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Found 8 results

  1. Celiac.com 11/30/2016 - Trials using hookworm as a possible treatment for celiac disease are already underway in Australia, but they latest hookworm news indicates that they might also be useful for treating asthma. The New World hookworm, aka necator americanus, is long and slender as an angel hair noodle. Adults are large enough to be seen with the naked eye. Seen up close, they look more like the sand worms in the movie Dune than anything people are used to seeing here on earth. Researchers are reporting that a protein produced by hookworms reduces the symptoms of asthma in mice, and could one day be used to treat asthma in humans, says the journal Science Translational Medicine. These parasites are some of the most maligned creatures in the animal kingdom. They chew into the human intestinal wall and suck blood to survive, but they just might be the key to making millions of people healthier. Says Severine Navarro, the paper's lead author and a senior research fellow at James Cook University in Australia, data from immunological studies shows that populations with no parasites also have "the highest incidence of autoimmune diseases and allergies." The data in this study arose from an effort by Navarro and her fellow researchers to look for a connection between success of de-worming programs around the world and the rise of immune system problems like asthma and celiac disease. Among other things, when hookworms infect humans, they secrete chemicals that turn off the immune alarm bells and repair the tissue around it. The worms limit blood consumption to a few drops a day and keeps its own numbers in check by plants offspring in the host's poop to ensure an orderly exit from the body. Navarro and her team wonder if the hookworm's stealthy adaptations also benefit their host by controlling in adverse immune reactions. The team's initial small study of one dozen trial participants showed that the hookworm did improve their tolerance of gluten. Since infecting large numbers of patients directly with hookworm might lead to other issues, the team isolated the active ingredient in hookworm spit - a compound called AIP-2 - and injected it into asthmatic mice on a daily basis for five days. Results showed a sharp decline in asthma symptoms, and reduced inflammation in airways. These benefits persisted for 10 weeks after the mice stopped getting the treatment. The researchers also noticed that AIP-2 seemed to have a calming effect on the body's dendritic cells - a part of the immune system responsible for processing threats. According to Navarro, the drug works by "basically rewiring the cells in that tissue into promoting very efficient regulatory T cells." This suggests that AIP-2 might also help humans, since dendritic cells have the same function in us that they do in mice. Navarro said the team's next step is a phase one clinical trial, which would test the effectiveness of an AIP-2 pill. Successful phase one trials will lead the way toward a safe drug that could help tens of millions of asthma sufferers. As seen in earlier studies using hookworm, the compound might be useful in treating autoimmune disorders, like celiac disease, inflammatory bowel disease and multiple sclerosis. Read more on hookworms and celiac disease. Source: ChicagoTribune.com.
  2. Before I get into the neurological symptoms, let me give you a synopsis of my background and family history. Both my parents smoke and my dad was always a heavy drinker. My mom had GERD / Acid Reflux pretty much her whole life and it should be noted that she's basically 100% Norwegian (I've read that Northern Europeans have GERD and gastrointestinal issues more than anyone else - same with the Irish). My mom was also recently tested positive for Celiac Disease (our diets growing up was filled with wheat products, so connecting the dots here, I think she was being bombarded with gluten and her body couldn't handle it). She would have severe mood swings, especially towards my dad (who is now passed on). Her acid reflux got so bad that she went in for an endoscopy and they told her that she had Barrett's Esophagus. She's still alive to this day though and seems to be holding up reasonably well. My sister also has severe acid reflux and panic attacks. Now to get to my own history. I was born in 1983. As a baby, I had severe eczema, and would rub certain areas of my body (such as my wrists) raw on the carpet, because I was constantly itchy. I would also constantly spit up breast-milk and even the baby formula. My parents had a hard time figuring out what to feed me! We would also drink tons of cow's milk. That finally hit a brick wall around age 25 (in 2008), when I started noticing that if I drank straight cow's milk I would end up with (and still do end up with if I drink it) sulfur burps which taste and smell like rotten eggs. I even tried drinking raw cow's milk one time and the result was the