitamin and mineral supplements) helps avoid skin rashes and restores normal taste. Up to 20% of celiacs will continue to experience loose or watery stools even after going on a gluten-free diet. Sometimes this is due to inadvertent gluten in the diet, but a recent study at Dr. Fines medical center showed that in these cases other diseases epidemiologically associated with celiac disease are present.[7] These include microscopic colitis, exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, lactose intolerance, selective IgA deficiency, hypo- or hyperthyroidism, and Type I diabetes mellitus. When diarrhea continues after beginning a gluten-free diet, a search for these associated diseases or others should be undertaken and treated if found. The use of cortico steroids has been advocated in celiacs when the response to the gluten-free diet is sluggish or absent. This is necessary more often in older than in younger patients. However, pancreatic enzyme supplements (prescribed by a doctor) may be needed to help digestion and resolve ongoing malabsorption in some patients. The endomysial antibody blood test is highly accurate and specific for detecting celiac disease. However, the current method of detecting these antibodies involves an operator looking through a microscope and observing the antibody binding on monkey esophagus or human umbilical cord tissue substrates. The correct interpretation of results is highly dependent on the skill and experience of the technician interpreting the fluorescence pattern through the microscope. Moreover, determination of the amount of antibody present relies upon repeat examinations following dilutions of the blood serum, with the last positive test being reported as a titer. A new discovery was reported by a research group in Germany.[8] The antigen substrate of the endomysial antibodies has been identified. This allows the development of a new test that can detect and measure serum endomysial antibodies in one, chemically-based test run [thus greatly reducing the potential for human error and significantly reducing the time needed for each test--ed.] These new tests should be available for clinical use shortly. In a recent study, Dr. Fine found that the frequency of positive stool blood tests was greater in patients with total villous atrophy relative to partial villous atrophy, and all tests were negative in treated patients without villous atrophy.[9] This suggests that fecal occult blood may be a non-invasive and inexpensive method of following the response of the damaged intestine to treatment. Also, it should be noted that the high frequency of positive tests due to villous atrophy will decrease the accuracy of the tests when used for cancer screening in this same patient population (which is how these tests are normally used by health care providers). There have been two recent reports touting the lack of deleterious effects when 50 grams of oats per day are added to the diet of celiac patients. Although this finding is exciting for celiacs, both studies possess certain limitations. In the first study, published by a Finnish group, the exclusion criteria for symptoms and histopathology were somewhat strict, so that patients with more mild forms of celiac disease seemingly were selected for study. And though no damage to duodenal histology occurred after one year of oats consumption, no physiologic or immunologic parameters of disease activity were measured. Furthermore, several patients in the treatment group dropped out of the study for reasons not mentioned in the article.[10] The second and more recent study involved only 10 patients, studied for twelve weeks. The favorable results of this study must be interpreted with caution because of the small sample size and short study period.[11] Even the one-year treatment period in the Finnish study may be too short to observe a harmful effect, as it is known that small intestinal damage sometimes will not occur for several years following there introduction of gluten to a treated celiac. At the worst, an increase in the incidence of malignancy may result from chronic ingestion of oats, an effect that could take decades to manifest. Therefore, this issue will require further study before oats can be recommended for the celiac diet. 3. From the September 1998 newsletter of the Houston Celiac-Sprue Support Group, a chapter of CSA/USA, Inc. 4. Ciacci C, Maurelli L, et el, Effects of dietary treatment on bone mineral density in adults with celiac disease; factors predicting response, Am J Gastroenterol, 1997; 92 (6): 992-996. 5. Mautalen C, Gonzalez D, et al, Effect of treatment on bone mass, mineral metabolism, and body composition in untreated celiac patients, Am J Gastroenterol, 1997; 2 (2):313-318. 6. Corazza gluten-free, Di Sario A, et al, Influence of pattern of clinical presentation and of gluten-free diet on bone mass and metabolism in adult coeliac disease, Bone, 1996; 18 (6):525-530. 7. Fine, KD, Meyer RL, Lee EL, The prevalence and causes of chronic diarrhea in patients with celiac sprue treated with a gluten-free diet, Gastroenterol, 1997; 112 (6):1830-1838. 8. Dieterich W, Ehnis T, et al, Identification of tissue transglutaminase as the autoantigen of celiac disease, Nat Med, 1997; 3 (7):797-801. 9. Fine KD, The prevalence of occult gastrointestinal bleeding in celiac sprue, N Engl J Med, 1996; 334 (18):1163-1167. 10. Janatuinen EK, Pikkarainen PH, et al, A comparison of diets with and without oats in adults with celiac disease, N Engl J Med, 1995; 333 (16):1033-1037. 11. Srinivasan U, Leonard N, et al, Absence of oats toxicity in adult coeliac disease, BMJ, 1996; 313 (7068):1300-1301.
  5. Vijay Kumar, M.D., Research Associate Professor at the University of Buffalo and President and Director of IMMCO Diagnostics: If the test is negative and there is a strong suspicion of celiac disease, it must be repeated after several weeks (3-4 weeks), especially after a high gluten intake. We did a study of two cases with DH who were serologically negative. However, a gluten challenge 1g/Kg body wt/day resulted in positive serology; the results became normal on a gluten free diet. If you are a relative of a celiac disease patient and are on a regular diet and the serology performed by an experienced laboratory is negative then there may not be any need for retesting until and unless clinically justified. Karoly Horvath, M.D., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Pediatrics; Director, Peds GI & Nutrition Laboratory; University of Maryland at Baltimore: There is no rule for it. If a family member with previous negative tests experiences any gastrointestinal symptoms associated with celiac disease, he/she should undergo serological testing as soon as possible. It is well known that up to 15% of the family members of a patient with celiac disease may have the asymptomatic (latent or silent) form of celiac disease, although they have positive serological tests and have the pathological changes in the upper part of the small intestine. It is also evident that there are at least three developmental stages of mucosal lesions (Marsh MN. Gastroenterology 1992;102:330-354) and celiac disease may manifest at each period of life. That is why we recommend a repeat test every 2-3 years in first degree relatives of celiac patients.
  6. TI- Klinika nietolerancji biaLek mleka krowiego i glutenu u dzieci. AU- Kaczmarski M JN- Pol Tyg Lek; 44 (4) p86-8 PY- Jan 23 1989 AB- In two comparative groups of 50 children with cow milk proteins and 45 children with gluten intolerance retrospective analysis of initial symptoms was carried out. The initial symptoms of intolerance included: vomiting, loss of appetite, recurrent diarrhea, and weight gain disorders. These symptoms closely correlated with the type of nutrition (mixed, artificial) and the duration of exposition to harmful component of the food. The symptoms appeared within first days after birth with peak intensity in 6-8 weeks of life in the group with cow milk proteins intolerance. The symptoms of intolerance were most frequent in children of group II in 7-12 months of life. To prevent food intolerance in Polish children, it is recommended to feed them naturally as long as possible and to introduce flour and 4 basic grains late (after the 6th months of life).
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