same, I was burping rotten egg smelling burps and would get diarrhea! This is also around the time when I noticed my acid reflux getting worse and worse. In 2009, I started lifting weights again after taking a long break from high school. When I would do any squatting motion exercises such as dead-lifts or squats, I'd almost pass out because I couldn't catch my breath afterwards. I finally went in for an endoscopy and they told me that my esophagus was raw and red. I also should note that I've read getting anesthesia and all the drugs they give you during that time, can cause long-term psychological issues, especially anxiety, which I never really had until after that year. I realized that I couldn't do those squatting exercises or anything that put pressure on the abdomen area, since it would push acid back up into my esophagus. I decided to start lifting weights on an empty stomach and that did work for awhile but I couldn't figure out why my acid reflux was still so bad. Acid shooting back up into the esophagus, is caused by inflammation. This affects the Vagus Nerve (which is the longest cranial nerve). Some of the main functions of the Vagus Nerve include, 1. Breathing 2. Speech 3. Sweating 4. Helping in keeping the larynx open during breathing 5. Monitoring and regulating the heartbeat 6. Informing the brain of the food that is ingested and food that has been digested 7. The Vagus Nerve performs the major function of emptying the gastric region of food Any damage to the vagus nerve causes Gastroparesis which is losing the muscular function in the stomach and intestines. This results in food being emptied slowly, that leads to other problems such as fermentation of food in the stomach and food getting compressed into hard pellets which can cause severe problems if the pellets get stuck in the intestine. Especially in people with diabetes, when sugar levels get high and are not well controlled, it can result in the vagus nerve damage. This can result in anxiety / panic attacks, OCD (Obsessive Compulsive Disorder), trouble swallowing, chills, asthma-like symptoms, heart palpitations, tingling / numbness in extremities and limbs, blood in the stool, hard of breathing, anxiety attack-like symptoms, canker sores, nightmares (including hypnogogic and hypnopompic auditory / visual hallucinations, such as hearing a gun shot upon waking up, even though no gun was fired), dry mouth, heart attack-like symptoms, and more (I had all these symptoms too btw). I believe that since our bodies are intolerant to wheat and dairy products, it is causing inflammation in the body, which then causes all these other symptoms. So at that point, I began having hallucinations (including hypnopompic and hypnagogic hallucinations). They were mainly auditory hallucinations and some (but fewer) visual hallucinations. They started around 2013, when I got sick with the flu and also had an in-grown toenail (I had to get it cut out by the doctor and it was the worst pain of my life!). I was extremely religious back then (I left my faith last year at end of 2015) and felt like these were omens or signs for some of the things that were deemed ‘sinful’. I then had a breakup with a gluten-free who lived in Montana and the auditory hallucinations continued. I’ve been having them again starting in 2016 after getting sick with a chest respiratory infection (I’m seeing a trend here with getting sick and having these), which I believe were caused by the Autumn Rhinitis / Hay Fever Allergies. I was at the gym around the start of August 2016, and I felt like I couldn’t catch my breath after each set of lifting. I went home and haven’t been back to the gym since. I was having trouble breathing just walking up a flight of stairs, and it was a daily nightmare until I started looking into ways to help solve my issues (which I’ll get into in a minute). I also don’t have a great sleep schedule from working late night shifts, so I’m typically always sleep deprived. I should also mention that I think I have formed P.T.S.D. (PTSD - Post Traumatic Stress Disorder) from watching a music video where it showed a death. The image of the woman dying kept playing in my head (this also happened around August 2016). Then on top of all that, I was lifting weights 2 times a week (full body workouts), doing H.I.I.T. (High Intensity Interval Training) a couple times a week in the morning, AND working night shifts. On top of all that, my dad died last year (October 3, 2015) and within a week afterwards around October 10th, I ended up with appendicitis so I had to get the appendectomy surgery to get my appendix removed. A few weeks later, I walked away from my faith (not due to emotional reasons, but due to extensive research, which was already in the process starting at the beginning of 2015). So I lost my dad, my faith and my appendix within a month's time period. It put a lot of stress on me I think. I’m 33 years old, so still somewhat young, but I think I was pushing my body to the limit, and it’s been affecting my brain chemistry. Not only that, but recently, I put the other dots to the puzzle and found out that I also have gluten intolerance / Celiac / Coeliac, so I’ve stopped eating gluten (and dairy) products. I also have done a few sessions of AAT (Advanced Allergy Therapy), by a doctor named Dr. Jill Cohn in the San Francisco / Berkeley / Oakland Bay Area. You don’t even have to be there in person for her to treat you, she does it all online through a conference call on a site similar to Skype. You can watch testimonials on YouTube as well, and I’m here to tell you that her system did cure me of Ragweed allergies. I now understand that because I was pushing my body to the limit as well as trying to stay 500 calories below maintenance (to cut fat and get shredded), that my body wasn’t getting the proper nutrients and vitamins due to eating wheat and gluten (as well as dairy). This damages the alveoli and villi in the intestinal tract which are crucial for absorbing the nutrients from your food. I also found out that my body reacts poorly to chocolate as well. Chocolate is a 'stimulant' and has been proven to affect the brain the same way that cannabis / marijuana will. This could be some of the problems you all are facing as well. At that point, your body is so run down, that it will start attacking ‘harmless’ invaders, such as ragweed pollen, pet dander or even just simple dust particles, which this process of your body in attack mode, will cause inflammation, hence the reason I was having trouble breathing (my body developed exercise-induced / allergy-induced asthma). Not only that, but when your body is so run down and not getting the proper nutrition, it can cause psychosis and schizophrenic symptoms as well! I started taking a ton of supplements and they’ve helped tremendously. Here are a few to get you started. Try these and eat a balanced diet for a couple months. I’ll bet you start to feel better and the hallucinations diminish. 1. Vitamin D3 (Jarrow Brand 5,000IU – take two to four per day) – This is especially necessary if you live above the 37 degree parallel (latitude) in the Fall and Winter (typically from September to March). The sun only produces Vitamin D3 in our body when it is 50 degrees (altitude not temperature) above the horizon and even during the Spring and Summer, this only occurs from around 10AM in the morning to 2-3PM in the afternoon. So you have only a 4 to 5 hour window in the morning to afternoon when the sun is producing Vitamin D3, which most people aren't really out during those times, because of work schedule. This is why around 75 to 80% of the world population are D3 deficient! A good source of information on this is Dr. John Cannell. Go research how vital and important D3 is for us! You want your ng/ml (nano-grams per milliliter of blood) to be from 50 to 100 (or even slightly over 100 is fine too!). 2. Magnesium (CALM BRAND) – Magnesium is the driver for Vitamin D3. It’s very important and we don’t get enough of it in our diet on average. 3. Vitamin C (take around 2,000mg per day) – Look up Dr. Thomas Levy and Dr. Linus Pauling for good information on this. The Liposomal type of Vitamin C is the best kind! 4. Vitamin K2 (different from Vitamin K1 – Get the Jarrow Brand called Vitamin K-Right) – Millions of people take calcium supplements to maintain healthy bones. Yet few patients or physicians realize that optimizing bone integrity involves more than taking a single mineral supplement. A critical additional component for bone and cardiovascular health is vitamin K2. Recent research has revealed that, without vitamin K2, calcium regulation is disrupted. In fact, low levels of vitamin K2 are associated with an increased risk of heart disease and atherosclerosis. K2 is the gateway that allows calcium to get to your bones. When you take vitamin D3, your body creates more of these vitamin K2-dependent proteins, the proteins that will move the calcium around. They have a lot of potential health benefits. But until the K2 comes in to activate those proteins, those benefits aren't realized. So, really, if you're taking vitamin D, you're creating an increased demand for K2. And vitamin D and K2 work together to strengthen your bones and improve your heart health.For so long, we've been told to take calcium for osteoporosis... and vitamin D3, which we know is helpful. But then, more studies are coming out showing that increased calcium intake is causing more heart attacks and strokes. That created a lot of confusion around whether calcium is safe or not. But that's the wrong question to be asking, because we'll never properly understand the health benefits of calcium or vitamin D3, unless we take into consideration K2. That's what keeps the calcium in its right place. 5. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) Ubiquinol – it’s a substance similar to a vitamin. It is found in every cell of the body. Your body makes CoQ10, and your cells use it to produce energy your body needs for cell growth and maintenance. It also functions as an antioxidant, which protects the body from damage caused by harmful molecules. (Get the Jarrow Brand – no I don’t work for them, but I’ve heard they are the best in all of these, and it’s what I take). 6. Vitamin B-Right (Jarrow) which has all of the B vitamins in it. Niacin (B3) has proven to be very helpful for those with Schizophrenia and Psychosis. Look up Dr. Abram Hoffer and his research on mental illness and Niacin. Careful with Niacin in huge quantities, as it will cause a 'flushing' effect, but you still want enough to get the benefits. 7. Oxylent (which is one of the best tasting and best multi-vitamins out there in my opinion). It’s got most of all you need in there when included with what I mentioned above. (Those are the main ones above, but here are a few other supplements I take. ChlorOxygen, Serrapeptase {SerraGold Brand}, mushroom supplement called 'Breathe' by New Chapter Life-shield, HealthForce Green Alchemy Protein Powder, HealthForce Vitamineral Green, Probiotics, MSM, Bragg's Apple Cider Vinegar, local honey, and avocados for potassium, along with getting at least a half gallon of water per day - which I drink at least 32 oz. to 50 oz. of water on an empty stomach every morning). Within a month of taking all this (I started on November 2nd, 2016), I’m now feeling about 95% back to my normal self. The other 5% is caused by my poor sleeping habits, as well as stress. I now realize that these psychological issues were all subconscious from the heavy religious indoctrination. If I had never been introduced to these religious ideas, I’m sure I’d not have these particular religious themed hypnopompic and hypnagogic hallucinations. When it first started, I was seeing visuals such as numbers and objects floating in the air upon waking up, which, they’d disappear within a few seconds. I also hear voices, which would say terrible things, and then the voices would continue in my head as if it were having dialogue with me in my own mind. I would feel like God hated me, due to the content of what was being said. I’m pretty sure I have some sort of religious trauma after leaving my faith and also, after my dad dying within the last year (2015). They actually have a name for this type of PTSD and it’s RTS (Religious Trauma Syndrome). You can find some good material through Dr. Marlene Winell online if you suffer from the religious form of PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder). Anyways, I hope all of this helps someone else who may be going through similar! Just know you’re not alone and it’s more than likely happening because of nutrient deficiency and/or a traumatic experience you suffered as well as your diet if you are gluten intolerant / lactose intolerant. These aren’t devils, demons, hobgoblins or ghouls harassing you, this is all natural phenomena and it can be treated with the right diet, the right supplements and proper sleep! I am still getting cross-contaminated (or there is a cross-reactor food that mimics gluten and/or dairy) somewhere in my diet, so my psychological issues persist, including waking up feeling like something is trying to talk to me in my mind. I am trying to figure that out now. But they also have supplements you can take that will break down gluten if you are accidentally 'glutened.' Here is a study I found from WW2, that correlates to mental disease and gluten / wheat below. "One of the first hints that these circumstances could have implications for the psychological sciences was the observation that, in several countries, hospitalization rates for schizophrenia during World War II dropped in direct proportion to wheat shortages. In the United States, where over that same period the consumption of wheat rose rather than diminished, such rates increased instead (Dohan, 1966a,b). In South Pacific islands with a traditionally low consumption of wheat, schizophrenia was only found in 1 person out of 30,000. When Western grain products were introduced into their society, it dramatically rose to 1 person out of 100! (Dohan et al., 1984)."
  3. I was diagnosed as Celiac at 53. I was asymptomatic or so I thought; i never smoked and was a teacher. I now realize I have had Celiac all of my life I have had severe asthma , seasonal allergies, and chronic lung inflation all my life. It seems when i read these boards many Celiacs have asthma but it is hard to get a handle on how many. I suspect my allergies, asthma and COPD are related to my Celiac. I have seen the same allergist/immunologist trained at National Jewish for decades. He missed it. I was the one that actually requested an endo when I had my over 50 colonoscopy. That is when it was found. I would like to see members just check in and say lungs clear or have had respiratory issues, allergies, asthma, bronchitis..... i suspect the correlation is higher than what is thought. I am thinking of this as a mini lab.
  4. Celiac.com 05/20/2011 - Over the years, researchers have been discovering more and more about celiac disease, an autoimmune disease which is caused by gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye. Studies have linked the disease to a variety of other medical conditions, such as irritable bowel syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, and osteoporosis. Researchers have now found a connection between celiac disease and asthma. Asthma is chronic lung disease that causes the passages of the lungs to become inflamed and narrowed, resulting in wheezing, shortness of breath, tightness in the chest area, and coughing. It often begins in childhood, and according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human services, more than 22 million people suffer from the condition. Many studies have linked asthma to airborne allergens, but doctors have begun to look into food culprits as well. One such study shows a connection to celiac disease, which isn’t an allergy but rather an autoimmune response to gluten. In a study published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, European researchers found that celiac individuals were 60 percent more likely to develop asthma than those without the condition. Celiac disease affects approximately one percent of the population and without treatment, which is a gluten-free diet, can cause a variety of physical and mental symptoms including chronic fatigue, headaches, malnutrition, chronic headaches, and stomach problems. Dr. Jonas Ludvigsson of Orebro University Hospital and the Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and his colleagues compared more than 28,000 Swedish celiac patients to more than 140,000 similar people without the disease. The study concluded that only a link between the two could be demonstrated, not that one condition causes the other; the researchers weren’t able to identify the reason for the association. One possible factor may be Vitamin D. According to Reuters Health, Dr. Ludvigsson said in an email, "Personally, I think the role of vitamin D deficiency should be stressed." Vitamin D has been demonstrated to be a factor in the development of tuberculosis and osteoporosis, both of which celiacs are more likely to develop. In celiac disease, gluten causes an autoimmune reaction that causes the immune system to attack the small intestine, specifically the villi, the finger-like structures that absorb the nutrients from food; thus celiac patients usually exhibit deficiencies in vitamins and minerals. If a celiac patient isn’t getting enough vitamin D into their system, according to Dr. Ludvigsson, the risk for asthma disease may be increased. According to Dr. Ludviggson, Swedish celiac patients adhere well to the gluten-free diet. The study didn’t determine how closely the 28,000 subjects were sticking to their diets, but Ludviggson told Reuters health, "Generally dietary compliance is high in Sweden, so I actually believe that also patients with good adherence are at increased risk of asthma.” It is recommended that people who suspect they may have celiac disease or asthma should consult with a qualified medical practitioner for testing, diagnosis, and treatment. Resources: U.S. Department of Health & Human Services: http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/dci/Diseases/Asthma/Asthma_WhatIs.html Gluten Free Society: Gluten Sensitivity Increases the Risk for Asthma: http://www.glutenfreesociety.org/gluten-free-society-blog/gluten-sensitivity-increases-the-risk-for-asthma/ Reuters: Asthma linked to celiac disease: http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/02/24/us-asthma-linked-celiac-disease-idUSTRE71N4WF20110224
  5. I accidentally ate something w/ cross contamination yesterday (only cooked from home) and started having symptoms in the early evening. My typical headache, then brain fog, extreme fatigue and feeling weak, chills & body aches. ' My breathing is quite shallow and I've used my emergency inhaler quite a few times in the past 24 hours because I feel as though I cannot breath deeply enough. It is not an asthma attack, but still uncomfortable all the same. I was dx as asthma as a kid but it doesn't bother me too much. Has anyone else experienced this when you've been 'glutened'? I'm not 100% if it is asthma, or just the extreme fatigue...its like I don't have the strength to fully fill my lungs Thanks
  6. Celiac.com 03/11/2009 - I recently had an unfortunate health experience related to celiac disease. I learned long ago that it’s my responsibility to manage my own health, so I came up with a strategy that was successful. Along the way, I also learned some important information that really helped me understand the problem and the eventual solution. Perhaps this information will help you avoid a similar health crisis. I’ve included links that can give you additional information. Disclaimer: I’m not a medical doctor. This is information that I have gathered based on my own experiences and research. Celiac Disease I have celiac disease. I manage it quite well through my diet. However, if I ingest anything with gluten, for instance a wayward crouton in a restaurant salad, I have a severe reaction that starts within five minutes. All or some of the following will occur: hives from head to toe, stomach cramps, uncontrollable diarrhea, vomiting, asthma, severe lethargy. I fall into an uncontrollable sleep that takes about four hours to run its course. Needless to say, I avoid gluten at all costs. A Bit of History Although I am a remarkable person (like all of us), my health history has been quite unremarkable. Nothing was ever wrong with me and I wasn’t allergic to anything. I can count on one hand how many times I’ve taken antibiotics in my entire life. In the past 30+ years, I never went to the doctor for an illness. I’ve had colds, various and sundry viruses and infections, but they ran their course with slowing down, plenty of rest and fluids. I believe that the primary strategy should be to give your body the time to heal itself first, and if that fails look for an alternative strategy from your doctor. Imagine my surprise when about six years ago the symptoms of celiac disease manifested themselves. (Note: I was going through an acute stressful time in my life when this occurred.) Along the way, other unexpected food allergies have presented themselves as well. One of my favorite foods was peanut butter. Since I was a little girl, I loved feasting on “peanut butter on spoon”. Out of the blue one day, a typical teaspoon of one of my favorite foods sent me into an anaphylactic reaction. And then a few months after that incident, a bite of a granola bar with cashews sent me on my first ambulance ride with a rapidly constricting throat to the emergency ward. My favorite food is now a deadly poison. I’ve had mild intestinal reactions to all vinegars and vinegar products (a little balsamic is OK), more than three glasses of red wine (not white wine or champagne), milk and cream (not cheese, thank the Universe!). I’ve also realized that I’m thirsty all the time. It seems that no matter how much water I drink, I can’t seem to quench my thirst. I even sleep with water next to my bed and drink several glasses throughout the night and still wake up thirsty. The water goes right through me and doesn’t seem to be absorbed. (I have recently been prodded, poked, examined and tested by a battery of doctors as a result of my once in 50-year checkup and they all agree that I’m the picture of health.) Both my mom and my grandmother suffered from asthma; my grandmother dealt with it her whole life. When I have an asthmatic reaction, my wheezing and coughing sound just like theirs! I remembered them being armed with their inhalers and their steroids at all times. I also remembered that these medical weapons didn’t stop the asthma attacks or the wheezing or uncontrollable coughing. They only dealt with the symptoms, not the underlying problem. Mom’s asthma went away when she started eating a gluten free diet. The Incident So I’ve come to enjoy cooking. Regardless of the disastrous results of my past cooking experiences well documented by my children, close friends and family, this new hobby relaxes me at the end of the day, is creative, saves money and insures a truly gluten and allergy free diet. I recently made a delicious French Onion and Ham Cream Soup. It was inspired by some wonderful French spices I bought from Penzey Spices. I made a big pot of the soup and had it for different meals throughout the week. I didn’t notice at the time an increased feeling of lethargy, intestinal rumblings and increased thirst that got progressively worse through the week. And then it happened. About five minutes after devouring the last of my delectable French Onion and Ham Cream Soup, the tell-tale signs of an oncoming asthma attack occurred: mucous pouring into my lungs, wheezing, airways closing up, unrelenting coughing. In addition, I had horrible abdominal cramping. I was tremendously thirsty, but the water just seemed to go through me and make me even thirstier. At about 4:00 am just as I was about to get myself to the hospital, I started to slowly stabilize, meaning I wasn’t getting worse. I slept for a little bit, then woke up coughing uncontrollably. My throat was so parched it felt like sandpaper. I dragged myself through a day of work exhausted, not being able to really get a good breath and feeling so very thirsty. That night I literally coughed all night long sitting straight up in a chair; I couldn’t lie down because of the coughing. I couldn’t go to work the next day. I needed to discover why this happened, how I can prevent it from happening again and implement an immediate strategy for managing this health crisis. Hypothesis I realized there was a relationship between several factors: celiac disease, since I had no allergies until it manifested itself; cow’s milk, which I knew was a highly allergic food; asthma, as the allergic reaction, and dehydration, because of the incessant thirst. By understanding how all of these factors related to each other, I thought I could figure out a strategy to 1) get myself into a healthy state quickly and 2) prevent this health crisis from happening again. (Even thought I knew this was an asthma attack, I wanted to make doubly sure it wasn’t pneumonia or something similar. I had no fever, chills, aches or pains, headache, or upper respiratory infection. I was fine one minute and not fine the next.) Research Asthma is a disease in which inflammation of the airways causes airflow into and out of the lungs to be restricted. When an asthma attack occurs, mucus production is increased, muscles of the bronchial tree become tight, and the lining of the air passages swells, reducing airflow and producing the characteristic wheezing and coughing. Asthma symptoms are usually worse at night. There is high correlation between people who have celiac disease and people who have sensitivities to proteins found in cow's milk. Milk is one of the most common food allergens in the American diet. And most cows eat a lot of grain and perhaps there’s a link here. Milk allergy symptoms can occur within minutes or hours after consuming the dairy product. They can be triggered by a very small amount of milk protein in the system. There is also a relationship between celiac disease, asthma and dehydration. People with celiac disease are often very thirsty even after drinking lots of water. And so are people with asthma. If fact, many doctors now think that asthma is a symptom of the body managing its water supply. This is how it works… Water is needed for every function of the body. Our bodies are 75% water and our brains are 85% water. Because of the water used in breathing, digestion, enzyme and hormone production, immune function, toxin removal and so on, we need to replace that water frequently throughout the day or our health will suffer. When we start to dehydrate, histamine production increases to conserve water in our bodies. This is vital since our lungs must remain moist to work properly. Excess histamine, a defense against losing more water, makes it difficult to breath and triggers an asthma attack. Histamine also stimulates mucous production to help seal in moisture, but that also leads to increased breathing difficulties. Histamines are also important for immune function, but during dehydration they are mostly used to look for water. If dehydration becomes chronic, the immune system will suffer; allergies, both inhalant and food allergies, will result because histamine is important for the proper balance of Tcells, antibodies and so on. Elevated histamine in the lungs causes the spasm of the bronchioles. This conserves moisture that would normally be lost during breathing. The mucus that clogs up the airways is the body’s attempt to keep the airways from completely drying out. Inflammation in the airways is the result of the body bringing more “micro-circulation” to the lungs as a result of dehydration. Common problem foods for people with asthma are dairy and gluten. Both are very hard to digest and require a lot of water to break down. If there is not enough water in the digestive tract when food is taken in, water will be pulled from other parts of the body and localized dehydration will result. This can lead to asthma, among other problems. Allergy symptoms of any kind are a sign that we need to drink more water. Antihistamines and most medicines, either directly or indirectly, actually are counterproductive for the body because they further dehydrate the body and shut off the body’s search for water. Pain, inflammation and digestive problems are also typically signs of dehydration. Dehydration is a common cause of migraines, for example. And then I unexpectedly learned about salt… Salt is the other half of the hydration equation. Salt is vital for the generation of hydroelectric energy and transmission of nerve impulses in all the cells. Salt acts as a natural antihistamine through salt-sensing nerves on the tongue and plays a major role in regulating water. Without enough salt, water is not absorbed. My Strategy The first step was to get myself in a healthy state. My re-hydration plans included continually drinking filtered water even through the night, teaspoons of honey to soothe my raw throat when needed and pinches of pink Australian sea salt (a Christmas gift from my wonderful mom) on my tongue throughout the day and night when I felt I needed it, although any sea salt would do. I also had vegetable juice and fruit juice for additional fluids. I noticed the salt working in a couple of hours. I was beginning to absorb the water (I didn’t have to pee every time I drank some water). It took about two days before the thirst went away. It was great waking up without a parched throat. The coughing was still uncontrollable, especially at night, but instead of a constant, non-productive coughing and horrible wheezing, the mucus was beginning to become looser. It took another three nights before I could sleep lying down, but the mucus had really broken up. The coughing was actually allowing the mucus to get out of my lungs. It took about six days to feel like myself again. I did gain about five pounds. But I lost it quickly and it was fat lost, not precious water. Besides, there’s nothing glamorous about walking around in a dehydrated, sickly state. The second step is to not let this happen again. I’m now drinking no less than 10 eight-ounce glasses of water every day with a pinch of salt on my tongue if I feel I need it. I need about ¼ teaspoon of salt for every quart of water I drink. After a lifetime of poor medical advice, I now know that salt is my friend. If I drink coffee or wine or if I get the nutty idea to exercise, I have to drink more water. And no more milk and cream - at least until I’m stabilized for awhile. If I feel an asthma attack coming on, the best treatment is to drink 2-3 cups of water and put a pinch of sea salt on my tongue. This will provide my body with the water it needs and the salt will send a signal to my brain to relax the bronchioles by letting it know relief is coming. Conclusion As difficult as this last health adventure was, I learned something that has changed the way I feel and has optimized my health. I found the root of the problem and fixed it instead of following mainstream medical thinking and putting a band aid on the symptoms. It’s really scary when it feels like your body is turning on you, and very empowering when you use science and knowledge to get yourself back. I’ve always said when it comes to business, “the market speaks, just listen.” I now need to take that advice for myself. My body speaks; I just have to listen!
  7. Celiac.com 04/07/2011 - People with celiac disease are 60 percent more likely to develop asthma than people without celiac disease, according to a new study, which appears in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. Moreover, the study results show that those with asthma are also more likely to eventually develop celiac disease. Indeed, for every 100,000 people with celiac disease, 147 will have asthma that would not have occurred in the absence of the digestive disorder. To assess possible links between celiac disease and asthma, Dr. Jonas Ludvigsson of Orebro University Hospital and the Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and colleagues compared more than 28,000 Swedes diagnosed with celiac to more than 140,000 similar people without the disease. Ludvigsson cautions that the study merely shows an links between the two diseases, it does not establish that asthma causes celiac disease, or vice versa. The exact nature of the association between the two diseases is unclear, but Ludvigsson told reporters that he thinks "the role of vitamin D deficiency should be stressed." Ludwigsson points out that people with celiac are more likely to develop osteoporosis and tuberculosis, both diseases in which vitamin D plays a role. If a person with celiac also has low levels of vitamin D, this could in turn affect the immune system, which could increase the risk of developing asthma. Another possibility, he points out, is that "asthma and celiac disease share some immunological feature. If you have it, you are at increased risk of both diseases. Ludvigsson also addresses the fact that the study did not establish levels of compliance with a gluten-free diet among the participants with celiac disease by noting that general "dietary compliance is high in Sweden," so he believes that "patients with good adherence are at increased risk of asthma." Source: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 2011. doi:10.1016/j.jaci.2010.12.1076
  8. Celiac.com 03/21/2011 - Two recent population-based studies, both performed in Sweden by Dr. Jonas Ludvigsson, have concluded that people who have had biopsies that reveal villous atrophy are at increased risk of both ischemic heart disease and asthma. But at least regarding heart disease, the bulk of the risk may simply be attributable to inflammation. The team of researchers looked at biopsy data collected from all twenty-eight of Sweden’s pathology departments between 2006 and 2008. The data included biopsies performed as far back as 1969, and represented 44,446 individuals: 28,190 with celiac disease, as ascertained by small intestine morphology; 12,598 with duodenal/jejuna inflammation lacking villous atrophy; and 3,658 with latent celiac disease, defined as those with positive celiac serology but normal mucosa. 219,392 healthy controls who had never had biopsies were included as controls. They concluded that celiac disease and inflammation of the small intestine were both modestly associated with ischemic heart disease, whereas latent celiac disease was not. Although these findings agree in kind, if not in degree, with reports previously published by others, this study had a number of flaws. First of all, the researchers lack data on individual adherence to a gluten free diet. The authors note that “low dietary adherence is associated with persistent inflammation and therefore might explain the increased risk of ischemic heart disease observed in patients with celiac disease.” They also lack data on blood pressure, smoking status, body mass index, lipid levels, exercise routines, and other established risk factors for ischemic heart disease. Because they found the highest risk in the first year following biopsy, they cede that this risk could be attributable to enhanced inflammation, enhanced stress surrounding a diagnosis with celiac disease, or even an increase in reporting rather than incidence due to more vigilant medical care immediately following the diagnosis with celiac disease. They even note that gastrointestinal and cardiac symptoms are easily confused, further confounding their analysis. The second study compared the same 28,190 Swedes with villous atrophy to 140,000 controls. It reported that people with celiac disease were 60% more likely to develop asthma than those without it, and conversely, that people with asthma are more likely to develop celiac disease. “A potential mechanism could be that asthma and celiac disease share some immunological feature,” said Dr. Ludvigsson. “If you have it, you are at increased risk of both diseases.” He also noted that vitamin D deficiency can play a causative role in both diseases, and should be assessed on both celiac patients and asthmatics. Sources: Circulation 2011; 123: 483-490 Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology February 11, 2011 / doi:10.1016/j.jaci.2010.12.1076
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